• Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) — The University of Kentucky is rooted in history from its esteemed alumni to its storied basketball program. Just take a quick walk through campus and it won’t take long to spot a vintage, copper signpost sharing a story of the university’s past. One such piece of history, lesser known to the average student or alumnus, but deeply rooted and just as prestigious, is the Tournament of Champions put on by the Kentucky Debate program.

    Founded in 1972 by J.W. Patterson, the Tournament of Champions (TOC) is regarded as one of the most prestigious high school speech and debate tournaments in the country. Held on UK's campus at the end of April each year, the TOC hosts the fiercest high school speech and debate competitors from across the country. In last year’s tournament over 900 students competed from 36 different states and four different countries, including China. 

    In 2012, the National Speech and Debate Association (NSDA) founded NSDA China, which oversees the domestic operations of the speech and debate organization in China: a burgeoning extracurricular activity for students. The NSDA is the largest speech and debate organization in the United States with the largest network of professional coaches and school members.

    This summer, Dave Arnett, director of the UK Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, and director of the Tournament of Champions, traveled to Shanghai, China, to meet with representatives of NSDA China about the future of their organization and to begin tournament preparations.  

    One of those aspirations was to host their own Tournament of Champions.

    On his trip, Arnett had a brief meeting with the vice president of NSDA China, Jeff Zhu, where they discussed future plans, including hosting a Tournament of Champions in China and all that it would entail. Arnett was encouraged by China’s enthusiasm.

    “A TOC seemed like the next piece of the puzzle for them,” Arnett said.

    However, as English-speaking debate is relatively new in China, he saw this project as part of a five-year plan, so to speak. After all, China sent their first students to Lexington to compete in the TOC just two years before his meeting with NSDA China over the summer.  

    But lo and behold, a mere six months later, the first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai Jan. 22-24.

    Nearly 150 students from some of the best high schools in China competed in this three-day event. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.

    “It was a very exciting and successful event that opened the door for more collaborations between China, the debate team and the university at large," Arnett said.

    While relatively small in size, with just around 5,000 English-speaking debaters, the potential for NSDA China is incredibly large. In the next two years, the organization hopes to double in size, and they believe that bringing the TOC to China as a yearly event will help to increase those numbers.

    A key component of NSDA China’s growing numbers are their esteemed coaches, all of whom are American.

    “The American coaches are an important marketing strategy for them, because they are trying to sell their brand to parents who want to send their children to American universities,” Arnett said.

    A significant amount of the schools that NSDA China works with are international schools where the students are native English speakers and over 90 percent of the league’s debaters will come to American universities.

    “Students that choose to pursue their education in America are often fascinated by the history and culture of the United States and adapt pretty seamlessly to both the new environments and the debating styles,” Arnett said. “And because most of them come from international schools, they are already native English speakers.”

    The US Tournament of Champions will be held April 29–May 1, 2017 at UK.

    For more information on the Tournament of Champions, visit www.uktoc.com.  

    The first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai last month. of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK helped host the first international Tournament of Champions (TOC) in Shanghai last month. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) Nathan Stevens, media officer in the  University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, is often sought out for his expertise in media and electronics. Not only by the college, but also by companies across the U.S.

    Last semester, he was one of the first individuals to try out the new "Skylanders Imaginators" video game, a must-have toy for the holiday season. Stevens runs a video game and movie review website and the company reached out to him before launch. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company. His creation: Connor Meow. A cat, of course. The game was later named a 2016 Best Family Game in the Game Critics Awards.

    In the College of Communication and Information, he produces media and helps direct the CI Collective, a technology usability lab where students and faculty work together to test emerging technologies. The primary purpose of the CI Collective is to support interdisciplinary research on human-computer interaction and related areas in understanding how people use communication technology and learn from information systems.

    Technology developers might have one use in mind, but consumers of all ages may find that a technological device may be used to fill a separate and distinct need. Research conducted in the CI Collective will help determine how users interact with technology.

    Stevens has made sure to connect his contacts in the video game and electronics industry to the college and UK students. In addition to being college media officer, he teaches MAS 435, "The History of Video Games and The Industry," and gives an overview of the industry and an examination of the technological advances in both software and hardware.

    In one lecture, he had a representative from Bethesda Softworks LLC, a large computer entertainment software company, Skype in to the class. Several of Stevens' connections have also reached out to get involved in the usability lab.  

    Stevens recently attended the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, where he sought out new technology and contacts for usability testing and research. This year’s show had a lot of focus on virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and the 360-degree camera.

    Stevens said the industry seemed to know that VR and AR are here to stay, not only in an entertainment capacity, but also for storytelling and marketing usage. "The health technology was also intriguing with different ways to maintain your own health at home without really the need for doctor intervention, on a smaller less urgent level of self-checkups," he said. "All in all, it was quite an amazing show with a lot of neat gadgets on display. A geek’s dream."

    Nathan Stevens was one of the first individuals to try out the new Skylanders Imaginators video game. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Nathan Stevens, media officer in the UK College of Communication and Information, is bringing his experience and connections in the video and electronics industry to UK students.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 14, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media will host a discussion, "The Cure for Fake News Disease: Truth and Fairness," with journalists on Wednesday, Feb. 15. The program is set for 3-4:30 p.m. in the Maggie Room of the Enoch Grehan Journalism Building.

    The event is part of the school's "Challenges to Journalism" series. It will be a panel discussion among two of the state’s most accomplished political journalists; a faculty member who has been a newspaper editor and helped start radio stations; and a conservative critic of Kentucky news outlets. They will explore whether the meanings of fairness and balance in journalism have changed, or need to change.

    Panelists will be:

    • John Stamper, politics and government editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader;
    • Joseph Gerth, metro columnist and former political writer for the Courier-Journal;
    • Kakie Urch, associate professor of new media and former Gannett Co. editor; and
    • Richard "Rick" Nelson, conservative media critic and director of the Commonwealth Policy Center.

    The panel will be moderated by Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, associate extension professor in the School of Journalism and Media, political columnist for the Courier-Journal and former national president of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

    The program is co-sponsored by SPJ’s campus chapter and the Department of Communication. The School of Journalism and Media and the Department of Communication are part of the UK College of Communication and Information.

    Refreshments will be available. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Accomplished political journalists, a UK faculty member and a conservative media critic will discuss fairness and balance in journalism at UK tomorrow.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Gail Hairston Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Committee on Social Theory hosts public lectures and faculty presentations throughout the academic year, including lecture series each fall and each spring, that give the public access to lectures by international scholars visiting the university campus.

    The College of Arts and Sciences’ noteworthy Social Theory Spring Lecture Series is created by a teaching team. Each of the instructors of the team invites an esteemed academic to lecture on a topic that intersects with both social theory and with the topic of that semester's course theme.

    This spring’s theme is “The Archive,” and team members include Melissa Adler of the School of Library and Information Science; Mónica Díaz of the Department of Hispanic Studies and Department of History; James Ridolfo of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and Richard Schein of the Department of Geography.

    This Spring Lecture Series schedule includes:

    Kimberly Christen, Washington State University

    “Sovereignty in Practice: Digital Archives and Technologies of Protest”

    2 p.m., Feb. 17

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

    Archives have their origins in assertions of state power. Colonialism thrived on the simultaneous fiction of the erasure of natives from the landscape and their memorialization in the archival memory of the nation. Current technologies shine a light on the long history of documentation and discovery used to uphold and validate violence, removal and conquest. Christen will examine how community digital archives, archivists as activists, and the practices of local archival documentation undo this colonial erasure through the purposeful use of technologies of protest.

     

    Jorge Camizares-Esguerra, University of Texas at Austin

    “On Archives, Imperial Historiographies, and Forgotten Epistemologies”

    2 p.m., March 10

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    Michelle Caswell, University of California, Los Angeles

    “Past Imperfect: Imagining Our Way Out of Annihilation in Archives”

    2 p.m., April 14

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    All Social Theory lectures are free and open to the public. The spring lecture series is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and the Special Collections Research Center of UK Libraries. 

    The Archive: Social Theory Spring Lecture SeriesOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Friday's speaker for Social Theory's Spring Lecture Series is Kimberly Christen of Washington State University. She will discuss how archives can be the reflection of state power. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2017) — Have you written or produced a story that just cries out for recognition? Then we have a contest for you. The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information is seeking entries for its seventh annual David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards.

    The award honors the best in Kentucky storytelling — stories that enlighten and inform while capturing the attention of the audience. Storytellers can inspire a heart or break it. Entries may be hard news, features, advocacy journalism, personality profiles, columns and even obituaries. No matter the form, the story should be well-developed and free from errors, possess sound journalistic mechanics and exhibit high ethical standards.

    Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 

    The student award is open to UK journalism majors for work published or completed through student media, at an internship or at any recognized media outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website). 

    Work published during 2016 is eligible for the 2017 awards. Entries for the award will be accepted through March 3, 2017, at this web address: https://ci.uky.edu/jat/webforms/david-dick-storytelling-award.

    The school established the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award to honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.

    “The School of Journalism and Media is all about telling great stories,” said Lars Willnat, director of the school. “This contest is a special way to recognize the career of one of the better storytellers of his generation and to encourage today’s storytellers.”    

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1987 and the UK Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He earned both his undergraduate and master’s degree at UK. After retiring from CBS, he taught in the school before becoming its director from 1987 until 1993.

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Feb. 8, 2017) The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22. While the tournament was named for the infamous feud between two families on the Kentucky-West Virginia border, the competition was friendly but fierce. Schools from seven states as far away as Michigan and Georgia traveled to UK for the tournament.

