• Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2018) — A public forum on the future of Lexington with the city’s mayoral candidates will be held over breakfast on Wednesday, April 25, on the University of Kentucky’s campus in Room 213 Kastle Hall.

    The forum, headlined “What’s Next, Lexington?” is being organized by the JOU 101: Introduction to Journalism class and is sponsored by the UK Student Government Association.

    If you have questions for the candidates, please send them to buck.ryan@uky.edu.

    The forum’s motto is “Spend two minutes or two hours, just add your two cents on what you would like to see for the future of Lexington.”

    The public forum will begin 8 a.m. and wrap up before 10 a.m. Participants will be able to pick up a program and voter guide, along with a bite to eat, in the first segment from 8 a.m. to 8:50 a.m. Then after a break the second segment will run from 9 a.m. to 9:50 a.m.

    All seven of the mayoral candidates, who face a May 22 primary election, have been invited and a majority have confirmed their attendance at the public event.

    The forum is being organized around three questions about Lexington:

    1. Where are we now?

    2. Where do we want to go?

    3. How are we going to get there?

    The last day to register to vote in the May 22 primary election is Monday, April 23, two days before the forum. The Kentucky Secretary of State’s Office offers online voter registration at https://vrsws.sos.ky.gov/ovrweb/

    “Please join the conversation,” said Gayle Hilleke, executive director of Kentucky Campus Compact, based at Northern Kentucky University, one of the partners for the event. “This is part of our larger ‘What’s Next, Kentucky?’ effort to bring citizens together for public problem-solving when citizens themselves step up or when they develop creative new relationships with public officials.”

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A public forum on the future of Lexington with the city’s mayoral candidates will be held over breakfast Wednesday, April 25, on UK’s campus in Room 213 Kastle Hall.
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  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Mike Farrell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 19, 2018) — His pictures graced the pages of National Geographic for 33 years, and on Thursday this UK alumnus will deliver the 41st annual Joe Creason Lecture.

    The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media, within the College of Communication and Information, will also recognize the photographer, Sam Abell, and eight other distinguished alumni as part of its Journalism Day Activities. The Creason Lecture, the announcement of the winners of the “David Dick What a Great Story!” Storytelling Awards and the introduction of the school’s distinguished alumni will begin at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, in the Kincaid Auditorium of the Gatton Business and Economics building. The public and the university community are invited. 

    The alumni to be recognized, in addition to Abell, are a popular and beloved Courier-Journal columnist; the editor of the newspaper of record for education; the founder of a public relations firm; an award-winning reporter, publisher and internet editor; a journalist whose career spanned 40 years including stints covering the Carter and Clinton White Houses and as a Washington correspondent; a two-time Kentucky Kernel editor-in-chief with a successful law career; a former reporter and editor who has served as communications director for three different Lexington mayors; and a Pulitzer Prize-winner for the Lexington Herald-Leader.

    Sam Abell (JOU/'69) began his photographic career before he ever stepped on the UK campus. The son of two teachers, he cites the influence of his father, a geography teacher and sponsor of a photography club, in the development of his career choice. He won an award in a national high school photography contest in 1960 for a black-and-white picture of his father standing at a train station. At UK, he became the editor of the Kentuckian yearbook, producing a two-volume set. After graduation, an interview led to his career taking photographs for National Geographic and a series of popular books. He is a teacher, an artist and an author. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1991 and into the university’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000.

    Gene Clabes (JOU/'69) is an award-winning reporter, former owner/publisher of a group of award-winning community weeklies in Northern Kentucky and the associate editor of the Northern Kentucky Tribune, an online news site. He has also been a college journalism instructor and served as president of the Kentucky Press Association. A native of Henderson, Kentucky, he started in journalism in high school as a sports reporter for The Gleaner, was managing editor of the Kernel, was an award-winning education reporter for The Evansville Courier and government reporter for the Evansville Press. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2004 and was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award by the UK College of Communication and Information in 2005.

    Joe Creason (JOU/'40) was born in Benton in far Western Kentucky. After graduation, he edited newspapers in Benton and Murray, Kentucky, before accepting a position in 1941 as a sports reporter, which led to opportunities as a feature writer and columnist for The Courier-Journal. His popular column, "Joe Creason's Kentucky," began in 1963 and documented the lives of everyday Kentuckians. The articles were collected into two books and a record album. He was also president of the UK Alumni Association. The Bingham family, owners of The Courier-Journal, other friends of Creason, and UK alumni established the Joe Creason Lecture Series, which began in 1977 with a lecture by nationally syndicated columnist James J. Kilpatrick. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. He will be represented by his son Bill Creason.

    Virginia Edwards (JOU/'78) oversaw the 90-person, $14.5 million-a-year nonprofit corporation that publishes Education Week and edweek.org as president of Editorial Projects in Education from 1997–2016. From 1989–2016, she served as editor-in-chief of Education Week — the premier “newspaper of record” for precollegiate education in the United States. She also served as editor of edweek.org, which reaches an audience of more than 1.2 million registered users. Before joining Educational Projects in Education, she worked for two years at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and, for nearly 10 years before that as a reporter and editor at The Courier-Journal. She was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    John R. (Jack) Guthrie (JOU/'63) founded Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations, one of the largest independently owned public relations firms in Kentucky. He sold his interest in 2005 to three senior staff members. Guthrie began his career in 1964 in the public relations department of Philip Morris Inc. in New York City. He was appointed community relations manager for the company’s Louisville facilities in 1967 and moved back to New York as director of communications for Philip Morris in 1969. He returned to Louisville as president of the Kentucky Derby Festival (1971-1977) where he was the driving force that propelled the two-week event into national prominence as one of the nation’s largest civic celebrations. He was appointed to the UK Board of Trustees for a six-year term as alumni trustee in 1996. Guthrie was named president of the UK Alumni Association in 1988 and remains on its board of directors. For eight years, beginning in 1993, he was president of UK’s School of Journalism Alumni Association and chairman of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Committee.

    Walter M. Grant (JOU/'67) was born and raised in Winchester, Kentucky. After graduating from high school, where he was editor-in-chief of the high school newspaper, he attended Centre College for one year before transferring to UK so he could major in journalism. He served as editor-in-chief of the Kernel during both his junior and senior years at UK. After graduation he moved to Washington, D.C., where he served as editor of the College Press Service for one year. He then enrolled in law school at Vanderbilt University and graduated first in his class. During his third year in law school, he served as editor-in-chief of the Vanderbilt Law Review. Grant joined the law firm Alston & Bird, still one of the largest law firms in Atlanta and the Southeast and was named a partner in the firm. While maintaining an active law practice, Grant also served as editor-in-chief of the Georgia State Bar Journal for three years. In 1983, one of Grant's clients, Contel Corporation, persuaded him to join Contel as its general counsel. Grant continued in this capacity for eight years until Contel was acquired by GTE Corporation, which later became a part of Verizon Communications. After serving as general counsel of three other companies in different industries, Grant decided to take a different path. Since then, he has been involved in several businesses in different capacities and has served as a member of the board of directors of several companies.

    William Neikirk (JOU/'60) is an award-winning journalist, working for more than 40 years as a Washington correspondent, columnist and editor. He was chief economics correspondent, White House correspondent during the Carter administration, and Washington Bureau news editor for the Chicago Tribune in the 1970s and early 1980s. He later served as the newspaper’s assistant managing editor for business news in Chicago and then returned to Washington to cover the Clinton White House. Before joining the Tribune, he worked as a reporter for the Associated Press in Lexington and Frankfort, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, and Washington, D.C. His awards include the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting. He was a runner-up for the Pulitzer Prize for a series on the impact of foreign trade. He wrote two books: “Volcker: Portrait of the Money Man” and “The Work Revolution: How High-Tech Is Sweeping Away Old Jobs and Industries and Creating New Ones in New Places.” Now retired, he and his wife, Ruth, both born and raised in Kentucky, live in Northern Virginia. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. He is unable to make the trip to UK and will be represented by members of his family.

    Susan Straub (JOU/'77) started her career working in newspapers, first in Georgetown and then in Northern Kentucky. She was promoted to the position of a suburban editor at The Cincinnati Post. After 10 years as a reporter and editor, she began working in public relations, and soon found her way to the Lexington Mayor’s Office, serving as communications director for then-Mayor Pam Miller, Lexington’s first woman mayor. Today, Straub is working for her third mayor, Jim Gray. When she began her work at City Hall, Lexington was a city of 225,000. Now the population tops 318,000. The dramatic growth has brought dramatic change, and Straub has enjoyed the opportunity to keep her community informed and translate the complicated work of government into language everyone can understand. She has two sons and is a devoted and doting grandmother of two young Straubs.

    Michael York (JOU/'74) was the political writer for the Kernel and broke two national stories as a student covering democratic Sen. George McGovern’s 1972 presidential campaign. He worked part-time as a reporter for Durham Morning Herald while attending law school at University of North Carolina. He helped put out the first edition of The Legal Times in Washington, D.C., then he joined the staff of the Lexington Herald. York won awards from the Kentucky Press Association and shared in the 1980 E.W. Scripps First Amendment Award. He won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting with Jeffrey Marx for a series of stories on NCAA rules violations in UK basketball and at other schools. York moved to Washington in 1983 as the Lexington Herald-Leader’s correspondent, then to The Washington Post in 1987 as investigative reporter. He formed a law firm, Wehner & York, in 1994, which represents journalists, bloggers and news websites, among other clients. He has been inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    Photographer Sam AbellOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: His pictures graced the pages of National Geographic for 33 years, and at 7:30 tonight, Thursday, this UK alumnus will deliver the 41st annual Joe Creason Lecture. The UK School of Journalism and Media is also honoring eight other distinguished alumni as part of its Journalism Day Activities.Section Feature: Section Feature
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  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2018)  A University of Kentucky alumna and adjunct professor are part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning team for their work covering the heroin epidemic.

    The Pulitzer Prizes, journalism's most prestigious awards program, were announced Monday, April 16, by administrator Dana Canedy, also a UK alumna.

    Sarah Brookbank, a Cincinnati Enquirer reporter and 2015 graduate of the UK School of Journalism and Media within the College of Communication and Information, and James Pilcher, investigative reporter at The Enquirer and journalist-in-residence at UK, both reported for the paper's “Seven Days of Heroin” project. UK alumna Nancy Daly, who graduated with a degree in journalism in 1982, also works on staff at The Enquirer.  

    Their team was awarded the coveted Pulitzer in the local reporting category, "for a riveting and insightful narrative and video documenting seven days of greater Cincinnati's heroin epidemic, revealing how the deadly addiction has ravaged families and communities."

    “Winning a Pulitzer Prize is to a journalist what winning an Olympic gold medal is to an athlete,” said Mike Farrell, professor and interim director of the School of Journalism and Media. "To see Sarah and James honored for their roles reinforces our faith in our students and the training we can provide them."

    More than 60 reporters, photographers and videographers went into Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities to explore the epidemic's impact and the personal stories of those affected. The piece chronicles just one week — July 10 through July 16 — but includes 18 deaths, nearly 200 overdoses, hundreds of heroin users in jail and 15 babies born with heroin-related medical issues.

    Brookbank was a news and features editor at the Kentucky Kernel while attending UK and Pilcher teaches data journalism and investigative journalism at UK.

    In a Kentucky Kernel story on the award, Pilcher spoke about UK's many connections to the Pulitzers.

    “The fact that Sarah was part of it, I was part of it, the Pulitzer chairwoman was part of it, I think it speaks to the legacy and the ongoing quality that speaks to the UK School of Journalism,” he said in the Kernel.

    “What is even better is that this was such a powerful story and on such a critical topic, a drug that is robbing families of loved ones," Farrell said. "The story reinforces our faith in the power and importance of journalism. And we are extremely proud that the wonderfully talented and accomplished Dana Canedy, a Pulitzer winner herself and one of our distinguished graduates, is the administrator of these coveted awards."

    View the full list of Pulitzer Prize winners here

    James Pilcher, investigative reporter at the Enquirer and journalist-in-residence at UK, and Sarah Brookbank, a Cincinnati Enquirer reporter and 2015 graduate of the UK School of Journalism and Media.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK alumna Sarah Brookbank and journalist-in-residence, James Pilcher, are part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning team for their work covering the heroin epidemic. The prestigious awards were announced Monday by Pulitzer Prizes administrator Dana Canedy, also a graduate of UK.Section Feature: Section Feature
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  • Body: Student and Academic LifeBy Bridgette Sloan Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2018)  It is a rare learning opportunity when students get to speak with an industry insider — especially when the insider works for one of the most famous bands on the planet. This was the experience for University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information students in Marc Whitt’s integrated strategic communication (ISC) event planning class when they got the chance to Skype with Beau Loendorf, event coordinator for the Grammy Award-winning rock band Chicago. The band has been performing for over 50 years and was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2016.

    The video conference took place April 3 during a rare break in Chicago’s hectic tour schedule. It was the result of months of planning by Loendorf and Whitt, who had been exchanging emails and texts since last summer to arrange the meeting. For well over an hour, Loendorf shared career and event planning advice with students and answered individual questions from each audience member. “Before Beau left us, he invited the students to connect with him via social media and to even share their resumes for a personal critique! Now that’s an incredible invitation!” Whitt said.

    Each semester, Whitt invites three guest speakers who are professional event planners to address his class, so students can learn from their real-world experience. Having Loendorf talk about his involvement with Chicago and how he coordinates their large-scale events brought a new and exciting perspective to students.

    “I think it is great having someone in the field they are trying to go into share insight on their story,” Loendorf said. “During my time in college we never had the opportunity to do something like this and ask questions with someone in the field we wanted to go into. I hope you all do more lectures like this because I thought it was great.”

    Loendorf added, “As for the students: they were wonderful and asked some great questions that made me think of things I have not thought of for a while. From questions regarding what I enjoy most and least about my job, fan interaction, and even with what I do to stay organized for traveling so much. I was impressed with all the questions they asked.”

    Loendorf, who holds a degree in communication studies from Colorado State University, has been planning events for Chicago since October 2016. When he is not traveling with the band on their nearly nonstop tour, he operates Big and Little, an event planning company in Colorado he co-founded.

    Some of the advice Loendorf had for students included becoming “super organized” and “stay on top of everything if you wish for everything to run smoothly.” He also stressed that attitude is important and having a positive outlook is key if you want a good outcome in the end.

    Whitt, who is also the director of philanthropy communications at UK, has special connections to Chicago. In addition to being a lifelong fan who has seen the band in concert 25 times, Whitt is a member of the national music fraternity Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia and was involved when the fraternity honored Chicago and its horn section, who are all fraternity members. Thanks to a good friend who was once the band’s tour manager, Whitt and his family have also had the opportunity to meet the band several times and even joined them for dinner.

    Whitt was very excited for his students to have this rare opportunity and thankful to Loendorf for generously sharing his time. “The students were able to hear from a professional whose bosses are members of Chicago. When does that ever happen?” 

    Beau Loendorf, event coordinator for the Grammy-award winning rock band Chicago, Skyped with UK ISC students in their event planning class.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: It is a rare learning opportunity when students get to speak with an industry insider — especially when the insider works for a Grammy Award-winning rock band.
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  • Body: Student and Academic LifeBy Bridgette Sloan Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 16, 2018) — Several students from the University of Kentucky's Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the College of Communication and Information took home gold and silver at the 2018 American Advertising Federation (AAF) ADDY Awards this semester. ISC students won in the categories of sales and marketing, print advertising, cross-platform, out of home and ambient media, elements of advertising, and online/interactive.

    The theme of this year’s event was ‘Boundless’ in reference to the global impact of creative advertising.

    The students who won gold were:

    • Rachel Buettner: Best of Show, Publication Design Book Cover (Sales & Marketing)
    • Robert Fischer: Judge’s Choice, Magazine Advertising Single Page (Print Advertising)
    • Claire Monkman: Outdoor Board (Out of Home & Ambient Media); Consumer Campaign (Cross Platform)

    The silver winners were: 

    • Robert Fischer: Two awards for entries in Social Media Single Execution (Online/Interactive)
    • Julia Harold: Packaging (Sales & Marketing)
    • Ally Iglesias: Judge’s Choice, Packaging (Sales & Marketing); Judge’s Choice, Cover/Editorial Spread or Feature Series (Sales & Marketing)
    • Chloe McMullen: Single Illustration (Elements of Advertising)
    • Liz Moore: Consumer Campaign (Cross Platform)
    • Jennifer O’Hagan: Logo Design (Elements of Advertising) 

    Rachel Hughes also won the Lexington Ad Club’s $1,000 student scholarship.

    The entries submitted by students were produced mostly in ISC 331 and 431 classes, "Advertising Creative Strategy" and "Execution I and II," taught by assistant professors Adriane Grumbein and Laura Fischer. Grumbein and Fischer met with students outside of class to help them perfect their work.

    "I am incredibly proud of these students," said Grumbein. "They are creative, talented and all-around awesome human beings! And, their work speaks for itself. ADDY awards are nationally recognized awards in the advertising world. Having one on your resume tells employers you are the best of the best. I can't wait to see what lucky company gets to snap these students up because they're headed for greatness."

    Fischer added, “The ADDY awards are a great way to let the advertising community learn more about our students and the work that they do in our classrooms. Additionally, it is a great honor for our students and their portfolios. It allows them to meet and network with professionals, while seeing the rewards for their hard work.” 

    The AAF ADDY awards competition is the first step in a three-tiered competition. Gold-winning entries advance to district competition, where judges decide which work will move on to nationals.

    The AAF was established in 1905 and is the “Unifying Voice for Advertising” as the only organization that includes members from all career levels and disciplines. The AAF has nearly 100 corporate members, over 200 college chapters and more than 200 local clubs nationwide. Annually, AAF hosts several programs, such as the Advertising Hall of Fame, the National Student Advertising Competition, the Mosaic Center on Multiculturalism and summer Ad Camps for high school students.

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Several students from the University of Kentucky's Department of Integrated Strategic Communication took home gold and silver at the 2018 American Advertising Federation (AAF) Lexington ADDY Awards this semester.Section Feature: Section Feature
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  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Harlie Collins Thursday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 12, 2018)  If you're unaware that your tweets could be analyzed by researchers and published in studies without your consent, you're not alone. A majority of Twitter users don't know that researchers often gather and study their tweets – and occasionally, even the deleted ones.

    Most believe researchers should be asking for permission and wrongly assume not doing so violates Twitter's Terms of Service, according to a new study by University of Kentucky Assistant Professor Nicholas Proferes and Casey Fiesler, an assistant professor at the University of Colorado Boulder.

    On the heels of the Cambridge Analytica controversy, in which 87 million Facebook users might have had their data shared with the firm, questions abound about data, privacy and ethics on social media and beyond.

    "In light of recent events, transparency is even more important," said Proferes, co-author and faculty member in the UK College of Communication and Information's School of Information Science.

