• Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 20, 2017) — The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is looking for a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment.

    The center in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media at the University of Kentucky is requesting nominations for its annual James Madison Award. The award, created in 2006, honors the nation’s fourth president, whose extraordinary efforts led to the passage and ratification of the Bill of Rights.

    The Madison Award recognizes someone who has worked in one or more of these areas: open government and open records; promotion of the watchdog role of the press; defense against government or private censorship; or robust debate in the marketplace of ideas. 

    Nominees must have significant ties to Kentucky, and their efforts must have resulted in the preservation or expansion of freedom of the press and/or freedom of speech. Dedication to the First Amendment principle of free expression is not accomplished in a day’s work but rather a lifetime. Thus the award recognizes a long-term commitment to such ideals.

    The deadline for nominations is Sept. 1.

    Honorees do not have to be journalists. Nominees may include, for example, educators, lawyers, judges, scholars, librarians, students or ordinary citizens.  The most deserving recipient will be someone who has made a significant contribution regardless of how much public attention it has received. 

    The nominator should submit a letter identifying the nominee, listing the nominee’s address, phone number and position, and explain why the nominee would be a worthy recipient. The letter should detail the specific efforts taken on behalf of First Amendment rights and should discuss obstacles and difficulties as well as the impact of the nominee’s efforts. The nominator may include up to three letters of support as well as other materials such as published or broadcast information.

    Entries will be reviewed by a committee that will include previous winners and the director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. The committee will have the option of not selecting a recipient if it does not believe any candidate is deserving.

    The award will be presented at the annual First Amendment Celebration, 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28, in the William T. Young Library auditorium on the university campus.

    Nominations should be sent to Mike Farrell, Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, School of Journalism and Media, 120 Grehan Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0042, or emailed to farrell@uky.edu.

    For more information, contact Mike Farrell, director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, at 859-257-4848, or farrell@uky.edu

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is looking for a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment. The deadline for nominations is Sept. 1.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 19, 2017) — University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media alumna Dana Canedy, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former senior editor at The New York Times, will oversee journalism's most prestigious awards program.

    The Pulitzer Prize Board and Lee C. Bollinger, president of Columbia University, named Canedy as the new administrator last week. Her appointment began Monday, July 17.

    “It is an enormous honor to be chosen as the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes,” Canedy said in a news release. “As a journalist and author for more than 25 years, I have tremendous respect for the importance of the prizes in promoting the best in American journalism and arts and letters. In an era of warp-speed digital and social change in journalism and unsettling assaults on a free and independent press, the role of the Pulitzer Prizes is more vital than ever.”

    Canedy was a special projects reporter and editor at The New York Times, where she won a 2001 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting on the series “How Race Is Lived in America." She also served as Florida bureau chief, covering the 2000 presidential election recount and the flight-school training of the 9/11 terrorists. She oversaw national breaking news coverage for The Times for four years and until recently led talent acquisition, management training, career development and diversity initiatives.

    She is also the author of "A Journal for Jordan: A Story of Love and Honor," a memoir based on her partner's journal for their unborn child. Her partner, First Sergeant Charles Monroe King, was killed in combat during the first Iraq war. Canedy's memoir has been published in 10 countries in eight languages and has been optioned for a movie by Columbia Pictures and Denzel Washington, according to the release.

    “For more than a century, Columbia's administration of the Pulitzer Prizes has signified our enduring commitment to both courageous journalism in the public interest and the highest achievement in American arts and letters,” said Bollinger, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. “There's no one who better reflects that commitment than Dana Canedy, a Pulitzer Prize-winner herself whose insightful writing and respected editing have set a consistent standard of journalistic excellence. We look forward to welcoming her to our campus and to the Pulitzers.”

    Canedy was born in Indianapolis and grew up near Fort Knox, Kentucky. She graduated from what is now the UK College of Communication and Information in 1988.

    "This appointment shows the respect and trust her journalism colleagues and the Pulitzer board have in Dana," said Mike Farrell, interim director of the UK School of Journalism and Media. "The Pulitzers are journalism's Oscars, and their integrity while journalism is attacked viciously and irresponsibly could not be more important. Dana's administration will protect that reputation. We are proud of Dana and proud to say she is one of our graduates."

    Canedy succeeds Mike Pride, who will retire after three years as administrator.  

     

    Canedy, named the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, graduated with a journalism degree from UK in 1988. Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK School of Journalism and Media alumna Dana Canedy, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former senior editor at The New York Times, will oversee journalism's most prestigious awards program.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Hale Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 7, 2017) "If I was going to lie to you, I'd already be elected."

    If you ever attended a Gatewood Galbraith campaign event, it was likely you heard just those words from the perennial candidate.

    A Kentucky politician, activist, author and public figure, Galbraith had a one-of-a-kind and frequently frank delivery unlike any of his competitors.

    A current University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) exhibit, “Gatewood Galbraith: The Last Free Man in America,” explores the life and work of this Kentucky icon whose outsized life had an impact not only on the state, but also the country.

    “Gatewood,” as he was simply known throughout the Commonwealth, was a vocal advocate for ending the prohibition of cannabis, which resulted in close friendships with country singer Willie Nelson, politician Ralph Nader and actor Woody Harrelson, as well as a national reputation. Galbraith defended Rev. Mary L. Thomas in 2001 in the first felony medical marijuana case, where Judge John D. Minton Jr. granted a stay in the case after its denial by the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

    In addition to his advocacy and activism for cannabis law reform, Galbraith also believed in expanding gun rights, freezing college tuition, restoring hemp as an agricultural crop, stricter environmental protections, internet access for all counties, abolition of the income tax for those who earned $50,000 or less, job development and the prohibition of mountaintop removal mining in the Commonwealth. He strongly believed Kentucky needed to fight the “Synthetic Subversion” and return to the state's focus on agriculture rather than its agreements with wealthy corporations.

    The monumental task to capture, preserve and tell the story of Gatewood Galbraith was given to the SCRC staff by the Galbraith family not long after his death in 2012.

    Then-Associate Dean Deirdre Scaggs (now interim dean of UK Libraries) approached the family to see if they had any interest in sharing his papers with the public. Because he had achieved somewhat of a celebrity status, the family was very careful in considering what they wanted to do with his collection and spent time with Scaggs deciding how they wanted to ensure his legacy.

    “It was a comfort to the family to know that the representation of Gatewood’s life would be properly preserved, organized and made available at the UK Libraries SCRC,” Scaggs said. “Knowing that in addition to the papers being used for research and for education, we would ensure that Gatewood’s history would be there for generations of the Galbraith family yet to be born was really important.”

    In addition, it seemed ideal for UK to preserve his papers as Galbraith was a graduate of UK, earning both his bachelor’s and law degrees at the school.

    Scaggs is honored the Galbraith family chose to work with UK and is thrilled with what the collection means for its users.

    “There is a great deal of value in Gatewood’s papers. He was an authentic public servant, an advocate for personal liberty, passionate and active in many political issues and various groups. He had strong views on the legalization of marijuana, gun rights, constitutional freedoms and agriculture,” Scaggs said. “In UK Libraries SCRC it is critical that we preserve the range of political viewpoints to provide the opportunity for civil discourse and unbiased research.”

    The Gatewood Galbraith papers consist of 28 boxes of materials. To help introduce this collection to the public, Matthew Strandmark, education archivist at the SCRC, approached library science graduate student and research room assistant Natalie Bishop with the idea to curate an exhibit using the papers.

    Bishop admits she was excited about the opportunity for more reasons than one. “I have a print of Gatewood hanging in my living room, so he meant something to me personally going into this exhibit.”

    At the beginning of the spring 2017 semester, Bishop began sifting through the Galbraith papers. She didn’t make any final decisions about the exhibit until April.

    “I wanted to make sure that I took my time when selecting items and prints to use, but I also loved reading the newspaper and magazine articles about Gatewood included in the collection,” she said.

    Located on the first and second floors at M.I. King Library Building, the resulting free public exhibit features photographs, campaign posters, newspaper clippings, memorabilia and some personal items, including one that was a trademark of his Galbraith's own style.

    “My favorite item on display is Gatewood’s signature wide-brimmed fedora hat. To me, Gatewood’s fedora signified his strong sense of self. He could give a Huey Long-style stump speech, and in the same weekend, go on tour with Willie Nelson, all while sporting his signature headpiece and a tie. Gatewood was unapologetically Gatewood, and his fedora symbolized that.”

    What does Bishop want visitors to take away from this glimpse into the life of Gatewood Galbraith?

    “I hope visitors are reminded of the impact that Gatewood had on our Commonwealth as a political and community leader, and realize they too can become active in similar spheres.”

    The Galbraith exhibit will run through July 28.

    Louis Gatewood Galbraith grew up in Carlisle, Kentucky. An outspoken and quick-witted activist and politician, Galbraith’s interest in politics started as a young boy after he heard a speech by Gov. Bert Combs. Always running with limited fundraising and on the outskirts of mainstream politics, Galbraith ran for Kentucky’s agriculture commissioner post in 1983; Kentucky’s attorney general position in 2003; Congress in 2000 and 2002; and governor five times: in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2011. At different points, he ran as a candidate for the Democratic Party, Reform Party and as an Independent. Galbraith never won more than 15 percent of the vote in any party primary.

    Galbraith continued his work as an attorney during his many campaigns. He famously quipped, “Losing statewide elections doesn’t pay worth a damn.”

    Although known widely for his humor, quips and legal knowledge, Galbraith’s friends, family and associates described him as a genuine, loving and good person, who cared about his community and the well-being of his neighbors.

    In addition to the Gatewood Galbraith papers, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History is home to 16 interviews with family and colleagues in its “Gatewood Galbraith Oral History project,” which researchers can also use to learn more about the famous Kentuckian.

    The SCRC at UK Libraries is home to a collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Nunn Center, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian Collection, the John G. Heyburn Initiative and ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLawLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: A current University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center exhibit, “Gatewood Galbraith: The Last Free Man in America,” explores the life and work of a Kentucky icon whose outsized life had an impact not only on the state, but also the country. The free public exhibit is on display through July 28, in the M.I. King Library Building. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 7, 2017) — University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media students in the UK College of Communication and Information brought home 10 awards, including the prestigious Tom Peterson Memorial Scholarship, at the 2017 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Association Awards held in April.

    That’s quite a feat considering there are only eight (college) radio categories and eight (college) television categories.

    Leading the list of winners was a first place showing in the Best College TV Newscast category for a UK Student News Network broadcast produced by Noah Richard. He also took second place in Public Affairs TV for his story explaining the 2016 Kentucky Republican presidential caucus.

    Marc Thomas placed first in Best TV News Story with “Trinity Gay Memorial Service” about the shooting of the Lafayette High School student and track athlete Trinity Gay, daughter of Olympian and Lexington-native Tyson Gay.

    Sofie Tapia took second place in Best College TV Feature Story for her coverage of “Artisanal Crafts in Berea.”

    UK swept the Best Public Affairs Radio category. The judges awarded first place to the team of Noah Richard and Morgan Henry for “Campus Voices: Ovarian Cancer Awareness”; second place to Melissa Payne, Stepper Toth and Caitlin Schwartz for “Campus Voices: Student Debt and Graduation Rates”; and third place to Penny Schmitz and Caitlin Schwartz for “Campus Voices: Kentucky Rape Kit Backlog.”

    Richard also took second place in the Best College Radio Reporter category.

    Lee Mengistu rounded out the radio awards with a third-place finish in the Best Feature Story category for “Tikur Traveler: The Young Folks.”

    Mengistu was also awarded the Tom Peterson Memorial Scholarship, the first UK student to win that award.

    UK School of Journalism and Media Professor and Interim Director Mike Farrell noted that while the faculty are proud of the awards, they are more proud of the deserving students who earned them.

    “They are dedicated journalists, and, despite everything the critics say about the future, we are optimistic about our profession because of the young men and women, award-winners or no, who work hard in our classrooms and develop the skills, the passion and the commitment to make a difference in our world,” Farrell added.

    “I'm especially proud of our broadcast faculty — professors Kakie Urch, Scoobie Ryan, Mel Coffee and Andrew Dawson — who teach and mentor with that same passion and commitment,” Farrell said.

    The full list of award winners can be found here: http://discover.ap.org/contests/kentucky-broadcast.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in the UK College of Communication and Information brought home 10 awards at the 2017 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Association Awards.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden May 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2017) — A student team from the University of Kentucky Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the College of Communication and Information has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world by earning one of only eight spots at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC).

    Each year, more than 130 schools participate in the AAF’s NSAC, beginning with competition in one of 15 districts. Each team creates a comprehensive campaign for the sponsor, based on a real-world marketing challenge the sponsor presents in a case study. This year’s NSAC sponsor was Tai Pei, a leading producer of Asian-style frozen entrees.

    Each student team creates a 27-page plans book and a 20-minute presentation to present to a panel of industry judges at the district competition to showcase their campaign.

    UK is in AAF District 5, which includes schools in Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The district competition was held in Lexington on April 7-8, where the UK team placed second and qualified for the national semifinals. The UK team is one of the eight national finalists that will now compete at ADMERICA, AAF's national conference June 8–10, in New Orleans.

    Each of the 19 teams invited to semifinals presented a five-minute pitch followed by a 10-minute question and answer session with judges from Tai Pei’s corporate marketing team. The national semifinal competition was conducted by a 15-minute video conference May 4.

    Finalists were announced the afternoon of May 5, less than two hours after 12 of the 13 team members walked across the stage in Rupp Arena to receive their bachelor’s degrees. Adriane Grumbein, assistant ISC professor and co-advisor of the NSAC team, said family and friends who were in town to attend graduation ceremony joined the team’s celebration as they heard the judge’s live announcement via conference call.

    “I am beyond proud of this talented team of students,” Grumbein said. “They poured their heart and soul into their work this semester — from primary research and strategy all the way to data analytics and creative executions. And, the result was an innovative, truly integrated campaign.”

    Alyssa Eckman, associate ISC professor and team co-advisor, said UK has competed in NSAC for more than 20 years. The team placed 13th at the national competition in 2013, and UK’s highest national finish at NSAC was in 2006 when its ISC team earned sixth place overall.

    “Just earning a spot in the NSAC finals is an impressive accomplishment,” Eckman said. “We are excited for our ISC students to represent UK in the Elite Eight at this prestigious academic competition.”

    The 2017 UK NSAC team members are:

    • Carli Ackerstein,
    • Laura Brower,
    • Madison Elder,
    • Megan Galage,
    • Alé Gibson,
    • Bailey Klutts,
    • Sarah Kosid,
    • Lauren Kowalski,
    • Danielle Mallory,
    • Alexi Mojsejenko,
    • Garrett Ringler,
    • Susan Schuldt, and
    • Joanna Sowa.

     

    2017 UK NSAC team members.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A team of 12 students from the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world, earning a spot at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden May 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2017) — A student team from the University of Kentucky Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the College of Communication and Information has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world by earning one of only eight spots at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC).

    Each year, more than 130 schools participate in the AAF’s NSAC, beginning with competition in one of 15 districts. Each team creates a comprehensive campaign for the sponsor, based on a real-world marketing challenge the sponsor presents in a case study. This year’s NSAC sponsor was Tai Pei, a leading producer of Asian-style frozen entrees.

    Each student team creates a 27-page plans book and a 20-minute presentation to present to a panel of industry judges at the district competition to showcase their campaign.

    UK is in AAF District 5, which includes schools in Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The district competition was held in Lexington on April 7-8, where the UK team placed second and qualified for the national semifinals. The UK team is one of the eight national finalists that will now compete at ADMERICA, AAF's national conference June 8–10, in New Orleans.

    Each of the 19 teams invited to semifinals presented a five-minute pitch followed by a 10-minute question and answer session with judges from Tai Pei’s corporate marketing team. The national semifinal competition was conducted by a 15-minute video conference May 4.

    Finalists were announced the afternoon of May 5, less than two hours after 12 of the 13 team members walked across the stage in Rupp Arena to receive their bachelor’s degrees. Adriane Grumbein, assistant ISC professor and co-advisor of the NSAC team, said family and friends who were in town to attend graduation ceremony joined the team’s celebration as they heard the judge’s live announcement via conference call.

    “I am beyond proud of this talented team of students,” Grumbein said. “They poured their heart and soul into their work this semester — from primary research and strategy all the way to data analytics and creative executions. And, the result was an innovative, truly integrated campaign.”

    Alyssa Eckman, associate ISC professor and team co-advisor, said UK has competed in NSAC for more than 20 years. The team placed 13th at the national competition in 2013, and UK’s highest national finish at NSAC was in 2006 when its ISC team earned sixth place overall.

    “Just earning a spot in the NSAC finals is an impressive accomplishment,” Eckman said. “We are excited for our ISC students to represent UK in the Elite Eight at this prestigious academic competition.”

    The 2017 UK NSAC team members are:

    • Carli Ackerstein,
    • Laura Brower,
    • Madison Elder,
    • Megan Galage,
    • Alé Gibson,
    • Bailey Klutts,
    • Sarah Kosid,
    • Lauren Kowalski,
    • Danielle Mallory,
    • Alexi Mojsejenko,
    • Garrett Ringler,
    • Susan Schuldt, and
    • Joanna Sowa.

     

    2017 UK NSAC team members.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A team of 12 students from the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world, earning a spot at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson May 5, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 5, 2017) The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information held its 17th annual Excellence Awards and Dinner on Friday, April 7, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

    The college recognized the following staff, faculty, alumni and friends:

    Friend of the College Award: Recognizes a person who has demonstrated support to the college or one of its units by volunteering, providing internships or by their involvement in programs supported by the college.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Craig Kurz, board member and mentor for the University of Kentucky’s Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNet); and
    • Jeremy Rogers, supporter of and mentor for the School of Journalism and Media and its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.

    Outstanding Alumnus Award: Recognizes an alumnus of the College of Communication and Information for their many contributions to the college and to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Jennifer Smith, graduate of the School of Journalism and Media.

    Faculty Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes faculty who not only demonstrate mastery of the subject matter, but also awareness of current developments, and a vision of what is to come. Recipients demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate that knowledge to students in ways that foster understanding, intellectual growth and a broadening of perspectives.

    This year the college honored:

    • Maria Cahill, assistant professor in the School of Information Science.

    Graduate Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes students who not only excel in their own studies, but they also demonstrate knowledge and expertise of their field through teaching undergraduate students.

    This year the college honored:

    • Nick Tatum, second year doctoral student specializing in instructional communication.

    Faculty Research Award: Recognizes faculty achievement in research that is important to both the college and the faculty member’s area of expertise.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Marko Dragojevic, assistant professor in the Department of Communication; and
    • Tae Baek, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

    Outstanding Staff Award: Recognizes outstanding work and contributions by a staff member.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Catherine Hayden, communications director for the College of Communication and Information; and
    • Harlie Collins, communications marketing specialist for the School of Information Science.

    Faculty Community Service Award: Recognizes achievements by our faculty in service to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Don Helme, associate professor in the Department of Communication.

    Outstanding Advisor Award: Recognizes the critical role played by advisors in fostering academic achievement, clearing pathways to graduation, and providing meaningful engagement on campus and in the community.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Suanne Early, student affairs director of the College of Communication and Information; and 
    • Brandi Frisby, associate professor in the School of Information Science and Instructional Communication.

    The College of Communication and Information also honored the following outstanding graduate students at the Excellence Awards:

    • Allie Thieneman, Bruce H. Westley Memorial Scholarship;
    • Audrey Smith Bachman, Dorothy M. Carozza Memorial Fellowship Fund, Palmgreen Fellowship;
    • Whitney Darnell, Carozza Graduate Fund for Excellence in Health Communication;
    • Sarah Scheff, Martha and Howard Sypher Memorial Graduate Fund;
    • Kaylee Lukacena, R. Lewis Donohew Graduate Fellowship;
    • Robert Rice, Crisis/Risk Communication Research Fellow;
    • Anna-Carrie “Annie” Beck, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Nicholas Tatum, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Emily Fox, Vivian J. and Melissa MacQuown Forsyth Fellowship Fund;
    • Amanda Neace, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship; and
    • Shawntel Ensminger, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship.
    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The College of Communication and Information recognized exceptional staff, faculty, alumni and friends at its annual Excellence and Awards Dinner.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson May 5, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 5, 2017) The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information held its 17th annual Excellence Awards and Dinner on Friday, April 7, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

    The college recognized the following staff, faculty, alumni and friends:

    Friend of the College Award: Recognizes a person who has demonstrated support to the college or one of its units by volunteering, providing internships or by their involvement in programs supported by the college.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Craig Kurz, board member and mentor for the University of Kentucky’s Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNet); and
    • Jeremy Rogers, supporter of and mentor for the School of Journalism and Media and its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.

    Outstanding Alumnus Award: Recognizes an alumnus of the College of Communication and Information for their many contributions to the college and to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Jennifer Smith, graduate of the School of Journalism and Media.

    Faculty Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes faculty who not only demonstrate mastery of the subject matter, but also awareness of current developments, and a vision of what is to come. Recipients demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate that knowledge to students in ways that foster understanding, intellectual growth and a broadening of perspectives.

    This year the college honored:

    • Maria Cahill, assistant professor in the School of Information Science.

    Graduate Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes students who not only excel in their own studies, but they also demonstrate knowledge and expertise of their field through teaching undergraduate students.

    This year the college honored:

    • Nick Tatum, second year doctoral student specializing in instructional communication.

    Faculty Research Award: Recognizes faculty achievement in research that is important to both the college and the faculty member’s area of expertise.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Marko Dragojevic, assistant professor in the Department of Communication; and
    • Tae Baek, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

    Outstanding Staff Award: Recognizes outstanding work and contributions by a staff member.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Catherine Hayden, communications director for the College of Communication and Information; and
    • Harlie Collins, communications marketing specialist for the School of Information Science.

    Faculty Community Service Award: Recognizes achievements by our faculty in service to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Don Helme, associate professor in the Department of Communication.

    Outstanding Advisor Award: Recognizes the critical role played by advisors in fostering academic achievement, clearing pathways to graduation, and providing meaningful engagement on campus and in the community.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Suanne Early, student affairs director of the College of Communication and Information; and 
    • Brandi Frisby, associate professor in the School of Information Science and Instructional Communication.

    The College of Communication and Information also honored the following outstanding graduate students at the Excellence Awards:

    • Allie Thieneman, Bruce H. Westley Memorial Scholarship;
    • Audrey Smith Bachman, Dorothy M. Carozza Memorial Fellowship Fund, Palmgreen Fellowship;
    • Whitney Darnell, Carozza Graduate Fund for Excellence in Health Communication;
    • Sarah Scheff, Martha and Howard Sypher Memorial Graduate Fund;
    • Kaylee Lukacena, R. Lewis Donohew Graduate Fellowship;
    • Robert Rice, Crisis/Risk Communication Research Fellow;
    • Anna-Carrie “Annie” Beck, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Nicholas Tatum, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Emily Fox, Vivian J. and Melissa MacQuown Forsyth Fellowship Fund;
    • Amanda Neace, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship; and
    • Shawntel Ensminger, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship.
    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The College of Communication and Information recognized exceptional staff, faculty, alumni and friends at its annual Excellence and Awards Dinner.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder May 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2017) — The week of graduation, most high school students are decorating their caps, writing last-minute yearbook notes and making fun plans for the summer.

    Lexington native Moran Nickodem wasn't so lucky — she spent her last week of high school heavily sedated in the hospital after meningitis, e. coli and a number of other bacterial infections attacked her already weak body. Doctors in Cincinnati gave her parents a prognosis: the situation was grave, and they should be prepared for the worst.  

    Moran came to on graduation day and was determined not to miss the ceremony, even as the day could be one of her last. She Skyped in to the Lexington Christian Academy graduation, and her brother walked across the stage to receive her diploma.