    The Saturday half of the tournament was named the McCoy Invitational and was hosted by UK. To help facilitate the tournament, the upperclassmen from UK’s team did not compete, but helped with other tournament hosting duties. UK’s freshmen class did compete and had a very successful tournament. Laura McAllister and Alec Foust placed fourth and fifth in quadrathon, a category which takes the cumulative total of all points earned in all the events in which a student competes. McAllister and Foust also won improvisational duo and took second in duo interpretation. Will Brennan was the top speaker in public debate and Josh Finley placed second in persuasive speaking.

    On Sunday, Marshall University took over to host the Hatfield Invitational, and UK’s full team participated in the competition. UK placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University. Junior Kaylon Kennedy and sophomore Matt Karijolic won duo interpretation, Kennedy also won program oral interpretation, Karijolic placed second in rhetorical criticism, sophomore Veronica Scott won persuasive speaking and broadcasting, and senior Sam Northrup placed second in impromptu speaking. In total, the team qualified another five events for nationals.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Kentucky Forensic Association state tournament held at Owensboro Community and Technical College in Owensboro, Kentucky, Feb. 17-18, 2017.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website at www.ukforensics.com.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HealthCareBy Allison Perry Feb. 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2017) – Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall.

    Much of Lowy's visit focused on research. During the morning session, nine UK faculty members gave presentations on major research initiatives and programs at Markey, ranging from efforts in cancer prevention and control to drug development and discovery. Major topics of discussion centered around the cancer types which affect Kentuckians the most: lung cancer, colon cancer, cervical cancer/HPV and the hepatitis C virus, which is linked to liver cancer.

    After meeting with a group of UK Markey Cancer Center junior faculty members, Lowy learned more about the UK HealthCare enterprise and its support of Markey from Dr. Michael Karpf, executive vice president for health affairs. Lowy finished the day with a tour of clinical space in UK Chandler Hospital's Pavilion A – future home to Markey's Hematology and Blood & Marrow Transplantation inpatient floor – and a dedicated cancer research lab in the UK College of Pharmacy.

    "We were honored to have Dr. Doug Lowy visit us today at the UK Markey Cancer Center to learn more about our patients and the research we do here," said Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center. "It was a wonderful opportunity to engage with the NCI, and with Dr. Lowy, so that they better understand some of the difficulties we have in delivering care to our patient population."

    Kentucky is home to the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the country, a major health problem that Markey is dedicated to change. In July 2013, Markey received a prestigious NCI designation, which allows the center access to more research funding, trials, and treatments.  

     

     

    NCI Interim Director Dr. Doug Lowy visited the UK Markey Cancer Center on Monday to learn more about research and patient care. of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationMedicinePharmacyPublic HealthMarkey Cancer Center

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Allison Perry
    allison.perry@uky.edu
    (859) 323-2399 Summary: Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Feb. 1, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2017) — Lexington Youth Soccer Association’s (LYSA) TOPSoccer was awarded the inaugural top honor at this year’s University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information CIS 112 Service Learning Thank You Breakfast.

    Held each year in December, this breakfast serves as a thank you to all the service le­­­­arning organizations that partner with the CIS 112 course, an accelerated communication and composition class at UK with a service learning component that requires students to complete 10 hours of community service over the course of the semester.   

    This year, for the first time, TOPSoccer received an award for its commitment to welcoming and engaging UK students. Many of the UK students who work with TOPSoccer for their course requirement complete more than the 10 required service hours and will often continue to work with the organization well after the course has ended.

    Janice Birdwhistell, the former development director and chief of staff for the College of Communication and Information and avid TOPSoccer volunteer, accepted the award on behalf of TOPSoccer.

     “TOPS is very honored by the award,” Birdwhistell said. “Volunteers are invaluable to our program and we could not exist without them.”

    TOPSoccer (The Outreach Program for Soccer) is a community-based soccer program designed to meet the needs of young athletes with physical, developmental and/or intellectual disabilities. US Youth Soccer, the nation’s largest youth sports association, started this organization in 1991 with the goal to improve the overall fitness, self-esteem and social skills of these athletes.

    “TOPS is a great service program. It gets students involved in the community, but it also connects them to a specific community that they would not have gotten to know otherwise,” said Sam Asbell, a CIS 112 student who volunteered with TOPS last semester. 

     TOPSoccer’s Lexington program began in 2009 under the leadership of Birdwhistell’s daughter Jessie, then a graduate student at UK. She worked with various youth sports associations like the Lexington Youth Soccer Association and the Kentucky Youth Soccer Association (KYSA) for initial support and funding, as well as garnering support and volunteers from various businesses and individuals in the Lexington community. 

    “We love working with CIS 112 and love having their students volunteer with us,” Janice Birdwhistell noted. "TOPSoccer is a labor of love for our volunteers, and our goal is to pass that love on to the CIS 112 students that choose to work with our program.”  

    Janice Birdwhistell, right, accepted the College of Communication and Information's award on behalf of TOPSoccer.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK College of Communication and Information honors organizations that partner with the college's service learning course.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium on Saturday, Feb. 18 to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete.

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture on Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Special thanks to our sponsors: the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Jan. 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library's UK Athletics Auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium Saturday, Feb. 18, to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community.  The entrepreneurs evaluate the students' presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete:

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Other sponsors are the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Friday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Jan. 13, 2017

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchThe Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Casis Thursday

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: The Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis Jan. 5, 2017

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 20, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 16, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 14, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk information. Another tip Sutton gives to public communicators and emergency managers: use the hashtag that has surfaced so that messages are “in one stream of information.”

    “The message content makes a real difference, but the style in which it’s delivered also makes a difference,” she said.

    Before the 9/11 attacks, disaster scholars focused primarily on natural and technological hazards. Technological hazards include such things as nuclear events, like the Three Mile Island accident, train crashes, and train derailments with chemical spills — all having long-term impacts on communities.

    But after 9/11, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), which oversees responses to federal disaster declarations, was absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security.

    “And that really changed the nature and the shape of disaster response as well as disaster research,” Sutton said. Now scholars study a wider range of event types.  

    The practical implications of Sutton’s research has allowed her to meet with practitioners — including those from the National Weather Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to offer research-based guidance, helping them build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. And by contributing to their success, she continues to help people directly impacted by disasters get the information they need in the most effective way.    

    This video feature is part of a monthly series called "see discovery: The People Behind Our Research." The videos, produced by REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Over the past several years, Twitter has become a crucial tool in emergency response and crisis communication. UK's Jeannette Sutton has collected and analyzed millions of these tweets. As director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, she offers research-based guidance, helping practitioners build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk information. Another tip Sutton gives to public communicators and emergency managers: use the hashtag that has surfaced so that messages are “in one stream of information.”

    “The message content makes a real difference, but the style in which it’s delivered also makes a difference,” she said.

    Before the 9/11 attacks, disaster scholars focused primarily on natural and technological hazards. Technological hazards include such things as nuclear events, like the Three Mile Island accident, train crashes, and train derailments with chemical spills — all having long-term impacts on communities.

    But after 9/11, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), which oversees responses to federal disaster declarations, was absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security.

    “And that really changed the nature and the shape of disaster response as well as disaster research,” Sutton said. Now scholars study a wider range of event types.  

    The practical implications of Sutton’s research has allowed her to meet with practitioners — including those from the National Weather Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to offer research-based guidance, helping them build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. And by contributing to their success, she continues to help people directly impacted by disasters get the information they need in the most effective way.    

    This video feature is part of a monthly series called "see discovery: The People Behind Our Research." The videos, produced by REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Over the past several years, Twitter has become a crucial tool in emergency response and crisis communication. UK's Jeannette Sutton has collected and analyzed millions of these tweets. As director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, she offers research-based guidance, helping practitioners build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 5, 2016) Jessica Waters, the University of Kentucky sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.

    She was recently awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter. The award recognizes service by an individual or group of young people who demonstrate outstanding commitment to the community through direct financial support, development of charitable programs, volunteering and leadership in philanthropy.

    Waters, a UK College of Communication and Information sophomore studying integrated strategic communication, founded Cupcakes for Camp in 2010 and began organizing the sale of cupcakes and other baked goods in her community of Beavercreek, Ohio. Her goal was to pay the fees for children wanting to attend camps designed specifically for adolescents with epilepsy, just as she did. 

    Since then, Waters has raised well over $15,000, allowing numerous children with epilepsy to attend summer camps.

    In June, she was awarded the Stars of Service Award by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the President’s Volunteer Service Award Gold Medal, which included a congratulatory letter from President Barack Obama, at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

    Read more about Waters and her service: UK Student's Diagnosis Leads to Life of Service, Presidential Recognition.

    Jessica Waters recently received the the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Jessica Waters, the UK College of Communication and Information sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Dec. 5, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 5, 2016) Jessica Waters, the University of Kentucky sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.

    She was recently awarded the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter. The award recognizes service by an individual or group of young people who demonstrate outstanding commitment to the community through direct financial support, development of charitable programs, volunteering and leadership in philanthropy.

    Waters, a UK College of Communication and Information sophomore studying integrated strategic communication, founded Cupcakes for Camp in 2010 and began organizing the sale of cupcakes and other baked goods in her community of Beavercreek, Ohio. Her goal was to pay the fees for children wanting to attend camps designed specifically for adolescents with epilepsy, just as she did. 

    Since then, Waters has raised well over $15,000, allowing numerous children with epilepsy to attend summer camps.

    In June, she was awarded the Stars of Service Award by the Corporation for National and Community Service and the President’s Volunteer Service Award Gold Medal, which included a congratulatory letter from President Barack Obama, at a ceremony in Washington, D.C.

    Read more about Waters and her service: UK Student's Diagnosis Leads to Life of Service, Presidential Recognition.

    Jessica Waters recently received the the Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy Award by the Association of Fundraising Professionals, Greater Dayton Region Chapter.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Jessica Waters, the UK College of Communication and Information sophomore known for her life of service after an epilepsy diagnosis, has been honored again for her philanthropic work.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Deb Weis Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2016) University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition, will be Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at William T. Young Library's auditorium.