    By surveying 268 individuals who used public Twitter accounts, the authors also found that many users thought researchers were banned from collecting and analyzing public tweets; were surprised that deleted tweets might be used in studies; and had very strong opinions on the practice if those users were taking steps to protect their account.

    Part of the problem, Proferes said, is how social media companies neglect to explain how information flows and is used beyond users' intended audiences.

    Many areas of research rely on social media data, from predicting sentiment for products to better understanding how communities respond to social events. In the study, most users thought using public social media data for science is important and would be willing to let their content be used for scientific research if they were asked.

    "This raises a number of questions about how we, as researchers, should handle user content, and how we might go about informing users about research that uses their publicly available content," he said.

    Typically, researchers are required to go through Institutional Review Board (IRB) processes when conducting research on human subjects, but these can differ among institutions. For example, some IRBs may treat research using publicly available social media data as an observational study in a public space that doesn’t require consent.

    "But is Twitter equivalent to a public park?" Proferes said. "It's not. If I see someone observing me, I can walk away. Twitter is a one-way mirror."

    Proferes and Fiesler also found that users’ attitudes toward the practice differed depending on contextual factors, such as the topic of the research, the pool of data — one tweet or the user's entire history — and whether the tweets would be attributed or anonymous.

    The researchers offer some best practices and considerations for researchers using public social media data: 1) Ask for permission if there is a reasonable way to do so; 2) Anonomyze identifying information when quoting tweets; 3) Request permission to publish the user’s identity; and 4) Avoid using deleted content.

    Proferes and Fiesler are also working on additional ethical guidelines to inform the research community, and Proferes is working with a colleague to develop a tool that could be used on social media to provide users with more information regarding research studies.

    "Twitter is a really rich source of data for scientists to understand social phenomena," Proferes said. "But we can do better about informing people about our research, getting their permission when possible and sharing our findings."

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: If you're unaware that your tweets could be analyzed by researchers and published in studies without your consent, you're not alone. A majority of Twitter users don't know that researchers often gather and study their tweets according to a new study.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Hale Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 9, 2018) The University of Kentucky Office of Nationally Competitive Awards will host two sessions with Rhodes Scholars Fagan Harris, the assistant American secretary of the Rhodes Trust, and Raymond Burse, former president of Kentucky State University, on the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship. All programming will be presented on Friday, April 13.

    The day will begin with a coffee and conversation program on the Rhodes Scholarship for faculty running 9-10:15 a.m., in Room 101 at the James W. Stuckert Career Center. This program will be an opportunity to learn more about the Rhodes Scholarship and its connection to Oxford University. The event will also identify ways UK faculty can help recruit more UK students to apply for the award. Those interested in attending this event are asked to RSVP to pat.whitlow@uky.edu to ensure sufficient space and coffee.

    Students can learn more about the Rhodes Scholarship later that same day at a session running 1-2 p.m., in Room 101 at the Stuckert Career Center.

    The Rhodes Scholarships are the oldest and most celebrated international fellowship awards in the world. Each year 32 young students from the United States are selected as Rhodes Scholars. Rhodes Scholars are chosen not only for outstanding scholarly achievements, but for character, commitment to others and to the common good, and for potential for leadership in their careers. The Rhodes Trust provides full financial support for scholars to pursue a degree or degrees at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

    The campus deadline for Rhodes Scholarship applicants is Sept. 7, 2018. UK nominees for Rhodes will be selected after an on-campus interview with a committee of faculty members.

    For more information on either of the Rhodes Scholarship programs, contact the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards at 859-257-4984 or email pat.whitlow@uky.edu.

    The UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, part of the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Division of Student and Academic Life at UK, assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as a nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to begin work with the office's director, Pat Whitlow, well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

    UK's Office of Nationally Competitive Awards will present a Rhodes Scholar information session for UK students from 1-2 p.m. Friday, April 13, in Room 101 of the Stuckert Career Center.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreHealth SciencesHonors CollegePublic HealthSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK's Office of Nationally Competitive Awards will host two sessions with Rhodes Scholars Fagan Harris, the assistant American secretary of the Rhodes Trust, and Raymond Burse, former president of Kentucky State University, on the prestigious Rhodes Scholarship. All programming for students and faculty will be presented on Friday, April 13.
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  • Body: Professional NewsBy Kathy Johnson Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 2, 2018) — The Women’s Executive Leadership Development (WELD) program at University of Kentucky has announced the following faculty and staff members have been selected to participate in the third cohort of the program. 

    • Tomi Akinyemiju, associate professor and assistant dean for inclusive excellence, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health
    • Kimberly Applegate, professor, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine
    • Katie Ballert, associate professor, Department of Urology, College of Medicine
    • Tiffany Barnes, associate professor, Department of Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Kristen Brown, associate director of Ambulatory Operations, UKHealthCare
    • Michelle Butina, program director and associate professor, Medical Laboratory Science Program, College of Health Sciences
    • Karen Butler, professor and assistant dean of academic operations, College of Nursing
    • Jennifer Cramer, associate professor and director of undergraduate studies, Department of Linguistics, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Amy DiLorenzo, senior lecturer and assistant dean for educational innovation and scholarship, Department of Anesthesiology, College of Medicine
    • Jennifer Edwards, assistant director of communications and strategic planning, Information Technology Services
    • Sally Foster, director of the Center for Personal Development, Lewis Honors College
    • Beth Goins, co-director of communication, College of Education
    • Tamra Langley, director of advanced practice provider critical care fellowship, Critical Care Medicine, UKHealthCare
    • Jessica Lee, associate professor, Department of Neurology, College of Medicine
    • Anne Lichtenberg, director of annual giving, Office of Philanthropy
    • Sarah Lyon, associate professor, Department of Anthropology, College of Arts and Sciences 
    • Barbara Nikolajczyk, associate director for translational research in diabetes, Barnstable Brown Diabetes and Obesity Center, and associate professor, Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, College of Medicine
    • Margaret Rintamaa, associate professor, Department of Instruction and Administration, College of Education
    • Karen Roper, associate research director, Department of Family and Community Medicine, College of Medicine
    • Lumy Sawaki Adams, associate professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine
    • Elizabeth Seelbach, associate professor, Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine
    • Sara Shahid Salles, professor and vice chair, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, College of Medicine
    • Megan Sizemore, chief of staff, College of Communication and Information
    • Therese Smith, director of the Community of Concern, Office of the Dean of Students
    • Alison Woodworth, associate professor, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, medical director, Clinical Chemistry and Point of Care Testing, College of Medicine
    • Sadia Zoubir-Shaw, associate professor and executive director of KFLC: The Language, Literatures, and Cultures Conference, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, College of Arts and Sciences

    “It is with great pleasure that I welcome the 2018 cohort to our WELD program," said WELD Director Hollie Swanson. "I look forward to guiding them on this next phase of their leadership journey. The high caliber of this group is a testament to all of the highly qualified individuals who applied, the strong support of their sponsors and the dedicated work of our WELD Advisory and Selection Committees.”

    The eight-month WELD program is designed to develop the next generation of University of Kentucky leaders through retreats, monthly meetings, conversations with upper level administrators and a group project. The upcoming WELD Kick-Off Lecture Thursday, April 26, will feature Lori Gonzalez, vice chancellor of academic, faculty and student affairs at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center and former dean of the College of Health Sciences at the University of Kentucky. The lecture will begin 4 p.m., April 26, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationHealth SciencesHonors CollegeMedicineNursingPublic HealthUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Twenty-six faculty and staff members have been accepted into UK's Women's Executive Leadership Development program.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2018) The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team placed eighth in the nation at the largest collegiate speech and debate competition in the country, the Pi Kappa Delta National Comprehensive Tournament. This placing extends the teams history of ranking in the top 10 at this national competition to its fourth continuous year and represents a new best placing for the university.

    This year’s tournament was hosted by Tennessee State University and had 82 colleges and universities in attendance for the four-day competition. Together, these schools entered more than 2,000 speeches and debate teams, which if spoken end-to-end, would last for nearly 58 days of continuous advocacy. In addition to placing eighth in combined team sweepstakes, the team from UK also placed fourth in debate sweepstakes and 10th in the sweepstakes category for speech events.

    “This tournament certainly represents a high point for our team,” Director Timothy Bill said. “The students spend months working for this moment. Placing eighth overall against the best teams in the nation shows just how talented and capable the students from UK are.”

    Bill went on to note that “this placing is also a result of alumni support. Our three judges were incredible in helping us throughout the week. We couldn’t have done it without them.”

    In addition to the team placings, senior Matt Karijolic became the second person in team history to be crowned a national champion at this tournament by winning extemporaneous commentary. Senior Rachel Brase was the top speaker in the varsity division of parliamentary debate and also placed fourth in slam poetry. Sophomore Laura McAllister was the fourth place speaker in the junior varsity division of parliamentary debate.

    View the full list of awards won by UK students at the tournament here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. The team’s final competition of the season will be the National Forensic Association National Tournament held April 19-23, at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

     

    Members of the UK Speech and Debate Team after placing eighth at the Pi Kappa Delta National Comprehensive Tournament.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team placed eighth in the nation against 82 colleges and universities at the largest collegiate speech and debate competition in the country.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Harlie Collins Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 20, 2018) — Virginia Eubanks, author of "Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor" will speak at the University of Kentucky on Wednesday, April 4, as part of the School of Information Science’s scholarly talk series, “SIS Talks.”   

    Eubanks is an associate professor of political science at the University at Albany, State University of New York, an author and editor of three books, a founding member of the Our Data Bodies Project and a fellow at New America. The guest lecture will begin at noon, in Kincaid Auditorium (Room 111) of the Gatton College of Business and Economics building.

    In her new book, "Automating Inequality," Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America. She draws from personal experience and three detailed narratives to illustrate data-based discrimination in automated systems that are used by the government to deliver social services.

    “Eubanks’ 'Automating Inequality' should be required reading for everyone interested in pursuing a career in ICT or policy. She debunks the myth that 'technology is neutral' and explicitly shows us how we embed our biases into our technologies in order to maintain a political agenda,” said David Nemer, assistant professor of information communication technology, an academic degree program housed in the UK College of Communication and Information. “It is a great wake-up call for those who put too much faith in technology and expect it to solve our social issues — when in fact, the technology is only amplifying the will of their stakeholders.”

    Eubanks will discuss communication technologies that promise to streamline public services, for example, automated systems that gauge welfare eligibility and databases that connect the homeless with housing resources.

    “In my class ICT 300: Information Communication Technology in Society, I thoroughly discuss this topic with my students and they are often surprised by how naively we tend to analyze the role of technology in society. By bringing this theme and Eubanks' approach, I hope students critically engage with ICT and understand that developing ICT is not just a matter of technical skills, but also understanding it as a social object with serious implications to our society,” Nemer said. 

    For two decades, Eubanks has worked in community technology and economic justice movements. She is author of "Digital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age" and co-editor with Alethia Jones of "Ain’t Nobody Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith." 

    “One of the reasons I’m optimistic is that these systems are also really incredible diagnostics. They make inequities in our country really concrete, and really relevant. Where one of the systems goes spiraling out of control is a place where we have a deep inequality that needs to be addressed,” said Eubanks in an interview with MIT Technology Review. “And so, I believe that the combination of the movement work that’s already happening now and increased attention to systems like these can create incredible pressure to create a more just social system overall.”

    For more information about "SIS Talks," email david.nemer@uky.edu.

    Virginia EubanksOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: In her new book, "Automating Inequality," Eubanks systematically investigates the impacts of data mining, policy algorithms and predictive risk models on poor and working-class people in America.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Hale Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2018) The University of Kentucky Student Organization for Art History will present its first symposium, “Politics and Aesthetics: An Interdisciplinary View,” later this year. The organization will take abstract submissions for the symposium from UK students across several fields of study through March 16, 2018.

    In today’s sociopolitical climate — where protesters regularly take to the streets with visually striking signs that claim their right to representation and to fight discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion and nationality — the political potential of aesthetics demands attention. Furthermore, as powerful politicians deploy images on social media with the aim of manipulating their followers, the role of aesthetics in politics has become a vital issue to consider.

    The intention of “Politics and Aesthetics” is to address the question: What role does aesthetics, with its emphasis on nature, representation and subjectivity, play in today’s political climate? Submissions for the 2018 symposium may address such topics as:

    • visual culture of resistance;
    • political representations of gender, sexuality, nationality, ethnicity and race;
    • social media and technology;
    • politics of performance;
    • critical spatial practices in art, design and architecture;
    • graphical strategies in politics;
    • critical theory and aesthetic philosophy;
    • relationships between art and activism;
    • aesthetic tactics of minor histories and experiences; and
    • politicizing popular culture.

    The UK Student Organization for Art History will accept submissions for “Politics and Aesthetics” from both undergraduate and graduate scholars in art history/visual studies, gender and women’s studies, philosophy, theatre and dance, music, film studies, design, architecture, cultural studies, and other related humanities fields at UK.

    Interested applicants should submit abstracts no longer than 300 words to UK Student Organization for Art History at uksofah@gmail.com with the subject “2018 Symposium.” Submissions should include the applicant’s name, proposed title of the paper, and applicant’s field of study. Applicants may also include a curriculum vitae/résumé, but it is not required. Deadline for submissions is Friday, March 16, 2018.

    The Student Organization for Art History (SOfAH)’s mission is to provide outside-of-the-classroom resources and networking opportunities for art history and visual studies (AH/VS) students at UK School of Art and Visual Studies.

    The School of Art and Visual Studies, at the UK College of Fine Arts, is an accredited member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art studio, art history and visual studies, art education, and digital media and design.

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationDesignFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationPatterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Student Organization for Art History will present its first symposium, “Politics and Aesthetics: An Interdisciplinary View,” later this year. UK students across several fields of study are encouraged to submit abstracts for the symposium through March 16, 2018.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Whitney Harder Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2018)  After graduating from the University of Kentucky in 2013, Luke Reedy took a chance to follow his dreams. He moved to Los Angeles without a job and knew only two people in the area. Today, he works for Warner Bros. as a post-production coordinator.  

    "During my senior year, I applied to hundreds of jobs in LA and never received a response … someone told me the only way to get a job in LA is to move there," said Reedy, who earned a media arts and studies degree from the College of Communication and Information.

    "So I found a place, packed up my car and headed west."

    After two months working at a country club while job searching, he landed his first gig in the television industry. He went on to work on the shows "Claws" and "Rizzoli & Isles," both on TNT, as well as the pilot for "Training Day," a show that aired on CBS, and "ESPN Sport Science," among others. He's met Ben Affleck and Jay Leno and worked with numerous stars, but he was most excited to work with Dean Norris and Bill Paxton.

    "Working in post you get to be a part of the entire process… You get to see what the script becomes."

    His latest work was managing the post-production office for ABC's new show "Deception," starring Jack Cutmore-Scott as superstar magician Cameron Black who joins forces with the FBI.

    Reedy worked with actors and agents to schedule automated dialogue replacement, which improves audio quality or changes dialogue; ensured production cuts were delivered on time; and helped the production crew in preparing dailies (the raw, unedited footage from the day's shoot).

    This weekend, he'll be watching his hard work on the small screen as "Deception" premieres at 10 p.m. (9 p.m. Central) Sunday, March 11.

    "When the show airs we have already memorized every minor detail of the episode," he said. "It's always nice to see how people react to it."

    Once Reedy and the team deliver the episodes, they have about a week to wrap up the office, and then it's time for a break.

    "We work long hours so it's good to take a break after you finish a show," he said.

    What's next? Possibly another show, possibly working on the next season of "Deception," depending on if the show gets picked up and when. In the long run, Reedy aims to become a co-producer.

    Luke Reedy, a 2013 UK alumnus, works in post-production for Warner Bros.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: This weekend, the media arts and studies graduate will be watching his hard work on the small screen as "Deception" premieres at 10 p.m. Sunday, March 11.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 6, 2018)  A transformational media executive, a woman who inherited a newspaper when her husband died, a highly respected Capitol reporter, a copy editor on prize-winning magazine work, a longtime TV reporter and editor, a veteran reporter and editor — this is just part of the story behind this year's inductees in the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    A total of six journalists who have made contributions to journalism will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame on April 9. They have worked in the Commonwealth, Texas, South Carolina and Washington, D.C.

    “We have an outstanding class of inductees this year, and they represent the quality of journalism that has benefited our state for decades,” said Mike Farrell, interim director of the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information, which houses the hall of fame and sets up the luncheon.   

    The 2018 class will bring the total of inductees to 226. The hall was initiated in 1981. Tickets for the induction luncheon at the Griffin Gate Marriott, located at 1800 Newtown Pike, are $50.    

    The class of 2018 inductees:

    Rich Boehne started his newspaper career near the bottom rung and climbed all the way to the top. Boehne, a native of Ft. Thomas, sold subscriptions to The Cincinnati Post while a student at Highlands High School. He earned a degree in communications and journalism at Northern Kentucky University. He worked first as a part-time reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer, then worked for a group of suburban newspapers before joining The Post as a business reporter and editor. In 1988, he joined The Post’s parent corporation, the E.W. Scripps Co., just before the family-owned newspaper and broadcasting company went public. He rose through the ranks to become president and CEO in 2011. He stepped down in 2017 and remains chairman of the board. He helped co-found the Scripps Leadership Institute and led Scripps through the tumultuous era when news media were undergoing dramatic changes. He serves as a director of the Associated Press, a director of the Cincinnati Freestore Foodbank and as chairman of the Board of Regents of NKU. He received the First Amendment Award from the Associated Press and the Outstanding Alumnus Award from NKU as well as its prestigious Lincoln Award.

    Jack Brammer has worked at the Lexington Herald-Leader in its state capital bureau for 40 years. While he has won accolades for his reporting during the terms of nine Kentucky governors and 58 sessions of the Kentucky General Assembly, his colleagues declare he has served as an outstanding mentor to the young reporters who have joined him in the bureau. Among those he taught are such Herald-Leader standouts as Editor-in-Chief Peter Baniak, Deputy Editor John Cheves and editorial writer Jamie Lucke. Brammer, a native of Maysville, began his career at The Sentinel-News in Shelbyville. Two years later, he joined the Lexington Leader, which became part of the Herald-Leader. He has covered Frankfort ever since. Among his awards, Brammer was part of the team that won the prestigious Seldon Ring in 1990 for the series, "Cheating Our Children," which uncovered the economic inequities plaguing Kentucky’s schools. His nominators praised him for his fairness in covering decades of political stories.

    Aileen Chambers Evans inherited the News-Democrat in Russellville in 1940 when her husband died at age 47. She poured her life into the community newspaper for the next 28 years before selling it. In her farewell column, she wrote, “I have written miles of copy of every kind and have walked miles of concrete in advertising.” But the only time her byline appeared in the newspaper was on that final column. Her original nomination was written by John Siegenthaler, the editor of The Tennessean in Nashville and a staunch defender of the First Amendment. Siegenthaler recalled writing a story on Thanksgiving Day 1953 revealing that a Russellville woman, who had disappeared and been declared dead, was actually living in Texas. Evans called her staff and they published an “extra” before dinner. Siegenthaler’s letter reports that the story made international news. Evans and her staff, according to the letter, won more than 70 awards in the annual Kentucky Press Association contest. Her ownership of the newspaper was a family matter: children and grandchildren worked at the News-Democrat and went on to other news outlets. Evans, who was born in 1895, graduated magna cum laude from Vanderbilt University while playing for the women’s basketball team.   