    Four years later, after beating the bleak prognosis time and time again, that determination led Moran to another graduation – her college graduation from the University of Kentucky. This time, she'll walk.

    "To walk across the stage at Rupp Arena, it's a really big deal for me and my family," she said.

    The challenges Moran faced to even get to college were not the usual teenager leaving home, figuring out what they want to do with their lives challenges. She faced those, too, but alongside them was the challenge of staying alive and healthy.

    She's been sick for her entire life, diagnosed at birth with Hirschsprung disease and hip dysplasia, and cared for by doctors in Cincinnati and a team of doctors at UK HealthCare and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington – including Drs. Ryan Muchow, Stephen Duncan and Henry Iwinski. Later, a UK emergency department doctor would diagnose her with anterior sacral meningocele, a rare form of spinal malformation.

    After she fought off the infections and continued to live past doctors' expectations, she underwent 19 back surgeries – in one summer. This was right before heading off to college; she had her bags packed for University of Mississippi.

    "We prayed about it and knew I couldn't go to Ole Miss," she said.

    Staying near her doctors, those in Cincinnati and in Lexington, Moran decided to attend UK, even while some family and friends worried about the stress and demand it would put on her body.

    "There was like no chance – how am I going to go to school when I was practically in a coma and had a wound vac?" Moran said, referring to the portable machine she wore to help her back heal after the surgeries.

    But she persevered, especially with the help of her mom. She let Moran go through sorority recruitment, pushing her around in a wheelchair to each sorority house.

    "On top of the wound vac, I had an IV machine hidden in my purse and I looked like a skeleton. The girls probably thought I was desperate to join," she said, laughing.

    It wasn't desperation though; it was just a desire to have a somewhat normal college life. She was adamant, too, about living on campus and getting as much room to grow into an independent young adult as she could.

    Shortly after joining Tri Delta and beginning class, it was Labor Day and time for her next procedure, a colostomy.

    "It's a brutal thing for anyone to deal with much less an 18-year-old college student," she said.

    Her holidays would continue like this – every school break, from Thanksgiving to Spring Break, Moran would undergo another surgery. So far, she's had around 40 surgeries throughout her life.

    While she traveled back and forth from Cincinnati to Lexington and from campus to Shriners Medical Center, taking 12 hours that first semester, somehow the integrated strategic communication (ISC) major in the College of Communication and Information barely missed a class.

    "It was hard though, going to class," she said. "The machines would go off, so I would try to conceal the noise and wore big clothing – no one knew. I didn't want to be known as the sick girl."

    After a difficult first year with an unsatisfactory GPA, things started to get better for Moran her sophomore year. She had become close to those living in her residence hall, Baldwin Hall, her Tri Delta sisters and her professors. As she began to share her story, she received a lot of encouragement in return.

    "My sorority sisters were my support system, and I made lifelong friends in my dorm," she said. "They all took care of me."

    She had her colostomy reversed, she no longer had a wound vac, and she had built a community of support around her – from her advisors to UK Transportation Services, which helped her with handicap parking and mobility around campus.  

    "And my ISC professors were unreal. I still have a lot of complications and there are days I wake up and can't get out of bed, and they didn't ask questions," she said. "They would say, 'come in my office when you feel better and we'll catch you up.'"

    Moran said the Disability Resource Center was also instrumental in her success, likening them to her on-campus parents. That year, she finally achieved her goal of making a 4.0 GPA. She continued to make a 4.0 each semester, even through a major hip surgery her junior year when Drs. Muchow and Duncan were able to lengthen one of her legs and greatly improve her limp.

    Looking back now, while she's as healthy as she can be, people ask Moran, "how in the heck did you do it? How did you go to school and have a social life? How did you even make it this far?"

    And it hits her, how much she has accomplished.

    "I'm like wow, that's insane to think about, but when you're going through it and you have the best support system – your teachers, your parents, your friends, your sorority – it's just like you don't have any other option. I just cannot imagine not being at UK during all this."

    Moran's most recent surgery was in January at Shriners Medical Center, and this week she went to her last Shriners appointment. As she graduates from UK, she is also graduating from Shriners. Moran will become a UK HealthCare patient, going just across the street from the new Shriners facility for her appointments, and will continue to see the same team of trusted doctors.

    As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude from UK tomorrow, landing a marketing and sales job in Michigan (and finally experiencing a new town), she's also excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned.

    "My life is always going to be centered around what I've been through," she said. "But I'm looking forward to not letting my health issues be the center of my world." 

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Morgan Hall, Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington, 859-202-1077, mwhall@shrinenet.org Summary: She's endured nearly 40 surgeries in her 21 years. Though Moran Nickodem received a grave prognosis at age 17 and wasn't expected to live a normal life past high school graduation, this Friday she will receive her bachelor's degree from UK. As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude, she's excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder May 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2017) — The week of graduation, most high school students are decorating their caps, writing last-minute yearbook notes and making fun plans for the summer.

    Lexington native Moran Nickodem wasn't so lucky — she spent her last week of high school heavily sedated in the hospital after meningitis, e. coli and a number of other bacterial infections attacked her already weak body. Doctors in Cincinnati gave her parents a prognosis: the situation was grave, and they should be prepared for the worst.  

    Moran came to on graduation day and was determined not to miss the ceremony, even as the day could be one of her last. She Skyped in to the Lexington Christian Academy graduation, and her brother walked across the stage to receive her diploma.

    Four years later, after beating the bleak prognosis time and time again, that determination led Moran to another graduation – her college graduation from the University of Kentucky. This time, she'll walk.

    "To walk across the stage at Rupp Arena, it's a really big deal for me and my family," she said.

    The challenges Moran faced to even get to college were not the usual teenager leaving home, figuring out what they want to do with their lives challenges. She faced those, too, but alongside them was the challenge of staying alive and healthy.

    She's been sick for her entire life, diagnosed at birth with Hirschsprung disease and hip dysplasia, and cared for by doctors in Cincinnati and a team of doctors at UK HealthCare and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington – including Drs. Ryan Muchow, Stephen Duncan and Henry Iwinski. Later, a UK emergency department doctor would diagnose her with anterior sacral meningocele, a rare form of spinal malformation.

    After she fought off the infections and continued to live past doctors' expectations, she underwent 19 back surgeries – in one summer. This was right before heading off to college; she had her bags packed for University of Mississippi.

    "We prayed about it and knew I couldn't go to Ole Miss," she said.

    Staying near her doctors, those in Cincinnati and in Lexington, Moran decided to attend UK, even while some family and friends worried about the stress and demand it would put on her body.

    "There was like no chance – how am I going to go to school when I was practically in a coma and had a wound vac?" Moran said, referring to the portable machine she wore to help her back heal after the surgeries.

    But she persevered, especially with the help of her mom. She let Moran go through sorority recruitment, pushing her around in a wheelchair to each sorority house.

    "On top of the wound vac, I had an IV machine hidden in my purse and I looked like a skeleton. The girls probably thought I was desperate to join," she said, laughing.

    It wasn't desperation though; it was just a desire to have a somewhat normal college life. She was adamant, too, about living on campus and getting as much room to grow into an independent young adult as she could.

    Shortly after joining Tri Delta and beginning class, it was Labor Day and time for her next procedure, a colostomy.

    "It's a brutal thing for anyone to deal with much less an 18-year-old college student," she said.

    Her holidays would continue like this – every school break, from Thanksgiving to Spring Break, Moran would undergo another surgery. So far, she's had around 40 surgeries throughout her life.

    While she traveled back and forth from Cincinnati to Lexington and from campus to Shriners Medical Center, taking 12 hours that first semester, somehow the integrated strategic communication (ISC) major in the College of Communication and Information barely missed a class.

    "It was hard though, going to class," she said. "The machines would go off, so I would try to conceal the noise and wore big clothing – no one knew. I didn't want to be known as the sick girl."

    After a difficult first year with an unsatisfactory GPA, things started to get better for Moran her sophomore year. She had become close to those living in her residence hall, Baldwin Hall, her Tri Delta sisters and her professors. As she began to share her story, she received a lot of encouragement in return.

    "My sorority sisters were my support system, and I made lifelong friends in my dorm," she said. "They all took care of me."

    She had her colostomy reversed, she no longer had a wound vac, and she had built a community of support around her – from her advisors to UK Transportation Services, which helped her with handicap parking and mobility around campus.  

    "And my ISC professors were unreal. I still have a lot of complications and there are days I wake up and can't get out of bed, and they didn't ask questions," she said. "They would say, 'come in my office when you feel better and we'll catch you up.'"

    Moran said the Disability Resource Center was also instrumental in her success, likening them to her on-campus parents. That year, she finally achieved her goal of making a 4.0 GPA. She continued to make a 4.0 each semester, even through a major hip surgery her junior year when Drs. Muchow and Duncan were able to lengthen one of her legs and greatly improve her limp.

    Looking back now, while she's as healthy as she can be, people ask Moran, "how in the heck did you do it? How did you go to school and have a social life? How did you even make it this far?"

    And it hits her, how much she has accomplished.

    "I'm like wow, that's insane to think about, but when you're going through it and you have the best support system – your teachers, your parents, your friends, your sorority – it's just like you don't have any other option. I just cannot imagine not being at UK during all this."

    Moran's most recent surgery was in January at Shriners Medical Center, and this week she went to her last Shriners appointment. As she graduates from UK, she is also graduating from Shriners. Moran will become a UK HealthCare patient, going just across the street from the new Shriners facility for her appointments, and will continue to see the same team of trusted doctors.

    As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude from UK tomorrow, landing a marketing and sales job in Michigan (and finally experiencing a new town), she's also excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned.

    "My life is always going to be centered around what I've been through," she said. "But I'm looking forward to not letting my health issues be the center of my world." 

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Morgan Hall, Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington, 859-202-1077, mwhall@shrinenet.org Summary: She's endured nearly 40 surgeries in her 21 years. Though Moran Nickodem received a grave prognosis at age 17 and wasn't expected to live a normal life past high school graduation, this Friday she will receive her bachelor's degree from UK. As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude, she's excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Harlie Collins May 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Information Science, within the College of Communication and Information, is excited to announce they will be offering a new track in their information communication technology degree.

    This track is an online degree completion, which will focus on applied skills in the field of information studies. Students who are interested in completing their degree need to have at least 60 hours completed at an accredited university.

    “I believe this is truly an opportunity for people to earn a UK-branded degree who are unable to attend class in Lexington," said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the School of Information Science. "Further, this opportunity provides less of a disruption for individuals who have already busy schedules."

    “I am so happy that we are moving in this direction at the University of Kentucky,” said Renee Kaufmann, an assistant professor in the School of Information Science. “Online learning provides students an opportunity to come back to a university they love and earn a degree in a field that will allow them to advance within a current position or gain employment in a job they desire. Plus, online learning allows students to take their courses whenever and wherever.”

    The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.

    The School of Information Science hopes that this option will help to increase the overall level of education among Kentucky residents and help increase retention rates. Some benefits of an online degree completion include: the ability to complete the degree while being geographically separated from the university, flexibility and support.

    Students who are interested in the IS Track should apply through undergraduate admissions at www.uky.edu/Admission/content/apply-uk by July 1.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a master's degree in library science, School Library Certification, master's degree in information communication technology, bachelor's degree in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Harlie Collins May 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Information Science, within the College of Communication and Information, is excited to announce they will be offering a new track in their information communication technology degree.

    This track is an online degree completion, which will focus on applied skills in the field of information studies. Students who are interested in completing their degree need to have at least 60 hours completed at an accredited university.

    “I believe this is truly an opportunity for people to earn a UK-branded degree who are unable to attend class in Lexington," said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the School of Information Science. "Further, this opportunity provides less of a disruption for individuals who have already busy schedules."

    “I am so happy that we are moving in this direction at the University of Kentucky,” said Renee Kaufmann, an assistant professor in the School of Information Science. “Online learning provides students an opportunity to come back to a university they love and earn a degree in a field that will allow them to advance within a current position or gain employment in a job they desire. Plus, online learning allows students to take their courses whenever and wherever.”

    The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.

    The School of Information Science hopes that this option will help to increase the overall level of education among Kentucky residents and help increase retention rates. Some benefits of an online degree completion include: the ability to complete the degree while being geographically separated from the university, flexibility and support.

    Students who are interested in the IS Track should apply through undergraduate admissions at www.uky.edu/Admission/content/apply-uk by July 1.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a master's degree in library science, School Library Certification, master's degree in information communication technology, bachelor's degree in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 26, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2017) — K'Quan McNease's time is split between studying journalism at the University of Kentucky and caring for his foster children. Most of their parents have abused opioids, he said, so the issue of the opioid epidemic in Kentucky hits close to home for him.

    The problem is well-known. Many Kentuckians are personally affected, and the epidemic — and the devastation it brings — is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But McNease wonders how many of those Kentuckians know how to help someone who has overdosed? Do they know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy?

    The UK senior, graduating this May, is hoping a project he's been working on with other UK students will get the word out about a life-saving tool developed by UK College of Pharmacy's Daniel Wermeling, professor of pharmacy practice and science.

    Led by UK School of Journalism and Media Associate Professor Kakie Urch, McNease and his classmates in a multimedia storytelling course, in collaboration with UK pharmacy students, produced public service announcements (PSAs) about obtaining and administering the nasal spray application of naloxone.

    "Opioid addicts and their loved ones across Kentucky are struggling with a complex — and deadly — disease," said Urch, who is involved in the local recovery community and teaches at the Hope Center. "Our work with the UK College of Pharmacy and its students let our fact-based storytelling in journalism multimedia go to work to get the word out."

    "Any person, with education, is qualified to be a life-saving first responder to an opioid overdose," Wermeling said. "The unmet need is that the public hears about tragedies and dramatic events but not what they can do to respond. In the 1990s the public health issue at the time was to train the public on what to do if they encounter a person in cardiac arrest, including CPR and use of defibrillators placed in public buildings. The same concept applies here."

    The need for quick response continues to grow as the number of overdose deaths rises. In Kentucky, that number reached 1,248 in 2015, according to the latest data available from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. Loved ones of those with an opioid addiction now have the option to quickly respond with the nasal spray, an easy-to-use and readily available antidote to be administered before EMS (emergency medical services) arrival. But to save lives, friends and family first must know about the tool and how to use it.

    Following Wermeling's development, legislation was passed to allow Kentucky pharmacists, acting under a physician-approved protocol, to fill naloxone orders without a physician's prescription. UK then trained pharmacists across the state on distributing the drug. The PSAs are the next step in getting the tool out into Kentucky communities with accurate information.

    "Messaging like this is important to get research and pharmaceutical developments out as laws change. Word of mouth starts somewhere — whether it is on late night or public access TV — or on social media shares of video," Urch said.

    McNease and 15 other UK journalism students in the College of Communication and Information teamed up with students in the College of Pharmacy's Rho Chi Honor Society to produce two PSAs. It's an unlikely partnership — journalism and pharmacy students — but after Wermeling approached Urch about the idea, both groups gained valuable experience.  

    Pharmacy students and Wermeling ensured the medical information was accurate and previewed the videos to other pharmacy students for their feedback. Urch and her students wrote scripts, developed storyboards, filmed and edited the PSAs. While journalism students learned about Kentucky's serious public health crisis, pharmacy students learned about media production and communicating important information effectively.

    Having a professional acting background and his own production company, McNease served as director. His goal was to keep things simple and to avoid confusing viewers. He acknowledged that the overdose scenes may make some feel uncomfortable. But he said sometimes "you need to make people uncomfortable" when speaking on important issues.

    "This is a bit of a different role for journalists, to make a PSA, because we're completely invested in this side of the issue," he said. "But we're able to help our community, our families, and give them some clarity."

    To do so, the students collaborated with community partners across Lexington. Playing victims, friends and EMTs (emergency medical technicians) in the PSAs are STEAM Academy interns and local EMTs in training. The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Office of Public Safety and the Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention program also lent support.

    Urch and her students hope to air the PSAs on the Lexington Public Access Channel, the UK Student News Network on Channel 16, local network stations and at the Kentucky Theatre as movie previews. Lexington Community Radio, on 93.9 FM and 95.7 FM, is also running Spanish and English audio versions of the PSAs.

    "Hopefully people watch and listen to these and don't feel intimidated to respond," McNease said. "We're letting people know it's okay to be scared, but here's how you can react when someone's life is on the line."

    The second PSA, "Family Matters," can be viewed at https://youtu.be/xlSbQbkdqa4. "Out of Body," above, can also be viewed at https://youtu.be/Q-9o80U6GAA.

    If you or someone you know is seeking facilities and services for substance use disorder in or around Lexington, visit http://gethelplex.org

    "Out of Body" is one of two PSAs produced by UK journalism students in collaboration with UK pharmacy students. of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationPharmacy

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Many Kentuckians are personally affected by the opioid crisis, and the epidemic is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But do people know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy? A group of UK journalism and pharmacy students are hoping a project they've been working on will get the word out. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 26, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2017) — K'Quan McNease's time is split between studying journalism at the University of Kentucky and caring for his foster children. Most of their parents have abused opioids, he said, so the issue of the opioid epidemic in Kentucky hits close to home for him.

    The problem is well-known. Many Kentuckians are personally affected, and the epidemic — and the devastation it brings — is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But McNease wonders how many of those Kentuckians know how to help someone who has overdosed? Do they know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy?

    The UK senior, graduating this May, is hoping a project he's been working on with other UK students will get the word out about a life-saving tool developed by UK College of Pharmacy's Daniel Wermeling, professor of pharmacy practice and science.

    Led by UK School of Journalism and Media Associate Professor Kakie Urch, McNease and his classmates in a multimedia storytelling course, in collaboration with UK pharmacy students, produced public service announcements (PSAs) about obtaining and administering the nasal spray application of naloxone.

    "Opioid addicts and their loved ones across Kentucky are struggling with a complex — and deadly — disease," said Urch, who is involved in the local recovery community and teaches at the Hope Center. "Our work with the UK College of Pharmacy and its students let our fact-based storytelling in journalism multimedia go to work to get the word out."

    "Any person, with education, is qualified to be a life-saving first responder to an opioid overdose," Wermeling said. "The unmet need is that the public hears about tragedies and dramatic events but not what they can do to respond. In the 1990s the public health issue at the time was to train the public on what to do if they encounter a person in cardiac arrest, including CPR and use of defibrillators placed in public buildings. The same concept applies here."

    The need for quick response continues to grow as the number of overdose deaths rises. In Kentucky, that number reached 1,248 in 2015, according to the latest data available from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. Loved ones of those with an opioid addiction now have the option to quickly respond with the nasal spray, an easy-to-use and readily available antidote to be administered before EMS (emergency medical services) arrival. But to save lives, friends and family first must know about the tool and how to use it.

    Following Wermeling's development, legislation was passed to allow Kentucky pharmacists, acting under a physician-approved protocol, to fill naloxone orders without a physician's prescription. UK then trained pharmacists across the state on distributing the drug. The PSAs are the next step in getting the tool out into Kentucky communities with accurate information.

    "Messaging like this is important to get research and pharmaceutical developments out as laws change. Word of mouth starts somewhere — whether it is on late night or public access TV — or on social media shares of video," Urch said.

    McNease and 15 other UK journalism students in the College of Communication and Information teamed up with students in the College of Pharmacy's Rho Chi Honor Society to produce two PSAs. It's an unlikely partnership — journalism and pharmacy students — but after Wermeling approached Urch about the idea, both groups gained valuable experience.  

    Pharmacy students and Wermeling ensured the medical information was accurate and previewed the videos to other pharmacy students for their feedback. Urch and her students wrote scripts, developed storyboards, filmed and edited the PSAs. While journalism students learned about Kentucky's serious public health crisis, pharmacy students learned about media production and communicating important information effectively.

    Having a professional acting background and his own production company, McNease served as director. His goal was to keep things simple and to avoid confusing viewers. He acknowledged that the overdose scenes may make some feel uncomfortable. But he said sometimes "you need to make people uncomfortable" when speaking on important issues.

    "This is a bit of a different role for journalists, to make a PSA, because we're completely invested in this side of the issue," he said. "But we're able to help our community, our families, and give them some clarity."

    To do so, the students collaborated with community partners across Lexington. Playing victims, friends and EMTs (emergency medical technicians) in the PSAs are STEAM Academy interns and local EMTs in training. The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Office of Public Safety and the Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention program also lent support.

    Urch and her students hope to air the PSAs on the Lexington Public Access Channel, the UK Student News Network on Channel 16, local network stations and at the Kentucky Theatre as movie previews. Lexington Community Radio, on 93.9 FM and 95.7 FM, is also running Spanish and English audio versions of the PSAs.

    "Hopefully people watch and listen to these and don't feel intimidated to respond," McNease said. "We're letting people know it's okay to be scared, but here's how you can react when someone's life is on the line."

    The second PSA, "Family Matters," can be viewed at https://youtu.be/xlSbQbkdqa4. "Out of Body," above, can also be viewed at https://youtu.be/Q-9o80U6GAA.

    If you or someone you know is seeking facilities and services for substance use disorder in or around Lexington, visit http://gethelplex.org

    "Out of Body" is one of two PSAs produced by UK journalism students in collaboration with UK pharmacy students. of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationPharmacy

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Many Kentuckians are personally affected by the opioid crisis, and the epidemic is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But do people know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy? A group of UK journalism and pharmacy students are hoping a project they've been working on will get the word out. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Sarah Geegan and Savanah Sellars April 24, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 24, 2017) — To continue with its charge, envisioning the future of the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for graduate education, the Blue-Ribbon Committee for Graduate Education will host an open forum to hear from members of the university community.

    The open forum will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building. The purpose of the forum is to answer any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date.

    The Blue-Ribbon Committee was formed in cooperation with the UK Graduate School and University Senate Council to perform a comprehensive analysis of graduate education at the institution. Ultimately, the Blue-Ribbon Committee is tasked with “envisioning the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for the University of Kentucky’s graduate education mission for the next 10-15 years.”

    After the final report is released and recommendations adopted, the colleges, necessary campus entities and deliberative bodies will begin implementation in January 2018. 

    Members of the Provost’s Blue-Ribbon Committee on Graduate Education are:

    • Carl Mattacola, College of Health Sciences, chair;
    • Brett Spear, College of Medicine, co-chair;
    • Mark Coyne, College of Agriculture, Food and  Environment;
    • Mark Lauersdorf, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Sarah Lyon, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Jenny Minier, Gatton College of Business and Economics;
    • Terry Lennie, College of Nursing;
    • Beth Barnes, College of Communication and Information; 
    • Greg Luhan, College of Design;
    • Beth Rous, College of Education;
    • David Puleo, College of Engineering;
    • Zach Hilt, College of Engineering;
    • Rachel Shane, College of Fine Arts;
    • Donna Kwon, College of Fine Arts;
    • Katie Cardarelli, College of Public Health;
    • Gabriela Jiskrova, student;
    • Kaylynne Glover, student;
    • Donna Arnett, dean of UK College of Public Health;
    • Kip Guy, dean of UK College of Pharmacy;
    • Mark Kornbluh, dean of UK College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Ann Vail, interim dean of College of Social Work; and
    • David Brennen, dean of UK College of Law (ex-officio).

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan@uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Summary: The open forum, which will serve to address any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date, will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Sarah Geegan and Savanah Sellars April 24, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 24, 2017) — To continue with its charge, envisioning the future of the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for graduate education, the Blue-Ribbon Committee for Graduate Education will host an open forum to hear from members of the university community.

    The open forum will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building. The purpose of the forum is to answer any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date.