    Venture Challenge provides an opportunity for students from every college to pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would. Students gain valuable contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through Venture Challenge.

    Prior to pitching, students develop their ideas into a business concept and prepare a three- to five-page written proposal. Venture Challenge is open to all UK undergraduate and graduate students with an innovative idea for a start-up, existing business, or nonprofit venture.

    Online registration opens Jan. 17. Interested students should fill out the Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    “The UK Venture Challenge is a great opportunity for students to hone the skills needed to start or be involved in the earliest stages of a company,” said local entrepreneur Randall Stevens, CEO of ArchVision. “These are skills that will serve them well no matter where their careers take them.”

    Stevens also serves as co-chair of iNET, or Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, the UK organization that puts on Venture Challenge.

    The three winning teams share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    Sponsors of Venture Challenge include the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Contact Deb Weis for more information, and to receive the 2017 Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    UK students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Online registration opens Jan. 17 for the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition. Three winning teams will share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Deb Weis Nov. 30, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 30, 2016) University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition, will be Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, at William T. Young Library's auditorium.

    Venture Challenge provides an opportunity for students from every college to pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would. Students gain valuable contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through Venture Challenge.

    Prior to pitching, students develop their ideas into a business concept and prepare a three- to five-page written proposal. Venture Challenge is open to all UK undergraduate and graduate students with an innovative idea for a start-up, existing business, or nonprofit venture.

    Online registration opens Jan. 17. Interested students should fill out the Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    “The UK Venture Challenge is a great opportunity for students to hone the skills needed to start or be involved in the earliest stages of a company,” said local entrepreneur Randall Stevens, CEO of ArchVision. “These are skills that will serve them well no matter where their careers take them.”

    Stevens also serves as co-chair of iNET, or Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, the UK organization that puts on Venture Challenge.

    The three winning teams share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    Sponsors of Venture Challenge include the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Contact Deb Weis for more information, and to receive the 2017 Venture Challenge Intent to Compete.

    UK students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Online registration opens Jan. 17 for the annual, university-wide student entrepreneur competition. Three winning teams will share $3,000 in scholarship prizes, and will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Rebecca Stratton and Trey Furnish Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2016) Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie — a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, senior University of Kentucky Dance Team member Jordan Shellhaas.

    Meet Jordan Shellhaas, a senior integrated strategic communication major on the UK Dance Team! Shellhaas has been dancing since the age of 3 and decided that UK's dance team was a dream of hers during her junior year of high school. As she prepares for her final semester at UK, she shares what her experience has been like dancing on the sidelines of UK games and as a student, as well as offers advice to incoming freshmen in her "see blue." #selfie.

    UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

    Jordan Shellhaas: Senior integrated strategic communication major.

    UK: Where are you from?

    JS: Louisville, Kentucky.

    UK: Being a senior on the dance team, what leadership responsibilities do you have?

    JS: The leadership opportunities vary from making up routines for us to perform at games, leading practices and holding everyone accountable.

    UK: How many years have you been on the UK Dance Team?

    JS: Four.

    UK: When did you decide that being on UK's dance team was a goal for you? 

    JS: My junior year in high school.

    UK: What do you find most rewarding about being on the UK Dance Team?

    JS: I like getting to see the progression the girls make in just over a year. It's cool to see.

    UK: What else are you involved in? 

    JS: I am a sister in Chi Omega sorority as well as an active member in the American Marketing Association and Public Relations Student Society of America.

    UK: Do you have plans post-graduation?

    JS: Either dancing for a cruise line or working for a public relations firm out of the country.

    UK: What is a typical week like for you being on this team?

    JS: A life in the week of Jordan on the dance team is making sure to manage my time well due to practices, games and any other events.

    UK: Do you dance at football and basketball games?

    JS:  Yes.

    UK: What has been your favorite thing about being on the team thus far?

    JS: I have liked getting to meet and get close with so many amazingly talented girls. They are more than teammates; we are a family.  

    UK: Have you had any embarrassing moment during a game or competition? 

    JS: The most embarrassing thing I've done was forgetting a part in a dance. But, I feel like that's something only I noticed so it wasn't that bad.

    UK: How do you prepare for competitions and how many do you have a year?

    JS: We have one competition a year over winter break. We stay in Lexington and practice every day. We get a four-day break for Christmas, then it's back to Lexington where we practice every day until our competition in January.

    UK: Did you dance growing up?

    JS: Yes, since I was 3 years old. I didn't dance competitively until middle school.

    UK: When you wake up in the morning, what's the first thing you do?

    JS: Brush my teeth.

    UK: How long does it take you to get ready for a game or competition?

    JS: About an hour.

    UK: Who's your favorite artist? 

    JS: I don't have one. I just love music in general.

    UK: Who's your role model? 

    JS: My parents because they not only taught me the importance of pushing myself to be the best version of myself, but they also embody that same characteristic.

    UK: What is your biggest fear?

    JS: Never getting married.

    UK: What's your spirit animal?

    JS: The Grinch, Tigger and Amanda Bynes in "She's the Man."

    UK: What is your favorite color? 

    JS: Blue.

    UK: What is your most used social media channel?

    JS: Instagram. Follow me @jordan_shelfort.

    UK: Have you ever had a secret admirer?

    JS: No, I wish I was cool enough to have one.

    UK: If you could have a super power what would it be?

    JS: Oh man. That is tough! Transporting. I like that. I want to be able to transport anywhere in a second.

    UK: What's your favorite restaurant in Lexington?

    JS: Local Taco or Planet Thai.

    UK: How do you think the skills you have learned from the UK Dance Team will help lead you through life?

    JS: It has taught me a great deal of time management and understanding that everyone doesn't always agree. So now, it's easier for me to accept other ideas and opinions because there will never be a time where everyone thinks the same way.

    UK: If you could go back to freshman year, what advice would you give yourself?

    JS: Take every moment in because before you know it, it will be time to graduate.

    "see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Rebecca Stratton
    rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
    859-323-2395 Summary: Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! Up this week, senior Dance Team member Jordan Shellhaas. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 29, 2016) — University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information Department of Communication Chair Elisia Cohen was honored as the 2016 Mayhew Derryberry Award recipient at the Public Health Education and Health Promotion Awards luncheon in Denver, Colorado, earlier this month.  

    The award, named after dedicated public health service officer Mayhew Derryberry, was designed to recognize exceptional reach and impact of research conducted by faculty in the field of health promotion, health education and health communication. Cohen’s 13 years of health communication research, specifically focusing on cancer prevention and control, made her an excellent candidate for the award.

    “I was really honored to receive the award,” Cohen said. “There are certainly people in the field of health communication and health promotion who receive recognition for the volume of their scholarship, and while there might be other people who produce more scholarly articles or reports, I like to think that my research has a large impact and that my work in communication specifically can extend the reach and effectiveness of health promotion and health communication activities. I think this award was really recognition of that.”

    Unbeknownst to her, Cohen was nominated for the Mayhew Derryberry Award by a group of her friends, colleagues and former students. The award was presented to Cohen at the luncheon in Colorado by her former student, Katie Head, who has gone on since her time as Cohen’s student to become an assistant professor at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.

    Cohen insists that were it not for the group efforts of the teams she worked with to further her cancer prevention studies, her research would not stand as successful as it does today. Beyond her collaborations with colleagues in the Department of Communication, she is a member of the Markey Cancer Center and has enjoyed collaborations with Robin Vanderpool and Richard Crosby of the College of Public Health, Jenna Hatcher in the College of Nursing, and Mark Dignan in the College of Medicine. 

    “Without those collaborations, really there would be no recognition," she said. "I’ve had the good fortune to work with excellent researchers in health and medicine who are interested in moving the needle on their impact from a communication perspective."

    Cohen is also a recipient of the 2014 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award, sponsored by the UK Women's Forum and the 2009 and 2012 College of Communication and Information Excellence in Research Award. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK College of Communication and Information Department of Communication Chair Elisia Cohen was honored as the 2016 Mayhew Derryberry Award recipient at the Public Health Education and Health Promotion Awards.
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  • Body: Professional NewsBy Staff Report Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2016) According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kentucky is vulnerable for an HIV outbreak based on intravenous drug use. Out of 220 counties in the country that are at risk, 54 of those counties are located in Kentucky. Lisa A. Brown, director of student and multicultural affairs in the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, says that although these numbers are startling, we are not powerless in reversing these trends.

    Brown, an avid playwright, is using her artistic skills to bring attention to Kentucky’s vulnerability of an HIV epidemic. She will debut her most recent production, "Positively Unbreakable," on World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center in Lexington. The play will run through Dec. 3.

    "Positively Unbreakable" is the fictitious, but riveting story of a married woman who is expecting her first child. Fearing that she is experiencing complications from the pregnancy, she and her husband discover that she is HIV positive. Interwoven within the storyline is an intravenous drug user whose path has indirectly crossed with the expectant mother. The play also explores the issues of teenage promiscuity and peer pressure, homophobia, and the growing population of senior adults who are contracting HIV.

    “I enjoy writing about issues that people are grappling with daily, whether it’s loss of a job, a strain in a relationship, or learning that you have been diagnosed with an illness," Brown said. "My objective is to provide hope in what may seem like a bleak situation."

    Brown says she was commissioned in 2011 to produce a skit focusing on HIV after being approached by Maxine Thomas, director of the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary, who was sponsoring a women’s empowerment conference. After writing and producing the skit, Brown didn’t give any more thought to the production until late last year.

    “I awakened one morning and I felt an urgency to revise the script without fully understanding why.”

    Brown wasn’t aware at the time that the CDC would issue a report outlining Kentucky’s risk for an HIV outbreak based on the increasing number of intravenous drug use.