    Warren Wheat spent 55 years in journalism, graduating from the University of Kentucky, where he worked on the Kentucky Kernel. First, there was a stop with the United States Air Force, where he served as a public information officer. His path led to the Winchester Sun; to the Lexington Leader as a city hall reporter while taking graduate classes; and then 14 years at The Cincinnati Enquirer covering Northern Kentucky and serving as chief of first the Columbus bureau and then the Washington bureau. From 1979-1984, he was a regional reporter with the Gannett News Service. He worked at USA Today for 14 years, serving as the first deputy Washington editor and then working on the editorial page. After two years as governance and national editor at The State in Columbia, South Carolina, Wheat returned to Kentucky to edit The News-Enterprise in Elizabethtown. He retired in 2009 and now works for No-Labels, an organization based in Washington, D.C., that advocates for bipartisan policymaking.      

    Valerie Ellison Wright is a native of Lexington and a journalism graduate of the University of Kentucky. Her journalism has, in some ways, followed the career of her husband, George Wright, a UK alumnus who recently stepped down after 14 years as president of Prairie View A&M University in Texas. After graduating in 1972, Wright worked for the Louisville Times as a reporter covering neighborhoods. She covered city and county governments for The Durham Sun from 1974-1977. From 1977-1980, she worked at the Lexington Leader, reporting on schools and local courts. The following year, she worked as a copy editor and reporter for The Austin American-Statesman. After being employed by the Texas Education Agency, she took a job at Texas Monthly Magazine as an assistant editor. She was promoted to associate editor and then research editor. From 2000 until her retirement in 2016, she was a fact-checker, serving again as associate editor and then research editor. In 1980, she was a member of the first class for Editing Program for Minority Journalists at the University of Arizona. In 2013, Texas Monthly won National Magazine Awards for stories it published. In the magazine’s announcement, the editor praised her for her work fact-checking one of those stories.

    Steve York, a graduate of Georgetown College, also logged many years in journalism. He started at WVLK-AM and -FM in Lexington, as a reporter/news director working with a five-person news team that covered Central Kentucky. From there, he moved to WAVE-TV in Louisville. He covered stories from Central and Western Kentucky for WAVE from Elizabethtown from 1978 to 1985. He provided WAVE viewers with celebrated coverage of the 1979 and 1983 gubernatorial races, as well as the 1981 coal strike. In 1985, WAVE named him assignment editor, and he was promoted to assistant news director in 1998, overseeing daily operations of the newsroom. He retired in 2011. He is the recipient of numerous journalism awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, the Kentucky Broadcasters Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.   

    For tickets to the April 9 induction luncheon, visit http://ci.uky.edu/jam/. Tickets are $50. The deadline for reservations is March 30. The presenting sponsor is the E.W. Scripps Co. Other sponsors are the Lexington Herald-Leader, the Northern Kentucky University Foundation and the UK School of Journalism and Media.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Six journalists will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame on April 9. Their careers span newspapers, magazines, television and radio. They have worked in the Commonwealth, Texas, South Carolina and Washington, D.C. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 6, 2018)  A transformational media executive, a woman who inherited a newspaper when her husband died, a highly respected Capitol reporter, a copy editor on prize-winning magazine work, a longtime TV reporter and editor, a veteran reporter and editor — this is just part of the story behind this year's inductees in the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.

    A total of six journalists who have made contributions to journalism will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame on April 9. They have worked in the Commonwealth, Texas, South Carolina and Washington, D.C.

    “We have an outstanding class of inductees this year, and they represent the quality of journalism that has benefited our state for decades,” said Mike Farrell, interim director of the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information, which houses the hall of fame and sets up the luncheon.   

    The 2018 class will bring the total of inductees to 226. The hall was initiated in 1981. Tickets for the induction luncheon at the Griffin Gate Marriott, located at 1800 Newtown Pike, are $50.    

    The class of 2018 inductees:

    Rich Boehne started his newspaper career near the bottom rung and climbed all the way to the top. Boehne, a native of Ft. Thomas, sold subscriptions to The Cincinnati Post while a student at Highlands High School. He earned a degree in communications and journalism at Northern Kentucky University. He worked first as a part-time reporter for The Cincinnati Enquirer, then worked for a group of suburban newspapers before joining The Post as a business reporter and editor. In 1988, he joined The Post’s parent corporation, the E.W. Scripps Co., just before the family-owned newspaper and broadcasting company went public. He rose through the ranks to become president and CEO in 2011. He stepped down in 2017 and remains chairman of the board. He helped co-found the Scripps Leadership Institute and led Scripps through the tumultuous era when news media were undergoing dramatic changes. He serves as a director of the Associated Press, a director of the Cincinnati Freestore Foodbank and as chairman of the Board of Regents of NKU. He received the First Amendment Award from the Associated Press and the Outstanding Alumnus Award from NKU as well as its prestigious Lincoln Award.

    Jack Brammer has worked at the Lexington Herald-Leader in its state capital bureau for 40 years. While he has won accolades for his reporting during the terms of nine Kentucky governors and 58 sessions of the Kentucky General Assembly, his colleagues declare he has served as an outstanding mentor to the young reporters who have joined him in the bureau. Among those he taught are such Herald-Leader standouts as Editor-in-Chief Peter Baniak, Deputy Editor John Cheves and editorial writer Jamie Lucke. Brammer, a native of Maysville, began his career at The Sentinel-News in Shelbyville. Two years later, he joined the Lexington Leader, which became part of the Herald-Leader. He has covered Frankfort ever since. Among his awards, Brammer was part of the team that won the prestigious Seldon Ring in 1990 for the series, "Cheating Our Children," which uncovered the economic inequities plaguing Kentucky’s schools. His nominators praised him for his fairness in covering decades of political stories.

    Aileen Chambers Evans inherited the News-Democrat in Russellville in 1940 when her husband died at age 47. She poured her life into the community newspaper for the next 28 years before selling it. In her farewell column, she wrote, “I have written miles of copy of every kind and have walked miles of concrete in advertising.” But the only time her byline appeared in the newspaper was on that final column. Her original nomination was written by John Siegenthaler, the editor of The Tennessean in Nashville and a staunch defender of the First Amendment. Siegenthaler recalled writing a story on Thanksgiving Day 1953 revealing that a Russellville woman, who had disappeared and been declared dead, was actually living in Texas. Evans called her staff and they published an “extra” before dinner. Siegenthaler’s letter reports that the story made international news. Evans and her staff, according to the letter, won more than 70 awards in the annual Kentucky Press Association contest. Her ownership of the newspaper was a family matter: children and grandchildren worked at the News-Democrat and went on to other news outlets. Evans, who was born in 1895, graduated magna cum laude from Vanderbilt University while playing for the women’s basketball team.   

    Warren Wheat spent 55 years in journalism, graduating from the University of Kentucky, where he worked on the Kentucky Kernel. First, there was a stop with the United States Air Force, where he served as a public information officer. His path led to the Winchester Sun; to the Lexington Leader as a city hall reporter while taking graduate classes; and then 14 years at The Cincinnati Enquirer covering Northern Kentucky and serving as chief of first the Columbus bureau and then the Washington bureau. From 1979-1984, he was a regional reporter with the Gannett News Service. He worked at USA Today for 14 years, serving as the first deputy Washington editor and then working on the editorial page. After two years as governance and national editor at The State in Columbia, South Carolina, Wheat returned to Kentucky to edit The News-Enterprise in Elizabethtown. He retired in 2009 and now works for No-Labels, an organization based in Washington, D.C., that advocates for bipartisan policymaking.      

    Valerie Ellison Wright is a native of Lexington and a journalism graduate of the University of Kentucky. Her journalism has, in some ways, followed the career of her husband, George Wright, a UK alumnus who recently stepped down after 14 years as president of Prairie View A&M University in Texas. After graduating in 1972, Wright worked for the Louisville Times as a reporter covering neighborhoods. She covered city and county governments for The Durham Sun from 1974-1977. From 1977-1980, she worked at the Lexington Leader, reporting on schools and local courts. The following year, she worked as a copy editor and reporter for The Austin American-Statesman. After being employed by the Texas Education Agency, she took a job at Texas Monthly Magazine as an assistant editor. She was promoted to associate editor and then research editor. From 2000 until her retirement in 2016, she was a fact-checker, serving again as associate editor and then research editor. In 1980, she was a member of the first class for Editing Program for Minority Journalists at the University of Arizona. In 2013, Texas Monthly won National Magazine Awards for stories it published. In the magazine’s announcement, the editor praised her for her work fact-checking one of those stories.

    Steve York, a graduate of Georgetown College, also logged many years in journalism. He started at WVLK-AM and -FM in Lexington, as a reporter/news director working with a five-person news team that covered Central Kentucky. From there, he moved to WAVE-TV in Louisville. He covered stories from Central and Western Kentucky for WAVE from Elizabethtown from 1978 to 1985. He provided WAVE viewers with celebrated coverage of the 1979 and 1983 gubernatorial races, as well as the 1981 coal strike. In 1985, WAVE named him assignment editor, and he was promoted to assistant news director in 1998, overseeing daily operations of the newsroom. He retired in 2011. He is the recipient of numerous journalism awards from the Kentucky Associated Press, the Kentucky Broadcasters Association and the Society of Professional Journalists.   

    For tickets to the April 9 induction luncheon, visit http://ci.uky.edu/jam/. Tickets are $50. The deadline for reservations is March 30. The presenting sponsor is the E.W. Scripps Co. Other sponsors are the Lexington Herald-Leader, the Northern Kentucky University Foundation and the UK School of Journalism and Media.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Six journalists will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame on April 9. Their careers span newspapers, magazines, television and radio. They have worked in the Commonwealth, Texas, South Carolina and Washington, D.C.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 2, 2018) For 30 years, a small studio staffed by talented University of Kentucky students has filled the Lexington airwaves with unique tunes not often heard elsewhere. WRFL, UK's student-run radio station and a mainstay on campus and in the local arts scene, is celebrating the big 3-0 this month doing what it does best — bringing people together with music.  

    "The station is without a doubt in the top 10 college radio stations in the U.S.," said Kakie Urch, associate professor in the College of Communication's School of Journalism and Media.

    As a student at UK, Urch helped establish the free, alternative radio station in 1988. The station airs 24/7 and its coverage area includes Georgetown, Frankfort, Versailles and Stamping Ground, as well as Lexington and online at http://WRFL.FM. A wide range of artists and bands are featured on WRFL, but they all have one thing in common — they live outside Top 40 radio and expose listeners to underground and local music.

    WRFL's real charm lies in how its operated though, and who's in the DJ chair. Since it began broadcasting, students studying journalism, music, engineering and other fields have manned the DJ chair 24/7, 365. Automation? Never. The students who take on the role of WRFL DJ form a tight-knit community, one that includes hundreds of alumni over the years.

    From film producers to regional on-air talent and reporters, artists to the current assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, WRFL alumni have found success across industries and the nation. This weekend, they'll be traveling back to Lexington to celebrate the station, reconnect with fellow RFLiens and meet current students.

    The 30th Birthday Bash will feature three days of live performances, all with WRFL connections, at the Burl and the Distillery District. Get the full schedule here. Tickets for Friday night's show are sold out, but tickets for Saturday night can be purchased here. During the bash, RFLiens will also tour the current temporary studio and take a peek at what will be its brand-new studio when the UK Student Center opens.  

    Want to hear what it was like at WRFL during the early days? Visit Radio Free Lexington Oral History Project featuring alumni sharing their memories. The collection was digitized by UK Libraries Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

    Grant Sparks and Mitchell Mullins at WRFL. Photo by Matt Barton.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: WRFL, UK's student-run radio station and a mainstay on campus and in the local arts scene, is celebrating the big 3-0 this month doing what it does best — bringing people together with music. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder March 2, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 2, 2018) For 30 years, a small studio staffed by talented University of Kentucky students has filled the Lexington airwaves with unique tunes not often heard elsewhere. WRFL, UK's student-run radio station and a mainstay on campus and in the local arts scene, is celebrating the big 3-0 this month doing what it does best — bringing people together with music.  

    "The station is without a doubt in the top 10 college radio stations in the U.S.," said Kakie Urch, associate professor in the College of Communication's School of Journalism and Media.

    As a student at UK, Urch helped establish the free, alternative radio station in 1988. The station airs 24/7 and its coverage area includes Georgetown, Frankfort, Versailles and Stamping Ground, as well as Lexington and online at http://WRFL.FM. A wide range of artists and bands are featured on WRFL, but they all have one thing in common — they live outside Top 40 radio and expose listeners to underground and local music.

    WRFL's real charm lies in how its operated though, and who's in the DJ chair. Since it began broadcasting, students studying journalism, music, engineering and other fields have manned the DJ chair 24/7, 365. Automation? Never. The students who take on the role of WRFL DJ form a tight-knit community, one that includes hundreds of alumni over the years.

    From film producers to regional on-air talent and reporters, artists to the current assistant secretary of defense for international security affairs, WRFL alumni have found success across industries and the nation. This weekend, they'll be traveling back to Lexington to celebrate the station, reconnect with fellow RFLiens and meet current students.

    The 30th Birthday Bash will feature three days of live performances, all with WRFL connections, at the Burl and the Distillery District. Get the full schedule here. Tickets for Friday night's show are sold out, but tickets for Saturday night can be purchased here. During the bash, RFLiens will also tour the current temporary studio and take a peek at what will be its brand-new studio when the UK Student Center opens.  

    Want to hear what it was like at WRFL during the early days? Visit Radio Free Lexington Oral History Project featuring alumni sharing their memories. The collection was digitized by UK Libraries Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History.

    Grant Sparks and Mitchell Mullins at WRFL. Photo by Matt Barton.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: WRFL, UK's student-run radio station and a mainstay on campus and in the local arts scene, is celebrating the big 3-0 this month doing what it does best — bringing people together with music.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Stephanie Swarts Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2018) Eleven art students from the University of Kentucky were recognized during the 2017 Carey Ellis Juried Student Show this past December. The Carey Ellis Juried Student Show is part of the UK School of Art and Visual Studies popular visual art celebration, Open Studio, held in the Art and Visual Studies Building.

    During the Bolivar Art Gallery exhibition, three students were recognized for their works’ excellence as part of this year’s Carey Ellis Juried Student Show. The winners selected by juror, sculptor and UK alumna Melanie VanHouten were:

    Other school honors presented at the show included the Arturo Alonzo Sandoval Fiber Award. These awards were given to Aya AlJabiri, a 2017 art studio graduate, from Lexington, and Alex Lewis. The Sandoval Fiber Award, presented by the recently retired Alumni Endowed Professor of Art Arturo Alonzo Sandoval, is awarded to artists whose work reflects the significant use of fiber.

    The Theophilia Joan Oexmann Awards were given to Nicolette Lim, an art studio senior from Lexington, minoring in art history; Andrew Campbell, a 2017 art studio and integrated strategic communication graduate from Louisville, Kentucky; and Alexis “Ali” Deane, an art studio senior, minoring in art history, from Brevard, North Carolina. Faculty of the School of Art and Visual Studies presented the Oexmann Awards to students who showed great promise in their work through creativity and originality.

    The Ross Zirkle Memorial Art Studio Award was presented to Hayla Ragland, a Lewis Honors College member and art studio and psychology senior, minoring in art history, from LaGrange, Kentucky. Created in memory of faculty member Ross Zirkle, funds for this award were raised by donations from family, friends and former students of Zirkle. This award is presented to a student who is studying printmaking or drawing, and demonstrates qualities of artistic excellence, hard work and interest in helping the community, like Zirkle.

    UK’s Windgate Fellowship nominations went to Taylor Davis, an art studio senior from Lexington, and Delany Bal, an art studio senior, minoring in art history, from Morgantown, West Virginia. UK was allotted two nominees to be considered for the prestigious Windgate Fellowship, one of the largest awards offered nationally to college graduating art students.

    Grace Mayeur, a 2017 art studio graduate from Columbia, Tennessee, was awarded the new Back Alley Press Excellence in Printmaking Award.

    The UK School of Art and Visual Studies, at UK College of Fine Arts, is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art education, art history and visual studies, art studio, and digital media and design.

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationHonors College

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Eleven UK art students were recognized during the Carey Ellis Juried Student Show in December. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Stephanie Swarts Feb. 28, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2018) Eleven art students from the University of Kentucky were recognized during the 2017 Carey Ellis Juried Student Show this past December. The Carey Ellis Juried Student Show is part of the UK School of Art and Visual Studies popular visual art celebration, Open Studio, held in the Art and Visual Studies Building.

    During the Bolivar Art Gallery exhibition, three students were recognized for their works’ excellence as part of this year’s Carey Ellis Juried Student Show. The winners selected by juror, sculptor and UK alumna Melanie VanHouten were:

    Other school honors presented at the show included the Arturo Alonzo Sandoval Fiber Award. These awards were given to Aya AlJabiri, a 2017 art studio graduate, from Lexington, and Alex Lewis. The Sandoval Fiber Award, presented by the recently retired Alumni Endowed Professor of Art Arturo Alonzo Sandoval, is awarded to artists whose work reflects the significant use of fiber.

    The Theophilia Joan Oexmann Awards were given to Nicolette Lim, an art studio senior from Lexington, minoring in art history; Andrew Campbell, a 2017 art studio and integrated strategic communication graduate from Louisville, Kentucky; and Alexis “Ali” Deane, an art studio senior, minoring in art history, from Brevard, North Carolina. Faculty of the School of Art and Visual Studies presented the Oexmann Awards to students who showed great promise in their work through creativity and originality.

    The Ross Zirkle Memorial Art Studio Award was presented to Hayla Ragland, a Lewis Honors College member and art studio and psychology senior, minoring in art history, from LaGrange, Kentucky. Created in memory of faculty member Ross Zirkle, funds for this award were raised by donations from family, friends and former students of Zirkle. This award is presented to a student who is studying printmaking or drawing, and demonstrates qualities of artistic excellence, hard work and interest in helping the community, like Zirkle.

    UK’s Windgate Fellowship nominations went to Taylor Davis, an art studio senior from Lexington, and Delany Bal, an art studio senior, minoring in art history, from Morgantown, West Virginia. UK was allotted two nominees to be considered for the prestigious Windgate Fellowship, one of the largest awards offered nationally to college graduating art students.

    Grace Mayeur, a 2017 art studio graduate from Columbia, Tennessee, was awarded the new Back Alley Press Excellence in Printmaking Award.

    The UK School of Art and Visual Studies, at UK College of Fine Arts, is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design and offers undergraduate and graduate degrees in the fields of art education, art history and visual studies, art studio, and digital media and design.