    The Blue-Ribbon Committee was formed in cooperation with the UK Graduate School and University Senate Council to perform a comprehensive analysis of graduate education at the institution. Ultimately, the Blue-Ribbon Committee is tasked with “envisioning the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for the University of Kentucky’s graduate education mission for the next 10-15 years.”

    After the final report is released and recommendations adopted, the colleges, necessary campus entities and deliberative bodies will begin implementation in January 2018. 

    Members of the Provost’s Blue-Ribbon Committee on Graduate Education are:

    • Carl Mattacola, College of Health Sciences, chair;
    • Brett Spear, College of Medicine, co-chair;
    • Mark Coyne, College of Agriculture, Food and  Environment;
    • Mark Lauersdorf, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Sarah Lyon, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Jenny Minier, Gatton College of Business and Economics;
    • Terry Lennie, College of Nursing;
    • Beth Barnes, College of Communication and Information; 
    • Greg Luhan, College of Design;
    • Beth Rous, College of Education;
    • David Puleo, College of Engineering;
    • Zach Hilt, College of Engineering;
    • Rachel Shane, College of Fine Arts;
    • Donna Kwon, College of Fine Arts;
    • Katie Cardarelli, College of Public Health;
    • Gabriela Jiskrova, student;
    • Kaylynne Glover, student;
    • Donna Arnett, dean of UK College of Public Health;
    • Kip Guy, dean of UK College of Pharmacy;
    • Mark Kornbluh, dean of UK College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Ann Vail, interim dean of College of Social Work; and
    • David Brennen, dean of UK College of Law (ex-officio).

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan@uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Summary: The open forum, which will serve to address any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date, will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser April 21, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2017) — When you hear Sherali Zeadally teaching, it's obvious he has a passion for helping students learn. 

    "Teaching is one of the very few professions that actually gives someone the opportunity to have a profound impact," said Zeadally, a winner of the 2017 Great Teacher Award.

    Click on the video above to watch the moment Zeadally realized he won this prestigious teaching award and why he hopes to have an impact on students beyond the realm of academics.  

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, and authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctoral degree in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: UKNow is spotlighting each of this year's Great Teachers through a video featuring the award-winning professors with the students who nominated them. This week we feature Sherali Zeadally from the College of Communication and Information.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser April 21, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2017) — When you hear Sherali Zeadally teaching, it's obvious he has a passion for helping students learn. 

    "Teaching is one of the very few professions that actually gives someone the opportunity to have a profound impact," said Zeadally, a winner of the 2017 Great Teacher Award.

    Click on the video above to watch the moment Zeadally realized he won this prestigious teaching award and why he hopes to have an impact on students beyond the realm of academics.  

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, and authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctoral degree in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: UKNow is spotlighting each of this year's Great Teachers through a video featuring the award-winning professors with the students who nominated them. This week we feature Sherali Zeadally from the College of Communication and Information.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Eric Lindsey April 20, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2017)Student-athletes from all of the University of Kentucky's winter teams combined to earn a total of 70 spots on the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Winter Academic Honor Roll, the league announced this week.

    UK had the fourth-most honorees in the conference and ranked in the top three in men’s basketball and men’s swimming and diving representatives.

    A total of 701 student-athletes were named to the 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll..The 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll is based on grades form the 2016 spring, summer and fall terms. It includes the sports of basketball, equestrian, gymnastics, and swimming and diving.

    Any student-athlete who participates in a SEC championship sport or a student-athlete who participates in a sport listed on his/her institution’s NCAA Sports Sponsorship Form is eligible for nomination to the Academic Honor Roll. The following criteria is followed: 1. A student-athlete must have a grade point average of 3.0 or above for either the preceding academic year (two semesters or three quarters) or have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or above at the nominating institution. 2. If a student-athlete attends summer school, his/her grade-point average during the summer academic term must be included in the calculation used to determine eligibility for the Academic Honor Roll. 3. Student-athletes eligible for the Honor Roll include those receiving an athletics scholarship, recipients of an athletics award (i.e., letter winner), and non-scholarship student-athletes who have been on a varsity team for two seasons. 4. Prior to being nominated, a student-athlete must have successfully completed 24 semester or 36 quarter hours of non-remedial academic credit toward a baccalaureate degree at the nominating institution. 5. The student-athlete must have been a member of a varsity team for the sport’s entire NCAA championship segment.

    Kentucky representatives:

    Student-athlete

    Sport

    Major

    Jonny David

    men’s basketball

    kinesiology

    Isaac Humphries

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Dillon Pulliam

    men’s basketball

    computer engineering

    Tai Wynyard

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Evelyn Akhator

    women’s basketball

    community and leadership development

    Makenzie Cann

    women’s basketball

    integrated strategic communication

    Makayla Epps

    women’s basketball

    social work

    Jessica Hardin

    women’s basketball

    health care communication

    Maci Morris

    women’s basketball

    exercise science

    Taylor Murray

    women’s basketball

    public health

    Rachel Potter

    women’s basketball

    agricultural biotechnology/biology

    Alyssa Rice

    women’s basketball

    accounting/finance

    Katie Carlisle

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Katrina Coca

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Sidney Dukes

    gymnastics

    marketing

    Alex Hyland

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Cori Rechenmacher

    gymnastics

    nursing

    Aubree Rose

    gymnastics

    communication

    Katie Stuart

    gymnastics

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Sydney Waltz

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Billy Azzinaro

    rifle

    mechanical engineering

    Jenna Bethea

    rifle

    public health

    Hanna Carr

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Carmen Fry

    rifle

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Heather Kirby

    rifle

    equine science and management

    Sonya May

    rifle

    media arts and studies

    Andrew Miller

    rifle

    business management/marketing

    Cathryn Papasodora

    rifle

    integrated strategic communication

    Jason Sharbel

    rifle

    forestry

    Jason Spaude

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Bowen Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Shane Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Tanner Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Andrew Aviotti

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance/accounting

    Matthew Beach

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Samuel Day

    men’s swimming and diving

    biosystems engineering

    David Dingess

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Brandon Flynn

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Cobe Garcia

    men’s swimming and diving

    mechanical engineering

    Jackson Gunning

    men’s swimming and diving

    political science

    Austin Haney

    men’s swimming and diving

    civil engineering

    Kyle Higgins

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Isaac Jones

    men’s swimming and diving

    middle level teacher education

    Jarod Kehl

    men’s swimming and diving

    anthropology

    Seb Masterton

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Noah Richter

    men’s swimming and diving

    mathematics

    James Stevenson

    men’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Mike Summe

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Josh Swart

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Walker Thaning

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Bridgette Alexander

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Morgan Belli

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kelly Berger

    women’s swimming and diving

    elementary education

    Kendal Casey

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kayla Churman

    women’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Courtney Clark

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing/finance

    Kendra Crew

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting/business management

    Ann Davies

    women’s swimming and diving

    social work

    Ally Dupay

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Kailey Francetic

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Rachael Freeman

    women’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Geena Freriks

    Women’s swimming and diving

    dietetics

    Danielle Galyer

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/political science

    Maddie Gordon

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

    Rebecca Hamperian

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/marketing

    Kate Kelly

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Haley McInerny

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Allie Peterson

    women’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Alaina Potts

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Meredith Whisenhunt

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

     

     

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Eric Lindsey

    Summary: The University of Kentucky again placed among the leaders in the number of student-athletes on the most recent edition of the SEC Academic Honor Roll.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Eric Lindsey April 20, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2017)Student-athletes from all of the University of Kentucky's winter teams combined to earn a total of 70 spots on the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Winter Academic Honor Roll, the league announced this week.

    UK had the fourth-most honorees in the conference and ranked in the top three in men’s basketball and men’s swimming and diving representatives.

    A total of 701 student-athletes were named to the 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll..The 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll is based on grades form the 2016 spring, summer and fall terms. It includes the sports of basketball, equestrian, gymnastics, and swimming and diving.

    Any student-athlete who participates in a SEC championship sport or a student-athlete who participates in a sport listed on his/her institution’s NCAA Sports Sponsorship Form is eligible for nomination to the Academic Honor Roll. The following criteria is followed: 1. A student-athlete must have a grade point average of 3.0 or above for either the preceding academic year (two semesters or three quarters) or have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or above at the nominating institution. 2. If a student-athlete attends summer school, his/her grade-point average during the summer academic term must be included in the calculation used to determine eligibility for the Academic Honor Roll. 3. Student-athletes eligible for the Honor Roll include those receiving an athletics scholarship, recipients of an athletics award (i.e., letter winner), and non-scholarship student-athletes who have been on a varsity team for two seasons. 4. Prior to being nominated, a student-athlete must have successfully completed 24 semester or 36 quarter hours of non-remedial academic credit toward a baccalaureate degree at the nominating institution. 5. The student-athlete must have been a member of a varsity team for the sport’s entire NCAA championship segment.

    Kentucky representatives:

    Student-athlete

    Sport

    Major

    Jonny David

    men’s basketball

    kinesiology

    Isaac Humphries

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Dillon Pulliam

    men’s basketball

    computer engineering

    Tai Wynyard

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Evelyn Akhator

    women’s basketball

    community and leadership development

    Makenzie Cann

    women’s basketball

    integrated strategic communication

    Makayla Epps

    women’s basketball

    social work

    Jessica Hardin

    women’s basketball

    health care communication

    Maci Morris

    women’s basketball

    exercise science

    Taylor Murray

    women’s basketball

    public health

    Rachel Potter

    women’s basketball

    agricultural biotechnology/biology

    Alyssa Rice

    women’s basketball

    accounting/finance

    Katie Carlisle

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Katrina Coca

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Sidney Dukes

    gymnastics

    marketing

    Alex Hyland

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Cori Rechenmacher

    gymnastics

    nursing

    Aubree Rose

    gymnastics

    communication

    Katie Stuart

    gymnastics

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Sydney Waltz

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Billy Azzinaro

    rifle

    mechanical engineering

    Jenna Bethea

    rifle

    public health

    Hanna Carr

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Carmen Fry

    rifle

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Heather Kirby

    rifle

    equine science and management

    Sonya May

    rifle

    media arts and studies

    Andrew Miller

    rifle

    business management/marketing

    Cathryn Papasodora

    rifle

    integrated strategic communication

    Jason Sharbel

    rifle

    forestry

    Jason Spaude

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Bowen Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Shane Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Tanner Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Andrew Aviotti

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance/accounting

    Matthew Beach

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Samuel Day

    men’s swimming and diving

    biosystems engineering

    David Dingess

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Brandon Flynn

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Cobe Garcia

    men’s swimming and diving

    mechanical engineering

    Jackson Gunning

    men’s swimming and diving

    political science

    Austin Haney

    men’s swimming and diving

    civil engineering

    Kyle Higgins

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Isaac Jones

    men’s swimming and diving

    middle level teacher education

    Jarod Kehl

    men’s swimming and diving

    anthropology

    Seb Masterton

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Noah Richter

    men’s swimming and diving

    mathematics

    James Stevenson

    men’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Mike Summe

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Josh Swart

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Walker Thaning

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Bridgette Alexander

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Morgan Belli

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kelly Berger

    women’s swimming and diving

    elementary education

    Kendal Casey

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kayla Churman

    women’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Courtney Clark

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing/finance

    Kendra Crew

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting/business management

    Ann Davies

    women’s swimming and diving

    social work

    Ally Dupay

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Kailey Francetic

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Rachael Freeman

    women’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Geena Freriks

    Women’s swimming and diving

    dietetics

    Danielle Galyer

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/political science

    Maddie Gordon

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

    Rebecca Hamperian

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/marketing

    Kate Kelly

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Haley McInerny

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Allie Peterson

    women’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Alaina Potts

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Meredith Whisenhunt

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

     

     

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Eric Lindsey

    Summary: The University of Kentucky again placed among the leaders in the number of student-athletes on the most recent edition of the SEC Academic Honor Roll.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Mike Farrell April 17, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) If Terry Hunt ever decides to write his own biography, he could title it “From Bellevue to the White House.”

    The University of Kentucky journalism graduate, who covered four different presidents over 25 years for the Associated Press, will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.

    “Covering Reagan to Trump: A View from the Front Row” is the title of his address.

    Hunt, a native of Bellevue in Northern Kentucky, graduated from the University of Kentucky with a journalism degree in 1967. He served as managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel.

    He was drafted into the Army, returned to a summer internship with the AP in Louisville, then took a job in Providence, Rhode Island, as an AP correspondent. The wire service transferred Hunt to Washington at the height of the Watergate scandal in 1974. During the 1980 presidential campaign, he was asked to cover California Gov. Ronald Reagan for two days, an assignment that turned into the rest of the campaign. After the election, Hunt followed Reagan to the White House.

    During the presidencies of Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Hunt logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering the nation’s chief executive. He traveled to West Germany with Reagan, who stood at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” 

    Hunt left the White House near the end of the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy bureau chief in Washington to help manage the news agency’s largest bureau. 

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and into UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence. 

    Before Hunt delivers the Creason Address, he will be one of six recipients of the School of Journalism and Media Distinguished Alumni awards. The other recipients are Cathy Black, a CBS producer; Judith G. Clabes, newspaper editor, online news site creator and Scripps Howard Foundation president and CEO; the late William R. Grant, who produced award-winning programming for PBS; retired Courier-Journal editor David Hawpe; and Richard G. Wilson, one of the foremost education reporters for the Courier-Journal until his retirement in 1999.

    In addition, the seventh annual David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award will be presented to journalism senior Derek Terry for his story on former football star Zeke Pike.

    The Joe Creason Lecture is annually one of the highlights of the academic calendar for the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communicaton and Information. The lecture by a nationally prominent journalist honors the memory of Creason, an outstanding Kentucky journalist and an honored alumnus. The lecture series was made possible through a matching grant from the Bingham Enterprises Foundation of Kentucky and gifts donated by UK alumni and friends of Joe Creason.

    The university family and the public are invited. 

    Terry Hunt will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Terry Hunt, who retired last fall after a distinguished 46-year career with Associated Press including 25 years as chief White House correspondent, will deliver the Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium..
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Mike Farrell Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) If Terry Hunt ever decides to write his own biography, he could title it “From Bellevue to the White House.”

    The University of Kentucky journalism graduate, who covered four different presidents over 25 years for the Associated Press, will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.

    “Covering Reagan to Trump: A View from the Front Row” is the title of his address.

    Hunt, a native of Bellevue in Northern Kentucky, graduated from the University of Kentucky with a journalism degree in 1967. He served as managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel.

    He was drafted into the Army, returned to a summer internship with the AP in Louisville, then took a job in Providence, Rhode Island, as an AP correspondent. The wire service transferred Hunt to Washington at the height of the Watergate scandal in 1974. During the 1980 presidential campaign, he was asked to cover California Gov. Ronald Reagan for two days, an assignment that turned into the rest of the campaign. After the election, Hunt followed Reagan to the White House.

    During the presidencies of Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Hunt logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering the nation’s chief executive. He traveled to West Germany with Reagan, who stood at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” 

    Hunt left the White House near the end of the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy bureau chief in Washington to help manage the news agency’s largest bureau. 

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and into UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence. 

    Before Hunt delivers the Creason Address, he will be one of six recipients of the School of Journalism and Media Distinguished Alumni awards. The other recipients are Cathy Black, a CBS producer; Judith G. Clabes, newspaper editor, online news site creator and Scripps Howard Foundation president and CEO; the late William R. Grant, who produced award-winning programming for PBS; retired Courier-Journal editor David Hawpe; and Richard G. Wilson, one of the foremost education reporters for the Courier-Journal until his retirement in 1999.

    In addition, the seventh annual David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award will be presented to journalism senior Derek Terry for his story on former football star Zeke Pike.

    The Joe Creason Lecture is annually one of the highlights of the academic calendar for the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communicaton and Information. The lecture by a nationally prominent journalist honors the memory of Creason, an outstanding Kentucky journalist and an honored alumnus. The lecture series was made possible through a matching grant from the Bingham Enterprises Foundation of Kentucky and gifts donated by UK alumni and friends of Joe Creason.

    The university family and the public are invited. 

    Terry Hunt will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Terry Hunt, who retired last fall after a distinguished 46-year career with Associated Press including 25 years as chief White House correspondent, will deliver the Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium..
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell April 14, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2017) — The faculty of the University of Kentucky  School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information has voted to annually recognize graduates of the school who have had outstanding careers and made significant contributions to their communities and professions.

    “I am not sure many people realize the impact our graduates have had on our state and our country,” Lars Willnat, School of Journalism and Media director, said. “This first group includes some amazing people — reporters, editors, producers, many of them award winners in their field.

    “That’s quite a legacy from one school. And this is just the beginning. We have dozens more who deserve this award and dozens of recent graduates who are making their own marks.”

    The first six recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Award will be recognized Tuesday, April 18, at the school’s 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture. The lecture will be delivered by UK alumnus Terry Hunt, who retired last fall from the White House bureau of the Associated Press as deputy bureau chief. The event begins at 6 p.m. in the auditorium of the William T. Young Library.  The winner of the David Dick “What a Great Story Award” Storytelling Award will also be announced.

    These six graduates of the School of Journalism and Media will be recognized:

    Cathy A. Black (1985):  A graduate of the school’s telecommunications major, now known as the media arts and studies major, she is a senior producer at CBS News in broadcast marketing. Her responsibilities include the promotion and marketing of “CBS This Morning,” hosted by Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell, to the network’s affiliated stations.

    Previously, Black booked musical guests for the “Early Show” and “Saturday Early Show.” In that position, she produced concerts throughout the United States and overseas. She’s produced concerts and segments featuring performers including Prince, Garth Brooks, Sting, Adele, Rihanna, Kanye West, Katy Perry, Lenny Kravitz and Marc Anthony.

    Black also has covered many headline events, including the Gulf War, the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Hurricane Katrina and the Michael Jackson trial, as well as the 2012 and 2016 national political party conventions.  She joined CBS News in 1990, working on the assignment desk before becoming an assistant to “CBS This Morning” anchor Harry Smith.

    A native of Lexington, she lives in New York City.  

    Judith G. Clabes (1967):  This journalism graduate from Henderson, who also majored in English and education, has received numerous national, regional and state awards for her work in journalism, in community service and in philanthropy.  She earned a master’s degree in public administration from Indiana State University and has received four honorary doctorates, the most recent in 2010 from UK.

    During her 37-year career with the E.W. Scripps Co., she broke the glass ceiling as the first woman to edit a Scripps newspaper, beginning with the Sunday Courier and Press in Evansville, a post she held for five years until she became editor of The Kentucky Post.

    While editor of The Post, she founded the UK First Amendment Center, since renamed the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. In 1996, she was named chief executive officer and president of the Scripps Howard Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the E.W. Scripps Co. She retired in 2008.

    In retirement, she and her husband, Gene, founded KyForward.com, an online news site serving Kentucky.  In late 2013, she and Gene founded the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism and started planning to launch a daily online newspaper  for Northern Kentucky. The NKyTribune was launched Jan. 12, 2015.  She also founded the Kentucky Philanthropy Initiative to promote charitable giving.

    Judith Clabes was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1997 and the University of Kentucky Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 1989. She was the first recipient of the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment from the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. She also is a member of the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame. In 2006, she was given the Gerald Sass Distinguished Service Award from the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communications.

    They live in Edgewood.

    William R. Grant (1966):  This native of Winchester served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel and was the first person to earn a master’s in mass communication at UK.  He lived a storied and successful career in print and broadcast journalism over more than four decades. He interned for The Courier-Journal, then after graduation covered politics for The Lexington Leader. The next stop was the Detroit Free Press, where he covered education.  He was a Nieman Fellow in 1979-80, a prestigious program that covers a year of study, innovation and experimentation at Harvard University. In 1980-83, he was an education writer for the San Francisco Chronicle. As a reporter, Grant’s writing won many national awards, including five from the National Council for the Advancement of Education Writing and two Charles Stewart Mott Education Writing Awards.

    Grant entered broadcast journalism in 1983. He was a major contributor to public television programming and served in numerous positions of increasing responsibility. He worked for two years as managing editor of “Frontline,” the investigative program of the Public Broadcasting System, and 10 years as executive editor of “Nova,” the long-running science program. He joined WNET in 1997, where he led the largest documentary production unit in U.S. public television, supervising development, funding and production of more than 50 hours of programming a year in the areas of natural history, science, history, and travel and adventure. He served as the executive producer for a number of highly acclaimed programs, including the mini-series “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow” and “The American President,” a 10-hour series.

    Programs produced under his supervision won 13 national news and documentary Emmy awards and eight George Foster Peabody awards. Grant co-founded the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in 1991, was named chairman in 2002 and continued to serve as chairman emeritus of the festival board until his death in 2016.

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2001. He was named to the University of Kentucky’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2005. His wife, Ellen, and his brother, William, will represent him. 

    David V.  Hawpe (1965):  His journalism career began with the Associated Press the year he graduated. He served as editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times before joining The Courier-Journal in the Hazard bureau in 1969. Along the way he served as editorial writer, copy editor, assistant state editor and managing editor before being named editor of the state’s largest-circulation newspaper. In 2009, he retired, concluding a 44-year career. During his tenure in leadership positions, The Courier-Journal won four Pulitzer Prizes.

    Hawpe was a Nieman Fellow in 1974-75 at Harvard and taught there, as well as at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville. He was president in 1990 of the Kentucky Press Association. He also was active in the Associated Press Managing Editors, American Society of Newspaper Editors and was a frequent lecturer at the American Press Institute and the Poynter Institute. He was a Pulitzer Prize juror four times.

    In 2009 he received the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment from the university’s Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the Distinguished Service Award from the Associated Press Managing Editors (APME). He served as APME president and led the rewrite of its ethics policy, adding a mandate for diverse staffing and coverage by newspapers. His awards also included the 1999 Walker Stone Prize for Editorial Writing and that year's Anthony Lewis Media Award for Public Advocacy from the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.

    Since retirement Hawpe has served as a University of Kentucky trustee and a Morehead State University regent. He has worked in political campaigns, and beginning with the 2013 Kentucky General Assembly session he has been senior aide to Sen. Morgan McGarvey.

    Hawpe lives in Louisville.

    Terence P. Hunt (1967):  This former managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel retired a year ago after 46 years with the Associated Press, 25 of them as its chief White House correspondent.

    He logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He was in West Berlin when Reagan stood at the Brandenburg Gate and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

    Hunt left the White House during the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic economic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy chief of the Washington bureau, the news agency’s largest bureau.

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence.

    He lives in Kensington, Maryland, with his wife, Jeanie Johnson. 

    Richard G. Wilson (1966):  This graduate retired from The Courier-Journal with a reputation as one of the most respected journalists in the Commonwealth and was recognized nationally for his reporting on education.

    A Kernel editor and then its advisor after graduation, he reported for the Lexington Leader and The State Journal in Frankfort. He joined The Courier-Journal in 1967, and two years later moved to the newspaper’s Frankfort bureau. There he covered state government, education, politics and political campaigns for 16 years.

    In 1984, with Richard Whitt, Wilson won the Kentucky School Boards Association’s award for exemplary investigative reporting and the Kentucky Education Association’s School Bell Award for a series of stories, “What’s Wrong with Kentucky Schools.” In 1985, Wilson became chief of the Bluegrass Bureau in Lexington, continuing to cover higher education and regional issues throughout Central Kentucky. He remained in that position until he retired in 1999, ending a reporting career of almost 50 years, all in Kentucky.

    He served as interim director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, as it was then known, from July 1, 2002, until June 30, 2003. During that period, he led the school successfully through reaccreditation and instituted the Journalism Alumni Symposium, an annual event that brings the school’s graduates to campus to meet with students. He is a 1999 inductee of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, has served as an adjunct journalism instructor and has mentored numerous young journalists.