    In what she terms as combining the arts with advocacy and activism, Brown hopes that "Positively Unbreakable" will help educate Kentuckians about their risk for contracting HIV. She will be partnering with the Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, which instituted a clean needle exchange program. The health department will share information about their program with theater patrons. Brown is also partnering with AVOL (AIDS Volunteers) Inc. Both of these organizations will provide free, confidential HIV screenings during a health fair an hour before the play begins.

    Velma Grant, president of the Frankfort/Lexington (KY) Chapter of the Links Incorporated and one of the actors in "Positively Unbreakable," hopes to reach a large audience with this production.

    “It is relevant to me because a national initiative of the Links is to educate our community on the incidence and prevalence of HIV/AIDS," she said. "We want the African-American community to know how this disease can be prevented.”

    "Positively Unbreakable" stars Nieta Wigginton, a Lexington native whose prior stage credits include, "Blues for an Alabama Sky," "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," "Oak & Ivy" and "U.S. vs. Fear." Joining Wigginton on stage is Whit Whitaker, UK music performance and arts administration alumnus. Whitaker has performed in "To Kill a Mockingbird," "Crumbs from the Table of Joy," "Don Quixote" and "The King and I." "Positively Unbreakable" also features UK music performance sophomore Clark Janell Davis, who reigned as the 2015-2016 Miss Kentucky. She recently performed in the UK Opera Theatre’s production of "Ragtime."

    Tickets for "Positively Unbreakable" are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. They are available by calling the Lyric box office at 859-280-2218, online at www.lexingtonlyric.com, or on site at 300 E. Third St. A portion of the proceeds will be used to benefit AVOL.

    For more information, contact Lisa A. Brown at 859-492-3036.

    "Positively Unbreakable," by Lisa Brown, runs Dec. 1-3, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts AdministrationMusic

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK School of Journalism and Media's Lisa A. Brown will debut her latest production, "Positively Unbreakable," starring a UK student and alumnus, on Dec. 1, at the Lyric Theatre.
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  • Body: Student LifeBy Rebecca Stratton Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2016) — Want to get to know the people behind some of the biggest student leadership positions on campus? We did, too! That's why we've introduced "see blue." #selfie — a series on UKNow that lets student leaders from across campus tell us a little bit more about themselves and their organizations. Up this week, College of Communication and Information Ambassador Michael Ayers.

    Michael Ayers is a 2016-17 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information ambassador. Now a junior journalism major, Ayers uses his position as ambassador to be an informative, encouraging guy for prospective students. Ayers firmly believes that if you keep trying, eventually everything will fall into place. And that’s what’s happening for him. Learn more about this UK CI ambassador in his "see blue." #selfie!

    UKNow: What is your major and what year are you?

    Michael Ayers: I am a junior and I am a journalism major.

    UK: Where are you from?

    MA: Fort Thomas, Kentucky.

    UK: Tell me about your position in the College of CI.

    MA: I am an ambassador in the College of CI, and basically we go to locations in the nation, that the university has selected and we recruit individuals to the University of Kentucky and the college. 

    UK: When did you decide that being an ambassador was something you’d want to do?

    MA: To be honest, out on the TV screen in Grehan I saw people's faces, and I always wanted to know how to do that, and they said you have to be an ambassador. So I became an ambassador. I wish someone freshman year found a kid like me and was like “you need to be here.” I wanted to be that guy, the guy I wish I had. I wanted to go to Preview Nights and tell them they needed to be here. Be the push.

    UK: What else are you involved in? 

    MA: I am news director for WRFL and I’m a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity. 

    UK: What are some cool things you got to do as an ambassador this fall? 

    MA: I would say one cool thing was before school we met and got to meet with the dean and the faculty. They are awesome and so personable. During K Week, we got to get a group of students and help them plan where they wanted to go based on their interests.  Being able to influence them and push them toward their goals was unique and different and cool in a way. And the preview nights were cool too. 

    UK: Did you all do any preparing during the summer? 

    MA: We had a meeting last semester outlining all we were going to do. We had a breakfast and just went over all the majors, how to interact with people, what to do in different situations and emails to send. 

    UK: Which staff member has made a positive impact on your time here at UK?

    MA: I would say Schyler Simpson, 100 percent. I had her in a CIS class freshman year and she looked at me and said “you need to be an ISC major.” I refused and refused, and I took a paper to her office and she fixed it and tried to recruit me to be ISC. It showed that she cared and they are trying to find good students for their majors. 

    UK: What made you decide to come to UK?

    MA:  The truth is, I never visited — I just came.  I wanted to play small school football. It came to the final day at Highlands, my high school, and I just chose UK. My dad asked me why. I loved Lexington, I wasn’t too far but far enough and be at college. I knew I wanted to buy into wherever I ended up,  so I thought UK! I like blue, I like Lexington ,so I went here and three years later I'm sitting in this chair. 

    UK: As an ambassador, what impression do you hope to leave on those you’re recruiting?  

    MA: So, when it comes to CI, we are the first representation that prospective students have. When I am trying to recruit people to come, they are going to walk away thinking I’m either informative or not what they are wanting to hear. I am hoping that each person can walk away feeling like I was informative. 

    UK: What would you sing at karaoke night?

    MA: It’s hard not to go with Bon Jovi's "Living on a Prayer." 

    UK: If you had a warning label, what would it say?

    MA: Warning High Energy

    UK: What’s your most embarrassing moment at UK? 

    MA: In JOU 302 I did weather for the first time. The camera said roll, and I was a deer in the headlights. I didn’t know what to do. I said it was 55 degrees and it was like 80 degrees. I walked back into the studio and my teacher just looked at me and said “we have some things to work on.” 

    UK: What was your favorite Halloween costume growing up?

    MA: I am going to say Woody, from "Toy Story." 

    UK: What’s your favorite candy?

    MA: Jolly Ranchers. 

    UK: Being an ambassador, I’m sure there are plenty of incoming Wildcats that have questions for you that are not necessarily about academics, but I bet they are wondering about campus life too. These are some questions a senior in high school has for you: If you could go back to freshman year what advice would you give yourself?

    MA: To relax. Take a deep breath and relax. 

    UK: What about UK made you want to stay here, even after your freshman year?

    MA: To be honest, I think that was a characteristic inside. Dale Mueller, my high school football coach, taught us to never quit. I wasn’t going to switch schools or drop out even though I wasn’t finding my niche yet. I was always told to keep going, keep trying and eventually it could fall into place. And that’s what’s happening.

    UK: Think back on your first day as a freshman, was your first day as scary as everyone made it seem?

    MA: No, but I felt like I was at camp as I was just getting into the dorms and you haven’t had your first class; you’re with your roommate and you want to know when your next activity is. 

    UK: Are you constantly busy, or are you able to have lazy days?

    MA: I have lazy days. I do. But, my busy days must be a majority of my life. 

    UK: Is college just like high school?

    MA: No. Heck no. It’s what you make it, I think, It’s what you put into it. If you buy into it, you’ll get a big return. If you want to go through the motions that’s what your outcome is going to be. 

    UK: Do you ever get home sick?

    MA: Absolutely.

    UK: Were you able to decide on your major before you got to college, or did you change it? 

    MA: I was not, I came in undecided and I wanted to go the business route, so I took those classes. Freshman year showed me everything I didn’t want to do in my life, so I went back to broadcasting like I did in high school and started with journalism. 

    UK: Do you have a plan for what you want to do after you graduate?

    MA: No.

    UK: Would you say that your transition from high school to college was easy?

    MA: No. I'd say it was a lot to take in. Advice - have an open mind in the transition. Don’t fight what’s about to hit you in the next year to four. 

    UK: Where do you see yourself in five to 10 years from now? How does that differ than what you imagined in high school?

    MA: Five to 10 years. So, I will be 26 in five years. I plan on being not in Kentucky and not in Ohio. Somewhere away. On my own. Everything- I want to be paying for it. I feel like in order to be on your own you have to move away completely and be an independent person. I think you really find yourself when you’re on your own, too. 

    "see blue." #selfies will appear every other Tuesday on UKNow. Know a student leader we should feature? Contact Rebecca Stratton at rebecca.stratton@uky.edu to nominate someone.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Rebecca Stratton
    rebecca.stratton@uky.edu
    859-323-2395 Summary: Michael Ayers is a 2016-17 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information ambassador. Learn more about this junior majoring in journalism in his "see blue." #selfie!
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  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2016) — The news media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential election is the focus of a public panel discussion Tuesday at the University of Kentucky, sponsored by the UK student chapter and the Bluegrass chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

    “The 2016 Presidential Election: What Did Journalists Get Right?” will feature veteran journalists, people with political experience and a researcher with political expertise.

    The program will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday in Room 122 of the White Hall Classroom Building, next to the Patterson Office Tower. The university community and general public are invited. Parking is available in Parking Structure #5, between Limestone and Upper streets.

    “Every presidential election brings new media strategies from the candidates and their party machinery,” said Mike Farrell, professor of journalism and co-advisor of the SPJ campus chapter. “And every campaign presents new challenges for journalists.”

    The panelists will be journalism professor Al Cross, an election analyst for Kentucky Educational Television and a contributing columnist for The Courier-Journal, where he was political writer; David Hawpe, former  Kentucky Kernel editor, longtime reporter and editor of The Courier-Journal and now a UK trustee; Les Fugate, senior vice president for RunSwitch PR, who worked as an aide to former Kentucky Secretary of State Trey Grayson; and Lars Willnat, director of the UK School of Journalism and Media, whose research includes media effects on political attitudes, theoretical aspects of public opinion formation, and political effects of global communication.

    Retired EKU journalism professor Liz Hansen, the president of the Bluegrass SPJ chapter, will moderate the discussion. Hawpe, Cross and Hansen are inductees of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    The program is open to the public and the university community. The goal is to help make better sense of what happened on Election Day after a long, bitter campaign and to help journalists and the public better understand journalism’s role in the process.