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationHonors College

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Eleven UK art students were recognized during the Carey Ellis Juried Student Show in December.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Hal Morris Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 27, 2018) When Eric Scott (2008, College of Communication and Information) saw his football career come to an end after two years in the National Football League, he knew two things: He wanted to finish his master’s degree, and his future career was not going to have him stuck behind a desk.

    He had no idea that mission would lead him to where he is now … as a lieutenant in the UK Police Department.

    Scott, who played football at UK from 2003-2007 and then played two seasons for the NFL’s Tennessee Titans, has been with the department for eight years. He says it has been the best career he could have hoped for. Scott did not know it at the time, but his interest in law enforcement began during his playing days at UK. Kevin Franklin, a captain on the force, was one of the officers assigned as security to accompany the football team on road trips.

    Scott says Franklin became a good friend and mentor at UK, and they reconnected when Scott returned to Lexington to finish working on his master’s degree.

    “When I got hurt, I decided to come back to Lexington,” Scott said. “I went to a career fair because I was looking for a graduate assistant job to pay for the second half of my master’s (degree). As soon as I walked in the door, I saw this giant FBI banner. All the investigative stuff they did drew my attention.

    “I had done internships with Wells Fargo, and I was completely miserable behind a desk. When I saw that FBI banner, it intrigued me. Next to the banner was the UK Police Force banner, and behind it were Capt. Kevin Franklin and Maj. Nathan Brown. So when I saw those two there, I kind of hit it off with them,” explained Scott.

    Scott told Franklin he was looking to finish up graduate school, and the police force interested him. He found out the force was hiring, which meant Scott could pay for his schooling as a UK employee.

    “For me, it was kind of a sign. I could not only come here to get school paid for, but they’ll give me a salary, as well. I had never thought about applying for a law enforcement job before, but as soon as I saw them I knew this was what I was supposed to be doing,” Scott said. “I was basically looking for the complete opposite of a desk job, and policing was that for me.”

    Scott’s athletic career prepared him for what law enforcement entailed.

    “You have to stay fit. Teamwork is involved. There are a lot of characteristics in athletics that are similar to policing,” he said. “It was an immediate attraction. I will say it does take a lot of patience. In football, every play lasts about three-and-a-half seconds. So if you are frustrated, you have three-and-a-half seconds to take out that frustration. In law enforcement, you have to remain patient and professional and understand no matter the situation, you have to remain cool. That’s one of the differences from sports.”

    That patience was tested once Scott joined the force. He tended to be a little too recognizable, especially when dealing with students, many having been his friends just a few years earlier.

    “It’s quite the scene when it’s me at 6'4", 280 pounds, hopping out of a cruiser and walking toward a person and telling them to stop whatever they’re doing,” Scott said. “And then a buddy sees me and goes, ‘Hey, how you doing, Eric?’ It can ruin the whole presence of being professional and firm.”

    Scott, who has three daughters, is happy with his life and career in Lexington now, but he is looking ahead. He has thought about joining the FBI or U.S. Marshals Service in the future.

    “Their age cutoff is 37. I’m 31 now, so if I’m going to do something, I have to do it within that time,” he said.

    Scott has also been able to give back to an athletics program that he credits with helping him become the man he is now. From 2009-2016, Scott traveled with the football team full time and part time with the basketball team on road trips. Aside from providing security for the head coach, Scott says he tried to show players different sides of the police than some of them were used to seeing.

    “I was a resource for players, kind of an advisor, and gave them guidance,” he said. “With my background, the players trusted me. Those guys, it’s hard for some of them to trust the police with their backgrounds. It was one of the coolest details I’ve had at the university.

    “UK Athletics has bent over backward for me in my career and has been an awesome resource. I’ll forever be in its debt. They took a kid from Atlanta at age 18 and helped turn him into a man. With Rich Brooks, Joker Phillips and Mitch Barnhart and their guidance, I’ll forever be indebted to them for helping me grow and get to where I am today.”

    Eric ScottOrganizational Unit: Communication and InformationGraduate School

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Former NFL player Eric Scott found a new purpose in life when he returned to his alma mater for a graduate education.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Hal Morris Feb. 27, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 27, 2018) When Eric Scott (2008, College of Communication and Information) saw his football career come to an end after two years in the National Football League, he knew two things: He wanted to finish his master’s degree, and his future career was not going to have him stuck behind a desk.

    He had no idea that mission would lead him to where he is now … as a lieutenant in the UK Police Department.

    Scott, who played football at UK from 2003-2007 and then played two seasons for the NFL’s Tennessee Titans, has been with the department for eight years. He says it has been the best career he could have hoped for. Scott did not know it at the time, but his interest in law enforcement began during his playing days at UK. Kevin Franklin, a captain on the force, was one of the officers assigned as security to accompany the football team on road trips.

    Scott says Franklin became a good friend and mentor at UK, and they reconnected when Scott returned to Lexington to finish working on his master’s degree.

    “When I got hurt, I decided to come back to Lexington,” Scott said. “I went to a career fair because I was looking for a graduate assistant job to pay for the second half of my master’s (degree). As soon as I walked in the door, I saw this giant FBI banner. All the investigative stuff they did drew my attention.

    “I had done internships with Wells Fargo, and I was completely miserable behind a desk. When I saw that FBI banner, it intrigued me. Next to the banner was the UK Police Force banner, and behind it were Capt. Kevin Franklin and Maj. Nathan Brown. So when I saw those two there, I kind of hit it off with them,” explained Scott.

    Scott told Franklin he was looking to finish up graduate school, and the police force interested him. He found out the force was hiring, which meant Scott could pay for his schooling as a UK employee.

    “For me, it was kind of a sign. I could not only come here to get school paid for, but they’ll give me a salary, as well. I had never thought about applying for a law enforcement job before, but as soon as I saw them I knew this was what I was supposed to be doing,” Scott said. “I was basically looking for the complete opposite of a desk job, and policing was that for me.”

    Scott’s athletic career prepared him for what law enforcement entailed.

    “You have to stay fit. Teamwork is involved. There are a lot of characteristics in athletics that are similar to policing,” he said. “It was an immediate attraction. I will say it does take a lot of patience. In football, every play lasts about three-and-a-half seconds. So if you are frustrated, you have three-and-a-half seconds to take out that frustration. In law enforcement, you have to remain patient and professional and understand no matter the situation, you have to remain cool. That’s one of the differences from sports.”

    That patience was tested once Scott joined the force. He tended to be a little too recognizable, especially when dealing with students, many having been his friends just a few years earlier.

    “It’s quite the scene when it’s me at 6'4", 280 pounds, hopping out of a cruiser and walking toward a person and telling them to stop whatever they’re doing,” Scott said. “And then a buddy sees me and goes, ‘Hey, how you doing, Eric?’ It can ruin the whole presence of being professional and firm.”

    Scott, who has three daughters, is happy with his life and career in Lexington now, but he is looking ahead. He has thought about joining the FBI or U.S. Marshals Service in the future.

    “Their age cutoff is 37. I’m 31 now, so if I’m going to do something, I have to do it within that time,” he said.

    Scott has also been able to give back to an athletics program that he credits with helping him become the man he is now. From 2009-2016, Scott traveled with the football team full time and part time with the basketball team on road trips. Aside from providing security for the head coach, Scott says he tried to show players different sides of the police than some of them were used to seeing.

    “I was a resource for players, kind of an advisor, and gave them guidance,” he said. “With my background, the players trusted me. Those guys, it’s hard for some of them to trust the police with their backgrounds. It was one of the coolest details I’ve had at the university.

    “UK Athletics has bent over backward for me in my career and has been an awesome resource. I’ll forever be in its debt. They took a kid from Atlanta at age 18 and helped turn him into a man. With Rich Brooks, Joker Phillips and Mitch Barnhart and their guidance, I’ll forever be indebted to them for helping me grow and get to where I am today.”

    Eric ScottOrganizational Unit: Communication and InformationGraduate School

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Former NFL player Eric Scott found a new purpose in life when he returned to his alma mater for a graduate education.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jenny Wells Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 23, 2018) — In keeping with University of Kentucky tradition, a student will be selected to speak at each of the four UK Commencement ceremonies this May.

    Because doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients are now recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Students receiving a doctoral, master's or undergraduate degree at the May 2018 Commencement interested in speaking must submit their application by 8 a.m. Wednesday, March 28. Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three- to five-minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages. In addition, applicants must have contributed to the university through campus, community activities or through their chosen field of study and show evidence of demonstrated public speaking ability. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the selection committee. The committee may contact any applicant for a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

    Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

    To accommodate rising numbers and to provide a better experience for UK graduates and their families and friends, the university now holds four ceremonies over the course of two days. All four will be held at Rupp Arena.

    Friday, May 4:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; College of Communication and Information; College of Public Health; The Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; The Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m. - Gatton College of Business and Economics, College of Health Sciences, College of Fine Arts, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy

    Sunday, May 6:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Arts and Sciences; College of Social Work; College of Design
    • 2 p.m. - College of Education; College of Engineering; College of Medicine

    All May graduates should register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

    Martha Tillson speaks at a December 2017 Commencement ceremony. UK Photo | Mark Cornelison.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three- to five-minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jenny Wells Feb. 23, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 23, 2018) — In keeping with University of Kentucky tradition, a student will be selected to speak at each of the four UK Commencement ceremonies this May.

    Because doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients are now recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Students receiving a doctoral, master's or undergraduate degree at the May 2018 Commencement interested in speaking must submit their application by 8 a.m. Wednesday, March 28. Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three- to five-minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages. In addition, applicants must have contributed to the university through campus, community activities or through their chosen field of study and show evidence of demonstrated public speaking ability. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the selection committee. The committee may contact any applicant for a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

    Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

    To accommodate rising numbers and to provide a better experience for UK graduates and their families and friends, the university now holds four ceremonies over the course of two days. All four will be held at Rupp Arena.

    Friday, May 4:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; College of Communication and Information; College of Public Health; The Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; The Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m. - Gatton College of Business and Economics, College of Health Sciences, College of Fine Arts, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy

    Sunday, May 6:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Arts and Sciences; College of Social Work; College of Design
    • 2 p.m. - College of Education; College of Engineering; College of Medicine

    All May graduates should register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

    Martha Tillson speaks at a December 2017 Commencement ceremony. UK Photo | Mark Cornelison.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three- to five-minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Kristie Law Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 21, 2018) The University of Kentucky Women's Forum announces 14 women have been nominated for the 2018 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award, one of UK's most prestigious awards for women. Women's Forum, who established the award in 1994, is currently celebrating over 26 years of open discussion and creativity while providing leadership development for all women employed at UK.

    The Sarah Bennett Holmes Award honors a distinguished former dean of women at the University of Kentucky. Holmes, who was widowed at a young age, raised four children while completing her own education. She went on to have a successful career at UK where she inspired young women to persevere in the face of hardship and pursue their career goals. Among her accomplishments, Holmes developed work programs for women during the Depression.

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of this award, granted annually to women working at UK who promote the growth and well-being of other women at the university and across the Commonwealth. Two awards will be presented — one to a faculty member and one to a staff member. 

    The UK Women’s Forum is inviting the campus community to the annual award ceremony and luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at the Woodford Reserve Club at Kroger Field. The Woodford Reserve Club is accessible between gates 10 and 11 in the Blue Lot. Cost is $15 per individual, or departments/offices can purchase a table of eight for $120. Please click here to register and pay for your ticket. The registration deadline is March 19, 2018.

    The 2018 nominees are:

    Faculty

    • Mary Davis, College of Law;
    • Frances Feltner, Center for Excellence in Rural Health;
    • Nancy Harrington, Department of Communication;
    • Janice Kuperstein, College of Health Sciences;
    • Debra Moser, College of Nursing;
    • Susan Smyth, Internal Medicine, Physiology;
    • Hollie Swanson, Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences;
    • Donna Wilcock, Physiology, Sanders-Brown Center on Aging; and
    • Olivia Yinger, Music Therapy.

    Staff

    • Lisa Collins, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment;
    • Michelle Del Toro, Gender and Women’s Studies;
    • Sarah Geegan, Public Relations;
    • Sara Price, Enrollment Management; and
    • Lori Tyndall, Geography.
    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Fourteen women have been nominated for the annual Sarah Bennett Holmes Award. The recognition ceremony, open to all campus, is March. 28.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Kristie Law Feb. 21, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 21, 2018) The University of Kentucky Women's Forum announces 14 women have been nominated for the 2018 Sarah Bennett Holmes Award, one of UK's most prestigious awards for women. Women's Forum, who established the award in 1994, is currently celebrating over 26 years of open discussion and creativity while providing leadership development for all women employed at UK.

    The Sarah Bennett Holmes Award honors a distinguished former dean of women at the University of Kentucky. Holmes, who was widowed at a young age, raised four children while completing her own education. She went on to have a successful career at UK where she inspired young women to persevere in the face of hardship and pursue their career goals. Among her accomplishments, Holmes developed work programs for women during the Depression.

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of this award, granted annually to women working at UK who promote the growth and well-being of other women at the university and across the Commonwealth. Two awards will be presented — one to a faculty member and one to a staff member. 

    The UK Women’s Forum is inviting the campus community to the annual award ceremony and luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at the Woodford Reserve Club at Kroger Field. The Woodford Reserve Club is accessible between gates 10 and 11 in the Blue Lot. Cost is $15 per individual, or departments/offices can purchase a table of eight for $120. Please click here to register and pay for your ticket. The registration deadline is March 19, 2018.

    The 2018 nominees are:

    Faculty

    • Mary Davis, College of Law;
    • Frances Feltner, Center for Excellence in Rural Health;
    • Nancy Harrington, Department of Communication;
    • Janice Kuperstein, College of Health Sciences;
    • Debra Moser, College of Nursing;
    • Susan Smyth, Internal Medicine, Physiology;
    • Hollie Swanson, Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences;
    • Donna Wilcock, Physiology, Sanders-Brown Center on Aging; and
    • Olivia Yinger, Music Therapy.

    Staff

    • Lisa Collins, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment;
    • Michelle Del Toro, Gender and Women’s Studies;
    • Sarah Geegan, Public Relations;
    • Sara Price, Enrollment Management; and
    • Lori Tyndall, Geography.
    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Fourteen women have been nominated for the annual Sarah Bennett Holmes Award. The recognition ceremony, open to all campus, is March. 28.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Hal Morris Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 21, 2018) Jomo Thompson ('00 College of Arts and Sciences, 2020 College of Business and Economics) and Dawn Walters ('88 College of Communication and Information) are both proud of their accomplishments as head coaches.

    But to do it at their alma mater means everything to the pair.

    Thompson won two national titles as a UK cheerleader and has coached the cheerleading team to 10 of its 22 Universal Cheerleaders Association titles. Walters, who was a member of UK’s first cheerleading title squad in 1986 (and won in 1987), has led the UK dance team to unprecedented heights, and it is now on the verge of its own national championship.

    “It is awesome. I’ve been here the whole time, and I think the initial thing that was so cool is when I walked to my office for the first time. I am right around the corner from the old sports information office where I worked when I was a senior in college,” said Walters, a Lexington native. “So getting to come into Memorial, that’s when it hit me. Coming back as dance coach, it felt surreal.”

    Thompson, who cheered for two years at University of Florida before transferring to UK, is proud but also welcomes the challenge that comes with leading a program that is the best in the history of the sport. But his coaching tenure did not start out well. UK had won eight straight titles, but failed to win again his first year as coach.

    “The pressure the next year was even greater. I felt like I let everybody down, but we were able to win it back the next year and win it the next three years,” said Thompson, who had planned to get his master’s degree in business before coaching came calling. “I thought I would end up going into some kind of business, but the opportunity came along, and I took it. I’m glad I did.

    “I really enjoy seeing the athletes come in as freshmen and mature and find more confidence in themselves and be able stand on their own feet.”

    Walters came in with the task of building a program that would measure up to the cheer squad. She had her work cut out for her.

    “Since I had cheered before, when I came in (athletics officials) told me what direction they wanted to go,” Walters said. “They said we want the dance team to be super energetic, athletic, very upbeat for performances. At Rupp, there are over 24,000 fans, so they want to keep everything going. They wanted us doing more pom-based hip-hop, a more upbeat style.”

    The dance team had its best season last year, finishing runner-up in the Universal Dance Association Hip-Hop category and fourth in Pom. With success comes better exposure.

    “What has been wonderful over the years is the amount of recognition and publicity we’ve gotten,” Walters said. “A lot of it is social media, but so many people have watched us grow, especially in competition. They’ve seen us become a national contender. People really honed in on that, they’ve watched us the last six or seven years really move up. Now kids want to come to this program and have seen what we’ve done. Fans see that, too.”

    Thompson, a UK assistant before taking over in 2002, said he is just trying to carry on the tradition that longtime advisor T. Lynn Williamson ('68 AS, '74 College of Law) built.

    “He established the right mindset, the right ideals. And those things, I have basically just piggybacked off of and continued to spread those messages,” he said. “Our program talks about absolute responsibility in everything that you do. We talk about being persistent, we talk attitude, and then winning, those are four key principles our program is based around and have been since T. Lynn started doing this.”

    Thompson also knows his squad serves as “ambassadors to the university,” so those are the kind of students he recruits.

    “A lot of people focus on competition, and that’s what we’re known for. But our primary focus is cheering at the games,” Thompson said. “That’s what a lot of the kids enjoy. It’s fun to have great seats for football, basketball, volleyball and gymnastics.

    “We do community service appearances. We read to kids, do things like God's Pantry, visit schools, anything to help in the community and anything to help UK out, as well. If there is a College of Engineering event and they want the Wildcat or cheerleaders to make it festive, we do that kind of stuff. We’re not an NCAA sport, per se. We’re more than a sport.”

    While the two don’t think about it in the moment, they are also trailblazers as the first African-American coaches in their sports at UK.

    “You don’t consciously think about it, but you might be paving that way,” Walters said. “Yeah, African-American cheer and dance coach, that’s what I want to go into. Any of my dancers coming through, they can go, ‘Yeah I can do it, too.’”

    Thompson said UK had an African-American assistant coach when he was a student, so being a pioneer never occurred to him.

    “I hadn’t really thought about it that way. I’m just happy to be here, and I want to make sure Kentucky cheer continues to excel. So that’s my primary focus,” he said. “But if it inspires some other African American to get into that field or if they want to talk to me, I’d be happy to do that as well.” 

    Dawn Walters and Jomo ThompsonOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Jomo Thompson is head coach of the Universal Cheerleaders Association champion cheerleading squad, and Dawn Walters has coached the UK dance team to the verge of its own national championship.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Hal Morris Feb. 21, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 21, 2018) Jomo Thompson ('00 College of Arts and Sciences, 2020 College of Business and Economics) and Dawn Walters ('88 College of Communication and Information) are both proud of their accomplishments as head coaches.

    But to do it at their alma mater means everything to the pair.