    He and his wife Deborah live in Frankfort. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: The School of Journalism and Media will present its first Distinguished Alumni Awards to six journalists with outstanding careers. The presentation will be part of the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture April 18.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Harlie Collins April 14, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2017) — David Jake Willis, a University of Kentucky student in the College of Communication and Information, is the first information communication technology (ICT) major invited to attend the 2017 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR).

    NCUR is an annual conference for champions and practitioners dedicated to undergraduate research, scholarship and creativity in all fields of study. The conference receives more than 4,000 abstract submissions from students in a variety of disciplines every year. This year, 60 UK students were selected by the UK Office of Undergraduate Research to attend NCUR from April 6-8 at the University of Memphis in Tennessee, Willis among them.

    His research on behavior based wireless surveillance got its start last semester in the ICT ColLab, a research laboratory aimed at engineering solutions in networking, cybersecurity, human-computer interaction, social computing and related fields, under the direction of Michail Tsikerdekis, assistant professor of information communication technology in the School of Information Science and ColLab director.

    “Jake is an excellent collaborator and shows great commitment for insightful research," Tsikerdekis said. "He committed to exploring the ideas we established when we set this project up.”

    In brief, the project introduces a framework that enables an investigator to track a person of interest (POI) over time and allows them to establish a timeline without having to rely on Internet Protocol (IP) or media access control (MAC) addresses as identifiers. The framework can be applied to cases of surveillance where investigators need to monitor a POI passively.

    “Surveillance as it is performed on the internet or on telecommunication networks go beyond wiretapping a suspect’s phone or a security video system,” Willis said. “It can affect anyone who uses a smartphone, computer, internet of things (IoT) device, social media or transmits pictures, and even medical information, regardless of whether or not they are suspected of a crime.”

    Willis began testing a variety of techniques on wireless networks that could be used to collect information about network users without their knowledge. For example, he used already existing tools like Aircrack, a toolset used to assess Wi-Fi network security, and Pyshark, a Python library, to test evil twin attacks and packet analysis, respectively.

    “It was surprising to learn how so much information can be discovered from even just simple performance characteristics like wireless signal intensity. The reception or transmission of a laptop using Wi-Fi for example could be used to locate it relative to a sensor like a wireless access point,” Willis said.

    In the future, Willis plans to expand the research and try similar packet analysis techniques on Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS) networks that are used by AT&T and T-Mobile, in addition to air interfaces other than Wi-Fi. To add, Willis hopes to make related open source contributions and seeks to eventually publish this research.

    Willis presented his research behavior based wireless surveillance at the University of Memphis on Friday, April 7. 

    “I believe as a student and professional he has the core elements required to be successful in the IT industry, not merely using technologies but having the passion for coding and for developing new solutions that aim to improve the current state of the art. I am extremely proud of Jake,” Tsikerdekis said.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information at UK became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a M.S. in Library Science, School Media Certification, M.S. in Information Communication Technology, B.A./B.S. in Information Communication Technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

     

    Willis presented his research on behavior based wireless surveillance at NCUR on April 7.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: David Jake Willis, a UK student in the College of Communication and Information, is the first information communication technology major invited to attend the 2017 National Conference on Undergraduate Research.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Monday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) – The media landscape continues to change in the digital and social world, impacting not only journalism, but also public and media relations. What do shrinking newsrooms, instant access and direct connection to audiences mean for public relations (PR)? Do these changes present a challenge or an opportunity?

    These and other questions will be addressed in a panel titled, "What a Changing Media Landscape Means for PR," at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, at the University of Kentucky.

    The panel will include public relations leaders from the office of Gov. Matt Bevin, office of Mayor Jim Gray, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK.

    The event, hosted by the UK College of Communication and Information, will take place in the Gatton College of Business and Economics' Kincaid Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

    Panelists include:

    Amanda Stamper, communications director for Gov. Matt Bevin. Prior to accepting her role in the governor’s office, she worked in corporate communications for Lexmark from 2014 to 2016. Stamper also served as manager of digital and social marketing for DecoArt from 2012 to 2014 and director of communications for Asbury Theological Seminary from 2008 to 2012. Outside of her communications role, she is also a small business owner. Stamper is a Lexington native and graduate of the UK's Integrated Strategic Communications program. She is married to David Stamper and has two children, Zach and Gracie.  

    Susan Straub, communications director for Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington. Straub also held this post in the administrations of Mayor Jim Newberry and Mayor Pam Miller. Previously, she worked for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio. Straub holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK. She lives in Lexington and has two sons and two grandchildren.

    Lisa Deffendall, district spokeswoman for Fayette County Public Schools. Deffendall taught science and math in New Orleans and rural Louisiana for four years as a Teach for America corps member. She was hired to cover public schools in 1996. She spent the next nine years covering K-12 education for newspapers in Houma, Louisiana; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Lexington, and garnering awards for hard-hitting investigative coverage. In 2004, she joined the Fayette County Public Schools with a directive to bring transparency to school district communications. Since then the district has received state and national accolades for its communication efforts. Deffendall majored in journalism, education and African-American studies at Northwestern University. The mother of nine- and 14-year-old girls, she is married to Matthew Deffendall, director of first generation initiatives for UK.

    Jerry Grasso, senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Lexmark International. Grasso has also served as vice president of corporate communications. In that position, he was responsible for public relations, internal communications and corporate creative services since joining Lexmark in 2008. Before Lexmark, Grasso was vice president of corporate communications at EarthLink Inc., one of the country’s largest internet service providers. Prior to EarthLink, he was director of corporate communications for Epoch Internet. Additionally, he has worked at the ARIS Corporation and with Sprint’s business division. Grasso holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Kansas State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Texas at Arlington. 

    Jay Blanton, executive director for public relations and marketing for the University of Kentucky. Blanton held this position from 2004-2008 and again from 2010 until now. Previously, he has worked in communications roles for former Gov. Steve Beshear, former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson and former Kentucky Treasurer Jonathan Miller. He also has worked for the Keeneland Association and the public relations firms Preston-Osborne and Guthrie/Mayes. Blanton received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK as well as his master’s in higher education. He and his wife, Carla, a communications consultant, live in Lexington.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: At 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, public relations (PR) leaders from Kentucky's Office of the Governor, Lexington's Office of the Mayor, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK will discuss challenges and opportunities for PR in a changing media landscape.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder April 17, 2017

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) – The media landscape continues to change in the digital and social world, impacting not only journalism, but also public and media relations. What do shrinking newsrooms, instant access and direct connection to audiences mean for public relations (PR)? Do these changes present a challenge or an opportunity?

    These and other questions will be addressed in a panel titled, "What a Changing Media Landscape Means for PR," at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, at the University of Kentucky.

    The panel will include public relations leaders from the office of Gov. Matt Bevin, office of Mayor Jim Gray, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK.

    The event, hosted by the UK College of Communication and Information, will take place in the Gatton College of Business and Economics' Kincaid Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

    Panelists include:

    Amanda Stamper, communications director for Gov. Matt Bevin. Prior to accepting her role in the governor’s office, she worked in corporate communications for Lexmark from 2014 to 2016. Stamper also served as manager of digital and social marketing for DecoArt from 2012 to 2014 and director of communications for Asbury Theological Seminary from 2008 to 2012. Outside of her communications role, she is also a small business owner. Stamper is a Lexington native and graduate of the UK's Integrated Strategic Communications program. She is married to David Stamper and has two children, Zach and Gracie.  

    Susan Straub, communications director for Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington. Straub also held this post in the administrations of Mayor Jim Newberry and Mayor Pam Miller. Previously, she worked for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio. Straub holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK. She lives in Lexington and has two sons and two grandchildren.

    Lisa Deffendall, district spokeswoman for Fayette County Public Schools. Deffendall taught science and math in New Orleans and rural Louisiana for four years as a Teach for America corps member. She was hired to cover public schools in 1996. She spent the next nine years covering K-12 education for newspapers in Houma, Louisiana; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Lexington, and garnering awards for hard-hitting investigative coverage. In 2004, she joined the Fayette County Public Schools with a directive to bring transparency to school district communications. Since then the district has received state and national accolades for its communication efforts. Deffendall majored in journalism, education and African-American studies at Northwestern University. The mother of nine- and 14-year-old girls, she is married to Matthew Deffendall, director of first generation initiatives for UK.

    Jerry Grasso, senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Lexmark International. Grasso has also served as vice president of corporate communications. In that position, he was responsible for public relations, internal communications and corporate creative services since joining Lexmark in 2008. Before Lexmark, Grasso was vice president of corporate communications at EarthLink Inc., one of the country’s largest internet service providers. Prior to EarthLink, he was director of corporate communications for Epoch Internet. Additionally, he has worked at the ARIS Corporation and with Sprint’s business division. Grasso holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Kansas State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Texas at Arlington. 

    Jay Blanton, executive director for public relations and marketing for the University of Kentucky. Blanton held this position from 2004-2008 and again from 2010 until now. Previously, he has worked in communications roles for former Gov. Steve Beshear, former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson and former Kentucky Treasurer Jonathan Miller. He also has worked for the Keeneland Association and the public relations firms Preston-Osborne and Guthrie/Mayes. Blanton received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK as well as his master’s in higher education. He and his wife, Carla, a communications consultant, live in Lexington.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: At 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, public relations (PR) leaders from Kentucky's Office of the Governor, Lexington's Office of the Mayor, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK will discuss challenges and opportunities for PR in a changing media landscape.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (April 11, 2017) — For the third year in a row, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team has placed in the top 10 at the Pi Kappa Delta national tournament. Ten students representing UK traveled to Boise State University to participate in the 50th biennial National Tournament and Convention. Seventy-two programs from 30 states entered over 2,000 public speaking events and debate teams at this competition.

    UK Speech and Debate placed ninth in combined sweepstakes which totals points earned from both public speaking and debate events. This placing is the highest in UK’s history. The team also placed fifth in the public speaking sweepstakes competition, more than doubling the team’s performance in this category from this tournament two years ago. UK took home 12th in the debate sweepstakes competition.

    In addition to these impressive team performances, sophomore Veronica Scott was crowned national champion of communication analysis. Scott is the first national champion in the team’s history. Her speech examines how the rhetoric of gun violence influences instances of domestic assault. Additionally, freshman Laura McAllister placed second in after dinner speaking and senior Sam Northrup advanced to quarterfinals in public debate.

    “The team did so incredibly well at this competition,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “Each competitor poured their heart and soul into every performance over the past four days. They have worked for months on these events and I could not be prouder.”

    The Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament and Convention uses a unique scoring system for its events. Competitors in the top 10 percent of an event receive superior ratings, those in the next 20 percent receive excellent ratings, and the following 30 percent receive good ratings. Additionally, showcases are held instead of elimination rounds for the public speaking events.

    The full list of awards earned by UK competitors is available here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

     

    UK Speech and Debate placed 9th in combined sweepstakes, the highest in UK’s history.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Seventy-two programs from 30 states entered over 2,000 public speaking events and debate teams at this competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 7, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2017)  Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.

    Kirk is editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel for the 2016-17 academic year and was chosen for her pursuit of open records from UK. In January, a judge ruled in favor of UK's position in the case involving the privacy of victim survivors of sexual misconduct. The Kernel is appealing.

    Kirk, along with nine other winners, is profiled in the May issue of Glamour. The story is available online at www.glamour.com/story/2017-college-women-of-the-year-winners.  

    All winners receive a cash prize, a trip to New York City, introductions to top professionals in a variety of fields, national recognition in the magazine, and hair styling and makeup for the awards-ceremony luncheon.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden April 6, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2017)  University of Kentucky journalism majors will learn about “Taking the Right Steps to That First Job” on Thursday, April 6, at the annual Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium. Six graduates of the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information will discuss their job search and their careers at the symposium, which begins at 6 p.m. today, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

    “We look forward to our graduates returning and sharing their experiences and perspectives with our students,” said Lars Willnat, director of the school. “Faculty have told me how this event really resonates with our students as they gain insight from other young journalists.”

    The program this year features five graduates working in journalism-related fields. Another graduate, who is a lawyer, will moderate.

    Eric Lindsey, who graduated in 2008, has just completed his ninth year working with UK Athletics and his third season as the primary contact for the men’s basketball program.

    Lindsey manages the overall publicity and promotional efforts for Kentucky’s men basketball program, which includes coordinating with Coach John Calipari and his coaching staff and making players available for interviews. Kentucky’s social media presence — under the direction of Lindsey — is regarded as one of the nation’s leaders in popularity, ingenuity and creativity. 

    Before joining Kentucky’s media relations staff full time, Lindsey served as the editor of CoachCal.com from 2011-14. Lindsey managed all social media content. Site traffic increased by more that 400 percent. He worked directly with Calipari in providing exclusive content, while also assisting in the production of The New York Times best seller “Players First: Coaching From the Inside Out.” 

    As an undergraduate, he served as a reporter and editor for the Kentucky Kernel. Lindsey was honored in 2009 by the Kentucky Press Association for the Best College Sports Story, Best College Sports Column and Best Sports Feature in the state. A story he wrote placed fourth nationally in the Associate Collegiate Press Newspaper Awards in 2009. 

    Casey Parker-Bell works as part of Kentucky Educational Television’s public affairs team. He reports on the General Assembly for “Legislative Update” on Kentucky’s statewide Public Broadcasting System (PBS) network. He has produced “Comment on Kentucky” and “Kentucky Tonight,” where newsmakers and journalists discuss the issues confronting Kentuckians, and continues to produce special programming on Kentucky’s politics, government and important topics.

    He graduated from the University of Kentucky in 2015, earning a degree in journalism with an emphasis on broadcasting and a minor in business. Before becoming a journalist he had a variety of careers, most notably working as a general contractor in charge of multiple construction projects in Western Kentucky. He said he could not be prouder of his decision to change careers.

    Sabirah Rayford, a 2016 graduate, started working for WKYT in October 2015 as a multimedia journalist. She had worked an internship at the station during her sophomore year and interviewed former UK stars John Wall, Anthony Davis and Darius Miller when she helped cover the Pelicans vs. Wizards NBA preseason game.

    In 2015, she won Feature of the Year at the Kentucky Associated Press Broadcaster Awards for a story about a former state Supreme Court justice who transitioned from a man to a woman at the age of 65. She also received Best in Show for her work that year.

    Racial tensions at the University of Missouri led Rayford to Frankfort, Kentucky, where she found the first black student to attend the University of Missouri. She talked to him about racial issues during his time at the university and compared them to the diversity concerns students have today at UK.

    Ben Roberts, who graduated in 2005, covered the UK men’s basketball team for two seasons while at the Kentucky Kernel. He won a Hearst Award in 2006 for his story on the legacy of former University of Kentucky basketball coach Adolph Rupp.

    He has been a sports reporter for the Lexington Herald-Leader since 2012, primarily covering recruiting, UK men’s basketball and football.

    He has worked for the Herald-Leader in various roles since 2005, starting as a freelance sports reporter, spending four years as a sports copy editor and also creating the “Next Cats” recruiting blog, which chronicles the latest news on UK’s basketball and football recruits. In 2012, he was hired as the newspaper’s first full-time recruiting reporter.

    Roberts worked in Washington, D.C., from 2010 to 2012 as a sports copy editor and designer for Stars and Stripes, the newspaper serving the U.S. military community. He was also part of the Washington Center for Politics & Journalism in the fall of 2005, reporting on local and national politics out of the Washington, D.C., bureau of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

    Roberts, a Frankfort native, graduated with a degree in journalism and political science.

    Adam Sichko, who served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel in 2005-2006, is senior reporter for the Nashville Business Journal. He covers the booming real estate and economic development scene in the city. Before that he reported for the Albany (N.Y.) Business Review for six years. Both newspapers are owned by the American City Business Journals, one of the nation’s largest employers of business journalists.

    He has twice won national awards from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers for his reporting.

    Kate Carpenter will moderate the symposium discussion. She is an attorney in Louisville with Fulton and Devlin. She graduated from UK in 2012 with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She is licensed to practice law in Kentucky and is a member of the Kentucky Bar Association. Her interests include cycling, reading and spending time with family and friends.

    The first Journalism Alumni Symposium was held in 2003 and organized by Dick Wilson, at the time the interim director of what was then the School of Journalism and Telecommunications. Wilson, one of the school’s distinguished graduates, brought successful graduates back to connect with current students. He raised money so that the program could continue and this is the 15th annual symposium. The UK Journalism Alumni Association named it the Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium in appreciation for his many contributions to the school.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Six graduates of the UK School of Journalism and Media will discuss their job search and their careers at the Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium, which begins at 6 p.m. today, in the auditorium of William T. Young Library.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Lily Johnson and Amy Jones-Timoney April 5, 2017

    Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area. 

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2017) — Hannah Ellis has been a true blue fan her entire life.

    Growing up in the small town of Campbellsville, Kentucky, rooting for the Wildcats was instilled in her from a young age. Her love for the Cats continued to grow when she decided to attend the University of Kentucky. As Ellis studied integrated strategic communication in UK's College of Communication and Information, she finally understood what it was like to experience the Big Blue Nation (BBN) first hand.

    Upon graduation, Ellis' dreams led her out of her comfort zone of the Bluegrass State she loved and to the city of Nashville to purse her long-desired career in music. She is currently working on recording her debut EP (extended-play recording), which should be released this summer. Recently we talked to Ellis about what her life and career in Nashville is all about and why she still treasures her UK experience.

    UK: What was your reaction when you found out your song “You Were Never Gone” was going to be featured on the hit MTV show “Teen Wolf”?

    Ellis: I won't lie, I was very excited. That is one of the biggest outlets that a song of mine has been played on, and I was so honored it was used in such a poignant moment in the show. The feedback I have received since the episode aired has been nothing short of amazing. 

    UK: Was there a certain epiphany type moment when you realized you were set on moving to Nashville or was it a gradual plan throughout college?

    Ellis: I would definitely say it was an epiphany type moment. It happened a few months before I graduated high school and I cried and told my parents I felt called to pursue a career in music. And they backed me 100 percent. 

    UK: What were you most apprehensive/nervous about when deciding to leave the comfort of your home state and pursuing your dreams in Nashville?

    Ellis: If I am being honest I think the fear of failure. That somehow my music and artistry wouldn't measure up and I would have to end up going home defeated. Once I got to Nashville I realized it doesn't work that way, and that I had a lot more say in my success than I thought. 

    UK: What is the most surprising thing you’ve experienced living in Nashville that you didn’t anticipate?

    Ellis: How tight-knit the community is. I expected it to be so competitive it would be hard to make and keep friends, but everyone cheers for each other and only wants the best for their peers. It is truly a family in country music. 

    UK: When you’re not working on your music what is your favorite hobby?

    Ellis: This sounds silly, but I love scrapbooking. I see life as one big adventure, but sometimes it's the little moments that you look back and are so grateful that you captured them. 

    UK: When stress starts to build, what is your favorite way to clear your head and relax?

    Ellis: I would say it's a pretty even three-way split between working out, getting lost in a fiction novel or cooking basically anything. 

    UK: What country music star do you look up to and admire most?

    Ellis: Although she is a pop star now, I have always admired how connected Taylor Swift has always stayed to her fans, and how true she stays to herself. I believe she is both a smart business woman and a talented and kind person. 

    UK: What has been the biggest obstacle you’ve had to overcome when working on your first album?

    Ellis: Paperwork, LOL. People do not know how much goes in on the back end to make sure everything is done right and everyone involved is taken care of. Making the music is the fun part. 

    UK: Thus far in your career what are you most proud of?

    Ellis: The songs I am about to release this year. I have fought so hard to find and become the artist that I am and to know what I want to say to my fans, and now I am so ready for everyone to hear what we have been working on. 

    UK: How did your education/experiences at UK prepare you for your career in Nashville? 

    Ellis: The idea that nothing comes without hard work. I took some classes in college that were probably out of my league, but I fought hard to get the grades and learn as much as possible. The music industry requires that type of diligence and tenacity or it would become very frustrating very fast. 

    UK: Looking back at your time spent at UK what are some of your favorite memories? 

    Ellis: Oh, man. I have a list of people you could ask, LOL. No, honestly just nights I spent with my friends learning who I was and making memories that shaped me. I would never trade those years for anything and I will forever be grateful for the education I was provided in and out of the classroom at UK. 

    This video is part of a bi-monthly UKNow series. We want to tell “see blue.” stories about our alumni to show how the University of Kentucky prepares students to succeed after graduation. If you know of any UK alumni who should be featured, please email us. We might choose your suggestion for our next “see blue.” alumni story on UKNow.  

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: Since UK alumna Hannah Ellis arrived in Nashville to chase her dreams of writing and recording country music, a lot has changed. Her song, "You Were Never Gone," was featured on the hit MTV show "Teen Wolf," and she has been hard at work on her debut EP (extended-play recording). But one thing hasn't changed — her love for her alma mater. Click here to learn why her UK degree is helping Ellis build her career. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor April 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 4, 2017) Six University of Kentucky communication majors from the College of Communication and Information recently volunteered as judges for elementary and middle school speech competitors at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Communications Event.

    The CI students gave written feedback to competitors in the public speaking and demonstrations categories, rating them on a scale of 1-5 based on their delivery, presentation, content and overall performance, as well as giving additional comments when necessary.

    Traci Letcher, a senior lecturer in the college, reached out to her former students to see if they would be interested in judging the young students.

    “I was thrilled when so many of our students immediately replied and wanted to be a part of this event,” Letcher said.

    Senior organizational communication major Madalyn Klika was among the UK students that volunteered and noted that it was a really neat experience to be able to help the younger students.

    “I did not think I was qualified to judge a speech competition, but when it came to it I found I actually did have a lot of valuable advice to give them,” Klika said.

    The UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Fayette County Extension Office was so pleased with the UK students help that they asked the students to return in April to judge the state competition.

    The Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program hosted the event Thursday, March 23. The program strives to create opportunities and supportive environments for youth and adults to become capable, competent and caring citizens. They focus on hands-on learning in the youth’s areas of interest with the help of parents, adult volunteer leaders and professional staff. 

    The CI students gave written feedback to competitors in the public speaking and demonstrations categories.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK communications students recently lent their expertise and gave valuable advice to elementary and middle school students participating in a Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H speech competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Gail Hairston March 31, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 31, 2017) The University of Kentucky will send 59 undergraduate student-researchers to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) at the University of Memphis April 6-8.

    The UK group joins young researchers from around the world to showcase their research findings through poster and oral presentations. Each student will be given the opportunity to discuss their display and share their research results, illuminating how their work will have an impact on future research development. UK has been an active NCUR participant since the mid ’90s.

    One of the first things these young researchers learn is that most research is not conducted in the traditional laboratory with bubbling beakers and flaming Bunsen burners. But modern research spans all disciplines and majors, and includes a wide variety of activities.

    “For some students, this will be their first exposure to research displayed on a national stage. An experience such as this gives UK’s young researchers the opportunity to professionally present the results of their research projects and to talk with others who share their interests. They will come home with a much wider view of the world and their own intellectual potential. It will greatly expand their idea about what’s possible,” said Evie Russell, assistant director of the UK Office of Undergraduate Research, Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence.

    “These students represent the best of our best, and UK should be proud of each one of them.”

    The UK students will present their research on a wide range of topics and fields of study. The following is an alphabetical list of the 59 UK students traveling to Memphis with their name, grade, college, major and title of abstract.