    “We’ve never seen a candidate with the media expertise of Donald Trump. He racked up untold millions of dollars of free coverage with his phone calls to political programs and his tweeting,” Farrell said. “At the same time, journalists were covering the first woman nominated for president by one of the major political parties, and she was being dogged by constant revelations from WikiLeaks.”

    “We believe these are terrific panelists, and this should be an informative and fascinating discussion,” he said.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The panel will feature veteran journalists, people with political experience and a researcher with political expertise who will explore journalism's role in the presidential election. The discussion takes place at 7 p.m. tonight in White Hall Classroom Building.
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  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Nov. 11, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 11, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team won the prestigious Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament. This award is given each year to the team with the greatest number of sweepstakes points from all current and past iterations of the tournament combined.

    This traveling sweepstakes award is the first such achievement in the history of the UK Forensics team. Most team awards are based entirely on the performance of the students at a single competition. To win a traveling sweepstakes award, a team has to perform consistently well over the course of years to be victorious. In this case, UK has been attending the Chief Justice Invitational since the fall of 2013.

    “This award is not just a testament to the hard work of this year’s students, but is a recognition of the talent and dedication of every competitor who’s ever been a member of our team,” Director of Forensics Timothy Bill said. “Each year, these amazing students have continued to build on the successes of those who came before them. For a team that’s only in its fifth year of competition, they have an awful lot to be proud of.”

    The Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award trophy will remain at UK until next year’s competition when it will be returned to Marshall University and awarded to the next championship team. After winning the title, a team’s points are reset to zero and the accumulation of sweepstakes points begins anew. The previous recipient of this award was Western Kentucky University, the reigning national champions.

    At this year’s tournament, UK placed second in combined sweepstakes, second in the individual events sweepstakes, and was the second place Pi Kappa Delta chapter at the competition. Sophomores Matt Karijolic and Veronica Scott placed third and fourth in the individual sweepstakes competition. Both of these finishes are UK firsts at this tournament. Competitors from UK earned the following awards at this competition:

    Team Sweepstakes

    • Champions – Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Combined Speech and Debate Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Individual Events Sweepstakes
    • Second place – Pi Kappa Delta Chapter

    Individual Sweepstakes

    • Third place – Matt Karijolic
    • Fourth Place – Veronica Scott

    After Dinner Speaking

    • Third place – Matt Karijolic

    Broadcasting

    • Fourth place – Megan Wagner
    • Fifth place – Veronica Scott

    Drama Interpretation

    • Sixth place – Veronica Scott

    Duo Interpretation

    • Fifth place – Kaylon Kennedy and Rachel Brase
    • Sixth place – Kaylon Kennedy and Matt Karijolic

    Extemporaneous Speaking (Novice)

    • Fouth place – Josh Finley
    • Fifth place – Will Brennan

    Impromptu Speaking

    • Second place – Megan Wagner
    • Fourth place – Veronica Scott

    Improvisational Duo

    • First place – Will Brennan and Josh Finley
    • Top novices – Will Brennan and Josh Finley

    Parliamentary Debate (Novice)

    • Semifinalists – Will Brennan and Josh Finley

    Parliamentary Debate (Varsity)

    • Second place – Matt Karijolic and Veronica Scott
    • Semifinalists – Kaylon Kennedy and Rachel Brase
    • Sixth place speaker – Veronica Scott

    Poetry Interpretation

    • Sixth place – Laura McAllister

    Program Oral Interpretation

    • Third place – Kaylon Kennedy

    Public Debate

    • First place speaker – Sam Northrup

    Rhetorical Criticism

    • First place – Matt Karijolic
    • Fourth place – Rachel Brase

    The University of Kentucky Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the WYRD Invitational speech and debate tournament held at Transylvania University in Lexington, on Dec. 2-3.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in twelve public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    UK Forensics Team at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team won the prestigious Stephen J. Kopp Traveling Sweepstakes Award at the Marshall University Chief Justice Invitational speech and debate tournament.
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    A new institute in UK's Gatton College will be dedicated later this week.

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    The UK Forensics Team placed fourth in the national persuasion contest "Pitch it to PKD," held by Pi Kappa Delta.

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    Beth Barnes, professor in the UK College of Communication and Information, will use the grant to work with the Zambia Institute of Marketing, helping to develop a new integrated marketing communications curriculum.

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    Al Cross will discuss current presidential campaign with Louisville alumni.

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    The Associated Collegiate Press has awarded the Kentucky Kernel with the Pacemaker, one of the most prestigious awards in the country for student newspapers.

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    Torod B. Neptune, corporate vice president for corporate communications for Verizon Communications Inc., will deliver the 2016 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence Lecture.

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    For the third time in a row, the UK Forensics Team won the title of Grand Champion at the John G. Fee Memorial Speech and Debate Tournament hosted by Berea College.

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    Media expert and author Naeemah Clark will give a talk titled "Does the Media Tell Us Who We Are?" followed by a discussion at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20, at UK.

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    The public forum scheduled for 5:30 p.m. today (Thursday), Oct. 13, at UK has been postponed due to scheduling conflicts and will be rescheduled for a later date. 

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    Issues of privacy, transparency and accountability journalism will be explored in a public forum at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 13, in the auditorium of the William T. Young Library at UK.

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    The UK College of Communication and Information and the National Speech & Debate Association will host a Podius Debate on the UK campus on Thursday, Oct. 6. Two professional speakers and a moderator will analyze the controversial topic: the media is to blame for large-scale voter ignorance.

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    This Wednesday, Oct. 5, four members of NBC’s Olympic team will be on campus sharing their experiences covering the Games in Rio as the UK College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media presents its Gidel/Lombardo Sports Communication Lecture. 

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    UK alumnus Chad Yelton has a job that makes even his kids a little bit envious. In fact, they’ve often asked if they could join him every day at the office. That’s because his office is inside the Cincinnati Zoo. Watch the video and read the conversation below to discover why he loves his job so much and how his UK degree helps him every single day.  

     

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    Veteran journalist and former professor Battinto L. Batts will speak about social media's impact on the free speech rights of college students in his State of the First Amendment Address at UK on Tuesday, Sept. 27. 

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    Now successful news and sports reporters for ESPN, the Lexington Herald-Leader and McClatchy Newspapers, three UK grads talk about "Hurdling Barriers to Your Journalism Career" at 6:30 p.m. today in the William T. Young Library UK Athletics Auditorium.

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    Don Helme, associate professor in the UK Department of Communication, was in Qingdao, China, to work with scholars at Qingdao Technological University this summer as part of the UK Faculty China Short-Term Teaching Program.

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    UK School of Information Science Associate Professor Sherali Zeadally has received the Silver Jubilee Visiting Professorship Award from Edith Cowan University in Perth, Australia.

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    The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is again seeking nominations for its annual James Madison Award. The deadline for nominations is midnight Friday, Sept. 9.

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    The 2015-16 squad completed one of the most successful seasons in school history. Now, with a number of impressive recruits, the team prepares to open its competitive season in mid-September.

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    Sharon Burton, publisher of The Farmer’s Pride and Adair County Community Voice, will receive the award Sept. 29 in Lexington, at the annual Al Smith Awards Dinner of UK's Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues and the Bluegrass Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists.

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    After a diagnosis at 11 years old, UK sophomore Jessica Waters founded her own nonprofit — dedicating thousands of hours to community service and raising thousands of dollars for children like her. This summer, she received presidential recognition for her service in the nation's capital.

     

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    When David Stephenson isn't teaching at UK, advising Kentucky Kernel photographers or freelancing, the award-winning photojournalist is racing the "thoroughbreds of the sky." And he's capturing the beauty of their flight for his nearly 17,000 social media followers.

     

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    Media arts and studies student Marcus Dorsey has zipped and splashed through slides at dozens of water parks across the nation as well as parks in the Bahamas and in Dubai. It's all for fun, but it's also for his not-so-typical pastime: running a water slide database.

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    UK students are known for their successes in the classroom and on the court. Now students in the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications can add broadcasting to those categories.

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    UK School of Information Science Director Jeff Huber has been appointed to the senior editors team of the Journal of the Medical Library Association. 

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    The UK Forensics Team joined 85 other colleges and universities for the 2016 National Forensic Association national tournament hosted by Ball State University.

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    Freshmen in the UK College of Communication and Information’s CI Connect Living Learning Program participated this past semester in a pen pal program with fourth grade students at Joe Wright Elementary in Jacksonville, Texas.

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    Hannah Ellis will perform the song, "Officer Down," at the Peace Officers Memorial Day ceremony this Sunday, May 15.

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    Angela Evans, Larry Forester, Lois Mateus and Peggy Noe Stevens - leaders in their respective fields - join the UK College of Communication and Information's National Advisory Board.

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    The "CI Collective" includes the usability lab where students and faculty test emerging technologies and determine how users interact with them.

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    Graduates from the UK College of Communication and Information have degrees and experiences that prepare them for post-graduation life — including the rigorous challenges of Yale Law School.

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    Members of the UK College of Communication and Information family, including country singer J.D. Shelburne, were honored recently with awards for their outstanding work. 

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    U.S. Army Veteran. Musician. Leader. Wife. Christina Walker wears many hats, and she wears them well. On Sunday, May 8, she’ll be donning one she never imagined wearing — a graduation cap.

     

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    The University of Kentucky’s student entrepreneur team Race Assured placed fourth at the Idea State U finals competition this past weekend, winning the team $7,500. 

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    The people of UK are reaching out to help the people of Euador recover from a devastating earthquake.

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    William Henley, a graduate student in the UK School of Information Science, has been selected as one of three interns to work on the Alaska State Library Internship Project this summer.

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    Another UK student has earned an award from Phi Kappa Phi.

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    Completing one of the most successful years in the history of the UK Debate Team, the team recently competed at the 70th National Debate Tournament at the University of Binghamton.