    Thompson won two national titles as a UK cheerleader and has coached the cheerleading team to 10 of its 22 Universal Cheerleaders Association titles. Walters, who was a member of UK’s first cheerleading title squad in 1986 (and won in 1987), has led the UK dance team to unprecedented heights, and it is now on the verge of its own national championship.

    “It is awesome. I’ve been here the whole time, and I think the initial thing that was so cool is when I walked to my office for the first time. I am right around the corner from the old sports information office where I worked when I was a senior in college,” said Walters, a Lexington native. “So getting to come into Memorial, that’s when it hit me. Coming back as dance coach, it felt surreal.”

    Thompson, who cheered for two years at University of Florida before transferring to UK, is proud but also welcomes the challenge that comes with leading a program that is the best in the history of the sport. But his coaching tenure did not start out well. UK had won eight straight titles, but failed to win again his first year as coach.

    “The pressure the next year was even greater. I felt like I let everybody down, but we were able to win it back the next year and win it the next three years,” said Thompson, who had planned to get his master’s degree in business before coaching came calling. “I thought I would end up going into some kind of business, but the opportunity came along, and I took it. I’m glad I did.

    “I really enjoy seeing the athletes come in as freshmen and mature and find more confidence in themselves and be able stand on their own feet.”

    Walters came in with the task of building a program that would measure up to the cheer squad. She had her work cut out for her.

    “Since I had cheered before, when I came in (athletics officials) told me what direction they wanted to go,” Walters said. “They said we want the dance team to be super energetic, athletic, very upbeat for performances. At Rupp, there are over 24,000 fans, so they want to keep everything going. They wanted us doing more pom-based hip-hop, a more upbeat style.”

    The dance team had its best season last year, finishing runner-up in the Universal Dance Association Hip-Hop category and fourth in Pom. With success comes better exposure.

    “What has been wonderful over the years is the amount of recognition and publicity we’ve gotten,” Walters said. “A lot of it is social media, but so many people have watched us grow, especially in competition. They’ve seen us become a national contender. People really honed in on that, they’ve watched us the last six or seven years really move up. Now kids want to come to this program and have seen what we’ve done. Fans see that, too.”

    Thompson, a UK assistant before taking over in 2002, said he is just trying to carry on the tradition that longtime advisor T. Lynn Williamson ('68 AS, '74 College of Law) built.

    “He established the right mindset, the right ideals. And those things, I have basically just piggybacked off of and continued to spread those messages,” he said. “Our program talks about absolute responsibility in everything that you do. We talk about being persistent, we talk attitude, and then winning, those are four key principles our program is based around and have been since T. Lynn started doing this.”

    Thompson also knows his squad serves as “ambassadors to the university,” so those are the kind of students he recruits.

    “A lot of people focus on competition, and that’s what we’re known for. But our primary focus is cheering at the games,” Thompson said. “That’s what a lot of the kids enjoy. It’s fun to have great seats for football, basketball, volleyball and gymnastics.

    “We do community service appearances. We read to kids, do things like God's Pantry, visit schools, anything to help in the community and anything to help UK out, as well. If there is a College of Engineering event and they want the Wildcat or cheerleaders to make it festive, we do that kind of stuff. We’re not an NCAA sport, per se. We’re more than a sport.”

    While the two don’t think about it in the moment, they are also trailblazers as the first African-American coaches in their sports at UK.

    “You don’t consciously think about it, but you might be paving that way,” Walters said. “Yeah, African-American cheer and dance coach, that’s what I want to go into. Any of my dancers coming through, they can go, ‘Yeah I can do it, too.’”

    Thompson said UK had an African-American assistant coach when he was a student, so being a pioneer never occurred to him.

    “I hadn’t really thought about it that way. I’m just happy to be here, and I want to make sure Kentucky cheer continues to excel. So that’s my primary focus,” he said. “But if it inspires some other African American to get into that field or if they want to talk to me, I’d be happy to do that as well.” 

    Dawn Walters and Jomo ThompsonOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Jomo Thompson is head coach of the Universal Cheerleaders Association champion cheerleading squad, and Dawn Walters has coached the UK dance team to the verge of its own national championship.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 13, 2018) — It was September when she first touched a skeleton sled out of curiosity. September 2017, that is. As in ... five months ago. Before then, she had never heard of the sliding sport where an athlete hurtles head-first down a frozen track.  

    This month, University of Kentucky alumna Simidele "Simi" Adeagbo makes history as Nigeria’s first female skeleton athlete, Africa’s first female skeleton Olympian and the first black female skeleton Olympian.

    "It feels amazing to be an Olympian, but this journey is about the bigger significance of what I'm doing: showing a future generation of athletes what's possible and showing people that it's up to you to create your future."

    Her story could arguably be one of the best comebacks in sports. Not only did she come out of a 10-year retirement to compete in the Olympics, but she became one of the best in the world at a sport she mastered in less than six months.

    "Why not me, why not now?" is a question the 36-year-old has frequently asked herself over the past few weeks. It wasn't a conventional path to the Olympics — but in a way, she's been preparing for this her whole life.

    Adeagbo was born in Toronto to Nigerian parents and lived in Nigeria for several years as a child, later growing up between the U.S. and Canada. She eventually made her way to UK. While earning her journalism degree here in the early 2000s, Adeagbo was also breaking records on the UK Track and Field team. She was a four time All-American and remains the outdoor school record holder in the triple jump. She was also an Academic All-American and Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholar, and an NCAA and Southeastern Conference scorer.

    "You have to be powerful, strong and fast for both sports," she said.

    The first few seconds of a skeleton race begin with a running start that is "very similar to a long jump and triple jump," where Adeagbo bolts as fast as she can. Except in skeleton, she's running on a frozen ice track, pushing a nearly 80-pound sled, then hurling herself onto the sled and down an ice roller coaster at 80 mph — with her face inches from the ice. No big deal.    

    Although new to the sport of skeleton, this isn't Adeagbo's first crack at the Olympics. After a lot of success on the UK Track and Field team, she became a two-time U.S. Olympic Trials finalist in the triple jump, narrowly missing a spot on the 2008 team.

    "I thought my athletic journey had ended," she said. "Not making the team was a huge disappointment and it took its toll on me, but I knew I had given it my all."

    Having earned a journalism degree and a master's degree in communication from UK, she began a new journey working as a marketing manager for Nike in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    "I use those skills I learned at UK every day in my job, and to be able to communicate effectively is so important in any field."

    While at UK, she says a community of different people around her — track coaches, professors, CATS tutors — helped her navigate being a student and an athlete. She came back to visit that community in 2016 and walked around the transformed campus with Associate Professor Scoobie Ryan.

    "These banners on campus with different accomplishments stood out to me — everyone on those banners challenged convention or took a risk. They left legacies. That's what I wanted to do."

    "Simi already has left quite a legacy here at the school," said Ryan, associate director of the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information. "She was an outstanding student and a joy to work with. How she managed to excel in our program and in her athletic career amazed and impressed me. While I was surprised to hear from her that she planned to compete in the 2018 Olympics, and in skeleton of all things, I shouldn’t have been. She’s a woman who can do anything once she puts her mind to it. She proved that to all of us long ago. I’ll be rooting for her."

    In 2008, she thought her athletic career was over. Fast forward nine years and Adeagbo came across a story about the Nigerian women's bobsled team aiming to be the first ever African bobsled team to compete at the Winter Olympics.

    "Yes, let's get Africa represented!" she thought. And then she thought some more … she had heard of track and field athletes moving into bobsledding … "Why not me, why not now?"

    She reached out, but the team was already in place. They connected her to the Bobsled & Skeleton Federation of Nigeria. Next thing she knew, in August of 2017, she was on a 24-hour flight from Johannesburg to Houston. She proved her strength and speed in tryouts for the federation, and few weeks later she got the call inviting her to a team camp.

    "That's where I first touched a skeleton sled," she said. "Every day since then I've been learning."

    After a whirlwind of a journey competing qualifying races in Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Park City, Utah; and Lake Placid, New York, Adeagbo officially qualified for the Olympics on Jan. 15. She's in South Korea now, preparing for the women’s singles skeleton competition, scheduled for Feb. 16-17.

    "I'm just excited for the whole experience — marching in for the opening ceremonies, competing, cheering on my teammates, attending the other events. Nobody was sure how this would turn out. I'm blessed with this opportunity and beaming with pride."

    Follow Simi's journey as she breaks history online at www.simisleighs.com, on Twitter: @simisleighs and on Instagram: @simisleighs.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Not only did UK alumna Simidele Adeagbo come out of a 10-year retirement to compete in the Olympics, but she became one of the best in the world at a sport she mastered in less than six months.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Harder Feb. 13, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 13, 2018) — It was September when she first touched a skeleton sled out of curiosity. September 2017, that is. As in ... five months ago. Before then, she had never heard of the sliding sport where an athlete hurtles head-first down a frozen track.  

    This month, University of Kentucky alumna Simidele "Simi" Adeagbo makes history as Nigeria’s first female skeleton athlete, Africa’s first female skeleton Olympian and the first black female skeleton Olympian.

    "It feels amazing to be an Olympian, but this journey is about the bigger significance of what I'm doing: showing a future generation of athletes what's possible and showing people that it's up to you to create your future."

    Her story could arguably be one of the best comebacks in sports. Not only did she come out of a 10-year retirement to compete in the Olympics, but she became one of the best in the world at a sport she mastered in less than six months.

    "Why not me, why not now?" is a question the 36-year-old has frequently asked herself over the past few weeks. It wasn't a conventional path to the Olympics — but in a way, she's been preparing for this her whole life.

    Adeagbo was born in Toronto to Nigerian parents and lived in Nigeria for several years as a child, later growing up between the U.S. and Canada. She eventually made her way to UK. While earning her journalism degree here in the early 2000s, Adeagbo was also breaking records on the UK Track and Field team. She was a four time All-American and remains the outdoor school record holder in the triple jump. She was also an Academic All-American and Arthur Ashe Jr. Sports Scholar, and an NCAA and Southeastern Conference scorer.

    "You have to be powerful, strong and fast for both sports," she said.

    The first few seconds of a skeleton race begin with a running start that is "very similar to a long jump and triple jump," where Adeagbo bolts as fast as she can. Except in skeleton, she's running on a frozen ice track, pushing a nearly 80-pound sled, then hurling herself onto the sled and down an ice roller coaster at 80 mph — with her face inches from the ice. No big deal.    

    Although new to the sport of skeleton, this isn't Adeagbo's first crack at the Olympics. After a lot of success on the UK Track and Field team, she became a two-time U.S. Olympic Trials finalist in the triple jump, narrowly missing a spot on the 2008 team.

    "I thought my athletic journey had ended," she said. "Not making the team was a huge disappointment and it took its toll on me, but I knew I had given it my all."

    Having earned a journalism degree and a master's degree in communication from UK, she began a new journey working as a marketing manager for Nike in Johannesburg, South Africa.

    "I use those skills I learned at UK every day in my job, and to be able to communicate effectively is so important in any field."

    While at UK, she says a community of different people around her — track coaches, professors, CATS tutors — helped her navigate being a student and an athlete. She came back to visit that community in 2016 and walked around the transformed campus with Associate Professor Scoobie Ryan.

    "These banners on campus with different accomplishments stood out to me — everyone on those banners challenged convention or took a risk. They left legacies. That's what I wanted to do."

    "Simi already has left quite a legacy here at the school," said Ryan, associate director of the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information. "She was an outstanding student and a joy to work with. How she managed to excel in our program and in her athletic career amazed and impressed me. While I was surprised to hear from her that she planned to compete in the 2018 Olympics, and in skeleton of all things, I shouldn’t have been. She’s a woman who can do anything once she puts her mind to it. She proved that to all of us long ago. I’ll be rooting for her."

    In 2008, she thought her athletic career was over. Fast forward nine years and Adeagbo came across a story about the Nigerian women's bobsled team aiming to be the first ever African bobsled team to compete at the Winter Olympics.

    "Yes, let's get Africa represented!" she thought. And then she thought some more … she had heard of track and field athletes moving into bobsledding … "Why not me, why not now?"

    She reached out, but the team was already in place. They connected her to the Bobsled & Skeleton Federation of Nigeria. Next thing she knew, in August of 2017, she was on a 24-hour flight from Johannesburg to Houston. She proved her strength and speed in tryouts for the federation, and few weeks later she got the call inviting her to a team camp.

    "That's where I first touched a skeleton sled," she said. "Every day since then I've been learning."

    After a whirlwind of a journey competing in qualifying races in Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Park City, Utah; and Lake Placid, New York, Adeagbo officially qualified for the Olympics on Jan. 15. She's in South Korea now, preparing for the women’s singles skeleton competition, scheduled for Feb. 16-17.

    "I'm just excited for the whole experience — marching in for the opening ceremonies, competing, cheering on my teammates, attending the other events. Nobody was sure how this would turn out. I'm blessed with this opportunity and beaming with pride."

    Follow Simi's journey as she breaks history online at www.simisleighs.com, on Twitter: @simisleighs and on Instagram: @simisleighs.

    This year, "Blue" will be going for the "Gold," too. We will take you on the journey with special athletes and those who support them and have insight into what makes the Olympics so special. Be sure to visit www.uky.edu/Olympics and follow along on all of our social media channels by looking for #olympiCats.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Not only did UK alumna Simidele Adeagbo come out of a 10-year retirement to compete in the Olympics, but she became one of the best in the world at a sport she mastered in less than six months.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Harlie Collins Monday

    Lexington, Ky. (Feb. 12, 2018) —  Two city officials, Aldona Valicenti, chief information officer for Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG), and Scott Shapiro, chief innovation officer for Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, will speak at the University of Kentucky on Monday, Feb. 26, about LexGig, a high-speed broadband initiative.

    The talk will begin 5:30 p.m., in Woodward Hall (Room 307) of the Gatton College of Business and Economics building, located at 550 S. Limestone. Visitor parking is available in the South Limestone Garage, Parking Structure 5.

    The event is free and open to the public. Those interested can claim their free tickets on Eventbrite: https://lexgigleaders.eventbrite.com.

    Valicenti and Shapiro are two of many officials who have been meeting the past three years to improve Lexington’s broadband capacity and access. The LexGig project launched in September 2014 when Mayor Gray announced that the city would take the first steps in assessing new public-private and solely private partnerships to build fiber optic infrastructure.

    In November 2017, Mayor Gray announced an agreement with MetroNet, an Indiana-based cable and internet provider, to build the new fiber-optic network that will transform Lexington, Kentucky’s second largest town, into a gigabit city with ultrafast internet access.

    The School of Information Science, part of the UK College of Communication and Information, organized the talk, titled, “Leaders of LexGig.”

    “This is a great opportunity to learn more about Lexington’s broadband initiative and how this may affect various sectors of the community,” said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the school.

    A gigabit city is capable of up to 1,000 megabits per second. Lexington’s 16.2 megabits per second ranks 38th of 96 Kentucky cities and towns where internet is available, according to www.lexingtonky.gov/gig.

    To put it into perspective, in the past it would have taken a Lexingtonian 30 minutes to download a 90-minute high definition movie. With gigabit internet, downloading a movie at one gigabit could take just 30 seconds. Not only will gigabit internet improve resident life and attract new businesses, it can increase access across the city allowing school systems to better leverage educational content available online.

    “Lexington's push towards gigabit internet throughout the city will clearly provide increased access speeds for individuals and companies with access to new network infrastructure. However, the move to high-speed connectivity could also lay the groundwork for smart city initiatives in the city,” said Bryce Newell, assistant professor of information communication technology.

    The lecture will provide an in-depth look at Mayor Gray’s strategic goals, explain how the gigabit network project fits within the mayor’s vision, and review how information technology is driving efficiencies in city government and enhancing interactions with citizens.

    Valicenti was appointed chief information officer (CIO) for the Commonwealth of Kentucky during Gov. Paul Patton’s administration and has received numerous awards, including recognition as “public official of the year” by Governing magazine. She was appointed as Lexington’s CIO in September 2013 and has implemented and invested in network operations and cyber security. Throughout the LexGig project, Valicenti and Shapiro adopted another vision that also fits into the mayor’s view of Lexington as a University City. 

    Shapiro’s work on a city-benchmarking project led him to learn more about a new species of city — the University City — and he writes and speaks frequently about the concept’s implications for Lexington, its peers and aspiring University Cities. And, as part of a broader Smart Cities effort, he is launching the city’s first text-notification system, LexAlerts, providing advanced notification to citizens regarding the impact of city services on a house-by-house level.

    “Smart cities harness and leverage the collective intelligence of the city by integrating data collected by sensors and other information technologies (such as smart meters and other energy and utility-tracking sensors, traffic sensors, enhanced vehicle-to-infrastructure communications in public transit vehicles, internet-of-things devices, etc.) into citywide governance and decision making,” Newell said. “Smart city developments can increase efficiencies and make aspects of life in the city more accessible for many, but they can also raise significant privacy-related issues that need to be addressed early on — such as increased collection and analysis of personal information about citizens.”

    Construction on the new fiber-optic infrastructure started in January 2018 and the first customers could be on MetroNet’s network as early as summer 2018.

    For more information on the Leaders of LexGig talk, email infosci@uky.edu

    Lexington Vice Mayor Steve Kay talks with Aldona Valicenti about LexGig. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: On Feb. 26, Aldona Valicenti, chief information officer for Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, and Scott Shapiro, chief innovation officer for Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, will speak at UK about the city's high-speed broadband initiative.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Harlie Collins Feb. 12, 2018

    Lexington, Ky. (Feb. 12, 2018) —  Two city officials, Aldona Valicenti, chief information officer for Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government (LFUCG), and Scott Shapiro, chief innovation officer for Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, will speak at the University of Kentucky on Monday, Feb. 26, about LexGig, a high-speed broadband initiative.

    The talk will begin 5:30 p.m., in Woodward Hall (Room 307) of the Gatton College of Business and Economics building, located at 550 S. Limestone. Visitor parking is available in the South Limestone Garage, Parking Structure 5.

    The event is free and open to the public. Those interested can claim their free tickets on Eventbrite: https://lexgigleaders.eventbrite.com.

    Valicenti and Shapiro are two of many officials who have been meeting the past three years to improve Lexington’s broadband capacity and access. The LexGig project launched in September 2014 when Mayor Gray announced that the city would take the first steps in assessing new public-private and solely private partnerships to build fiber optic infrastructure.

    In November 2017, Mayor Gray announced an agreement with MetroNet, an Indiana-based cable and internet provider, to build the new fiber-optic network that will transform Lexington, Kentucky’s second largest town, into a gigabit city with ultrafast internet access.

    The School of Information Science, part of the UK College of Communication and Information, organized the talk, titled, “Leaders of LexGig.”

    “This is a great opportunity to learn more about Lexington’s broadband initiative and how this may affect various sectors of the community,” said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the school.

    A gigabit city is capable of up to 1,000 megabits per second. Lexington’s 16.2 megabits per second ranks 38th of 96 Kentucky cities and towns where internet is available, according to www.lexingtonky.gov/gig.