    • Sara Assef, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “An examination of the differences in the level of dependency between dual and conventional tobacco users throughout each trimester of pregnancy”
    • Alexis Axtell, freshman, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Correlating Knee Flexion Angles and Shoulder Range of Motion During the Tennis Serve”
    • Tiwaladeoluwa Adekunle, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies, “Afropolitanism: Unraveling the 'Pre' and 'Post' Dynamics of Decolonization”
    • Ibrahim Khalil Appleton, junior, College of Engineering, electrical engineering, “Quantification of Factors Contributing to Cross-Programming in Radio Frequency Identification Applications”
    • Elizabeth Barajas, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “A Drosophila Puparial Skin Protein That Is Regulated Through the Ligand Binding Pocket of Drosophila USP (RXR)”
    • Christopher Barrow, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-bar Experimentation”
    • Esias Bedingar, junior, College of Public Health, public health/neuroscience, “Brainwave Signatures for Detecting Malingered Neurocognitive Deficit (MNCD)”
    • Alyssa Bertoni, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science and international studies, “Syrian Refugees and the Difficulties of Seeking Asylum in Spain”
    • Nikita Birbasov, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Accurate Prediction of the Colloidal Nanoparticles Aggregation in an Implicit Solvent with Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics”
    • Evan Blanford, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Trade-off Between Survival and Reproduction for Female Beetles: How Is Death-feigning and Mate Search Mediated by the Number of Previous Mates?”
    • Shelby Brown, sophomore, College of Social Work, social work, “Ahlan wa Sahlan: Examining the Difficulties and Success of Resettled Syrian Refugee Women in Lexington, Kentucky”
    • Tori Buckley, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, "Single Cardiac Myocytes From the Left and Right Ventricles Respond Similarly to Isoproterenol and Omecamtiv Mecarbil”
    • Madison Calhoun, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science and sociology, “Roll-call Voting in the State Legislature: A Study of Kentucky and Louisiana”
    • Yujie Ding, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Effects of PCN on Cognition and Motor Function in hAPP-Overexpressing Mice”
    • DeAnna Duffy, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Academic Discrimination on Adolescent Women on Academic Performance and Attitudes in the STEM Fields”
    • Ted Ferguson, junior, College of Engineering, computer engineering, “Hardware Implementation of Synapse Using Memristors”
    • Allison French, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Association of Symptomatology and Engagement with Learning in a Narrative Comprehension Intervention for Third Graders At-risk for ADHD”
    • Vince Gouge, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Hairy-related 9 (Her9) and Vasculogenesis in the Vertebrate Retina”
    • Cannon Hanebuth, junior, College of Health Sciences, pre-physical therapy, “Comparison of Academic Performance Between Rural and Urban Physical Therapy Students”
    • Kaylee Hicks, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies, “Racial Bias in Epidemic Control in Modern Peru”
    • Hannah Himmelmann, senior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, animal science, “Effects of Electrolyte Water on Digital Dermatitis”
    • Katherine Huffman, senior, College of Communication and Information and College of Arts and Sciences, business communication and political science, “Understanding Political Trauma and How It Can Shape Terrorism”
    • Marcus Irvan, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-Bar Experimentation”
    • Joslyn Isaac, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Differential Effects of Isoproterenol and Omecamtiv Mecarbil on the Contractile Properties of Unloaded Myocytes”
    • Hayden Jinright, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Complementary and Alternative Medicine Uses in Physical Therapy”
    • Zachary Jones, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies/anthropology, “Racism in Japan and its Effects on Japanese Society”
    • Garcia Jordan, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Integrated Computational Design of Tunable 3D CNT/Graphene Hybrid Nanomaterials”
    • Ned Katz, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Social Media and Depressive Symptomatology”
    • Ashley Keen, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-Bar Experimentation”
    • Josephine Kim, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Combining Natural Compound ß-glucan with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy to Promote Antitumor Immunity”
    • Justin King, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Computational Simulation of Ionic Liquids at Mesoscale with Accurate Prediction of Dynamics Using Coarse-Graining Approach”
    • Taylor Lewis, senior, College of Nursing, nursing, “Relationship Between Psychosocial Factors and Their Influence on the Intention to Breastfeed During Pregnancy”
    • Daniel Ma, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology/neuroscience, “Ganging Enzyme-Coated Microelectrode Sites Produces Greater Sensitivity to an Analyte in a Biosensor”
    • Ashley McGar, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Stressful or Traumatic Events and Self-Concept Among College Women”
    • Hillary McLean, junior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, dietetics, “Higher Unsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Aerobic Training Are Related to Lower Intramyocellular Lipid in Older Adults”
    • Timothy Melton, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “Foreign Direct Investment's Effect on Political Stability in Developing Countries: Solving the Endogeneity Problem”
    • Gregory Milburn, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, chemistry/biology, “Effects of Ethynylestradiol on Carotenoid Allocation”
    • Samuel Northrup, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “The Political Role of Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones”
    • Stephanie Obieroma, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “Republicans and the Art of Gerrymandering: A Match Made in Political Heaven?”
    • Alexander Parmley, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, English/philosophy, “The Impact of Vlogging on Modern Web Based Media”
    • Joshua Preston, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and During Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk”
    • Haley Reichenbach, senior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, equine science, “Comparison of DX613 Copper Sulfate Acidifier Footbath to a 5 Percent Copper Sulfate Footbath for Prevention of Digital Dermatitis Lesions in Dairy Cattle”
    • Alberto Rondon, sophomore, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, agricultural biotechnology, “Protein Engineering to Efficiently Degrade Carbohydrates for Biofuel Production”
    • Kevin Royal, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, physics, “Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields”
    • Abby Schroering, senior, College of Fine Arts, theatre and English, “Moments of Being: Escaping Performativity in Virginia Woolf”
    • Samantha Scott, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology/biology, “Triboelectric Potentiation of Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Alzheimer’s Disease”
    • Brock Sigler, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Trends for Success”
    • DaHee Son, senior, College of Fine Arts, art studio and arts administration, “Reference Points for Intimacy”
    • Sarah Stewart, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Perceived Peer Support on Depressive Symptoms in Victims of Bullying”
    • Tyler Stoffel, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Effects of Interlayers on Effective Moduli and Interfacial Stress Transfers of Graphene-polymer Nanocomposites”
    • Stephanie Strothkamp, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, neuroscience, “Brainwave Signatures for Detecting Malingered Neurocognitive Deficit (MNCD)”
    • Michelle Tam, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Inequality in Early Social Development: The Effects of Income on Infants’ Processing of Emotion in Bodies”
    • Ravyn Tanner, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Family Characteristics on Coping Strategies with Sexual Harassment in Adolescent Females”
    • Martha Tillson, senior, College of Social Work, social work/psychology, “Early Risk Behaviors as Indicators of Rural Women’s High-Risk Drug Use”
    • Benjamin Troupe, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, philosophy with minor in political science, “An Earth Ethic for the New Millennium: Investigating the Moral Status of the Natural World”
    • Olivia Utley, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Hungry House Sparrows: Communicating Need in Passer Domesticus”
    • Madeline Weltzer, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Maternal Exercise Alters Lipid Accumulation in Offspring”
    • David Willis, senior, College of Communication and Information Science, information communication technology, “Behavior Based Wireless Surveillance”
    • Sai Charaan Yalla, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology and neuroscience, “Cocaine Choice: Dissociating Preference From Intake”
    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsArtTheatreHealth SciencesNursingPublic HealthSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: UK will send 59 undergraduate student-researchers to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research at the University of Memphis April 6-8.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) — Paidin Dermody, a University of Kentucky journalism and English sophomore with a minor in photography, has been named the Kentucky Kernel's editor for the 2017-2018 school year.

    “I feel lucky — opportunity met preparation, and I now have the great responsibility of following a talented line of editors-in-chief to continue the storied history of the Kernel as one of the pre-eminent student publications in the country,” Dermody said in a Kernel story last week. “Good people and great journalism will deliver an evolved, enlightened and entertaining product to our readers.”

    The Kernel Board selected Dermody, currently the managing editor, "for her detailed plan to expand the Kernel’s digital footprint, while continuing to offer a weekly print edition formatted like the KRNL magazine, the Kernel’s once-a-semester fashion magazine," the story reported.

    Dermody will receive a $10,000 editor's scholarship funded by former editor-in-chief Jack Guthrie.

    News editor Kat Manouchehri was also a candidate for the editor-in-chief position, and will work alongside Dermody next year as managing editor.

    Paidin Dermody. Photo provided by Kernel photo staff.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A UK journalism and English sophomore with a minor in photography has been named the Kentucky Kernel's editor for the 2017-18 school year.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Kathryn Macon March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) The University of Kentucky Department of Arts Administration in conjunction with the College of Communication and Information is encouraging undergraduate students to venture out and capitalize on the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNET).   

    The program aims to provide a convenient way for students to receive the certification along with their current workload. Students enrolled in the program need only take four additional courses; two required classes and two electives that will prepare them for future entrepreneurial endeavors.

    “The iNET certificate offers our students a new way to think about their futures," said Rachel Shane, chair of the Department of Arts Administration in the UK College of Fine Arts. "When they start realizing that they can make a difference in their community through innovation and entrepreneurship, their options for careers expand.”

    To enroll in the program, students must contact their academic advisors to set up an appointment. To earn the certificate students must take:

    • COM 381: Communication, Leadership and Entrepreneurial Thinking;
    • EXP 455: Capstone Experience in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking; and  
    • two approved elective courses from an extensive list.

    Participation in this program also provides students valuable connections with other entrepreneurial thinkers, as well as local entrepreneurial mentors.

    “I encourage our students in Arts Administration to add the iNET certificate so that they can gain experiences working with students in different majors to accomplish like-minded goals,” Shane said.

    For more information on the Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking program contact Kimberly Parker, iNET academic director, at kimberly.a.parker@uky.edu.  

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts Administration

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Department of Arts Administration in conjunction with the College of Communication and Information is now offering undergraduate students the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking that will help prepare them for future entrepreneurial endeavors.   
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Lars Willnat March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) — Nine new members will join the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Friday, April 28. They will be inducted at a luncheon ceremony sponsored by the University of Kentucky’s School of Journalism and Media and the UK School of Journalism Alumni Association.

    The new inductees being recognized for their contributions to journalism are: 

    • Tom Butler, retired vice president of news for WPSD-TV in Paducah, a mentor to several outstanding broadcast journalists and an advocate of strong journalism during his 35 years there.
    • Lewis Conn and William Matthews, whose 1968 creation of the Newspapers Inc. chain changed the way Kentucky community newspapers were owned and published. (Conn is deceased and will be inducted posthumously.)
    • Ron Daley of Hazard, former editor and publisher of the groundbreaking Troublesome Creek Times in Hindman, now strategic partner lead for the Kentucky Valley Educational Cooperative.
    • Mike Farrell, professor of journalism at the University of Kentucky, director of its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and former managing editor of The Kentucky Post.
    • Bill Francis, retired reporter and anchor for WDRB-TV, who covered Louisville for 42 years and was the first full-time business reporter for a Kentucky television station.
    • Mary D. Ferguson, who became the first female reporter for Hopkinsville’s Kentucky New Era in 1962, then a columnist and the Pennyrile area’s unofficial historian until her death in 2016 (posthumous induction).
    • Bettye Lee Mastin, a retired Lexington Herald-Leader reporter and author whose writing about historic architecture helped lead to the preservation of many historic structures in the Bluegrass.
    • Joe Palmer, a Lexington native and UK graduate whose thoroughbred racing coverage for the New York Herald Tribune in the 1940s and 1950s was hailed by many contemporaries as the best (posthumous induction). 

    The nine honorees will join more than 200 other journalists and news-media executives who have joined the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame since its 1981 inception. Members are chosen by a committee representing the state’s news media, Hall of Fame members, the UK Journalism Alumni Association and the School of Journalism and Media, part of the UK College of Communication and Information. Nominees must be either Kentucky natives or journalists who have spent the bulk of their careers in the state.

    To reserve a seat for the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame induction luncheon on Friday, April 28, go to www.ukalumni.net/journalismhalloffame. For more information, call Cheryl Edwards at 859-257-1730. UK’s annual Joe Creason Lecture in Journalism, which has usually been held the same day as the luncheon, is now a stand-alone event. It will be held April 18 and feature Terence Hunt, recently retired deputy Washington bureau chief and senior White House correspondent for The Associated Press.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Lars Willnat, 859-257-1730 Summary: The nine honorees will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame at a ceremony on Friday, April 28.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden March 27, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 27, 2017) — Twelve students enrolled in the Chinese Media and Society course at the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media visited the Chinese capital city of Beijing from March 10 through March 20 as part of the study abroad requirement for the class. Students had the opportunity to visit and experience top media and high-tech venues, prominent college campuses, and world-renowned historical sites during the trip.

    It was an eye-opening and rare firsthand learning experience for the participants in sites visits and face-to-face interactions with media professionals involving organizations such as the China National Radio (CNR), a global leader in multi-platform broadcasting in the new media era; iQiYi, the most popular online video sharing site in China with their in-house studios whose programs are available via smartphones, PDAs, and conventional TVs; Beijing Language and Culture University Press, a niche university publisher in multi-format delivery of educational content to a global audience; Huanqiu.com, a popular news site in China that exerts a voice to a global base of readership; and Baidu, often nicknamed China’s Google and a world leader in incorporating artificial intelligence in its breakthrough apps and inventions.

    Students also visited top-ranked Chinese universities such as the Communication University of China (CUC) and Tsinghua University, and had lengthy conversations with their Chinese counterparts on a wide range of issues and topics from campus life, journalism and media practices, to personal hobbies. Among popular tourist hotspots, the students went to the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, the Summer Palace, the Temple of Heaven, and various sites for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The group also had the unbeatable experience of enjoying Beijing roast duck at the world-famous Quanjude Restaurant in the busy commercial street of Wangfujing

    "Visiting China was an amazing experience in so many different ways," said Morgan Lloyd, a broadcast journalism major in the school. "Not only did we all gain a better cultural understanding of China, but by visiting the different media businesses we were able to compare and contrast the media industry in China versus the United States. The people we interacted with gave invaluable insight that will benefit all of the students' understanding of global media."

    The faculty director of the program is Zixue Tai, an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Media.

    “The United States and China will have vital roles to play on the global stage in the 21st century," Tai said. "For students of media and communication, it is critically important to develop an intimate and firsthand understanding of China as they prepare for a career to rise to the evolving challenges and emerging opportunities. There is no better place to start that process than Beijing, a city that spans a history of over 3,000 years and lies at the center of China’s ongoing cultural and economic transformation."

    This is the first time that a study abroad program targeted China as its destination in the UK College of Communication and Information, of which the School of Journalism and Media is a unit. The trip has been co-sponsored by the UK Confucius Institute and the Division of Confucius Institute Development at Beijing Language and Culture University.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students had the opportunity to visit and experience top media and high-tech venues, prominent college campuses, and world-renowned historical sites during the trip.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 22, 2017) — “How to Be Ethical in the Age of Fake News,” the next program in the “Challenges to Journalism” series created by the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media, will feature one of the profession’s most important voices on ethics.

    Andrew Seaman, the chair of the Ethics Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), will discuss how the assault on truth and the news media requires ethical behavior.

    The program begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 22, in Woodward Hall in the Gatton College of Business and Economics. Light refreshments will be available before the event.

    Seaman, the senior medical journalist for Reuters Health in New York City, served on the Ethics Committee when the Code of Ethics was revised during 2013-2014.

    At the conclusion of the process, he was named the committee chairman. He led the effort to make the code interactive for the first time. Members of the Ethics Committee compiled supporting documents to expand the explanation of the code’s principles. The goal is to increase understanding, and therefore adherence, to the Code of Ethics.

    “Ethical journalism is clearly defined by the SPJ Code of Ethics, a standard used throughout journalism,” said Lars Willnat, director of the School of Journalism and Media. “This is a great opportunity for our students and faculty to continue our discussion of the threats to journalism with one of the leading voices for ethical journalism.”

    The program is being sponsored by the school, which is part of the UK College of Communication and Information, the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, the UK chapter of the Society of Professional Journalism and the Bluegrass SPJ chapter.  

    SPJ is the largest professional organization of U.S. journalists. It ethics code — available at www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp — has been translated into eight languages.

    Before his current assignment with Reuters, Seaman covered health policy and the White House from its Washington, D.C., bureau. He was previously a contract writer with USA TODAY.

    His undergraduate degree was earned at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. As a scholar at the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, Seaman earned his master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City. He currently sits on its alumni board.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Andrew Seaman, chair of the Ethics Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists and senior medical journalist for Reuters Health, will speak about how to be ethical in the age of fake news today at 6 p.m.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Hale Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 20, 2017) The University of Kentucky Libraries, along with co-sponsors from the School of Information Science, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the School of Art and Visual Studies and the student organizations ACM-W (Association of Computing Machinery Women's Chapter) and LISSO (Library and Information Science Student Organization), will host an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon today (Monday), March 20. The event, which individuals may drop by for any period of time, will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

    This international event is designed to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and to encourage female editorship. The edit-a-thon will include tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials and refreshments. People of all gender identities and expressions are invited to participate, particularly transgender and cisgender women.

    In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10 percent of its contributors identify as female. A lack of female participation has led to a dearth of content about women and art in Wikipedia, but Art+Feminism’s edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art- and feminism-related subjects. Since 2014, over 280 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thons have taken place across the world, creating and improving an estimated 4,600 articles.

    This will be the second Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the University of Kentucky. The first was held in March 2015, during which participants created or updated articles about regional artists including Adele Brandeis, Ann Stewart Anderson and Jane Burch Cochran.

    This year, the UK Libraries edit-a-thon will continue to add and improve articles about female artists from Kentucky, many of whom currently have no Wikipedia entry, or whose current entries are brief stubs. The Little Fine Arts Library will bring specialized works from their collection to aid researchers at the edit-a-thon, such as reference books on women artists, exhibition catalogues, and historic dictionaries of artists and notable women in Kentucky.

    The UK Libraries Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Abbye Allan, Ida Sell, Karyn Hinkle, Melissa Adler and Kathryn Lybarger. They are excited to bring attention to underrepresented artists from the region and to help make the world’s most popular online encyclopedia a more inclusive source.

    For more information on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at UK, contact art librarian Karyn Hinkle at karyn.hinkle@uky.edu.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: This international event, designed to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and to encourage female editorship, will run from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today, at Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 13, 2017) For the third year in a row, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team has placed second at the Kentucky Forensic Association State Championship Speech and Debate Tournament. This competition tests students in 13 public speaking events and two forms of debate. Students from UK won four of the championship titles across these events, setting a new team record for best performance.

    This year, 10 teams from across the Commonwealth met at Owensboro Community and Technical College to compete for the state championship in speech and debate including Western Kentucky University, the current national champions. At this tough competition, the team from UK placed second in the grand champions sweepstakes division, second in the public speaking sweepstakes division for large schools, second in the parliamentary debate sweepstakes division for large schools, and second in the public debate sweepstakes competition for large schools.

    “I’m so proud of all of these students,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “Each year, they keep getting better and better. I’m continually moved by the passion and dedication they show for their speeches and the issues for which they’re advocating.”

    In addition to the team sweepstakes awards, five individuals placed in the individual sweepstakes competition, which combines scores from all of a competitors public speaking events. Junior Rachel Brase placed third, sophomore Matt Karijolic placed fourth, sophomore Veronica Scott placed fifth, junior Kaylon Kennedy placed sixth, and freshman Laura McAllister was awarded top novice. Brase was also elected the student president of the Kentucky Forensic Association. Team members earned another six qualifications for the National Forensic Association national tournament and Scott earned a qualification to the Interstate Oratorical Association nationals.

    The full list of awards earned by UK competitors is available here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Students from UK won four of the championship titles across these events, setting a new team record for best performance.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: For the third year in a row, the UK Speech and Debate Team placed second at the Kentucky Forensic Association State Championship Speech and Debate Tournament. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Jordyn Comitor Thursday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2017) — Laura Ungar, an investigative journalist with 26 years of reporting experience, is coming to the University of Kentucky on Monday, March 20, to address students in the College of Communication and Information about the current journalistic climate and the need for more high-impact journalism.

    Joined by her colleague Sujoy Dhar, the pair will give a lecture, "Making a Global Difference: The need for high-impact journalism in the world’s largest democracies." The lecture will focus on the importance and practice of journalism in two rapidly changing democracies and the need for more in-depth media, particularly in regards to investigative, health, environmental and other high-impact journalism that makes a difference.

    The lecture will take place at 10 a.m., March 20, in the Niles Gallery on the first floor of the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center. The lecture is free and open to the public. Following the lecture, the two will visit a set of journalism classes focused on investigating and reporting and a health communication class to discuss how technology is transforming medicine.

    Ungar met Dhar in 2007 while on a month-long fellowship in India. They found common ground over their shared experiences going to universities and talking with students, which spurred their working relationship. In 2009, they began traveling to universities together to discuss the need for global connection and understanding in the media between developed nations like the U.S. and developing ones like India. Ungar and Dhar have visited the University of Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky University and Bellarmine University among others in the Kentucky/Indiana region as well as universities in New Delhi and Kolkata, India.

    Ungar is currently based at the Courier-Journal in Louisville and is a member of USA TODAY’S national investigative team. She specializes in health care investigations and has previously worked on stories about lead in water, cervical cancer in India and prescription drug abuse in Kentucky. She has won more than 30 national, regional and local awards along with six fellowships.

    Dhar is a senior journalist and editor of an independent news service in India and was a former correspondent with Reuters. In addition, he freelances for many media outlets around the world such as The Washington Times and the Global Times. He specializes in the environment, health, human rights, geo-politics and human interest stories. 

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Journalist Laura Ungar, based at the Louisville Courier-Journal and a member of USA TODAY’S national investigative team, and Sujoy Dhar, senior journalist and editor of an independent news service in India and former Reuters correspondent, will speak at UK on March 20. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney and Kody Kiser Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Mar. 9, 2017) — On Feb. 28, the University of Kentucky Alumni Association held a dinner to honor this year’s recipients of the Great Teacher Award. Six UK professors have been named winners of the award for 2017:

    Since 1961, when the program was started, 283 faculty members have been honored as Great Teachers. The award holds special significance for the winners, because it is entirely student nominated. It is the oldest, continuously-given award for teachers at the University of Kentucky. Recipients are selected by a committee appointed by the UK Alumni Association’s Board of Directors and representatives of the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa. In addition to the awards dinner, the winners received a plaque, a cash stipend, and were recognized at center court on the floor of Rupp Arena during this season’s final home UK men's basketball game.

    On this episode of "Behind the Blue," each of the 2017 Great Teacher Award winners discuss what it was like to be presented with this honor, their teaching philosophies, their thoughts regarding their students here at UK, and more.

    Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” when they're released. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

    If you have questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email us at BehindTheBlue@uky.edu, or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationHealth SciencesMedicine

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Kody Kiser
    kody.kiser@uky.edu
    859-257-5282 Summary: This week's "Behind the Blue" podcast gets to know the 2017 Great Teacher Award winners at UK.Media Embed: <iframe style="border: none" src="//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/5148961/height/90/width/640/theme/custom/autonext/no/thumbnail/yes/autoplay/no/preload/no/no_addthis/no/direction/backward/no-cache/true/render-playlist/no/custom-color/0033a0/" height="90" width="640" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Dominique Page Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2017)  Only one week remains before the March 15 deadline for the inaugural Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship being awarded by the University of Kentucky Libraries.

    Students who have completed projects demonstrating information literacy skills and the effective use of library resources are considered well-rounded applicants for this scholarship. Submissions are encouraged from all disciplines and may include: a documentary, performance or studio art project, recorded presentation in any field or discipline, or a written essay. 

    A cash prize of $1,000 will be awarded to the student winner. The winner and their faculty sponsor(s) will be honored at a special event in the spring.