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    The UK Information Communication Technology program facilitated two Periscope broadcasts as part of the fourth annual Bike Week, which gave students and employees the opportunity to ask a bike mechanic questions about repairs and spring tune ups.

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    The conference, April 14-16, is an internationally recognized venue for health communication research and practice with a goal to advance understanding of behavioral and communication science in health promotion and disease prevention.

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    Jeffrey Marks, the general manager of a Virginia television station who led his staff through the murder of two coworkers, will deliver the 39th Creason Lecture at the University of Kentucky on April 19.

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    University of Kentucky will hold a U.S.-China forum for administrators and highly accomplished researchers in various subfields of applied communication from several universities in the United States and China from April 13-15, on UK’s campus.

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    A student team from the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication won first place in their district in the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition. 

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    UK College of Communication and Information Professor Beth Barnes gave a talk on sales promotion, spoke on behalf of the U.S. Embassy at two other events, and answered questions about U.S. government and politics, U.S. higher education structure and opportunities for Zambian students.

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    More than 900 coaches, students and judges representing 86 schools from 28 states participated in the tournament at UK during spring break. The UK Forensics Team placed 10th overall. 

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    A Louisville native and UK graduate who won a Pulitzer Prize while working for the Wall Street Journal heads the 2016 class of inductees for the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. He will be inducted posthumously with eight other journalists on April 19.

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    Six successful graduates of the UK School of Journalism and Media will share how they got their start in the field at the Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium on Tuesday evening, March 29.

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    Jeff Huber, UK School of Information Science director and professor, was selected by the Medical Library Association to receive the 2016 Lucretia W. McClure Excellence in Education Award for his contributions to the field of health sciences librarianship.

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    UK alumnus and entrepreneur Randall Stevens is the new co-chair of the advisory board for the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking in the College of Communication and Information.

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    For the first time since 1994, UK is ranked among the top 16 debate teams in the country. The team is on its way to the national finals in a few weeks with two first-round “byes” in its pocket, and UK Debate Coach David Arnett could not be more proud. After all, as in a basketball tournament, a debate tournament bye is earned by a consistently excellent performance throughout the season.

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    The UK Forensics team’s next competition will be the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament held March 16-20, at UK. 

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    After she graduated from UK in 2012,  Hannah Ellis packed her bags and headed to Music City — Nashville, where her old Kentucky home would find its way back into her life and help shape her career.

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    From an early age, Hannah Ellis loved music. After she graduated from UK in 2012, she packed her bags and headed to Music City — Nashville. Little did she know, her old Kentucky home would find its way back into her life and would help shape her career.

     

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    University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information seniors Jordan Mason and Chelsea St. Clair were both selected to intern in New York City this summer through the Multicultural Advertising Intern Program.

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    Judges are needed for the national debate tournament to be held at UK March 17-20. Judges are paid $15 per round judged. No previous experience is necessary.

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    Two College of Agriculture students won the UK Venture Challenge, while two College of Engineering students came in second.

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    The UK Forensics team placed second in the Kentucky Forensic Association state championship tournament. Freshman competitor Veronica Scott was the tournament champion in persuasive speaking, which qualifies her to attend the 134th Interstate Oratorical Association National Tournament. 

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    The UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, in the College of Communication and Information, has changed its name to the School of Journalism and Media.

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    Awesome Inc. will lead an Android App Development Workshop to build ICT students' skill set and expose them to the mobile development world. A public open house will be held off campus later in the day.

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    UK students compete Saturday for scholarships and the right to represent their university at the statewide Idea State U. The public can take part in the judging by voting online.

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    Entries are being accepted now for the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award. Entries will be accepted through March 4.

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    Several first-place trophies were brought back to the University of Kentucky this week by the Forensics Team, including the team sweepstakes.

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    Students from the UK College of Communication and Information assisted the ESPNU broadcasting crew to produce a UK men's basketball game.

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    The UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications welcomes Lars Willnat as its new director.

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    Students are invited to take their ideas to the next level and gain entrepreneurial experience and contacts at the UK Venture Challenge, Saturday, Feb. 20. Venture Challenge is open to all UK undergraduate and graduate students with an innovative idea for a startup, existing business, or nonprofit venture.

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    UK College of Communication and Information Journalist-in-Residence John Winn Miller goes above and beyond serving as executive producer in the the new Indie film "Band of Robbers."

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    Zixue Tai, an associate professor in the College of Communication and Information, served as a judge for the 2016 EurekAlert! Fellowships for International Science Reports Program in China.

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    The UK Debate Team has posted a successful season so far with several team members bringing home top honors at multiple tournaments.

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    Representatives from the College of Communication and Information visited the Communication University of China in Beijing to dicuss partnernships in student exchanges, joint conferences and joint research in health communication and other areas.

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    University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information senior Kristyn Cherry will serve as student speaker during the December 2015 Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony Friday, Dec. 18.

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    Beth Barnes — interim part-time assistant provost for internationalization and director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications — plans to stay connected to UK throughout her time abroad in Zambia and London.

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    The Integrated Strategic Communication program recently became its own department within the College of Communication and Information.

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    The UK Debate Team placed first in the Transylvania University tournament Dec. 4-5. Thus far, the team has qualified to compete in 26 events at the national tournament in April.

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    Former political reporters Al Cross and John Miller collaborate to teach a journalism course, "Covering the Governor's Race."

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    The UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications will host the 2015 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 12. at the Singletary Center Recital Hall.

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    The College of Communication and Information is dedicated to improving lives through excellence in research, service, education and training for undergraduate and graduate students in the global society of the information age.

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    The UK Forensics team brought home the title of Grand Champion from the John G. Fee memorial tournament at Berea College.

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    The UK Debate team is off to a strong start in the 2015-2016 season. Team meber Donald Grasse has taken the top speaker award in the teams first two tournaments.

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    Renowned journalist and UK graduate will return home to Kentucky to talk roots at The Louisville Times and wings at The New York Times.

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    JoAnn Sciarrino will speak at the Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising and Digital Media hosted by the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication in the College of Communication and Information.

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    The UK Forensics team had a successful showing at the For the Sake of Argument tournament at Texas Christian University.

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    Jon Fleischaker will deliver the 10th annual State of the First Amendment Address Tuesday, Sept. 29 at 7:30 p.m. in the Alumni Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

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    The UK Forensics Team began their 2015-2016 season with a strong showing at the Fall Forensics Fiesta at Western Kentucky University.

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    The new Information Communication Technology program at UK graduated its first student from the program this summer.

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    The 2015 Gidel/Lombardo Sports Communication Series will make its way to campus Tuesday, Sept. 15, for a panel discussion.

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    The University of Kentucky debate team will begin its season Sept. 19.

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    UK Associate Professor Brandi Frisby's research suggests flirting is the key to a healthy, successful marriage.

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    Two University of Kentucky students were awarded the Kentucky Broadcasters Association Harry Barfield Scholarship for the 2015-2016 academic year.

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    UK's debate and forensics teams post impressive seasons.

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    An alumnus of the College of Communication and Information's Library and Information Science graduate program has been one of three chosen as one of the 2015 Associate Fellows at the National Library of Medicine.

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    The University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center held its sixth annual Markey Cancer Center Research Day, highlighting the work of UK students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty from the past year.

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    UK broadcast journalism students receive awards at 2015 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Awards ceremony

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    Cpl. Matthew Bradford, a Wounded Warrior and Purple Heart recipient who served in the United States Marine Corps, checks off the last item on his bucket list by studying journalism and history at UK.

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    An associate professor in the Media Arts and Studies program has been solicited to share his research and insight on social media and China with the global community of scholars and media practitioners by popular online publications.

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    Two UK integrated strategic communication students have placed in the top five of a national logo design competition offered by the Visual Communication Division of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication .

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    UK College of Communication and Information honored faculty, staff, students, alumni and friends at its annual Excellence Awards Dinner.

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    Chelsea St. Clair, an integrated strategic communication major from West Des Moines, Iowa, will work as an advertising intern at the Ogilvy and Mather New York offices this summer.

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    Students in CIS 112 partner with Kentucky Refugee Ministries to give refugee family a home in Lexington

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    Mike Farrell, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, has been awarded both the Kentucky award for Region Three Outstanding Advising Award in a Faculty Role and a national Outstanding Advising Award for Faculty Academic Advising from the National Academic Advising Association.

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    The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finishes the 2014-2015 season with its strongest performance to date; now looking toward team tryouts in August.

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    The 13th annual Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium will take place at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 21, in Room 230 of the Student Center.

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    UK professors Tae Hyun Baek and Chan Yun Yoo win Best Paper Award from the American Academy of Advertising.

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    UK Forensics Team places second at state tournament, moves on to national tournament April 16.

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    UK graduate, director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts to deliver State of the First Amendment Address

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    UK Forensics traveled to Athens, Ohio, to compete in the 49th annual Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament and Convention held at Ohio University. 

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    University of Kentucky Department of Communication Chair Elisia Cohen gave this year’s annual Walter Fisher Lecture at the University of South California.

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    Six new members will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Thursday, April 16, at The Grand Reserve, 903 Manchester Street #190, in Lexington. 

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    Pamela Brown, CNN justice correspondent, will deliver the 2015 Joe Creason Lecture in Journalism at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 16, in Room 118 of the White Hall Classroom Building.

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    UK alum Megan Powell loves sports, but working for ESPN as an associate producer is not just fun and games.  It takes a lot of hard work and adaptability.  From Alabama to California to New York, the Versailles native has traveled across the country in her position.  As March Madness begins, she'll help bring the Women's NCAA and NIT tournament action to viewers like you. 

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    Working for ESPN as an associate producer is not all fun and games.  Discover why a UK alum must bring a lot of energy into her job both before and during the games she helps to broadcast!

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    A special issue of Health Communication featured five UK authors and was edited by Nancy Harrington, associate dean for research in the College of Communication and Information. 