    To put it into perspective, in the past it would have taken a Lexingtonian 30 minutes to download a 90-minute high definition movie. With gigabit internet, downloading a movie at one gigabit could take just 30 seconds. Not only will gigabit internet improve resident life and attract new businesses, it can increase access across the city allowing school systems to better leverage educational content available online.

    “Lexington's push towards gigabit internet throughout the city will clearly provide increased access speeds for individuals and companies with access to new network infrastructure. However, the move to high-speed connectivity could also lay the groundwork for smart city initiatives in the city,” said Bryce Newell, assistant professor of information communication technology.

    The lecture will provide an in-depth look at Mayor Gray’s strategic goals, explain how the gigabit network project fits within the mayor’s vision, and review how information technology is driving efficiencies in city government and enhancing interactions with citizens.

    Valicenti was appointed chief information officer (CIO) for the Commonwealth of Kentucky during Gov. Paul Patton’s administration and has received numerous awards, including recognition as “public official of the year” by Governing magazine. She was appointed as Lexington’s CIO in September 2013 and has implemented and invested in network operations and cyber security. Throughout the LexGig project, Valicenti and Shapiro adopted another vision that also fits into the mayor’s view of Lexington as a University City. 

    Shapiro’s work on a city-benchmarking project led him to learn more about a new species of city — the University City — and he writes and speaks frequently about the concept’s implications for Lexington, its peers and aspiring University Cities. And, as part of a broader Smart Cities effort, he is launching the city’s first text-notification system, LexAlerts, providing advanced notification to citizens regarding the impact of city services on a house-by-house level.

    “Smart cities harness and leverage the collective intelligence of the city by integrating data collected by sensors and other information technologies (such as smart meters and other energy and utility-tracking sensors, traffic sensors, enhanced vehicle-to-infrastructure communications in public transit vehicles, internet-of-things devices, etc.) into citywide governance and decision making,” Newell said. “Smart city developments can increase efficiencies and make aspects of life in the city more accessible for many, but they can also raise significant privacy-related issues that need to be addressed early on — such as increased collection and analysis of personal information about citizens.”

    Construction on the new fiber-optic infrastructure started in January 2018 and the first customers could be on MetroNet’s network as early as summer 2018.

    For more information on the Leaders of LexGig talk, email infosci@uky.edu

    Lexington Vice Mayor Steve Kay talks with Aldona Valicenti about LexGig. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: On Feb. 26, Aldona Valicenti, chief information officer for Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, and Scott Shapiro, chief innovation officer for Lexington Mayor Jim Gray, will speak at UK about the city's high-speed broadband initiative.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Gail Hairston Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2018) ― Sometimes, things just don’t go according to plan.

    Freshmen enter college, thinking they want to major in one subject, but soon hundreds of never-imagined options tempt them in a new academic direction. Or, perhaps, there are so many options, a young college student is simply confused.

    The professionals at the University of Kentucky James W. Stuckert Career Center understand. They’ve seen it countless times, and they have devised a solution.

    UK students are invited to “Speed Date a Major” from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12, in White Hall Classroom Building. College representatives will be on hand to meet with students curious to learn more about the academic opportunities available at UK. The event is free.

    “Speed Date a Major” will introduce students to representatives from the colleges of Agriculture, Food, and Environment; Arts and Sciences; Business and Economics; Communication and Information; Design; Education; Engineering; Fine Arts; Health Sciences; Public Health and Social Work, as well as the Stuckert Career Center and Education Abroad and Exchanges.

    "Speed Date a Major" is part of an ongoing effort to support the “exploratory students,” explained Matthew Deffendall, of UK’s Stuckert Career Center.

    In keeping with the “fair” theme, representatives from the colleges and other divisions will set up tables so that students can wander through and ask questions about majors in the representative’s college.

    “If a student is trying to find their academic path at UK then this is the ideal event for them,” Deffendall said. “We will also have representatives from the Career Center present to answer questions and assist students with activating their Handshake accounts.”

    Handshake is the Career Center’s online career services platform that connects students with employers for jobs or internships. Students already have an account they can access using their link blue ID and password at www.uky.edu/careercenter/handshake.

    “UK is a big and dynamic campus with an assortment of academic programs and majors,” said Ray Clere, Stuckert Career Center director. “'Speed Date a Major' gives students an opportunity to meet with representatives from multiple colleges and career services offices in one location to ask questions and gather information about academic and career options available to them at UK. This is a great opportunity for students to learn about majors in-brief and to connect with advisors.” 

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: At "Speed Date a Major" college representatives will be on hand to meet with students curious to learn more about the academic opportunities available at UK.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Gail Hairston Feb. 9, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2018) ― Sometimes, things just don’t go according to plan.

    Freshmen enter college, thinking they want to major in one subject, but soon hundreds of never-imagined options tempt them in a new academic direction. Or, perhaps, there are so many options, a young college student is simply confused.

    The professionals at the University of Kentucky James W. Stuckert Career Center understand. They’ve seen it countless times, and they have devised a solution.

    UK students are invited to “Speed Date a Major” from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 12, in White Hall Classroom Building. College representatives will be on hand to meet with students curious to learn more about the academic opportunities available at UK. The event is free.

    “Speed Date a Major” will introduce students to representatives from the colleges of Agriculture, Food, and Environment; Arts and Sciences; Business and Economics; Communication and Information; Design; Education; Engineering; Fine Arts; Health Sciences; Public Health and Social Work, as well as the Stuckert Career Center and Education Abroad and Exchanges.

    "Speed Date a Major" is part of an ongoing effort to support the “exploratory students,” explained Matthew Deffendall, of UK’s Stuckert Career Center.

    In keeping with the “fair” theme, representatives from the colleges and other divisions will set up tables so that students can wander through and ask questions about majors in the representative’s college.

    “If a student is trying to find their academic path at UK then this is the ideal event for them,” Deffendall said. “We will also have representatives from the Career Center present to answer questions and assist students with activating their Handshake accounts.”

    Handshake is the Career Center’s online career services platform that connects students with employers for jobs or internships. Students already have an account they can access using their link blue ID and password at www.uky.edu/careercenter/handshake.

    “UK is a big and dynamic campus with an assortment of academic programs and majors,” said Ray Clere, Stuckert Career Center director. “'Speed Date a Major' gives students an opportunity to meet with representatives from multiple colleges and career services offices in one location to ask questions and gather information about academic and career options available to them at UK. This is a great opportunity for students to learn about majors in-brief and to connect with advisors.” 

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: At "Speed Date a Major" college representatives will be on hand to meet with students curious to learn more about the academic opportunities available at UK.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Tony Neely Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2018) Student-athletes at the University of Kentucky combined to earn a total of 80 spots on the 2017 Southeastern Conference Fall Sports Academic Honor Roll, the league announced earlier this week. 

    The 2017 Fall SEC Academic Honor Roll includes the sports of cross country, football, soccer and volleyball. It is based on grades from the 2017 spring, summer and fall terms. Among other qualifications, student-athletes must have a 3.0 grade-point average to be on the honor roll.   

    Fittingly, UK’s SEC co-champion volleyball team also tied for the most student-athletes on the SEC Honor Roll with 13. UK placed seven student-athletes in the sport of men’s cross country, six in women’s cross country, 27 in football, 13 in men’s soccer and 14 in women’s soccer. 

    Kentucky representatives, their sport and major are as follows:

    • Cole Dowdy, Men's Cross Country, biology;
    • Tanner Dowdy, Men's Cross Country, political science;
    • Brennan Fields, Men's Cross Country, finance;
    • Ian Jones, Men's Cross Country, human health sciences;
    • Kendall Muhammad, Men's Cross Country, human health sciences;
    • Daniel Southard, Men's Cross Country, communication;
    • Jacob Thomson, Men's Cross Country, accounting/finance;
    • Avery Bussjagger, Women's Cross Country, biology;
    • Sarah Crawford, Women's Cross Country, biology;
    • Katy Kunc, Women's Cross Country, economics/marketing;
    • Michelle McKinney, Women's Cross Country, human nutrition;
    • Whitney O'Bryan, Women's Cross Country, exercise science;
    • Caitlin Shepard, Women's Cross Country, nursing;
    • David Baumer, Football, business management;
    • Brayden Berezowitz, Football, finance/business management;
    • Bryan Berezowitz, Football, finance/business management;
    • Blake Best, Football, economics/finance;
    • Logan Blue, Football, finance/business management;
    • David Bouvier, Football, marketing/business management;
    • Miles Butler, Football, accounting/finance;
    • C.J. Conrad, Football, communication;
    • Luke Fortner, Football, mechanical engineering;
    • Dylan Greenberg, Football, finance;
    • Jordan Griffin, Football, community and leadership development/integrated strategic communication;
    • Greg Hart, Football, communication/marketing;
    • Jacob Hyde, Football, social work;
    • Ryan Kendall, Football, business management;
    • Austin MacGinnis, Football, finance;
    • Grant McKinniss, Football, psychology;
    • Charles Moushey, Football, exercise science;
    • Tyler Pack, Football, undeclared;
    • Kayaune Ross, Football, community and leadership development;
    • Drew Schlegel, Football, finance;
    • Brett Slusher, Football, marketing;
    • Charles Walker, Football, finance/marketing;
    • Jamar Watson, Football, sociology;
    • Mason Wolfe, Football, sociology;
    • Luke Wright, Football, community and leadership development;
    • Tristan Yeomans, Football, finance/accounting;
    • Landon Young, Football, animal sciences; 
    • Kevin Barajas, Men's Soccer, finance;
    • Alex Bumpus, Men's Soccer, health care communication;
    • Stuart Ford, Men's Soccer, communication;
    • Tanner Hummel, Men's Soccer, community and leadership development;
    • Noah Hutchins, Men's Soccer, business management; 
    • Aime Mabika, Men's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Andrew McKelvey, Men's Soccer, marketing/psychology;
    • Grant Mook, Men's Soccer, business management;
    • Keyarash Namjoupanah, Men's Soccer, business management;
    • Landon Souder, Men's Soccer, finance;
    • Sam Stockton, Men's Soccer, accounting;
    • Stefan Stojkovic, Men's Soccer, psychology/sociology;
    • J.J. Williams, Men's Soccer, communication;
    • Payton Atkins, Women's Soccer, dietetics;
    • Sophie Babo, Women's Soccer, business management;
    • Tate Barney, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Marissa Bosco, Women's Soccer, journalism;
    • Gina Crosetti, Women's Soccer, integrated strategic communication;
    • Danielle Hayden, Women's Soccer, biology;
    • Katherine Hein, Women's Soccer, hospitality, management and tourism;
    • Jada Holmes, Women's Soccer, neuroscience;
    • Jordan Holt, Women's Soccer, integrated strategic communication;
    • Foster Ignoffo, Women's Soccer, elementary education;
    • Katy Keen, Women's Soccer, communication;
    • Kelly Novak, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Evangeline Soucie, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • LaMaya Williams, Women's Soccer, marketing;
    • Kaz Brown, Volleyball, communication;
    • Olivia Dailey, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Ashley Dusek, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Leah Edmond, Volleyball, elementary education;
    • Emily Franklin, Volleyball, health promotion/marketing;
    • Jordan Fry, Volleyball, biology;
    • Harper Hempel, Volleyball, accounting/marketing;
    • Merideth Jewell, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Darian Mack, Volleyball, information communication technology;
    • Brooke Morgan, Volleyball, communication;
    • Anna Nyberg, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Kylie Schmaltz, Volleyball, marketing; and
    • McKenzie Watson, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;

    For the latest on UK Athletics, follow @UKathletics on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, as well as on the web at www.UKathletics.com.

    Photo by UK Athletics.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringHealth SciencesNursingSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Tony Neely

    Summary: UK student-athletes turned in another strong semester academically during the fall of 2017.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Tony Neely Feb. 9, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2018) Student-athletes at the University of Kentucky combined to earn a total of 80 spots on the 2017 Southeastern Conference Fall Sports Academic Honor Roll, the league announced earlier this week. 

    The 2017 Fall SEC Academic Honor Roll includes the sports of cross country, football, soccer and volleyball. It is based on grades from the 2017 spring, summer and fall terms. Among other qualifications, student-athletes must have a 3.0 grade-point average to be on the honor roll.   

    Fittingly, UK’s SEC co-champion volleyball team also tied for the most student-athletes on the SEC Honor Roll with 13. UK placed seven student-athletes in the sport of men’s cross country, six in women’s cross country, 27 in football, 13 in men’s soccer and 14 in women’s soccer. 

    Kentucky representatives, their sport and major are as follows:

    • Cole Dowdy, Men's Cross Country, biology;
    • Tanner Dowdy, Men's Cross Country, political science;
    • Brennan Fields, Men's Cross Country, finance;
    • Ian Jones, Men's Cross Country, human health sciences;
    • Kendall Muhammad, Men's Cross Country, human health sciences;
    • Daniel Southard, Men's Cross Country, communication;
    • Jacob Thomson, Men's Cross Country, accounting/finance;
    • Avery Bussjagger, Women's Cross Country, biology;
    • Sarah Crawford, Women's Cross Country, biology;
    • Katy Kunc, Women's Cross Country, economics/marketing;
    • Michelle McKinney, Women's Cross Country, human nutrition;
    • Whitney O'Bryan, Women's Cross Country, exercise science;
    • Caitlin Shepard, Women's Cross Country, nursing;
    • David Baumer, Football, business management;
    • Brayden Berezowitz, Football, finance/business management;
    • Bryan Berezowitz, Football, finance/business management;
    • Blake Best, Football, economics/finance;
    • Logan Blue, Football, finance/business management;
    • David Bouvier, Football, marketing/business management;
    • Miles Butler, Football, accounting/finance;
    • C.J. Conrad, Football, communication;
    • Luke Fortner, Football, mechanical engineering;
    • Dylan Greenberg, Football, finance;
    • Jordan Griffin, Football, community and leadership development/integrated strategic communication;
    • Greg Hart, Football, communication/marketing;
    • Jacob Hyde, Football, social work;
    • Ryan Kendall, Football, business management;
    • Austin MacGinnis, Football, finance;
    • Grant McKinniss, Football, psychology;
    • Charles Moushey, Football, exercise science;
    • Tyler Pack, Football, undeclared;
    • Kayaune Ross, Football, community and leadership development;
    • Drew Schlegel, Football, finance;
    • Brett Slusher, Football, marketing;
    • Charles Walker, Football, finance/marketing;
    • Jamar Watson, Football, sociology;
    • Mason Wolfe, Football, sociology;
    • Luke Wright, Football, community and leadership development;
    • Tristan Yeomans, Football, finance/accounting;
    • Landon Young, Football, animal sciences; 
    • Kevin Barajas, Men's Soccer, finance;
    • Alex Bumpus, Men's Soccer, health care communication;
    • Stuart Ford, Men's Soccer, communication;
    • Tanner Hummel, Men's Soccer, community and leadership development;
    • Noah Hutchins, Men's Soccer, business management; 
    • Aime Mabika, Men's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Andrew McKelvey, Men's Soccer, marketing/psychology;
    • Grant Mook, Men's Soccer, business management;
    • Keyarash Namjoupanah, Men's Soccer, business management;
    • Landon Souder, Men's Soccer, finance;
    • Sam Stockton, Men's Soccer, accounting;
    • Stefan Stojkovic, Men's Soccer, psychology/sociology;
    • J.J. Williams, Men's Soccer, communication;
    • Payton Atkins, Women's Soccer, dietetics;
    • Sophie Babo, Women's Soccer, business management;
    • Tate Barney, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Marissa Bosco, Women's Soccer, journalism;
    • Gina Crosetti, Women's Soccer, integrated strategic communication;
    • Danielle Hayden, Women's Soccer, biology;
    • Katherine Hein, Women's Soccer, hospitality, management and tourism;
    • Jada Holmes, Women's Soccer, neuroscience;
    • Jordan Holt, Women's Soccer, integrated strategic communication;
    • Foster Ignoffo, Women's Soccer, elementary education;
    • Katy Keen, Women's Soccer, communication;
    • Kelly Novak, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • Evangeline Soucie, Women's Soccer, exercise science;
    • LaMaya Williams, Women's Soccer, marketing;
    • Kaz Brown, Volleyball, communication;
    • Olivia Dailey, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Ashley Dusek, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Leah Edmond, Volleyball, elementary education;
    • Emily Franklin, Volleyball, health promotion/marketing;
    • Jordan Fry, Volleyball, biology;
    • Harper Hempel, Volleyball, accounting/marketing;
    • Merideth Jewell, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Darian Mack, Volleyball, information communication technology;
    • Brooke Morgan, Volleyball, communication;
    • Anna Nyberg, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;
    • Kylie Schmaltz, Volleyball, marketing; and
    • McKenzie Watson, Volleyball, integrated strategic communication;

    For the latest on UK Athletics, follow @UKathletics on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook, as well as on the web at www.UKathletics.com.

    Photo by UK Athletics.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringHealth SciencesNursingSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Tony Neely

    Summary: UK student-athletes turned in another strong semester academically during the fall of 2017.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Whitney Hale Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 7, 2018) Two University of Kentucky School of Music faculty, a beloved former faculty member and a WUKY DJ were recipients of awards at the fourth annual Lexington Music Awards held Jan. 28, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.

    Raleigh Dailey, associate professor of UK Jazz Studies, took home the award for Best Keyboardist. This is the second time since the awards' inception that Dailey has garnered this award.

    Dailey, who earned his doctoral degree from UK, a master’s degree from University of North Texas and a bachelor’s degree from Kent State University, is an internationally recognized jazz pianist, composer, scholar and educator. Under his direction, UK's Lab Band and Jazz Combos have performed nationally at various jazz festivals, including the International Jazz Education Network Conference. A pianist and staff arranger for the DiMartino/Osland Jazz Orchestra (DOJO) and pianist and composer for the Osland/Dailey Jazztet, Dailey regularly performs worldwide.

    Miles Osland, professor of saxophone and director of Jazz Studies, took home the award for Best Wind/Brass. This is his second win in this category of the Lexington Music Awards. In addition, he previously received the Best Jazz/World award in 2015 from the organization for his band DOJO, created with former UK School of Music professor Vince DiMartino.

    Osland, who has been teaching saxophone at UK since 1989 and serves as director of UK’s Jazz Ensemble and Mega-Sax, holds a master's degree from Eastman School of Music and a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Northridge. As a distinguished performing artist, he has recorded with Sea Breeze Jazz Records. The record company has submitted nine of Osland's recordings for Grammy nominations through the years. Osland has appeared throughout North and South America, Europe and Asia as a guest conductor, performer and clinician for Selmer Saxophones and Bay Woodwind mouthpieces.

    Another connection to UK School of Music earned honors. UK Professor Emeritus Sara Holroyd, who taught at UK for 26 years, received the Lexington Music Award’s Lifetime Achievement Award for her dedication to Kentucky music. Holroyd’s fellow recipients were country music duo Montgomery Gentry, local guitar and harmonica master Ronn Crowder, and Lexington bluesman Tee Dee Young.