    Eligibility for this award requires students meet the following criteria:

    • current full-time undergraduate enrollment status at the University of Kentucky;
    • projects must be original work, not previously published, and not co-authored;
    • completion and submission of an original research project for a UK credit-bearing course or for a faculty mentored project, in any format or medium; and
    • projects must be completed during the time period from the beginning of the spring 2016 semester to the submission date during the spring 2017 semester.

    Applicants applying for the Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship, must submit the following by March 15:

    • an application cover sheet;
    • a project abstract (250-300 words);
    • a 750-1000 word reflective essay;
    • a final version of the project including a complete bibliography in a standard publication style consistent with the discipline; and  
    • a supporting statement from their faculty sponsor(s).

    All application material should be emailed to Matt Strandmark at mstrandmark@uky.edu.

    For more information about the timeline, general criteria, and submission requirements, see the UK Libraries Dean's Award Guide at http://libguides.uky.edu/UGRA.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArt MuseumArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLibrariesNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Only one week remains before the March 15 deadline for the inaugural Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship to be awarded by UK Libraries.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team won the first Tri-State Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament held at Gateway Community and Technical College. Thirteen schools from Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina and Tennessee gathered in Florence, Kentucky, for the competition. UK placed first in the combined sweepstakes division, which totals points earned for each team from both the speech and debate events. UK also placed first in the speech events sweepstakes and second in debate sweepstakes.

    In total, competitors from UK earned top awards in nine of the 14 events offered at the tournament including winning both divisions of parliamentary debate. Sophomore Matt Karijolic also placed first in the individual sweepstakes competition and was awarded the title of tournament champion. Much like the team sweepstakes competition, individual sweepstakes totals all of the points earned by a competitor from all of their public speaking events. Team members from UK earned five of the six awards in this category. Junior Rachel Brase placed second, senior Sam Northrup placed third, junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, and freshman Laura McAllister earned top novice in individual sweepstakes.

    “It was a great way to conclude our regular season this year,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “We’ve had a wonderful year so far. Now we have two weeks to finish preparing for nationals.”

    A full list of awards earned by UK competitors can be found here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    The team’s next competition will be the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament and Convention held at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, March 21-25.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website at www.ukforensics.com

    In total, competitors from UK earned nine of the 14 events offered at the tournament including winning both division of parliamentary debate. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team concluded its regular season by winning the Tri-State Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Ashley Murphy Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 7, 2017) Being able to apply what is learned in the classroom in a real-world setting is one of the most valuable experiences that a student will have during their college career. The University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) and Education Abroad encourages students to apply their education on a global scale, by offering students the opportunity to travel to China on four different trips, including a new trip during spring break that will host its first group of students this upcoming March.

    The four trips include Education in Chinese Culture, Chinese Conversation, Young Leaders Understanding China for Gaines Center Fellows and Media and Culture in China, which is a new program offered this year to students in the College of Communication and Information. Each trip gives students a unique and different educational experience, for example, in the case of Media and Culture in China, students will engage in face-to-face interactions with professionals from U.S. media outlets such as The New York Times, CNN and The Wall Street Journal, to learn about reporting on China to American audiences. 

    Student engagement and understanding of Chinese culture, history and contemporary life is essential to helping lay out a strong foundation for a successful professional career, and to know the relationship between the United States and China. “The Sino-American relationship is perhaps the most strategically important relationship of the 21st century. UKCI and Education Abroad are doing its best to enhance that relationship through generous opportunities it provides highly-motivated UK students,” said Philip Harling, interim director of UK Honors College and director of Gaines Center, who co-led one of the trips to China last summer.

    Each trip values the engagement of professionals currently in the field with students, so they can best learn how to practice in their chosen field from a global perspective, and continue to grow as a student. Those who have traveled in the past described the experience as eye opening and that the trip has left a lasting impact on their educational efforts and life. “This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and I am so grateful to have visited our largest Eastern neighbor,” said international studies senior Kaylee Hicks, of Versailles, Kentucky, who traveled to China through the Young Leaders trip last summer. “China is shockingly different from home, but I am already thrilled to know another corner of the world to be a little more in tune with what the rest of the planet experiences.”

    Hicks is just one of the countless students who has personally been impacted by participating in a trip to China, and many more will get this kind of experience in the upcoming trips. Education Abroad has seen an increase in applications and student interest for the trips to China offered in the summer, while the Media and Culture China trip offered during spring break has 12 students planning to travel to Beijing this March.

    UK Confucius Institute and Education Abroad support trips to China in order to encourage student engagement and an enlarged outlook of China. Each trip targets different interest and offers learning experiences for all students. “If you are serious about learning the Chinese language in addition to experiencing its culture and history, these are your programs,” said Liang Luo, associate professor of Chinese studies.

    For more information on each trip visit, Media and Culture in China, Education in Chinese Culture and Chinese Conversation.

    If you’re interested in these trips, contact seanjmcclure@uky.edu.

    A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, UK Confucius Institute provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth. To keep up with UK Confucius Institute and future events, join the institute's listerv and follow them on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat (UKConfucius).

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Confucius Institute and Education Abroad encourages students to apply their education on a global scale, by offering students the opportunity to travel to China on four different trips, including a new trip during spring break.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Gail Hairston, Amy Jones-Timoney, and Kody Kiser March 1, 2017Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2017) ― Six University of Kentucky educators were named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2017 Great Teacher Award Tuesday night.

    The recipients are:

    • Richard Andreatta, College of Health Sciences - Communication Sciences and Disorders
    • Gitanjali Pinto-Sinai, College of Dentistry - Restorative Dentistry
    • Jeff Reese, College of Education - Educational, School and Counseling Psychology
    • Michelle Sizemore, College of Arts and Sciences - English
    • Nathan Vanderford, College of Medicine - Toxicology and Cancer Biology
    • Sherali Zeadally, College of Communication and Information - Information Science

    Award recipients were honored at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner last night at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington. They were also recognized during the Vanderbilt vs. Kentucky men’s basketball game last night.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    Andreatta is an associate professor in the Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) and in the Rehabilitation Sciences Doctoral Program, both located within the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences in the College of Health Sciences. He is also a faculty associate with the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center at the UK Medical Center. Currently, Andreatta serves as the director of undergraduate studies for the CSD program and as the director of graduate studies for the Rehabilitation Sciences Doctoral Program.

    Andreatta is also director of the Laryngeal and Speech Dynamics Lab. This shared facility contains several specialized hardware and software systems for testing, recording and analyzing orofacial sensory perception, orofacial muscle force, vocal tract aerodynamics, and trigemino-facial brainstem-level evoked reflexes. Other capabilities of the lab include stroboscopic laryngeal imaging (ridged and flex-scoping), EGG, acoustic analyses of speech, and respiratory kinematics. 

    Andreatta received his doctorate in speech physiology and neuroscience in 1999 from Indiana University, Bloomington. Postdoctoral work in animal laryngeal neurophysiology was completed at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda.

    Pinto-Sinai is an assistant professor in the UK Division of Restorative Dentistry of the College of Dentistry. She received her dental training and DDS from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo in 2001. She completed a two-year general practice residency program at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Connecticut. After six years in private dental practice in New York and Chicago, she relocated to Lexington.

    She began her career as a dental educator at UKCD in 2009. After three years as a part-time faculty member she accepted a full-time position in 2012. She divides her time between clinical and pre-clinical instruction of student dentists. She is the course director for a dental simulation lab course which focuses on the restoration of teeth with dental crowns. She also continues to practice as a general dentist at the UKCD Faculty Practice Clinic.

    In addition to serving as a formal mentor to students, Pinto-Sinai is the faculty advisor for the Delta Sigma Delta (DSD) dental fraternity. She volunteers with DSD and the Hispanic Student Dental Association, both providing dental treatment and supervising student dentists treating uninsured patients at the Mission Lexington Clinic in downtown Lexington.

    Reese is professor and chair of the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology in the UK College of Education. He received his doctorate from Texas A&M University in 2000. Reese’s research interests are psychotherapy process/outcome, psychotherapy supervision and training, and telehealth. His current research is focused on investigating the process of client feedback and the use of technology to provide counseling services to underserved populations. 

    He currently serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, and Psychotherapy. Reese teaches Counseling Techniques I, Supervision and Consultation, and Practicum. His theoretical orientation is grounded in a psychodynamic-interpersonal process approach that draws upon cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused, and family systems strategies. He is a licensed psychologist in Kentucky.

    Sizemore is an assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of English. She earned her doctorate at the University of Wisconsin. She received the 2015 Outstanding Teaching Award, with special recognition for excellence in teaching large courses. Her success in the large classroom has fostered shifted attitudes in the English department from initial concern about undertaking large lecture courses to a recognition of the potential benefits of such classes.

    Sizemore teaches American studies, English and social theory. Her academic and research interests lie in the fields of colonial America, literary theory, political theory, time studies, affect studies, literature and para-religion, and literature and science.

    To date, her writing has encompassed invitational reviews and book chapters, and journal articles. However, her first book is scheduled for publication in August 2017. “American Enchantment: Rituals of the People in the Postrevolutionary World” investigates the phenomenon of “enchantment” through social and political rituals and literary and cultural discourses. She notes that writings of the post-revolutionary period recognize the role of people as “not simply a flesh-and-blood substance but also a quasi-mystical force.”

    Vanderford is an assistant professor in the Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, assistant director for research in the Markey Cancer Center and assistant dean for academic development in the College of Medicine. He earned his doctorate at the University of Kentucky with a postdoctoral fellowship at Vanderbilt University.

    Vanderford’s research interests include epidemiology and molecular etiology of lung cancer, research administration, technology transfer and entrepreneurship, and science pedagogy and career development. One of his most recent publications (in the Journal of Research Administration) detailed a case study at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center focused on enhancing faculty productivity through a centralized communications and project management infrastructure. In another article published by Science in July 2016, Vanderford described the unusual paths he took to secure a nontraditional faculty position at UK. Vanderford secured his initial opportunity at the Markey Cancer Center as a science writer and editor and, from there, he took on leadership roles that contributed to his transition into a unique tenure-track faculty position. 

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctorate in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    The 2017 Great Teachers (L-R) Sherali Zeadally, Gitanjali Pinto-Sinai, Nathan Vanderford, Richard Andreatta, Michelle Sizemore, Jeff Reese. Photo by Tim Webb. Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationDentistryEducationHealth SciencesMedicine

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Six University of Kentucky educators were recently named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2017 Great Teacher Award.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Connie Sapienza Feb. 28, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2017) In keeping with University of Kentucky tradition, a student will be selected to speak at each of the four UK Commencement ceremonies this May.

    Since doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients will now be recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Students receiving a doctoral, master's or undergraduate degree in December 2016, May 2017 or August 2017 at the May 2017 Commencement ceremony interested in speaking must submit their application by Monday, April 3. Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three-five minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages. In addition, applicants must have contributed to the university through campus, community activities or through their chosen field of study and show evidence of demonstrated public speaking ability. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the selection committee. The committee may contact any applicant for a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

    Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

    To accommodate rising numbers and to provide a better experience for UK graduates and their families and friends, the university will hold four ceremonies over the course of two days. All four will be held at Rupp Arena.

    Friday, May 5:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; College of Communication and Information; College of Public Health; The Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; The Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m. - College of Business and Economics, College of Health Sciences, College of Fine Arts, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy

    Sunday, May 7:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Arts and Sciences; College of Social Work; College of Design 
    • 2 p.m. - College of Education; College of Engineering; College of Medicine

    Read more about the May 2017 Commencement schedule here.

    All May graduates should register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

    Jared Scott speaks at the May 2016 Commencement ceremony.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in years past. Students interested in speaking must submit their application by Monday, April 3.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Feb. 22, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 22, 2017) — Interiors graduate student Marissa Wilson and finance and accounting December graduate Omer Tariq won the University of Kentucky Venture Challenge with their idea for i-Remember, a website and app to help connect, communicate and form personal relationships with people who have memory problems. They will share $1,500 in scholarship prize money and will represent UK at the state competition in April.

    Placing second on Saturday at the William T. Young Library auditorium was Kai Zhang, a second year doctoral student in pharmacology. Zhang won $1,000 for Welcome Home, a service to assist international students in finding housing before they arrive in the United States.

    Third place and $500 went to the UNi Software team of Xi “Bill” Chen, biochemistry and statistics; Tom Johnston, communication and media studies at Georgetown College; Charles Smith, mechanical engineering; and Randall Smith, English. They are developing an app that will unify higher education communication through a personalized platform.

    All three winning teams will go on to Idea State U, the state competition.

    “I want to congratulate these three winning teams, all of whom were participants in the UK Venture Studio Entrepreneurial Bootcamp this past fall,” said Warren Nash, executive director of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship. “I also want to commend each of the teams competing in the UK Venture Challenge. These teams came from varied academic backgrounds within UK and exhibited great passion for their ideas. The judges provided very valuable feedback, which I hope all of the teams will utilize as they continue their entrepreneurial journey.”

    Chandni Joshi, a chemical engineering student at the UK Paducah Campus, won $50 for the most online votes. Her venture is The Sustainable Products Company.

    Other students in UK Venture challenge included:

    • Team GreatJob! – Josh Cochran, accounting and finance; and Will Hibbard, economics;
    • Team Impact LEX – Olivia Burkett, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce;
    • Team Pacific Peach – Alex Carrabre, management and marketing; and
    • Team Radventurous Rewards  – Logan Jones, finance.

    Judges included: Jo Ellen Hayden, engineering and industry/government senior manager, Bluegrass Angels; Dan Hollingshead, founder/CEO, Connected Patients; and Joe Noonan, sales leader and entrepreneur/investor, Bluegrass Angels.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    The Venture Challenge sponsors are: the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Two talented UK students won the UK Venture Challenge with their idea for i-Remember, a website and app to help connect, communicate and form personal relationships with people who have memory problems. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) — The University of Kentucky is rooted in history from its esteemed alumni to its storied basketball program. Just take a quick walk through campus and it won’t take long to spot a vintage, copper signpost sharing a story of the university’s past. One such piece of history, lesser known to the average student or alumnus, but deeply rooted and just as prestigious, is the Tournament of Champions put on by the Kentucky Debate program.

    Founded in 1972 by J.W. Patterson, the Tournament of Champions (TOC) is regarded as one of the most prestigious high school speech and debate tournaments in the country. Held on UK's campus at the end of April each year, the TOC hosts the fiercest high school speech and debate competitors from across the country. In last year’s tournament over 900 students competed from 36 different states and four different countries, including China. 

    In 2012, the National Speech and Debate Association (NSDA) founded NSDA China, which oversees the domestic operations of the speech and debate organization in China: a burgeoning extracurricular activity for students. The NSDA is the largest speech and debate organization in the United States with the largest network of professional coaches and school members.

    This summer, Dave Arnett, director of the UK Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, and director of the Tournament of Champions, traveled to Shanghai, China, to meet with representatives of NSDA China about the future of their organization and to begin tournament preparations.  

    One of those aspirations was to host their own Tournament of Champions.

    On his trip, Arnett had a brief meeting with the vice president of NSDA China, Jeff Zhu, where they discussed future plans, including hosting a Tournament of Champions in China and all that it would entail. Arnett was encouraged by China’s enthusiasm.

    “A TOC seemed like the next piece of the puzzle for them,” Arnett said.

    However, as English-speaking debate is relatively new in China, he saw this project as part of a five-year plan, so to speak. After all, China sent their first students to Lexington to compete in the TOC just two years before his meeting with NSDA China over the summer.  

    But lo and behold, a mere six months later, the first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai Jan. 22-24.

    Nearly 150 students from some of the best high schools in China competed in this three-day event. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.

    “It was a very exciting and successful event that opened the door for more collaborations between China, the debate team and the university at large," Arnett said.

    While relatively small in size, with just around 5,000 English-speaking debaters, the potential for NSDA China is incredibly large. In the next two years, the organization hopes to double in size, and they believe that bringing the TOC to China as a yearly event will help to increase those numbers.

    A key component of NSDA China’s growing numbers are their esteemed coaches, all of whom are American.

    “The American coaches are an important marketing strategy for them, because they are trying to sell their brand to parents who want to send their children to American universities,” Arnett said.

    A significant amount of the schools that NSDA China works with are international schools where the students are native English speakers and over 90 percent of the league’s debaters will come to American universities.

    “Students that choose to pursue their education in America are often fascinated by the history and culture of the United States and adapt pretty seamlessly to both the new environments and the debating styles,” Arnett said. “And because most of them come from international schools, they are already native English speakers.”

    The US Tournament of Champions will be held April 29–May 1, 2017 at UK.

    For more information on the Tournament of Champions, visit www.uktoc.com.  

    The first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai last month. of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK helped host the first international Tournament of Champions (TOC) in Shanghai last month. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) Nathan Stevens, media officer in the  University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, is often sought out for his expertise in media and electronics. Not only by the college, but also by companies across the U.S.

    Last semester, he was one of the first individuals to try out the new "Skylanders Imaginators" video game, a must-have toy for the holiday season. Stevens runs a video game and movie review website and the company reached out to him before launch. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company. His creation: Connor Meow. A cat, of course. The game was later named a 2016 Best Family Game in the Game Critics Awards.

    In the College of Communication and Information, he produces media and helps direct the CI Collective, a technology usability lab where students and faculty work together to test emerging technologies. The primary purpose of the CI Collective is to support interdisciplinary research on human-computer interaction and related areas in understanding how people use communication technology and learn from information systems.

    Technology developers might have one use in mind, but consumers of all ages may find that a technological device may be used to fill a separate and distinct need. Research conducted in the CI Collective will help determine how users interact with technology.

    Stevens has made sure to connect his contacts in the video game and electronics industry to the college and UK students. In addition to being college media officer, he teaches MAS 435, "The History of Video Games and The Industry," and gives an overview of the industry and an examination of the technological advances in both software and hardware.

    In one lecture, he had a representative from Bethesda Softworks LLC, a large computer entertainment software company, Skype in to the class. Several of Stevens' connections have also reached out to get involved in the usability lab.  

    Stevens recently attended the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, where he sought out new technology and contacts for usability testing and research. This year’s show had a lot of focus on virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and the 360-degree camera.

    Stevens said the industry seemed to know that VR and AR are here to stay, not only in an entertainment capacity, but also for storytelling and marketing usage. "The health technology was also intriguing with different ways to maintain your own health at home without really the need for doctor intervention, on a smaller less urgent level of self-checkups," he said. "All in all, it was quite an amazing show with a lot of neat gadgets on display. A geek’s dream."

    Nathan Stevens was one of the first individuals to try out the new Skylanders Imaginators video game. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Nathan Stevens, media officer in the UK College of Communication and Information, is bringing his experience and connections in the video and electronics industry to UK students.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 14, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media will host a discussion, "The Cure for Fake News Disease: Truth and Fairness," with journalists on Wednesday, Feb. 15. The program is set for 3-4:30 p.m. in the Maggie Room of the Enoch Grehan Journalism Building.

    The event is part of the school's "Challenges to Journalism" series. It will be a panel discussion among two of the state’s most accomplished political journalists; a faculty member who has been a newspaper editor and helped start radio stations; and a conservative critic of Kentucky news outlets. They will explore whether the meanings of fairness and balance in journalism have changed, or need to change.

    Panelists will be:

    • John Stamper, politics and government editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader;
    • Joseph Gerth, metro columnist and former political writer for the Courier-Journal;
    • Kakie Urch, associate professor of new media and former Gannett Co. editor; and
    • Richard "Rick" Nelson, conservative media critic and director of the Commonwealth Policy Center.

    The panel will be moderated by Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, associate extension professor in the School of Journalism and Media, political columnist for the Courier-Journal and former national president of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

    The program is co-sponsored by SPJ’s campus chapter and the Department of Communication. The School of Journalism and Media and the Department of Communication are part of the UK College of Communication and Information.

    Refreshments will be available. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Accomplished political journalists, a UK faculty member and a conservative media critic will discuss fairness and balance in journalism at UK tomorrow.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Gail Hairston Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Committee on Social Theory hosts public lectures and faculty presentations throughout the academic year, including lecture series each fall and each spring, that give the public access to lectures by international scholars visiting the university campus.

    The College of Arts and Sciences’ noteworthy Social Theory Spring Lecture Series is created by a teaching team. Each of the instructors of the team invites an esteemed academic to lecture on a topic that intersects with both social theory and with the topic of that semester's course theme.

    This spring’s theme is “The Archive,” and team members include Melissa Adler of the School of Library and Information Science; Mónica Díaz of the Department of Hispanic Studies and Department of History; James Ridolfo of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and Richard Schein of the Department of Geography.

    This Spring Lecture Series schedule includes:

    Kimberly Christen, Washington State University

    “Sovereignty in Practice: Digital Archives and Technologies of Protest”

    2 p.m., Feb. 17

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

    Archives have their origins in assertions of state power. Colonialism thrived on the simultaneous fiction of the erasure of natives from the landscape and their memorialization in the archival memory of the nation. Current technologies shine a light on the long history of documentation and discovery used to uphold and validate violence, removal and conquest. Christen will examine how community digital archives, archivists as activists, and the practices of local archival documentation undo this colonial erasure through the purposeful use of technologies of protest.

     

    Jorge Camizares-Esguerra, University of Texas at Austin

    “On Archives, Imperial Historiographies, and Forgotten Epistemologies”

    2 p.m., March 10

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    Michelle Caswell, University of California, Los Angeles

    “Past Imperfect: Imagining Our Way Out of Annihilation in Archives”

    2 p.m., April 14

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    All Social Theory lectures are free and open to the public. The spring lecture series is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and the Special Collections Research Center of UK Libraries. 

    The Archive: Social Theory Spring Lecture SeriesOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Friday's speaker for Social Theory's Spring Lecture Series is Kimberly Christen of Washington State University. She will discuss how archives can be the reflection of state power. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2017) — Have you written or produced a story that just cries out for recognition? Then we have a contest for you. The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information is seeking entries for its seventh annual David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards.

    The award honors the best in Kentucky storytelling — stories that enlighten and inform while capturing the attention of the audience. Storytellers can inspire a heart or break it. Entries may be hard news, features, advocacy journalism, personality profiles, columns and even obituaries. No matter the form, the story should be well-developed and free from errors, possess sound journalistic mechanics and exhibit high ethical standards.

    Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 

    The student award is open to UK journalism majors for work published or completed through student media, at an internship or at any recognized media outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website). 

    Work published during 2016 is eligible for the 2017 awards. Entries for the award will be accepted through March 3, 2017, at this web address: https://ci.uky.edu/jat/webforms/david-dick-storytelling-award.

    The school established the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award to honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.

    “The School of Journalism and Media is all about telling great stories,” said Lars Willnat, director of the school. “This contest is a special way to recognize the career of one of the better storytellers of his generation and to encourage today’s storytellers.”    

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1987 and the UK Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He earned both his undergraduate and master’s degree at UK. After retiring from CBS, he taught in the school before becoming its director from 1987 until 1993.

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Feb. 8, 2017) The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22. While the tournament was named for the infamous feud between two families on the Kentucky-West Virginia border, the competition was friendly but fierce. Schools from seven states as far away as Michigan and Georgia traveled to UK for the tournament.

    The Saturday half of the tournament was named the McCoy Invitational and was hosted by UK. To help facilitate the tournament, the upperclassmen from UK’s team did not compete, but helped with other tournament hosting duties. UK’s freshmen class did compete and had a very successful tournament. Laura McAllister and Alec Foust placed fourth and fifth in quadrathon, a category which takes the cumulative total of all points earned in all the events in which a student competes. McAllister and Foust also won improvisational duo and took second in duo interpretation. Will Brennan was the top speaker in public debate and Josh Finley placed second in persuasive speaking.