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    Architecture graduate student Mark Manczyk won the UK Venture Challenge and a $1,500 scholarship with his business idea, "re.3." 

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    Perry will present his lecture, "Saving Our Youth: Revolutionizing Education in America,"  at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 10, in Memorial Hall.

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    Creative and innovative students from across campus will pitch their business concepts at UK Venture Challenge, sponsored by the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNET), Saturday, Feb. 28, in the William T. Young Library Auditorium.

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    A Wildcat won big this weekend, but it didn't have anything to do with athletics. 

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    The new Journalist in Residence program in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Telecommunications was created to give students and the professional community at UK more exposure to professionals in the journalism field.

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    The Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications spent four days at the University of Kentucky’s College of Communication and Information evaluating the Journalism program and has recommended the program for re-accreditation

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    The Division of Instructional Communication and Research housed in the School of Library and Information Science hosted the 53rd annual Basic Course Director’s Conference at the Lexington Hyatt Regency on Jan. 22-24.

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    PRSSA announces first meeting of the semester.

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    The University of Kentucky has officially been selected to the host of the Pi Kappa Delta National Comprehensive Tournament in March of 2016.

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    Student teams can take their ideas to the next level and gain valuable entrepreneurial experience by competing in UK Venture Challenge. Registration is now open for the annual competition to be held on Saturday, Feb. 28.

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    The UK 150 contest aimed to collect at least 150 pitches of 150 seconds or less from UK students who posted their ideas on YouTube.

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    American and Chinese journalists are participating in a two-day seminar to discuss community journalism in the two countries. 

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    Sherali Zeadally, associate professor at the UK College of Communication and Information, has been selected to receive the 2014 IEEE-USA Professional Achievement Award for outstanding professional activities in education and research in the field of computer networking and information security. 

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    Lauren Thompson, a communication major from Louisville, was selected among several candidates by UK President Eli Capilouto to represent her class at the December 2014 Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony.

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    The UK Forensics Team, a student organization housed in the College of Communication and Information.had a strong showing this past weekend at the annual Proch Swing tournament at Bellmont University in Nashville, Tennessee. 

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    The UK150 Challenge, hosted by iNET in the College of Communication and Information, is to tap into the creativity and innovation of UK students. 

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    The UK College of Communication and Information recently held a disaster communication workshop to address the most pressing issues in that field. 

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    A recent study by Allison Scott, assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information, examines how the quality of communication among family members and care givers impacts end-of-life decisions. Scott says family communication holds a great deal of potential for improving end-of-life health care.

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    Representatives from the Wolf Run Wildlife Refuge recently visited two composition and communication classes at the UK College of Communication and Information as part of the curricullum's service component.

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    Students will learn a valuable entrepreneural tool called The Business Model Canvas as part of iNET, the Innovative Network for Entrepreneural Training at the UK College of Communication and Information. 

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    The UK Forensics Team in the College of Communication and Information is off to a strong start in the first several competitions of the year. 

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    The UK College of Communication and Information hosted a Professional-Amateur Networking Day Oct. 29 at the Hillary J. Boone Center to prepare soon-to-be graduates for their postgrad life. 

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    The Al Smith award for public service in community journalism by a Kentuckian and the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, tenacity and integrity in rural journalism were recently presented by the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues based at the UK College of Communication and Information.

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    First Generation students at the UK College of Communication and Information recently took a journey through time when they explored the history of the Underground Railroad in the Ohio Valley. 

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    "Ballot Bomb: Exploring the Young Voter Explosion," a KET documentary by Buck Ryan, professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Information, explores the question whether young voters can swing the U.S. Senate race in Kentucky. 

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    Richard Edelman, president and CEO of Edelman, the world's largest public relations firm, will deliver the 2014 James C. Bowlling Excellence-in-Residence lecture on Oct. 21 at the UK Singletary Center Recital Hall. 

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    Journalism students at UK have the unique oppportunity this semester to learn the ins and outs of political writing and reporting from two seasoned political journalists during one of the country's most hotly debated senatorial races. 

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    Beth Barnes, professor and director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, recently led a workshop at the Rural Doctors Association of South Africa 2014 conference. 

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    The UK Venture Challenge competition allows graduate and undergraduate students to show off their innovative and entrepreneurial spirit and gain real world experience.

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    The School of Journalism and Telecommunications is celebrating 100 years of journalism education at UK. 

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    Two faculty members from the Information Communication Technology Program at the UK College of Communication and Information recently published research exploring social media deception and how methods to detect it might be used on a broad scale. 

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    The UK Forensics Team, a public speaking and debate student organization housed within the College of Communication and Information, competes with teams all across the nation in 12 public speaking events and three forums of debate. 

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    The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center at the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications annually recognizes individuals outside the journalism profession who work to uphold or expand First Amendment freedoms. 

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    UK faculty members from the UK College of Arts and Sciences and the UK College of Communication and Information led a series of college teacher training workshops at Qingdao Technological University in China from July 14 through Aug. 1, 2014. 

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    Buck Ryan, of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Infomration is publishing an aticle on journalism education in a prestigious research journal on Chinese culture. 

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    The award is presented annually to honor and recognize a young alumna or alumnus who is an active member of the UK Alumni Association and who has worked on behalf of young people through the university, the association, their alumni club or in the local community.

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    The Kentucky Kernel, UK's daily student newspaper, has announced new staff for 2014-15.

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    Jeff Johnson, award winning television journalist, social activitst, political correspondent,  motivational speaker, and author will visit UK April 22.

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    Media consultant Mervin R. Aubespin will deliver the 37th annual UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications' Joe Creason Lecture April 29 in the Worsham Theater.

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    At noon April 18, in Chandler Hospital Pavilion A auditorium, Beth Barnes, director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, will discuss the school’s partnership with a media training organization in Zambia to raise the standard of reporting and use journalistic techniques to provide information on HIV and AIDS.  

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    Three UK undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneur teams won a total of $19,000 at the Cabinet for Economic Developmpent's Idea State U competition last weekend.

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    UK's top undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneurs will compete for a share of $100,000 against 25 teams from across the state at Idea State U, April 11-12 at the Lexington Convention Center.

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    Seven new members will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Tuesday, April 29, at a luncheon ceremony sponsored by the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications Alumni Association.  

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    The UK forensics team placed 14th in the nation at the Pi Kappa Delta National Comprehensive Tournament held March 20-23 at the Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis campus in Indianapolis.

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    Douglas Boyd, professor in the Department of Communication at the UK College of Communication and Information will receive the 2014 Broadcast Education Association's (BEA) Distinguished Education Service Award at the BEA's annual convention ceremony in Las Vegas in April.

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    Priority registration for the Kentucky Conference on Health Communication to be held April 11-12 is now open.

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    The UK Forensics team recently placed third in the annual Kentucky Forensics Association championship speech and debate tournament.

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    The undergraduate team Shouter and graduate team MosquitoTech were the winners of the third annual UK Venture Challenge student entrepreneur competition.

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    Information communication technology is a fast emerging field expected to rise over the next 10 years with most job categories reflecting double-digit increases.

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    Student participants in the 3rd Annual UK Venture Challenge Saturday, March 1, are competing for $3,000 in scholarship prizes and the opportunity to represent UK at the state competition in April.

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    Students will have the opportunity to participate in a set of educational workshops offered by the UK College of Communication and Information this summer that are uniquely designed for those looking to enhance their careers as professionals and as educators.

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    Student entrepreneurs still have time to register for the UK Venture Challenge competition on March 1.

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    Award recipients will be honored at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner Tuesday, March 4. 

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    The inaugural Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising and Media scheduled for 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 3, has been postponed due to inclement weather.

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    The Integrated Strategic Communication program in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications at the UK College of Communication and Information will host the inaugural Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising & Media.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is a competition which allows student entrepreneurs to present their ideas for a new innovation, product or service to a panel of judges for a chance to win a $3,000 scholarship prize and the right to represent UK at the state competition.

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    UK journalism Associate Professor Buck Ryan traveled to Moscow State University last semester to explore ways that UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunications might work with Russia's most prominent journalism program.  

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    Eric Hauck, CEO/President of Equinext LLC, will talk about the 10 Misconceptions about Business Plans from 5 - 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 21 at the- James. F. Hardymon Theater in the Davis Marksbury Building.

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    First-year College of Communication and Information students will be offered the opportunity to be part of UK's Living Learning Community for the first time in the fall of 2014.  

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    Students from 31 high schools representing 10 states in the region recently participated in UK's annual high school debate tournament, the Ohio Valley Invitational.

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    Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunications was recently honored by the Kentucky Psychological Association for his contributions to the health and mental health of Kentuckians. 

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    The UK Honors Program and the Citizen Kentucky Project will host a Kentucky Senate candidate forum for a special election to replace Kathy Stein in the 13th state Senate District.

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    Students in the iNET Living Learning Community discover that thinking like an entrepreneur will not only help them in the future, but also helps them day to day to be better students. Twenty freshmen from 16 majors and six colleges make the iNET LLC their campus home currently in Patterson Hall but moving to Champions Court I next year.

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    The UK College of Communication and Infomration held its 14th annual Awards Dinner recently honoring outstanding faculty, staff, alulmni, and past award recipients. 

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    The UK Venture Challenge allows students to show off their innovative and entrepreneural spirt while getting real world experience competing.

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    Facination with the Zombie Apocalypse is preparing students in the College of Communication and Information in crisis communication preparation and prevention. 

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    UK College of Communications and College of Library and Information Science merged in 1993 to form what is now the College of Communication and Information.

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    The Bowling Lecture honors James C. Bowling, the late retired assistant chairman of Philip Morris Companies Inc.

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    Al Cross, director of Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at UK was recently interviewed by the Washington Post blog The Fix. 

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    Beth Barnes, professor and director of the School of Journalism and Telecommunications in the UK College Communication and Information, has been appointed to serve on the Advertising Technical Committee at the Zambia Institute of Marketing. 