    Holroyd received music education degrees from Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College for Teachers and Columbia University and Indiana University, where she studied both trumpet and voice. Though she received no formal training in choral conducting, she progressively started taking over choral groups from retiring professors at UK eventually becoming one of only two female directors of choral activities in the collegiate ranks across the nation. Holroyd is best known for her colorful and vibrant Madrigal Dinners, "The Gift of Music" concerts and for her collaborations with Salli Terri on "A Shaker Worship Service," as well as preparing choruses on four occasions to perform with the world-renowned Atlanta Symphony Conductor Robert Shaw. Other collaborations produced performances with such famed choral conductors/arrangers as Robert DeCormier, Donald Craig, Norman Dello Joio and John Jacob Niles.

    WUKY’s own DeBraun Thomas took home the Best Radio DJ honor. He is host of the NPR affiliate’s weekly segment “Local Music Mondays,” which highlights local musicians from Lexington, and the “Crunkadelic Funk Show,” which airs Saturday nights at 9 p.m.

    Thomas fell in love with radio at a young age but only had real interest in working in radio after learning funk musician Sly Stone got his start that way. A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Thomas moved to Lexington in 2009 to attend UK and pursue a career in radio. He joined campus radio station WRFL in 2009 and through his journalism studies at UK had two features air on WUKY. In October 2012, Thomas began interning at WUKY and produced the “Unghosting of Medgar Evers.” In August 2013, he became a regular staff member at WUKY. In addition to producing and hosting a radio show, Thomas also explores his other passion as a musician in Lexington, has produced a documentary on the 50th anniversary of the March on Frankfort, and is a co-founder of Take Back Cheapside.

    The idea for the Lexington Music Awards came about from Lexington musician and music teacher, David McLean. McLean intended for the event to be a small gathering, but soon realized that there was much more interest in the event than he originally predicted. To determine the winners of each category, McLean has the public make nominations online. He then narrows down the votes to the top four candidates per category and had individual nominees vote on each category to determine the winners.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts AdministrationMusic

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Two UK School of Music faculty, a beloved former faculty member and a WUKY DJ were recipients of awards at the fourth annual Lexington Music Awards.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Whitney Hale Feb. 7, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 7, 2018) Two University of Kentucky School of Music faculty, a beloved former faculty member and a WUKY DJ were recipients of awards at the fourth annual Lexington Music Awards held Jan. 28, at the Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center.

    Raleigh Dailey, associate professor of UK Jazz Studies, took home the award for Best Keyboardist. This is the second time since the awards' inception that Dailey has garnered this award.

    Dailey, who earned his doctoral degree from UK, a master’s degree from University of North Texas and a bachelor’s degree from Kent State University, is an internationally recognized jazz pianist, composer, scholar and educator. Under his direction, UK's Lab Band and Jazz Combos have performed nationally at various jazz festivals, including the International Jazz Education Network Conference. A pianist and staff arranger for the DiMartino/Osland Jazz Orchestra (DOJO) and pianist and composer for the Osland/Dailey Jazztet, Dailey regularly performs worldwide.

    Miles Osland, professor of saxophone and director of Jazz Studies, took home the award for Best Wind/Brass. This is his second win in this category of the Lexington Music Awards. In addition, he previously received the Best Jazz/World award in 2015 from the organization for his band DOJO, created with former UK School of Music professor Vince DiMartino.

    Osland, who has been teaching saxophone at UK since 1989 and serves as director of UK’s Jazz Ensemble and Mega-Sax, holds a master's degree from Eastman School of Music and a bachelor’s degree from California State University, Northridge. As a distinguished performing artist, he has recorded with Sea Breeze Jazz Records. The record company has submitted nine of Osland's recordings for Grammy nominations through the years. Osland has appeared throughout North and South America, Europe and Asia as a guest conductor, performer and clinician for Selmer Saxophones and Bay Woodwind mouthpieces.

    Another connection to UK School of Music earned honors. UK Professor Emeritus Sara Holroyd, who taught at UK for 26 years, received the Lexington Music Award’s Lifetime Achievement Award for her dedication to Kentucky music. Holroyd’s fellow recipients were country music duo Montgomery Gentry, local guitar and harmonica master Ronn Crowder, and Lexington bluesman Tee Dee Young.

    Holroyd received music education degrees from Vanderbilt University’s Peabody College for Teachers and Columbia University and Indiana University, where she studied both trumpet and voice. Though she received no formal training in choral conducting, she progressively started taking over choral groups from retiring professors at UK eventually becoming one of only two female directors of choral activities in the collegiate ranks across the nation. Holroyd is best known for her colorful and vibrant Madrigal Dinners, "The Gift of Music" concerts and for her collaborations with Salli Terri on "A Shaker Worship Service," as well as preparing choruses on four occasions to perform with the world-renowned Atlanta Symphony Conductor Robert Shaw. Other collaborations produced performances with such famed choral conductors/arrangers as Robert DeCormier, Donald Craig, Norman Dello Joio and John Jacob Niles.

    WUKY’s own DeBraun Thomas took home the Best Radio DJ honor. He is host of the NPR affiliate’s weekly segment “Local Music Mondays,” which highlights local musicians from Lexington, and the “Crunkadelic Funk Show,” which airs Saturday nights at 9 p.m.

    Thomas fell in love with radio at a young age but only had real interest in working in radio after learning funk musician Sly Stone got his start that way. A native of the San Francisco Bay Area, Thomas moved to Lexington in 2009 to attend UK and pursue a career in radio. He joined campus radio station WRFL in 2009 and through his journalism studies at UK had two features air on WUKY. In October 2012, Thomas began interning at WUKY and produced the “Unghosting of Medgar Evers.” In August 2013, he became a regular staff member at WUKY. In addition to producing and hosting a radio show, Thomas also explores his other passion as a musician in Lexington, has produced a documentary on the 50th anniversary of the March on Frankfort, and is a co-founder of Take Back Cheapside.

    The idea for the Lexington Music Awards came about from Lexington musician and music teacher, David McLean. McLean intended for the event to be a small gathering, but soon realized that there was much more interest in the event than he originally predicted. To determine the winners of each category, McLean has the public make nominations online. He then narrows down the votes to the top four candidates per category and had individual nominees vote on each category to determine the winners.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts AdministrationMusic

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Two UK School of Music faculty, a beloved former faculty member and a WUKY DJ were recipients of awards at the fourth annual Lexington Music Awards.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jay Blanton and Amy Jones-Timoney Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2018) ―  You can almost hear the familiar strains of music.

    And when you do, you know … it’s time for the Olympic games.

    From Feb. 9 to Feb. 25, the games of the 23rd Winter Olympics will be held in Pyeongchang County, South Korea.

    But this year, at this Olympics, Blue will be going for the gold, too, and that means you get the opportunity to go along for the ride.

    Throughout the games, UKNow will be serving up stories about the special ties the University of Kentucky — and the UK family — has to the Olympics and this year’s event in particular. We will be your official source of news — at www.uky.edu/Olympics — for all things "Blue" and "Gold" and some related stories that speak to the power of sports to heal, inspire, promote and educate.

    Here’s a preview of the next few weeks:

    • You will read about one of our alums, who is representing her native land — Nigeria. Nigeria’s Simidele Adeagbo, a graduate of UK’s College of Communication and Information, is Africa’s first female skeleton athlete to compete in the Winter Olympics. Before she even competes, she already has a number of firsts to her name. Find out what fuels her drive to compete.
    • Tom Hammond has been covering the Olympic games for NBC Sports longer than many of our current students have been alive. He will give a bird’s-eye view of what it is like to be on the inside of the games, covering both the “thrill of victory and the agony of defeat” on the world’s largest stage.
    • You will learn about UK’s Sports Medicine Research Institute, in the College of Health Sciences, where high-performance athletes can learn more about how their bodies work — and how they break down — as part of a nationally leading effort to help athletes and others maximize performance.
    • On a special podcast, we will discuss with two experts the growth of sports as business — now a multibillion-dollar enterprise that draws the attention of fans, corporations, products and commercials year-round.
    • A number of Korean students call UK home during the academic year. They will provide insight about culture and the way of life in South Korea, a country at the epicenter of global politics and, increasingly, an economic engine.
    • What fuels an athlete? At UK, we have our own high-performance approach to nutrition for students who participate in the university’s 22 varsity sports. We will give you a peek into what they eat and how they manage their nutrition to ensure they are ready for prime performance.
    • And you will travel with our UK cheerleading squad, which recently won a national championship for a record 23rd time. These special athletes, and UK representatives, have been chosen to represent the United States as cheerleading vies to be a sport at future Olympics.

    This year, "Blue" will be going for the "Gold," too. We will take you on the journey with special athletes and those who support them and have insight into what makes the Olympics so special. Be sure to follow along on all of our social media channels by looking for #olympiCats.

    Discover one of UK's closest connections to the Olympics by watching the video interview above with UK Cheerleading Head Coach Jomo Thompson. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationHealth SciencesUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: From Feb. 9 to Feb. 25, the 23rd Winter Olympics will be held in Pyeongchang County, South Korea. But at this Olympics, "Blue" will be going for the "Gold," too, and that means you get the opportunity to go along for the ride.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jay Blanton and Amy Jones-Timoney Feb. 8, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2018) ―  You can almost hear the familiar strains of music.

    And when you do, you know … it’s time for the Olympic games.

    From Feb. 9 to Feb. 25, the games of the 23rd Winter Olympics will be held in Pyeongchang County, South Korea.

    But this year, at this Olympics, Blue will be going for the gold, too, and that means you get the opportunity to go along for the ride.

    Throughout the games, UKNow will be serving up stories about the special ties the University of Kentucky — and the UK family — has to the Olympics and this year’s event in particular. We will be your official source of news — at www.uky.edu/Olympics— for all things "Blue" and "Gold" and some related stories that speak to the power of sports to heal, inspire, promote and educate.

    Here’s a preview of the next few weeks:

    • You will read about one of our alums, who is representing her native land — Nigeria. Nigeria’s Simidele Adeagbo, a graduate of UK’s College of Communication and Information, is Africa’s first female skeleton athlete to compete in the Winter Olympics. Before she even competes, she already has a number of firsts to her name. Find out what fuels her drive to compete.
    • Tom Hammond has been covering the Olympic games for NBC Sports longer than many of our current students have been alive. He will give a bird’s-eye view of what it is like to be on the inside of the games, covering both the “thrill of victory and the agony of defeat” on the world’s largest stage.
    • You will learn about UK’s Sports Medicine Research Institute, in the College of Health Sciences, where high-performance athletes can learn more about how their bodies work — and how they break down — as part of a nationally leading effort to help athletes and others maximize performance.
    • On a special podcast, we will discuss with two experts the growth of sports as business — now a multibillion-dollar enterprise that draws the attention of fans, corporations, products and commercials year-round.
    • A number of Korean students call UK home during the academic year. They will provide insight about culture and the way of life in South Korea, a country at the epicenter of global politics and, increasingly, an economic engine.
    • What fuels an athlete? At UK, we have our own high-performance approach to nutrition for students who participate in the university’s 22 varsity sports. We will give you a peek into what they eat and how they manage their nutrition to ensure they are ready for prime performance.
    • And you will travel with our UK cheerleading squad, which recently won a national championship for a record 23rd time. These special athletes, and UK representatives, have been chosen to represent the United States as cheerleading vies to be a sport at future Olympics.

    This year, "Blue" will be going for the "Gold," too. We will take you on the journey with special athletes and those who support them and have insight into what makes the Olympics so special. Be sure to visit www.uky.edu/olympics and follow along on all of our social media channels by looking for #olympiCats.

    Discover one of UK's closest connections to the Olympics by watching the video interview above with UK Cheerleading Head Coach Jomo Thompson. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationHealth SciencesUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: From Feb. 9 to Feb. 25, the 23rd Winter Olympics will be held in Pyeongchang County, South Korea. But at this Olympics, "Blue" will be going for the "Gold," too, and that means you get the opportunity to go along for the ride.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 6, 2018) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information is looking for the best stories published in the state in 2017.  

    The annual David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards honor the best in Kentucky storytelling — stories that enlighten and inform while capturing the attention of the audience. Storytellers can inspire a heart or break it. Entries may be hard news, features, advocacy journalism, personality profiles, columns and even obituaries. No matter the form, the story should be well developed and free from errors, possess sound journalistic mechanics and exhibit high ethical standards.

    The school established the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award to honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.

    Two awards are given: One recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture April 19 and will receive a cash reward. 

    The student award is open to UK journalism majors for work published or completed through student media, at an internship or at any recognized media outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website). The professional award is open to any journalist whose story was published or broadcast at a Kentucky news outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website).

    Work published during 2017 is eligible. Entries for the award will be accepted through the end of Wednesday, Feb. 28, at this web address: https://ci.uky.edu/jat/webforms/david-dick-storytelling-award.

    The 2017 David Dick award was won by journalism senior Derek Terry, now a reporter for CatsPause.com.

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1987 and the University of Kentucky Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He earned both his undergraduate and master’s degree at UK. After retiring from CBS, he taught in the school before becoming its director from 1987 until 1993.

    The awards honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK School of Journalism and Media is looking for the best stories published in the state in 2017. Two awards are given: one to a UK student journalist and one to a professional journalist working in Kentucky.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell Feb. 6, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 6, 2018) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information is looking for the best stories published in the state in 2017.  

    The annual David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards honor the best in Kentucky storytelling — stories that enlighten and inform while capturing the attention of the audience. Storytellers can inspire a heart or break it. Entries may be hard news, features, advocacy journalism, personality profiles, columns and even obituaries. No matter the form, the story should be well developed and free from errors, possess sound journalistic mechanics and exhibit high ethical standards.

    The school established the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award to honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.

    Two awards are given: One recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture April 19 and will receive a cash reward. 

    The student award is open to UK journalism majors for work published or completed through student media, at an internship or at any recognized media outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website). The professional award is open to any journalist whose story was published or broadcast at a Kentucky news outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website).

    Work published during 2017 is eligible. Entries for the award will be accepted through the end of Wednesday, Feb. 28, at this web address: https://ci.uky.edu/jat/webforms/david-dick-storytelling-award.

    The 2017 David Dick award was won by journalism senior Derek Terry, now a reporter for CatsPause.com.

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1987 and the University of Kentucky Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He earned both his undergraduate and master’s degree at UK. After retiring from CBS, he taught in the school before becoming its director from 1987 until 1993.

    The awards honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK School of Journalism and Media is looking for the best stories published in the state in 2017. Two awards are given: one to a UK student journalist and one to a professional journalist working in Kentucky.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Darias Collins Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 30, 2018) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team housed in the College of Communication and Information swept two tournaments with impressive victories, placing first and second in two of the nation’s most reputable tournaments.  

    The successful team was split between three tournaments recently competing in simultaneous tournaments at the U.S. Naval Academy, Dartmouth Round Robin and Indiana University.

    During a three-day competition in the Naval Academy Tournament, the duo of Amar Adam and Theodore Noparstack once again took first. The tournament featured nearly 100 teams from 16 states. The two champions defeated a nationally top-ranked team from Trinity University in a 2-1 decision in the final round. Earlier in the tournament, Kentucky won victories over a number of powerhouse competitors including Georgetown University, Dartmouth College and the University of Michigan.

    The team’s second impressive performance came during the Dartmouth Round Robin tournament with a strong second place finish by competitors Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    This was Kentucky’s strongest performance at the Dartmouth Round Robin Tournament and only the fourth time UK has been invited to compete. Only the top seven nationally ranked teams are invited to participate in the tournament, making it one of the nation’s top competitions.

    Sophomore duo Bannister and Trufanov were the youngest team in the field against powerful lineups from Harvard University and Northwestern University. Harvard placed second and Northwestern placed third.

    The up-and-coming pair of Genevieve Hackman and Jacinda Rivas worked their way to a fourth-place finish at a tournament at the Indiana University.

    Coach David Arnett summed up the past weeks’ events by saying, “As a coach you’re a lot less concerned with how the season starts than with how it finishes. You want to see your team grow and improve throughout the year and my takeaway is that’s exactly what we’re doing. Dan (Bannister) and Anthony (Trufanov) taking second place at Dartmouth is huge for a pair of sophomores. Our seniors Amar (Adam) and Theo (Noparstack) went to Navy and won a three-day marathon that included teams from 17 states and some of the best of the best like Georgetown and Michigan. Gen (Hackman) and Jacinda (Rivas) reaching the final four at Indiana was a huge step for them. My belief has always been that the best teams have a group that works hard and for each other. I think we have that and hope we can keep focused as we head into the national championship portion of the season.”

    While this team may be young, it continues to build a case as one of the top five teams in the country. Kentucky finishes the regular season with a tournament at the University of Texas at Austin in February.

    The young UK Debate Team continues to build a case as one of the top five teams in the country. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Debate Team swept two of the nation's most reputable tournaments with impressive victories.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Darias Collins Jan. 30, 2018

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 30, 2018) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team housed in the College of Communication and Information swept two tournaments with impressive victories, placing first and second in two of the nation’s most reputable tournaments.  

    The successful team was split between three tournaments recently competing in simultaneous tournaments at the U.S. Naval Academy, Dartmouth Round Robin and Indiana University.

    During a three-day competition in the Naval Academy Tournament, the duo of Amar Adam and Theodore Noparstack once again took first. The tournament featured nearly 100 teams from 16 states. The two champions defeated a nationally top-ranked team from Trinity University in a 2-1 decision in the final round. Earlier in the tournament, Kentucky won victories over a number of powerhouse competitors including Georgetown University, Dartmouth College and the University of Michigan.

    The team’s second impressive performance came during the Dartmouth Round Robin tournament with a strong second place finish by competitors Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    This was Kentucky’s strongest performance at the Dartmouth Round Robin Tournament and only the fourth time UK has been invited to compete. Only the top seven nationally ranked teams are invited to participate in the tournament, making it one of the nation’s top competitions.

    Sophomore duo Bannister and Trufanov were the youngest team in the field against powerful lineups from Harvard University and Northwestern University. Harvard placed second and Northwestern placed third.

    The up-and-coming pair of Genevieve Hackman and Jacinda Rivas worked their way to a fourth-place finish at a tournament at Indiana University.

    Coach David Arnett summed up the past weeks’ events by saying, “As a coach you’re a lot less concerned with how the season starts than with how it finishes. You want to see your team grow and improve throughout the year and my takeaway is that’s exactly what we’re doing. Dan (Bannister) and Anthony (Trufanov) taking second place at Dartmouth is huge for a pair of sophomores. Our seniors Amar (Adam) and Theo (Noparstack) went to Navy and won a three-day marathon that included teams from 17 states and some of the best of the best like Georgetown and Michigan. Gen (Hackman) and Jacinda (Rivas) reaching the final four at Indiana was a huge step for them. My belief has always been that the best teams have a group that works hard and for each other. I think we have that and hope we can keep focused as we head into the national championship portion of the season.”