    On Sunday, Marshall University took over to host the Hatfield Invitational, and UK’s full team participated in the competition. UK placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University. Junior Kaylon Kennedy and sophomore Matt Karijolic won duo interpretation, Kennedy also won program oral interpretation, Karijolic placed second in rhetorical criticism, sophomore Veronica Scott won persuasive speaking and broadcasting, and senior Sam Northrup placed second in impromptu speaking. In total, the team qualified another five events for nationals.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Kentucky Forensic Association state tournament held at Owensboro Community and Technical College in Owensboro, Kentucky, Feb. 17-18, 2017.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website at www.ukforensics.com.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HealthCareBy Allison Perry Feb. 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2017) – Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall.

    Much of Lowy's visit focused on research. During the morning session, nine UK faculty members gave presentations on major research initiatives and programs at Markey, ranging from efforts in cancer prevention and control to drug development and discovery. Major topics of discussion centered around the cancer types which affect Kentuckians the most: lung cancer, colon cancer, cervical cancer/HPV and the hepatitis C virus, which is linked to liver cancer.

    After meeting with a group of UK Markey Cancer Center junior faculty members, Lowy learned more about the UK HealthCare enterprise and its support of Markey from Dr. Michael Karpf, executive vice president for health affairs. Lowy finished the day with a tour of clinical space in UK Chandler Hospital's Pavilion A – future home to Markey's Hematology and Blood & Marrow Transplantation inpatient floor – and a dedicated cancer research lab in the UK College of Pharmacy.

    "We were honored to have Dr. Doug Lowy visit us today at the UK Markey Cancer Center to learn more about our patients and the research we do here," said Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center. "It was a wonderful opportunity to engage with the NCI, and with Dr. Lowy, so that they better understand some of the difficulties we have in delivering care to our patient population."

    Kentucky is home to the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the country, a major health problem that Markey is dedicated to change. In July 2013, Markey received a prestigious NCI designation, which allows the center access to more research funding, trials, and treatments.  

     

     

    NCI Interim Director Dr. Doug Lowy visited the UK Markey Cancer Center on Monday to learn more about research and patient care. of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationMedicinePharmacyPublic HealthMarkey Cancer Center

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Allison Perry
    allison.perry@uky.edu
    (859) 323-2399 Summary: Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Feb. 1, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2017) — Lexington Youth Soccer Association’s (LYSA) TOPSoccer was awarded the inaugural top honor at this year’s University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information CIS 112 Service Learning Thank You Breakfast.

    Held each year in December, this breakfast serves as a thank you to all the service le­­­­arning organizations that partner with the CIS 112 course, an accelerated communication and composition class at UK with a service learning component that requires students to complete 10 hours of community service over the course of the semester.   

    This year, for the first time, TOPSoccer received an award for its commitment to welcoming and engaging UK students. Many of the UK students who work with TOPSoccer for their course requirement complete more than the 10 required service hours and will often continue to work with the organization well after the course has ended.

    Janice Birdwhistell, the former development director and chief of staff for the College of Communication and Information and avid TOPSoccer volunteer, accepted the award on behalf of TOPSoccer.

     “TOPS is very honored by the award,” Birdwhistell said. “Volunteers are invaluable to our program and we could not exist without them.”

    TOPSoccer (The Outreach Program for Soccer) is a community-based soccer program designed to meet the needs of young athletes with physical, developmental and/or intellectual disabilities. US Youth Soccer, the nation’s largest youth sports association, started this organization in 1991 with the goal to improve the overall fitness, self-esteem and social skills of these athletes.

    “TOPS is a great service program. It gets students involved in the community, but it also connects them to a specific community that they would not have gotten to know otherwise,” said Sam Asbell, a CIS 112 student who volunteered with TOPS last semester. 

     TOPSoccer’s Lexington program began in 2009 under the leadership of Birdwhistell’s daughter Jessie, then a graduate student at UK. She worked with various youth sports associations like the Lexington Youth Soccer Association and the Kentucky Youth Soccer Association (KYSA) for initial support and funding, as well as garnering support and volunteers from various businesses and individuals in the Lexington community. 

    “We love working with CIS 112 and love having their students volunteer with us,” Janice Birdwhistell noted. "TOPSoccer is a labor of love for our volunteers, and our goal is to pass that love on to the CIS 112 students that choose to work with our program.”  

    Janice Birdwhistell, right, accepted the College of Communication and Information's award on behalf of TOPSoccer.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK College of Communication and Information honors organizations that partner with the college's service learning course.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium on Saturday, Feb. 18 to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete.

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture on Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Special thanks to our sponsors: the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Jan. 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library's UK Athletics Auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium Saturday, Feb. 18, to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community.  The entrepreneurs evaluate the students' presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete:

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Other sponsors are the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Friday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Jan. 13, 2017

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchThe Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Casis Thursday

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: The Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis Jan. 5, 2017

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 20, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 16, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 14, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk information. Another tip Sutton gives to public communicators and emergency managers: use the hashtag that has surfaced so that messages are “in one stream of information.”

    “The message content makes a real difference, but the style in which it’s delivered also makes a difference,” she said.

    Before the 9/11 attacks, disaster scholars focused primarily on natural and technological hazards. Technological hazards include such things as nuclear events, like the Three Mile Island accident, train crashes, and train derailments with chemical spills — all having long-term impacts on communities.

    But after 9/11, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), which oversees responses to federal disaster declarations, was absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security.

    “And that really changed the nature and the shape of disaster response as well as disaster research,” Sutton said. Now scholars study a wider range of event types.  

    The practical implications of Sutton’s research has allowed her to meet with practitioners — including those from the National Weather Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to offer research-based guidance, helping them build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. And by contributing to their success, she continues to help people directly impacted by disasters get the information they need in the most effective way.    

    This video feature is part of a monthly series called "see discovery: The People Behind Our Research." The videos, produced by REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Over the past several years, Twitter has become a crucial tool in emergency response and crisis communication. UK's Jeannette Sutton has collected and analyzed millions of these tweets. As director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, she offers research-based guidance, helping practitioners build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk information. Another tip Sutton gives to public communicators and emergency managers: use the hashtag that has surfaced so that messages are “in one stream of information.”

    “The message content makes a real difference, but the style in which it’s delivered also makes a difference,” she said.

    Before the 9/11 attacks, disaster scholars focused primarily on natural and technological hazards. Technological hazards include such things as nuclear events, like the Three Mile Island accident, train crashes, and train derailments with chemical spills — all having long-term impacts on communities.

    But after 9/11, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), which oversees responses to federal disaster declarations, was absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security.

    “And that really changed the nature and the shape of disaster response as well as disaster research,” Sutton said. Now scholars study a wider range of event types.  

    The practical implications of Sutton’s research has allowed her to meet with practitioners — including those from the National Weather Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to offer research-based guidance, helping them build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. And by contributing to their success, she continues to help people directly impacted by disasters get the information they need in the most effective way.    

    This video feature is part of a monthly series called "see discovery: The People Behind Our Research." The videos, produced by REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Over the past several years, Twitter has become a crucial tool in emergency response and crisis communication. UK's Jeannette Sutton has collected and analyzed millions of these tweets. As director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, she offers research-based guidance, helping practitioners build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 5, 2016) Jessica Waters, the University of Kentucky sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.

    She was recently awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter. The award recognizes service by an individual or group of young people who demonstrate outstanding commitment to the community through direct financial support, development of charitable programs, volunteering and leadership in philanthropy.

    Waters, a UK College of Communication and Information sophomore studying integrated strategic communication, founded Cupcakes for Camp in 2010 and began organizing the sale of cupcakes and other baked goods in her community of Beavercreek, Ohio. Her goal was to pay the fees for children wanting to attend camps designed specifically for adolescents with epilepsy, just as she did. 

    Since then, Waters has raised well over $15,000, allowing numerous children with epilepsy to attend summer camps.

    In June, she was awarded the Stars of Service Award by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the President’s Volunteer Service Award Gold Medal, which included a congratulatory letter from President Barack Obama, at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

    Read more about Waters and her service: UK Student's Diagnosis Leads to Life of Service, Presidential Recognition.

    Jessica Waters recently received the the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Jessica Waters, the UK College of Communication and Information sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Dec. 5, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 5, 2016) Jessica Waters, the University of Kentucky sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.

    She was recently awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter. The award recognizes service by an individual or group of young people who demonstrate outstanding commitment to the community through direct financial support, development of charitable programs, volunteering and leadership in philanthropy.

    Waters, a UK College of Communication and Information sophomore studying integrated strategic communication, founded Cupcakes for Camp in 2010 and began organizing the sale of cupcakes and other baked goods in her community of Beavercreek, Ohio. Her goal was to pay the fees for children wanting to attend camps designed specifically for adolescents with epilepsy, just as she did. 

    Since then, Waters has raised well over $15,000, allowing numerous children with epilepsy to attend summer camps.

    In June, she was awarded the Stars of Service Award by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the President’s Volunteer Service Award Gold Medal, which included a congratulatory letter from President Barack Obama, at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

    Read more about Waters and her service: UK Student's Diagnosis Leads to Life of Service, Presidential Recognition.

    Jessica Waters recently received the the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Jessica Waters, the UK College of Communication and Information sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Deb Weis Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2016) University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition, will be Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at William T. Young Library's auditorium.

    Venture Challenge provides an opportunity for students from every college to pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would. Students gain valuable contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through Venture Challenge.

    Prior to pitching, students develop their ideas into a business concept and prepare a three- to five-page written proposal. Venture Challenge is open to all UK undergraduate and graduate students with an innovative idea for a start-up, existing business, or nonprofit venture.

    Online registration opens Jan. 17. Interested students should fill out the Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    “The UK Venture Challenge is a great opportunity for students to hone the skills needed to start or be involved in the earliest stages of a company,” said local entrepreneur Randall Stevens, CEO of ArchVision. “These are skills that will serve them well no matter where their careers take them.”

    Stevens also serves as co-chair of iNET, or Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, the UK organization that puts on Venture Challenge.

    The three winning teams share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    Sponsors of Venture Challenge include the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Contact Deb Weis for more information, and to receive the 2017 Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    UK students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Online registration opens Jan. 17 for the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition. Three winning teams will share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Deb Weis Nov. 30, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2016) University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition, will be Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at William T. Young Library's auditorium.

    Venture Challenge provides an opportunity for students from every college to pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would. Students gain valuable contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through Venture Challenge.

    Prior to pitching, students develop their ideas into a business concept and prepare a three- to five-page written proposal. Venture Challenge is open to all UK undergraduate and graduate students with an innovative idea for a start-up, existing business, or nonprofit venture.

    Online registration opens Jan. 17. Interested students should fill out the Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    “The UK Venture Challenge is a great opportunity for students to hone the skills needed to start or be involved in the earliest stages of a company,” said local entrepreneur Randall Stevens, CEO of ArchVision. “These are skills that will serve them well no matter where their careers take them.”

    Stevens also serves as co-chair of iNET, or Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, the UK organization that puts on Venture Challenge.

    The three winning teams share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    Sponsors of Venture Challenge include the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Contact Deb Weis for more information, and to receive the 2017 Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    UK students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Online registration opens Jan. 17 for the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition. Three winning teams will share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Rebecca Stratton and Trey Furnish Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2016) Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie — a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, senior University of Kentucky Dance Team member Jordan Shellhaas.

    Meet Jordan Shellhaas, a senior integrated strategic communication major on the UK Dance Team! Shellhaas has been dancing since the age of 3 and decided that UK's dance team was a dream of hers during her junior year of high school. As she prepares for her final semester at UK, she shares what her experience has been like dancing on the sidelines of UK games and as a student, as well as offers advice to incoming freshmen in her "see blue." #selfie.

    UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

    Jordan Shellhaas: Senior integrated strategic communication major.

    UK: Where are you from?

    JS: Louisville, Kentucky.

    UK: Being a senior on the dance team, what leadership responsibilities do you have?

    JS: The leadership opportunities vary from making up routines for us to perform at games, leading practices and holding everyone accountable.

    UK: How many years have you been on the UK Dance Team?

    JS: Four.

    UK: When did you decide that being on UK's dance team was a goal for you? 

    JS: My junior year in high school.

    UK: What do you find most rewarding about being on the UK Dance Team?

    JS: I like getting to see the progression the girls make in just over a year. It's cool to see.

    UK: What else are you involved in? 

    JS: I am a sister in Chi Omega sorority as well as an active member in the American Marketing Association and Public Relations Student Society of America.

    UK: Do you have plans post-graduation?

    JS: Either dancing for a cruise line or working for a public relations firm out of the country.

    UK: What is a typical week like for you being on this team?

    JS: A life in the week of Jordan on the dance team is making sure to manage my time well due to practices, games and any other events.

    UK: Do you dance at football and basketball games?

    JS:  Yes.

    UK: What has been your favorite thing about being on the team thus far?

    JS: I have liked getting to meet and get close with so many amazingly talented girls. They are more than teammates; we are a family.  

    UK: Have you had any embarrassing moment during a game or competition? 

    JS: The most embarrassing thing I've done was forgetting a part in a dance. But, I feel like that's something only I noticed so it wasn't that bad.

    UK: How do you prepare for competitions and how many do you have a year?

    JS: We have one competition a year over winter break. We stay in Lexington and practice every day. We get a four-day break for Christmas, then it's back to Lexington where we practice every day until our competition in January.

    UK: Did you dance growing up?

    JS: Yes, since I was 3 years old. I didn't dance competitively until middle school.

    UK: When you wake up in the morning, what's the first thing you do?

    JS: Brush my teeth.

    UK: How long does it take you to get ready for a game or competition?

    JS: About an hour.

    UK: Who's your favorite artist? 

    JS: I don't have one. I just love music in general.

    UK: Who's your role model? 

    JS: My parents because they not only taught me the importance of pushing myself to be the best version of myself, but they also embody that same characteristic.

    UK: What is your biggest fear?

    JS: Never getting married.

    UK: What's your spirit animal?

    JS: The Grinch, Tigger and Amanda Bynes in "She's the Man."

    UK: What is your favorite color? 

    JS: Blue.

    UK: What is your most used social media channel?

    JS: Instagram. Follow me @jordan_shelfort.

    UK: Have you ever had a secret admirer?

    JS: No, I wish I was cool enough to have one.

    UK: If you could have a super power what would it be?

    JS: Oh man. That is tough! Transporting. I like that. I want to be able to transport anywhere in a second.

    UK: What's your favorite restaurant in Lexington?

    JS: Local Taco or Planet Thai.

    UK: How do you think the skills you have learned from the UK Dance Team will help lead you through life?

    JS: It has taught me a great deal of time management and understanding that everyone doesn't always agree. So now, it's easier for me to accept other ideas and opinions because there will never be a time where everyone thinks the same way.

    UK: If you could go back to freshman year, what advice would you give yourself?

    JS: Take every moment in because before you know it, it will be time to graduate.

    "see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Rebecca Stratton
    rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
    859-323-2395 Summary: Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! Up this week, senior Dance Team member Jordan Shellhaas. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2016) — University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information Department of Communication Chair Elisia Cohen was honored as the 2016 Mayhew Derryberry Award recipient at the Public Health Education and Health Promotion Awards luncheon in Denver, Colorado, earlier this month.  

    The award, named after dedicated public health service officer Mayhew Derryberry, was designed to recognize exceptional reach and impact of research conducted by faculty in the field of health promotion, health education and health communication. Cohen’s 13 years of health communication research, specifically focusing on cancer prevention and control, made her an excellent candidate for the award.

    “I was really honored to receive the award,” Cohen said. “There are certainly people in the field of health communication and health promotion who receive recognition for the volume of their scholarship, and while there might be other people who produce more scholarly articles or reports, I like to think that my research has a large impact and that my work in communication specifically can extend the reach and effectiveness of health promotion and health communication activities. I think this award was really recognition of that.”

    Unbeknownst to her, Cohen was nominated for the Mayhew Derryberry Award by a group of her friends, colleagues and former students. The award was presented to Cohen at the luncheon in Colorado by her former student, Katie Head, who has gone on since her time as Cohen’s student to become an assistant professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

    Cohen insists that were it not for the group efforts of the teams she worked with to further her cancer prevention studies, her research would not stand as successful as it does today. Beyond her collaborations with colleagues in the Department of Communication, she is a member of the Markey Cancer Center and has enjoyed collaborations with Robin Vanderpool and Richard Crosby of the College of Public Health, Jenna Hatcher in the College of Nursing, and Mark Dignan in the College of Medicine. 

    “Without those collaborations, really there would be no recognition," she said. "I’ve had the good fortune to work with excellent researchers in health and medicine who are interested in moving the needle on their impact from a communication perspective."

    Cohen is also a recipient of the 2014 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award, sponsored by the UK Women's Forum and the 2009 and 2012 College of Communication and Information Excellence in Research Award. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK College of Communication and Information Department of Communication Chair Elisia Cohen was honored as the 2016 Mayhew Derryberry Award recipient at the Public Health Education and Health Promotion Awards.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Staff Report Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2016) According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kentucky is vulnerable for an HIV outbreak based on intravenous drug use. Out of 220 counties in the country that are at risk, 54 of those counties are located in Kentucky. Lisa A. Brown, director of student and multicultural affairs in the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, says that although these numbers are startling, we are not powerless in reversing these trends.

    Brown, an avid playwright, is using her artistic skills to bring attention to Kentucky’s vulnerability of an HIV epidemic. She will debut her most recent production, "Positively Unbreakable," on World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center in Lexington. The play will run through Dec. 3.

    "Positively Unbreakable" is the fictitious, but riveting story of a married woman who is expecting her first child. Fearing that she is experiencing complications from the pregnancy, she and her husband discover that she is HIV positive. Interwoven within the storyline is an intravenous drug user whose path has indirectly crossed with the expectant mother. The play also explores the issues of teenage promiscuity and peer pressure, homophobia, and the growing population of senior adults who are contracting HIV.

    “I enjoy writing about issues that people are grappling with daily, whether it’s loss of a job, a strain in a relationship, or learning that you have been diagnosed with an illness," Brown said. "My objective is to provide hope in what may seem like a bleak situation."

    Brown says she was commissioned in 2011 to produce a skit focusing on HIV after being approached by Maxine Thomas, director of the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, who was sponsoring a women’s empowerment conference. After writing and producing the skit, Brown didn’t give any more thought to the production until late last year.

    “I awakened one morning and I felt an urgency to revise the script without fully understanding why.”

    Brown wasn’t aware at the time that the CDC would issue a report outlining Kentucky’s risk for an HIV outbreak based on the increasing number of intravenous drug use.

    In what she terms as combining the arts with advocacy and activism, Brown hopes that "Positively Unbreakable" will help educate Kentuckians about their risk for contracting HIV. She will be partnering with the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, which instituted a clean needle exchange program. The health department will share information about their program with theater patrons. Brown is also partnering with AVOL (AIDS Volunteers) Inc. Both of these organizations will provide free, confidential HIV screenings during a health fair an hour before the play begins.

    Velma Grant, president of the Frankfort/Lexington (KY) Chapter of the Links Incorporated and one of the actors in "Positively Unbreakable," hopes to reach a large audience with this production.

    “It is relevant to me because a national initiative of the Links is to educate our community on the incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS," she said. "We want the African-American community to know how this disease can be prevented.”

    "Positively Unbreakable" stars Nieta Wigginton, a Lexington native whose prior stage credits include, "Blues for an Alabama Sky," "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," "Oak & Ivy" and "U.S. vs. Fear." Joining Wigginton on stage is Whit Whitaker, UK music performance and arts administration alumnus. Whitaker has performed in "To Kill a Mockingbird," "Crumbs from the Table of Joy," "Don Quixote" and "The King and I." "Positively Unbreakable" also features UK music performance sophomore Clark Janell Davis, who reigned as the 2015-2016 Miss Kentucky. She recently performed in the UK Opera Theatre’s production of "Ragtime."

    Tickets for "Positively Unbreakable" are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. They are available by calling the Lyric box office at 859-280-2218, online at www.lexingtonlyric.com, or on site at 300 E. Third St. A portion of the proceeds will be used to benefit AVOL.

    For more information, contact Lisa A. Brown at 859-492-3036.

    "Positively Unbreakable," by Lisa Brown, runs Dec. 1-3, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts AdministrationMusic

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK School of Journalism and Media's Lisa A. Brown will debut her latest production, "Positively Unbreakable," starring a UK student and alumnus, on Dec. 1, at the Lyric Theatre.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Rebecca Stratton Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie — a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, College of Communication and Information Ambassador Michael Ayers.

    Michael Ayers is a 2016-17 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information ambassador. Now a junior journalism major, Ayers uses his position as ambassador to be an informative, encouraging guy for prospective students. Ayers firmly believes that if you keep trying, eventually everything will fall into place. And that’s what’s happening for him. Learn more about this UK CI ambassador in his "see blue." #selfie!

    UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

    Michael Ayers: I am a junior and I am a journalism major.

    UK: Where are you from?

    MA: Fort Thomas, Kentucky.

    UK: Tell me about your position in the College of CI.

    MA: I am an ambassador in the College of CI, and basically we go to locations in the nation, that the university has selected and we recruit individuals to the University of Kentucky and the college. 

    UK: When did you decide that being an ambassador was something you’d want to do?

    MA: To be honest, out on the TV screen in Grehan I saw people's faces, and I always wanted to know how to do that, and they said you have to be an ambassador. So I became an ambassador. I wish someone freshman year found a kid like me and was like “you need to be here.” I wanted to be that guy, the guy I wish I had. I wanted to go to Preview Nights and tell them they needed to be here. Be the push.

    UK: What else are you involved in? 

    MA: I am news director for WRFL and I’m a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity. 

    UK: What are some cool things you got to do as an ambassador this fall? 

    MA: I would say one cool thing was before school we met and got to meet with the dean and the faculty. They are awesome and so personable. During K Week, we got to get a group of students and help them plan where they wanted to go based on their interests.  Being able to influence them and push them toward their goals was unique and different and cool in a way. And the preview nights were cool too. 

    UK: Did you all do any preparing during the summer? 

    MA: We had a meeting last semester outlining all we were going to do. We had a breakfast and just went over all the majors, how to interact with people, what to do in different situations and emails to send. 

    UK: Which staff member has made a positive impact on your time here at UK?

    MA: I would say Schyler Simpson, 100 percent. I had her in a CIS class freshman year and she looked at me and said “you need to be an ISC major.” I refused and refused, and I took a paper to her office and she fixed it and tried to recruit me to be ISC. It showed that she cared and they are trying to find good students for their majors. 

    UK: What made you decide to come to UK?

    MA:  The truth is, I never visited — I just came.  I wanted to play small school football. It came to the final day at Highlands, my high school, and I just chose UK. My dad asked me why. I loved Lexington, I wasn’t too far but far enough and be at college. I knew I wanted to buy into wherever I ended up,  so I thought UK! I like blue, I like Lexington ,so I went here and three years later I'm sitting in this chair. 

    UK: As an ambassador, what impression do you hope to leave on those you’re recruiting?  

    MA: So, when it comes to CI, we are the first representation that prospective students have. When I am trying to recruit people to come, they are going to walk away thinking I’m either informative or not what they are wanting to hear. I am hoping that each person can walk away feeling like I was informative. 

    UK: What would you sing at karaoke night?

    MA: It’s hard not to go with Bon Jovi's "Living on a Prayer." 

    UK: If you had a warning label, what would it say?

    MA: Warning High Energy

    UK: What’s your most embarrassing moment at UK? 

    MA: In JOU 302 I did weather for the first time. The camera said roll, and I was a deer in the headlights. I didn’t know what to do. I said it was 55 degrees and it was like 80 degrees. I walked back into the studio and my teacher just looked at me and said “we have some things to work on.” 

    UK: What was your favorite Halloween costume growing up?