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    John Nelson, executive editor of the Danville-based Advocate Communications will be honored with the Al Smith Award for public service through community journalism during a dinner in Frankfort Nov. 16.

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    There’s an app for that.  A new iOS app developed in part by University of Kentucky researcher Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles will assist health care professionals seeking help communicating with patients during difficult conversations.

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    Come out for apple pie and lemonade as UK celebrates Constitution Day on Tuesday, Sept. 17.

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    David Wheeler, doctoral student at the UK College of Communication and Information, wrote an article on automated voice systems that was recently published on CNN's website.

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    Buck Ryan receives teaching award after completing a two-week summer course sponsored by the Confucius Institute.

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    Ryan will speak about the importance of engaging young voters in the 2014 midterm elections, especially the U.S. Senate race.

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    Video games often come under heavy fire for being both physically and mentally unhealthy for children and adults alike, but one UK professor is focusing his research efforts on how video games can be used to promote fitness and a healthy weight.

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    For many, talking to a celebrity is an once-in-a-lifetime experience.  For University of Kentucky alum Sharon Johnson, however, it's what she does on a daily basis.  As a CBS News/Newspath-Entertainment Producer, her job is to interview Hollywood stars about their upcoming projects. The Somerset native says her time at UK provided her with the experience and skills needed to build rapport with even the most famous celebrities.  

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    For many, talking to a celebrity is an once-in-a-lifetime kind of experience.  For University of Kentucky alum Sharon Johnson, however, it's what she does on a daily basis.  As a CBS News/Newspath-Entertainment Producer, her job is to interview Hollywood stars about their upcoming projects. The Somerset native says her experience at UK provided her with the experience and skills needed to build rapport with even the most famous celebrities.  

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    Sujin Kim, an associate professor of biomedical informatics at the University of Kentucky, has been chosen to receive UK's first Academic Planning, Analytics and Technologies Internal Grant Award.

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    A study about creativity in advertising, co-authored by Mark Stuhlfaut, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, was recently published in Advertising Age, one of the two major publications in the advertising field. 

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    UK Perspectives airs at 8:35 a.m. and 5:45 p.m. each Friday on WUKY 91.3, UK's NPR station.

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    Ashley Scoby, a UK journalism sophomore from Barren County, and Meaghan Downs of The Anderson News in Lawrenceburg, were selected as recipients of the 2013 David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards. 

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    H. Dan O'Hair, interim senior vice provost for Student Success, dean of the UK College of Communication and Infomration and professor in the Department of Communication will speak at a Congressional briefing on April 25.

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    ISC students from UK's School of Journalism and Telecommunciations won first place in district competition in the American Advertising Federation's National Student Advertising Competition held April 13.

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    All four teams of UK student entrepreneurs placed in the top two in their respective categroeis and won a total of $35,000 in prize money at Idea State U this past weekend.

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    The long-time journalist and now senior faculty for broadcast and online at the Poynter Institute will speak Tuesday, April 23.

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    The UK Forensics Team recently competed in the Kentucky State Championship Tournament and  placed second in the Individual Events Sweetpstakes for Large Division Schools and third in Debate Sweepstakes for Large Division Schools.

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    UK broadcast journalism studetns received three first places and a total of 10 awards overall at the 2013 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Awards ceremony.

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    H. Dan O'Hair, interim senior vice provost for Student Success, dean of the UK College of Communication and Information and professor in the Department of Communication, was named the recipient of the 2013 Broadcast Education Association Lifetime Achievement in Scholarship Award.

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    Unique summer camp will bring teachers and students together at the University of Kentucky for an intensive hands-on, immersion experience in communication teaching and learning.

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    It has been five years since a team from Kentucky made it to the elimination rounds at both winter break national college policy debate tournaments.

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    Craig R. Whitney, author of 'A Liberal's Case for the Second Amendment' will speak at UK March 28.

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    The UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications  will host the annual Richard G. Wilson Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) Alumni Symposium on March 25.

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    Five new members will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in April.

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    A new study authored by University of Kentucky researcher Elaine Wittenberg-Lyles shows that more empathic communication is needed between caregivers and hospice team members.

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    The University of Kentucky and the Commonwealth are front and center with strong representation in the first-ever class of the Alltech Graduate Academy, designed for emerging leaders in global agribusiness.

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    Thirty UK undergraduate and graduate student entrepreneur teams recently participated in the UK Venture Challenge.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is an annual event for student entrepreneurs  to compete for $3,000 in scholarships and the right to represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, in April.

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    In a second study featured in the January issue of the Journal of Communication, UK faculty from the UK College of Communication and Information and the College of Medicine, evaluated patients' needs after abnormal Pap test results and patient navigators' communication effectiveness.

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    UK faculty from the College of Public Health, the College of Communication and Information, and the Rural Cancer Prevention Center have developed a DVD intervention to promote the completion of the HPV vaccine series among women in the Appalachian communities of the Kentucky River Health District.

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    The UK Venture Challenge is an annual business competition for student entrepreneurs.

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    The awards honor the memory of David Dick, former director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications and a champion of great journalistic storytelling.  

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    Journalism professor and constitutional scholar to discuss the U.S. Electoral College.

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    The first iNET Colloquium on Entrepreneurship for the 2012 fall semester is available for viewing online and on UK Channel 16. 

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    Wildcats have reached the elimination round at every tournament they have attended so far. 

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    Jonathan D. Blum, chief public affairs officer, Yum! Brands Inc., will deliver the 2012 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 1, at the University of Kentucky Student Center’s Worsham Theatre.

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    Six graduates of the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications will share their experiences and insights on covering local news at the 11th annual Richard Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium on Wednesday.

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    Student entrepreneurs will learn about the "business model canvas" and plans for the 2013 University of Kentucky Venture Challenge from 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, Oct. 13, in the Ralph. G. Anderson Engineering Building Student Commons.

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    Professorship was established to "enhance communication education through the examination of existing research coupled with the generation of new ideas, concepts, and research findings in the area of communication."

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    The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center in the School of Journalism and Telecommunications will host the University of Kentucky Spelling Bee, a semifinal round of the Scripps National Spelling Bee for winners from schools in 63 Kentucky counties, in Spring 2013.

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    Students are invited to share ideas, meet iNET's entrepreneur in residence, and enjoy free pizza at the Cats Den from 5-6 p.m.
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    The event will begin at 11 a.m. with opening remarks from President Eli Capilouto on the north lawn of the Main Building.

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    UK alumnus Brian Raney, the first UK iNET Entrepreneur in Residence, is passionate about helping students become entrepreneurs.

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    High school students from Paul Laurence Dunbar, Henry Clay, Campbell County, Sayre School and Lexington Christian Academy spent an action-packed week at the University of Kentucky iNET I-Academy summer camp learning what it takes to be entrepreneurs.

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    UK journalism professor has visited Southern Africa to advocate for public's "right to know."  

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    ISC students professionally designed and pitched branding campaigns for two separate child welfare organizations in the Cape Town community.

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    Beth E. Barnes, professor and associate dean of undergraduate and international studies in the UK College of Communication and Information, was recently awarded a fellowship from Open Society Foundations to work with the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Kiev, Ukraine.

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    Associate Professor Buck Ryan has been named to JournalismDegree.org's list of Top 50 Journalism Professors for 2012.

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    Richard Labunski appears on "Kentucky Tonight."

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    A team of researchers and entrepreneurs based at the University of Kentucky is working to turn communication research into a profitable business model by developing a system of tailored messages aimed at reducing hospital readmissions.

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    A University of Kentucky journalism professor has written a detailed account of how an author used his research without attribution, something that scholars say happens often but is rarely discussed publicly. 

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    A new course designed to help students develop and refine digital storytelling skills with mobile technologies is being offered at the University of Kentucky during the Summer Eight-Week Session, starting Thursday, June 7.

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    The University of Kentucky Board of Trustees unanimously approved a proposal to change the name of the College of Communications and Information Studies. The college will be known as the College of Communication and Information, effective July 1.

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    University of Kentucky journalism senior Cassidy Herrington received a 2011 Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists for her story about Kentucky agriculture's dependence on migrant labor, which aired on WUKY in November.

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    University of Kentucky alumnus Wesley Jackson has been named publisher of The Courier-Journal, the state's largest newspaper in circulation. 

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    Four University of Kentucky freshmen in the First Generation Living Learning Community have been invited to deliver a presentation to the Eastern Communication Association convention, to be held April 26-29 in Boston.

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    The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications finished 10th in the annual William Randolph Hearst Foundation's Journalism Awards Program Intercollegiate Writing Competition for 2011-12.

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    Terry Birdwhistell, dean of libraries and William T. Young Endowed Chair at the University of Kentucky, has been chosen to receive the UK School of Library and Information Science Outstanding Alumnus Award for 2012.

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    University of Kentucky alumnus and former Kentucky Kernel Editor Jack Guthrie (1963) has created a fund to provide the equivalent of a full-tuition scholarship to future editors-in-chief of the Kernel, the independent student newspaper at UK. 

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    A panel of Chinese researchers will speak at the 12th biennial Kentucky Conference on Health Communication to be held April 19-21 at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington.

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    Aaron M. Smith, a University of Kentucky journalism junior from Oldham County, has been selected as the recipient of the first David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award for his story, "What Cal Left Behind."

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    Start-up companies made up of UK undergraduate and graduate students vied for cash prizes and valuable "face time" with the judges in two competitions, one for business concepts and one for business plans.

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    The college recognized student scholarship and fellowship recipients, in addition to outstanding accomplishments by staff, faculty, alumni and friends. 

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    John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will deliver the 35th annual University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Telecommunications' Joe Creason Lecture, titled "What the 2012 Campaign Tells Us About the State and Future of Political Journalism." 

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