    MA: I am going to say Woody, from "Toy Story." 

    UK: What’s your favorite candy?

    MA: Jolly Ranchers. 

    UK: Being an ambassador, I’m sure there are plenty of incoming Wildcats that have questions for you that are not necessarily about academics, but I bet they are wondering about campus life too. These are some questions a senior in high school has for you: If you could go back to freshman year what advice would you give yourself?

    MA: To relax. Take a deep breath and relax. 

    UK: What about UK made you want to stay here, even after your freshman year?

    MA: To be honest, I think that was a characteristic inside. Dale Mueller, my high school football coach, taught us to never quit. I wasn’t going to switch schools or drop out even though I wasn’t finding my niche yet. I was always told to keep going, keep trying and eventually it could fall into place. And that’s what’s happening.

    UK: Think back on your first day as a freshman, was your first day as scary as everyone made it seem?

    MA: No, but I felt like I was at camp as I was just getting into the dorms and you haven’t had your first class; you’re with your roommate and you want to know when your next activity is. 

    UK: Are you constantly busy, or are you able to have lazy days?

    MA: I have lazy days. I do. But, my busy days must be a majority of my life. 

    UK: Is college just like high school?

    MA: No. Heck no. It’s what you make it, I think, It’s what you put into it. If you buy into it, you’ll get a big return. If you want to go through the motions that’s what your outcome is going to be. 

    UK: Do you ever get home sick?

    MA: Absolutely.

    UK: Were you able to decide on your major before you got to college, or did you change it? 

    MA: I was not, I came in undecided and I wanted to go the business route, so I took those classes. Freshman year showed me everything I didn’t want to do in my life, so I went back to broadcasting like I did in high school and started with journalism. 

    UK: Do you have a plan for what you want to do after you graduate?

    MA: No.

    UK: Would you say that your transition from high school to college was easy?

    MA: No. I'd say it was a lot to take in. Advice - have an open mind in the transition. Don’t fight what’s about to hit you in the next year to four. 

    UK: Where do you see yourself in five to 10 years from now? How does that differ than what you imagined in high school?

    MA: Five to 10 years. So, I will be 26 in five years. I plan on being not in Kentucky and not in Ohio. Somewhere away. On my own. Everything- I want to be paying for it. I feel like in order to be on your own you have to move away completely and be an independent person. I think you really find yourself when you’re on your own, too. 

    "see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Rebecca Stratton
    rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
    859-323-2395 Summary: Michael Ayers is a 2016-17 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information ambassador. Learn more about this junior majoring in journalism in his "see blue." #selfie!
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2016) — The news media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential election is the focus of a public panel discussion Tuesday at the University of Kentucky, sponsored by the UK student chapter and the Bluegrass chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

    “The 2016 Presidential Election: What Did Journalists Get Right?” will feature veteran journalists, people with political experience and a researcher with political expertise.

    The program will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Room 122 of the White Hall Classroom Building, next to the Patterson Office Tower. The university community and general public are invited. Parking is available in Parking Structure #5, between Limestone and Upper streets.

    “Every presidential election brings new media strategies from the candidates and their party machinery,” said Mike Farrell, professor of journalism and co-advisor of the SPJ campus chapter. “And every campaign presents new challenges for journalists.”

    The panelists will be journalism professor Al Cross, an election analyst for Kentucky Educational Television and a contributing columnist for The Courier-Journal, where he was political writer; David Hawpe, former  Kentucky Kernel editor, longtime reporter and editor of The Courier-Journal and now a UK trustee; Les Fugate, senior vice president for RunSwitch PR, who worked as an aide to former Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson; and Lars Willnat, director of the UK School of Journalism and Media, whose research includes media effects on political attitudes, theoretical aspects of public opinion formation, and political effects of global communication.

    Retired EKU journalism professor Liz Hansen, the president of the Bluegrass SPJ chapter, will moderate the discussion. Hawpe, Cross and Hansen are inductees of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    The program is open to the public and the university community. The goal is to help make better sense of what happened on Election Day after a long, bitter campaign and to help journalists and the public better understand journalism’s role in the process.

    “We’ve never seen a candidate with the media expertise of Donald Trump. He racked up untold millions of dollars of free coverage with his phone calls to political programs and his tweeting,” Farrell said. “At the same time, journalists were covering the first woman nominated for president by one of the major political parties, and she was being dogged by constant revelations from WikiLeaks.”

    “We believe these are terrific panelists, and this should be an informative and fascinating discussion,” he said.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The panel will feature veteran journalists, people with political experience and a researcher with political expertise who will explore journalism's role in the presidential election. The discussion takes place at 7 p.m. tonight in White Hall Classroom Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Nov. 11, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 11, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team won the prestigious Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament. This award is given each year to the team with the greatest number of sweepstakes points from all current and past iterations of the tournament combined.

    This traveling sweepstakes award is the first such achievement in the history of the UK Forensics team. Most team awards are based entirely on the performance of the students at a single competition. To win a traveling sweepstakes award, a team has to perform consistently well over the course of years to be victorious. In this case, UK has been attending the Chief Justice Invitational since the fall of 2013.

    “This award is not just a testament to the hard work of this year’s students, but is a recognition of the talent and dedication of every competitor who’s ever been a member of our team,” Director of Forensics Timothy Bill said. “Each year, these amazing students have continued to build on the successes of those who came before them. For a team that’s only in its fifth year of competition, they have an awful lot to be proud of.”

    The Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award trophy will remain at UK until next year’s competition when it will be returned to Marshall University and awarded to the next championship team. After winning the title, a team’s points are reset to zero and the accumulation of sweepstakes points begins anew. The previous recipient of this award was Western Kentucky University, the reigning national champions.

    At this year’s tournament, UK placed second in combined sweepstakes, second in the individual events sweepstakes, and was the second place Pi Kappa Delta chapter at the competition. Sophomores Matt Karijolic and Veronica Scott placed third and fourth in the individual sweepstakes competition. Both of these finishes are UK firsts at this tournament. Competitors from UK earned the following awards at this competition:

    Team Sweepstakes

    • Champions – Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Combined Speech and Debate Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Individual Events Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Pi Kappa Delta Chapter

    Individual Sweepstakes

    • Third place – Matt Karijolic
    • Fourth Place – Veronica Scott

    After Dinner Speaking

    • Third place – Matt Karijolic

    Broadcasting

    • Fourth place – Megan Wagner
    • Fifth place – Veronica Scott

    Drama Interpretation

    • Sixth place – Veronica Scott

    Duo Interpretation

    • Fifth place – Kaylon Kennedy and Rachel Brase
    • Sixth place – Kaylon Kennedy and Matt Karijolic

    Extemporaneous Speaking (Novice)

    • Fouth place – Josh Finley
    • Fifth place – Will Brennan

    Impromptu Speaking

    • Second place – Megan Wagner
    • Fourth place – Veronica Scott

    Improvisational Duo

    • First place – Will Brennan and Josh Finley
    • Top novices – Will Brennan and Josh Finley

    Parliamentary Debate (Novice)

    • Semifinalists – Will Brennan and Josh Finley

    Parliamentary Debate (Varsity)

    • Second place – Matt Karijolic and Veronica Scott
    • Semifinalists – Kaylon Kennedy and Rachel Brase
    • Sixth place speaker – Veronica Scott

    Poetry Interpretation

    • Sixth place – Laura McAllister

    Program Oral Interpretation

    • Third place – Kaylon Kennedy

    Public Debate

    • First place speaker – Sam Northrup

    Rhetorical Criticism

    • First place – Matt Karijolic
    • Fourth place – Rachel Brase

    The University of Kentucky Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the WYRD Invitational speech and debate tournament held at Transylvania University in Lexington, on Dec. 2-3.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in twelve public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    UK Forensics Team at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team won the prestigious Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament.
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    The UK College of Communication and Information recently held a disaster communication workshop to address the most pressing issues in that field. 

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    A recent study by Allison Scott, assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information, examines how the quality of communication among family members and care givers impacts end-of-life decisions. Scott says family communication holds a great deal of potential for improving end-of-life health care.

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    The UK College of Communication and Information hosted a Professional-Amateur Networking Day Oct. 29 at the Hillary J. Boone Center to prepare soon-to-be graduates for their postgrad life. 

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    First Generation students at the UK College of Communication and Information recently took a journey through time when they explored the history of the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley. 

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    "Ballot Bomb: Exploring the Young Voter Explosion," a KET documentary by Buck Ryan, professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Information, explores the question whether young voters can swing the U.S. Senate race in Kentucky. 

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    Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman, the world's largest public relations firm, will deliver the 2014 James C. Bowlling Excellence-in-Residence lecture on Oct. 21 at the UK Singletary Center Recital Hall. 

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    Journalism students at UK have the unique oppportunity this semester to learn the ins and outs of political writing and reporting from two seasoned political journalists during one of the country's most hotly debated senatorial races. 

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    Beth Barnes, professor and director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, recently led a workshop at the Rural Doctors Association of South Africa 2014 conference. 

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    The UK Venture Challenge competition allows graduate and undergraduate students to show off their innovative and entrepreneurial spirit and gain real world experience.

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    The School of Journalism and Telecommunications is celebrating 100 years of journalism education at UK. 

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    Two faculty members from the Information Communication Technology Program at the UK College of Communication and Information recently published research exploring social media deception and how methods to detect it might be used on a broad scale. 

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    The UK Forensics Team, a public speaking and debate student organization housed within the College of Communication and Information, competes with teams all across the nation in 12 public speaking events and three forums of debate. 

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    The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center at the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications annually recognizes individuals outside the journalism profession who work to uphold or expand First Amendment freedoms. 

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    UK faculty members from the UK College of Arts and Sciences and the UK College of Communication and Information led a series of college teacher training workshops at Qingdao Technological University in China from July 14 through Aug. 1, 2014. 

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    Buck Ryan, of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Infomration is publishing an aticle on journalism education in a prestigious research journal on Chinese culture. 

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    The award is presented annually to honor and recognize a young alumna or alumnus who is an active member of the UK Alumni Association and who has worked on behalf of young people through the university, the association, their alumni club or in the local community.

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    The Kentucky Kernel, UK's daily student newspaper, has announced new staff for 2014-15.

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    Jeff Johnson, award winning television journalist, social activitst, political correspondent,  motivational speaker, and author will visit UK April 22.

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    Media consultant Mervin R. Aubespin will deliver the 37th annual UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications' Joe Creason Lecture April 29 in the Worsham Theater.

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    At noon April 18, in Chandler Hospital Pavilion A auditorium, Beth Barnes, director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, will discuss the school’s partnership with a media training organization in Zambia to raise the standard of reporting and use journalistic techniques to provide information on HIV and AIDS.  

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    Three UK undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneur teams won a total of $19,000 at the Cabinet for Economic Developmpent's Idea State U competition last weekend.

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    UK's top undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneurs will compete for a share of $100,000 against 25 teams from across the state at Idea State U, April 11-12 at the Lexington Convention Center.

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    Seven new members will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Tuesday, April 29, at a luncheon ceremony sponsored by the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications Alumni Association.  

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    The UK forensics team placed 14th in the nation at the Pi Kappa Delta National Comprehensive Tournament held March 20-23 at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus in Indianapolis.

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    Douglas Boyd, professor in the Department of Communication at the UK College of Communication and Information will receive the 2014 Broadcast Education Association's (BEA) Distinguished Education Service Award at the BEA's annual convention ceremony in Las Vegas in April.

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    Priority registration for the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication to be held April 11-12 is now open.

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    The UK Forensics team recently placed third in the annual Kentucky Forensics Association championship speech and debate tournament.

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    The undergraduate team Shouter and graduate team MosquitoTech were the winners of the third annual UK Venture Challenge student entrepreneur competition.

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    Information communication technology is a fast emerging field expected to rise over the next 10 years with most job categories reflecting double-digit increases.

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    Student participants in the 3rd Annual UK Venture Challenge Saturday, March 1, are competing for $3,000 in scholarship prizes and the opportunity to represent UK at the state competition in April.

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    Students will have the opportunity to participate in a set of educational workshops offered by the UK College of Communication and Information this summer that are uniquely designed for those looking to enhance their careers as professionals and as educators.

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    Student entrepreneurs still have time to register for the UK Venture Challenge competition on March 1.

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    Award recipients will be honored at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner Tuesday, March 4. 

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    The inaugural Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising and Media scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, has been postponed due to inclement weather.

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    The Integrated Strategic Communication program in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Information will host the inaugural Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising & Media.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is a competition which allows student entrepreneurs to present their ideas for a new innovation, product or service to a panel of judges for a chance to win a $3,000 scholarship prize and the right to represent UK at the state competition.

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    UK journalism Associate Professor Buck Ryan traveled to Moscow State University last semester to explore ways that UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunications might work with Russia's most prominent journalism program.  

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    Eric Hauck, CEO/President of Equinext LLC, will talk about the 10 Misconceptions about Business Plans from 5 - 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at the- James. F. Hardymon Theater in the Davis Marksbury Building.

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    First-year College of Communication and Information students will be offered the opportunity to be part of UK's Living Learning Community for the first time in the fall of 2014.  

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    Students from 31 high schools representing 10 states in the region recently participated in UK's annual high school debate tournament, the Ohio Valley Invitational.

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    Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunications was recently honored by the Kentucky Psychological Association for his contributions to the health and mental health of Kentuckians. 

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    The UK Honors Program and the Citizen Kentucky Project will host a Kentucky Senate candidate forum for a special election to replace Kathy Stein in the 13th state Senate District.

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    Students in the iNET Living Learning Community discover that thinking like an entrepreneur will not only help them in the future, but also helps them day to day to be better students. Twenty freshmen from 16 majors and six colleges make the iNET LLC their campus home currently in Patterson Hall but moving to Champions Court I next year.

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    The UK College of Communication and Infomration held its 14th annual Awards Dinner recently honoring outstanding faculty, staff, alulmni, and past award recipients. 

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    The UK Venture Challenge allows students to show off their innovative and entrepreneural spirt while getting real world experience competing.

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    Facination with the Zombie Apocalypse is preparing students in the College of Communication and Information in crisis communication preparation and prevention. 

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    UK College of Communications and College of Library and Information Science merged in 1993 to form what is now the College of Communication and Information.

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    The Bowling Lecture honors James C. Bowling, the late retired assistant chairman of Philip Morris Companies Inc.

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    Al Cross, director of Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at UK was recently interviewed by the Washington Post blog The Fix. 

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    Beth Barnes, professor and director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications in the UK College Communication and Information, has been appointed to serve on the Advertising Technical Committee at the Zambia Institute of Marketing. 

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    John Nelson, executive editor of the Danville-based Advocate Communications will be honored with the Al Smith Award for public service through community journalism during a dinner in Frankfort Nov. 16.

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    There’s an app for that.  A new iOS app developed in part by University of Kentucky researcher Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles will assist health care professionals seeking help communicating with patients during difficult conversations.

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    Come out for apple pie and lemonade as UK celebrates Constitution Day on Tuesday, Sept. 17.

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    David Wheeler, doctoral student at the UK College of Communication and Information, wrote an article on automated voice systems that was recently published on CNN's website.

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    Buck Ryan receives teaching award after completing a two-week summer course sponsored by the Confucius Institute.

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    Ryan will speak about the importance of engaging young voters in the 2014 midterm elections, especially the U.S. Senate race.

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    Video games often come under heavy fire for being both physically and mentally unhealthy for children and adults alike, but one UK professor is focusing his research efforts on how video games can be used to promote fitness and a healthy weight.

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    For many, talking to a celebrity is an once-in-a-lifetime experience.  For University of Kentucky alum Sharon Johnson, however, it's what she does on a daily basis.  As a CBS News/Newspath-Entertainment Producer, her job is to interview Hollywood stars about their upcoming projects. The Somerset native says her time at UK provided her with the experience and skills needed to build rapport with even the most famous celebrities.  

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    For many, talking to a celebrity is an once-in-a-lifetime kind of experience.  For University of Kentucky alum Sharon Johnson, however, it's what she does on a daily basis.  As a CBS News/Newspath-Entertainment Producer, her job is to interview Hollywood stars about their upcoming projects. The Somerset native says her experience at UK provided her with the experience and skills needed to build rapport with even the most famous celebrities.  

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    Sujin Kim, an associate professor of biomedical informatics at the University of Kentucky, has been chosen to receive UK's first Academic Planning, Analytics and Technologies Internal Grant Award.

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    A study about creativity in advertising, co-authored by Mark Stuhlfaut, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, was recently published in Advertising Age, one of the two major publications in the advertising field. 

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    UK Perspectives airs at 8:35 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

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    Ashley Scoby, a UK journalism sophomore from Barren County, and Meaghan Downs of The Anderson News in Lawrenceburg, were selected as recipients of the 2013 David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards. 

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    H. Dan O'Hair, interim senior vice provost for Student Success, dean of the UK College of Communication and Infomration and professor in the Department of Communication will speak at a Congressional briefing on April 25.

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    ISC students from UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunciations won first place in district competition in the American Advertising Federation's National Student Advertising Competition held April 13.

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    All four teams of UK student entrepreneurs placed in the top two in their respective categroeis and won a total of $35,000 in prize money at Idea State U this past weekend.

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    The long-time journalist and now senior faculty for broadcast and online at the Poynter Institute will speak Tuesday, April 23.

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    The UK Forensics Team recently competed in the Kentucky State Championship Tournament and  placed second in the Individual Events Sweetpstakes for Large Division Schools and third in Debate Sweepstakes for Large Division Schools.

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    UK broadcast journalism studetns received three first places and a total of 10 awards overall at the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Awards ceremony.

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    H. Dan O'Hair, interim senior vice provost for Student Success, dean of the UK College of Communication and Information and professor in the Department of Communication, was named the recipient of the 2013 Broadcast Education Association Lifetime Achievement in Scholarship Award.

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    Unique summer camp will bring teachers and students together at the University of Kentucky for an intensive hands-on, immersion experience in communication teaching and learning.

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    It has been five years since a team from Kentucky made it to the elimination rounds at both winter break national college policy debate tournaments.

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    Craig R. Whitney, author of 'A Liberal's Case for the Second Amendment' will speak at UK March 28.

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    The UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications  will host the annual Richard G. Wilson Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) Alumni Symposium on March 25.

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    Five new members will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in April.

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    A new study authored by University of Kentucky researcher Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles shows that more empathic communication is needed between caregivers and hospice team members.

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    The University of Kentucky and the Commonwealth are front and center with strong representation in the first-ever class of the Alltech Graduate Academy, designed for emerging leaders in global agribusiness.

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    Thirty UK undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneur teams recently participated in the UK Venture Challenge.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is an annual event for student entrepreneurs  to compete for $3,000 in scholarships and the right to represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, in April.

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    In a second study featured in the January issue of the Journal of Communication, UK faculty from the UK College of Communication and Information and the College of Medicine, evaluated patients' needs after abnormal Pap test results and patient navigators' communication effectiveness.

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    UK faculty from the College of Public Health, the College of Communication and Information, and the Rural Cancer Prevention Center have developed a DVD intervention to promote the completion of the HPV vaccine series among women in the Appalachian communities of the Kentucky River Health District.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is an annual business competition for student entrepreneurs.

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    The awards honor the memory of David Dick, former director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications and a champion of great journalistic storytelling.  

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    Journalism professor and constitutional scholar to discuss the U.S. Electoral College.

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    The first iNET Colloquium on Entrepreneurship for the 2012 fall semester is available for viewing online and on UK Channel 16. 

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    Wildcats have reached the elimination round at every tournament they have attended so far. 

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    Jonathan D. Blum, chief public affairs officer, Yum! Brands Inc., will deliver the 2012 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at the University of Kentucky Student Center’s Worsham Theatre.

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    Six graduates of the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications will share their experiences and insights on covering local news at the 11th annual Richard Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium on Wednesday.

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    Student entrepreneurs will learn about the "business model canvas" and plans for the 2013 University of Kentucky Venture Challenge from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 13, in the Ralph. G. Anderson Engineering Building Student Commons.

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    Professorship was established to "enhance communication education through the examination of existing research coupled with the generation of new ideas, concepts, and research findings in the area of communication."

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    The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications will host the University of Kentucky Spelling Bee, a semifinal round of the Scripps National Spelling Bee for winners from schools in 63 Kentucky counties, in Spring 2013.

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    Students are invited to share ideas, meet iNET's entrepreneur in residence, and enjoy free pizza at the Cats Den from 5-6 p.m.
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    The event will begin at 11 a.m. with opening remarks from President Eli Capilouto on the north lawn of the Main Building.

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    UK alumnus Brian Raney, the first UK iNET Entrepreneur in Residence, is passionate about helping students become entrepreneurs.

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    High school students from Paul Laurence Dunbar, Henry Clay, Campbell County, Sayre School and Lexington Christian Academy spent an action-packed week at the University of Kentucky iNET I-Academy summer camp learning what it takes to be entrepreneurs.

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    UK journalism professor has visited Southern Africa to advocate for public's "right to know."  

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    ISC students professionally designed and pitched branding campaigns for two separate child welfare organizations in the Cape Town community.

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    Beth E. Barnes, professor and associate dean of undergraduate and international studies in the UK College of Communication and Information, was recently awarded a fellowship from Open Society Foundations to work with the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Kiev, Ukraine.

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    Associate Professor Buck Ryan has been named to JournalismDegree.org's list of Top 50 Journalism Professors for 2012.

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    Richard Labunski appears on "Kentucky Tonight."

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    A team of researchers and entrepreneurs based at the University of Kentucky is working to turn communication research into a profitable business model by developing a system of tailored messages aimed at reducing hospital readmissions.

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    A University of Kentucky journalism professor has written a detailed account of how an author used his research without attribution, something that scholars say happens often but is rarely discussed publicly. 

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    A new course designed to help students develop and refine digital storytelling skills with mobile technologies is being offered at the University of Kentucky during the Summer Eight-Week Session, starting Thursday, June 7.

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    The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees unanimously approved a proposal to change the name of the College of Communications and Information Studies. The college will be known as the College of Communication and Information, effective July 1.

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    University of Kentucky journalism senior Cassidy Herrington received a 2011 Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for her story about Kentucky agriculture's dependence on migrant labor, which aired on WUKY in November.

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    University of Kentucky alumnus Wesley Jackson has been named publisher of The Courier-Journal, the state's largest newspaper in circulation. 

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    Four University of Kentucky freshmen in the First Generation Living Learning Community have been invited to deliver a presentation to the Eastern Communication Association convention, to be held April 26-29 in Boston.

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    The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications finished 10th in the annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards Program Intercollegiate Writing Competition for 2011-12.

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    Terry Birdwhistell, dean of libraries and William T. Young Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky, has been chosen to receive the UK School of Library and Information Science Outstanding Alumnus Award for 2012.

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    University of Kentucky alumnus and former Kentucky Kernel Editor Jack Guthrie (1963) has created a fund to provide the equivalent of a full-tuition scholarship to future editors-in-chief of the Kernel, the independent student newspaper at UK. 

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    A panel of Chinese researchers will speak at the 12th biennial Kentucky Conference on Health Communication to be held April 19-21 at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington.

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    Aaron M. Smith, a University of Kentucky journalism junior from Oldham County, has been selected as the recipient of the first David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award for his story, "What Cal Left Behind."

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    Start-up companies made up of UK undergraduate and graduate students vied for cash prizes and valuable "face time" with the judges in two competitions, one for business concepts and one for business plans.

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    The college recognized student scholarship and fellowship recipients, in addition to outstanding accomplishments by staff, faculty, alumni and friends. 

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    John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will deliver the 35th annual University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications' Joe Creason Lecture, titled "What the 2012 Campaign Tells Us About the State and Future of Political Journalism." 

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