    While this team may be young, it continues to build a case as one of the top five teams in the country. Kentucky finishes the regular season with a tournament at the University of Texas at Austin in February.

    The young UK Debate Team continues to build a case as one of the top five teams in the country. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Debate Team swept two of the nation's most reputable tournaments with impressive victories.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 26, 2018) — The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team traveled to Butler University this past weekend and placed third at the Bulldog Battle Speech and Debate Tournament. This year, 14 schools representing four different states took part in the competition. Many of these teams are nationally ranked which made for a challenging tournament in many of the team’s events.

    “Tough competitions like this are essential,” Coach Timothy Bill said. “The only way to prepare for nationals is to seek out the best teams as often and as early as we can each semester. We’ll learn what we used this weekend to get even better over the next few months.”

    UK’s third place showing was made possible by numerous individual performances in each of the team’s events. Junior Matt Karijolic and senior Rachel Brase succeeded in placing fifth and sixth respectively in the individual sweepstakes competition based off their cumulative scores at the tournament. Brase won the long-read-response speaking event and Karijolic won rhetorical criticism. Additionally, the team qualified another speech for nationals bringing the season to a record total of 33 qualifications.

    View the total list of awards won at the tournament here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. The team’s next competition will be the Hatfield and McCoy Swing held Feb. 9-11 at Marshall University in Huntington, West Virginia. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

     

    UK's third place showing was made possible by numerous individual performances in each of the team's events.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK Speech and Debate Team traveled to Butler University this past weekend and placed third at the Bulldog Battle Speech and Debate Tournament.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 24, 2018) —  As the national conversation about identity, racism, free speech, hate speech and censorship continues, challenging conversations are sure to arise across college campuses. The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information is hosting events next week that tackle these issues and present strategies for finding common ground.

    The first event 7 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 31, will feature Lecia Brooks, outreach director for the Southern Poverty Law Center. Brooks also serves as director of the Civil Rights Memorial Center in Montgomery, Alabama, an interpretive center designed to provide visitors to the Civil Rights Memorial with a deeper understanding of the civil rights movement. Brooks will present an overview of the Southern Poverty Law Center and talk about the alt-right movement.

    The talk is free and open to the public and will take place in the Gatton College Building's Kincaid Auditorium.

    The following evening, the college will team up with student organizations Underground Perspective and the Communication Student Association to present a panel discussion titled, "Finding Common Ground: Communication Strategies for Challenging Conversations." The discussion will take place 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 1, in Kincaid Auditorium and will focus on real-life scenarios previously submitted by students.

    Panelists for the Feb. 1 event include:

    • Lance Poston, director of LGBTQ* Resources at UK;
    • Ashley Sorrell, who leads the Center for the Enhancement of Learning and Teaching's Courageous Conversations initiative;
    • Victor Hazard, associate vice president for student engagement at UK;
    • DeBraun Thomas, founder of Take Back Cheapside Movement; and
    • Melissa Will, doctoral student and psychology intern at the UK Counseling Center.
    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationGraduate SchoolStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK College of Communication and Information is hosting Southern Poverty Law Center Outreach Director Lecia Brooks Wednesday, Jan. 31, and a panel discussion on how to find common ground in challenging conversations on Thursday, Feb. 1.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Darias Collins Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 24, 2018) —  An innovative technology lab at the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information has undergone a renovation thanks to sponsorship from UK Information and Technology Services. The lab is now ready for students, faculty and staff to conduct research using its cutting-edge technologies, beginning with an open house for the campus community from 12-4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 25. 

    The CI CoLab is a technology learning laboratory that fosters technological innovation and collaboration between students, faculty and staff. The CoLab provides a space to perform research in four divisions including user-experience (UX), eye-tracking, virtual reality (VR) and social media listening.

    The multidisciplinary venture was first introduced in the spring 2016 semester by College of Communication and Information Senior Associate Dean for Administrative Affairs Derek Lane and College Media Officer Nathan Stevens, along with Dean Dan O’Hair, as the CI Collective. Today, the lab is called the CI Collaborative Laboratory (CoLab).

    “The CI CoLab was built to find new technology, test it and find research within it. We’re here to inspire the researcher into finding new ways to make their studies easier and more interesting,” Stevens said. Stevens and Director of Operations Jesse Stallsworth are inviting students, faculty and staff from all departments and majors to tour the lab and experience its technology. The open house will be held in Room 310N of the Lucille Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

    “People from any discipline of study can make use of the technologies in the lab,” Stallsworth said. His favorite division is the Usability Lab. “It helps to improve technology for the general public and will hopefully make new and existing technology easier to use,” he said.

    The CI CoLab is used to conduct usability studies for outside companies and organizations as well research for students, faculty and staff at UK. Many companies will bring in their technology for people to use, study and answer surveys about the pros, cons and potential improvements of the technology. The program also brings in professionals in IT to study how and why people might adopt certain technologies. 

    Other projects underway in the CoLab are the Social Media Listening lab and “Arcadian Dream.” The Social Media Listening lab allows participants to plan and analyze post engagement with the goal of creating more relevant content that audiences would like to see. It also gives participants the ability to view what people are saying about a particular topic and analyze the audiences’ attitudes and engagement behaviors towards these topics. 

    The buzzworthy "Arcadian Dream" is currently still being developed. It is a fun and entertaining virtual reality game that aims to distract those with terminal illnesses from their current environment. Developers are planning to conduct research using distraction theory and other theories of gaming psychology and engagement. The precursor study will be conducted in a pediatric clinic with the end goal of conducting research at Kentucky Children’s Hospital oncology unit.

    The CoLab has developed a team and is always looking for more participants. Internships are available for students each semester. Stallsworth stressed the importance of getting involved and using the lab as a resource for expansions in research. “Feel free to stop by, get involved and ask questions,” he said.

    The lab can be used by anyone who is looking to learn and conduct research in any field of study.

    Stallsworth encourages the public to not only come and tour the lab but to later apply it to their academic studies. “I hope they get inspired to use even more technology. We hope to see a lot of meaningful research come out of the lab,” Stallsworth said.

    If anyone is interested in collaborative projects or if students are interested in working in the lab as an intern, or learning more information about how to get involved, contact Jesse Stallsworth at jst243@uky.edu or Nathan Stevens at nss@uky.edu.

    You can find the CI CoLab in Room 310N Little Library, on the third floor. 

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The CoLab provides a space to perform research in four divisions including user-experience, eye-tracking, virtual reality and social media listening. The lab will have an open house from 12-4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 25. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Al Cross Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 22, 2017) — A Northwest Iowa family that has demonstrated courage, tenacity and integrity in the face of competition and powerful, entrenched local interests is the winner of the 2017 Tom and Pat Gish Award from the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at the University of Kentucky.

    The Cullen family publishes the Storm Lake Times, a twice-weekly newspaper that has focused attention on water-pollution issues in Iowa, often to the dislike of agribusiness interests that are sources of much of the pollution.

    “We’ve lost some friends, we’ve lost subscriptions; for a while, lost some ads,” said Art Cullen, editor and co-owner of the paper started by his brother John more than 27 years ago. This year Art Cullen won the Pulitzer Prize for editorial writing, for a series of columns about pollution in the Raccoon River, which supplies water for Iowa’s capital and largest city, Des Moines. He and his son Tom also wrote many news stories about the issue.

    Following their reporting, the Des Moines Water Works sued the drainage districts of Buena Vista, Calhoun and Sac counties for failing to stop the pollution. The Times forced the release of public records that showed major agribusiness interests were paying for the suit’s defense. Courts ruled the districts couldn’t be sued, but the suit and the Pulitzer Prize focused more attention on the issue. Art Cullen says “The terms of the debate are changing,” and the amount of farmland in cover crops that prevent pollution has doubled in the past year.

    Cullen’s Pulitzer-winning columns had punch. He wrote in March 2016, "Anyone with eyes and a nose knows in his gut that Iowa has the dirtiest surface water in America. It is choking the waterworks and the Gulf of Mexico. It is causing oxygen deprivation in Northwest Iowa glacial lakes. It has caused us to spend millions upon millions trying to clean up Storm Lake, the victim of more than a century of explosive soil erosion."

    The Pulitzer committee said the editorials were “fueled by tenacious reporting, impressive expertise and engaging writing that successfully challenged powerful corporate agricultural interests.” Much of that reporting was done by Tom Cullen. Art’s wife, Dolores, also reports and takes photographs for the paper, and John’s wife, Mary, writes a recipe column. The family dog, Mabel, is there, too.

    The Times began reporting and editorializing about pollution from farms about a year after it was established in June 1990, first looking at concentrated hog-farming operations. It has brought to light other environmental concerns, such as the need to dredge Storm Lake, and issues surrounding the livestock-processing plants that have brought many immigrants to Buena Vista County, in the heart of socially and politically conservative northwest Iowa.

    In one of his most recent Editorial Notebooks, Art Cullen wrote, “Many of my ignorant friends conflate people of color with their having lost control of their own destiny; they don’t realize they never had control of it. It’s harder to hate the Chicago Board of Trade than it is a Mexican who doesn’t like American football or can’t speak English. They voted for Barack Obama to take on the Board of Trade and Wall Street. He didn’t,” so they voted for Donald Trump.

    “That column is a sterling example of a rural editor speaking hard truths to power and to the people he serves,” said Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues. “The Storm Lake Times has long been known to those of us who follow rural journalism as a great example to emulate, and Art Cullen’s Pulitzer Prize merely confirmed that. We hope this award to the Cullen family will show that they have had high ideals and standards for a very long time.”

    Cross noted that the paper is a commercial success, with a circulation of 3,000, more than the 1,700 reported by the thrice-weekly Storm Lake Pilot-Tribune, owned by Rust Communications of Cape Girardeau, Missouri. “Unlike most weeklies, the Times gets most of its revenue from circulation, with a relatively high $60 annual subscription price,” Cross said. “That is testimony of community support for quality journalism, providing another example to follow.”

    The Tom and Pat Gish Award is named for the late couple who published The Mountain Eagle at Whitesburg, Kentucky, for more than 50 years and became nationally known for their battles with coal operators and politicians, and the firebombing of their office by a Whitesburg policeman. Their son, Eagle Editor-Publisher Ben Gish, is on the award selection committee.

    “It is encouraging to know that small, family-owned-and-operated community newspapers like the Storm Lake Times and Editor Art Cullen are still here and doing their jobs in very difficult circumstances with the same courage and tenacity exhibited by my parents,” Ben Gish said.

    Past winners of the award have been the Gishes; the Ezzell family of The Canadian (Texas) Record; publisher Jim Prince and former publisher Stan Dearman of The Neshoba Democrat in Philadelphia, Mississippi; Samantha Swindler, columnist for The Oregonian, for her work in rural Kentucky and Texas; Stanley Nelson and the Concordia Sentinel of Ferriday, Louisiana; Jonathan and Susan Austin for their newspaper work in Yancey County, North Carolina; the late Landon Wills of the McLean County News in western Kentucky; the Trapp family of the Rio Grande Sun in Española, New Mexico; and Ivan Foley of the Platte County Landmark in Platte City, Missouri.

    Cross will present the 2017 Gish Award to the Cullen family at the annual convention of the Iowa Newspaper Association in Des Moines on Feb. 2.

    Nominations for the 2018 Gish Award are being accepted at 122 Grehan Journalism Building, University of Kentucky, Lexington KY 40506-0042 or via email to al.cross@uky.edu

    The Cullen family from left, John and Mary Cullen; Tom Cullen; Dolores and Art Cullen. Photo courtesy of the Storm Lake Times.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Summary: The award, presented by the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues each year, is named for the late couple who published The Mountain Eagle at Whitesburg, Kentucky, for more than 50 years and became nationally known for their battles with coal operators and politicians.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jay Blanton Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 19, 2017) —  Kentucky is among the states most ravaged by opioid abuse and drug addiction.

    But the University of Kentucky — with researchers and clinicians working across a number of colleges and disciplines — is on the front lines of finding solutions.

    Leaders from UK Research and UK HealthCare — along with some of the institution’s most prolific researchers — took their stories of hope and challenge to Washington, D.C., recently to make the case with some of the country’s top elected officials about the need to continue federal funding to address drug addiction and abuse.

    “The scourge of opioid abuse and addiction is wreaking havoc on Kentucky. Addiction is a disease of despair, victimizing individuals and communities when they are most vulnerable. It does not discriminate by ZIP code or neighborhood; race or ethnicity — it affects us all,” said UK President Eli Capilouto, who led the delegation to Washington. “Universities across the country are locked in a fight against opioid abuse. The University of Kentucky is among the leaders, working in partnership with local, state and federal stakeholders to stem the tide of this insidious menace.”

    A group of UK representatives — including Executive Vice President for Health Affairs Mark Newman, College of Medicine Dean Bob DiPaola, Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis and Vice President for University Relations Tom Harris — joined Capilouto in meetings with top elected officials in the country over the course of three days recently. Officials included Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Sen. Rand Paul as well as U.S. Reps. Hal Rogers, Andy Barr, Brett Guthrie, Thomas Massie, Jamie Comer and John Yarmuth.

    A second team of UK representatives, led by UK’s Vice President for Administration and External Affairs Mark D. Birdwhistell, included faculty from six different colleges who are engaged in substance abuse and addiction research. The university currently has $22.5 million in research funding around these issues as part of UK’s $330 million research enterprise. UK, in fact, received $11.2 million in research funding from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) last year alone.

    “The breadth of ongoing research in substance abuse by our faculty led to vibrant discussions with congressional staff," Cassis said. "Everyone had the same goal, and all agreed that support for substance research is critical.”

    UK’s opioid-focused research team in Washington included:

    • Carrie Oser, a sociology professor examining health service utilization, drug treatment outcomes, and infectious disease prevention among rural residents and minorities.
    • Donald Helme, an associate professor in the Department of Communication who focuses on media and school-based campaigns designed to prevent risky behaviors.
    • Alison Davis, an agricultural economics extension professor who has facilitated a local substance abuse coalition in Russell County, Kentucky, which is adopting strategies and policies to reduce substance abuse.
    • Mark Fillmore, a professor of psychology focusing research on acute and chronic effects of abused drugs on mental capacity.
    • Kristin Ashford, an associate professor of nursing and co-creator of the Perinatal Assistance and Treatment Home (PATHways), which is helping pregnant women who use opioids. Since the program launched in 2014, more than 150 women have received treatment through PATHways; of those, 77 percent who were admitted to labor and delivery tested negative for illicit drug use.
    • Jeffrey Talbert, a professor in pharmacy who focuses his research on the intersection of policy decisions and health outcomes.
    • April Young, an assistant professor of public health who works with the UK Center on Drug and Alcohol Research and is helping lead a $1.16 million cooperative research effort to build community-grounded health responses to combat opioid abuse in Appalachia.

    “Their work is making a difference,” Birdwhistell said. “But they will be the first to tell you that progress is not possible without the support they receive from our lawmakers and federal funding for their research efforts. Together, we can turn the tide, if we remain focused.” 

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthUK HealthCare

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jay Blanton
    jay.blanton@uky.edu
    859-257-6605 Summary: With UK researchers on the forefront of fighting the opioid crisis, their message to members of the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate emphasized the need for continued federal funding of research addressing drug addiction and abuse. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Harlie Collins Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 19, 2017) — Maria Cahill, associate professor in the University of Kentucky School of Information Science, has been awarded nearly $400,000 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to investigate how public library storytime programs support school readiness of young children. 

    The three-year, $393,876 project began on Dec. 1 and is a part of IMLS’s National Leadership Grant for Libraries, which “supports projects that address challenges faced by the library and archive fields and that have the potential to advance library and archival practice with new tools, research findings, models, services, or alliances that can be widely replicated,” per the IMLS website.

    Public libraries are uniquely positioned to provide rich learning opportunities that support school readiness through programs with high quality language environments for young children and their caregivers; however, there is little empirical evidence to demonstrate the extent to which storytime programs, a cornerstone of public library programming efforts, provide supportive environments to prepare children for academic success nor to understand the extent to which they meet the needs of parents and early childhood educators. 

    “The overarching goal of this project is to conduct research on storytimes that is both informed by practitioners and informative for their practice,” said Cahill.

    In addition to her appointment in the UK College of Communication and Information's School of Information Science, Cahill holds a joint appointment in the Department of Educational Leadership Studies in the College of Education.

    In collaboration with the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives, the State Library of Indiana and the State Library of Ohio, Cahill and co-investigators, Soohyung Joo, assistant professor in the School of Information Science, and Mary Howard, research and development associate at the UK Human Development Institute, will work with 36 public libraries across three states to observe interactions between librarians, children and adult participants. 

    Complementary to the investigation of storytimes, the team also intends to explore the needs and expectations of parents, childcare providers, librarians and library administrators in relation to storytime and other programs and services aimed at young children. 

    “This study will employ multiple methods to investigate different aspects of storytimes, such as structured observation, content analysis, surveys, textual analysis and hierarchical linear modeling,” Joo said. 

    The project will produce findings that will be useful and applicable to librarians across a wide spectrum of public libraries in the United States. 

    Cahill added, “The study will provide data to support the value of public library storytimes for school readiness and community building, as well as information to help librarians tailor storytimes and other programs and services to meet the needs of various stakeholders.” 

    Year one of the three-year project will focus on data collection. The team will video record 72 storytime sessions and administer two surveys; one to parents and caregivers, and one to librarians. They will also administer a survey to public library directors, conduct interviews with librarians who provide story time programs and conduct focus group interviews with child care providers from a variety of early care settings. Based on findings and a comprehensive needs assessment, the team will develop guidelines and digital learning modules to train librarians and other community program providers. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Maria Cahill, associate professor in the UK School of Information Science, has been awarded nearly $400,000 by the Institute of Museum and Library Services to investigate how public library storytime programs support school readiness of young children. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 18, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team is no stranger to success and the group's hard work is being rewarded. The team is currently ranked as one of the nation’s best teams with the sophomore duo of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov earning a number three ranking from the American Debate Association.  

    The duo is also ranked fourth in the nation on the College Debate Ratings website with the senior pair of Amar Adam and Theo Noparstak close behind at number 14 in the nation.

    The entire team gave a strong performance during the recent tournament at Wake Forest University, which stands as the nation’s largest first semester tournament hosting more than 130 teams from 23 states. Bannister and Trufanov lost a close 2-1 decision to Emory University in the final four while Adam and Noparstak reached the quarterfinals and fell to Harvard University.

    Kentucky performed impressively this semester, earning wins over the nation’s most prominent teams, including Harvard; Dartmouth College; University of California, Berkeley; Northwestern University; Emory; University of Michigan; and Wake Forest. The team also defeated regional rivals like University of Georgia, University of Louisville and Vanderbilt University.

    Bannister and Trufanov were invited to participate in the prestigious Dartmouth Round Robin, which takes place in January. They are noted as the only team of sophomores competing in the tournament.

    The Dartmouth Round Robin is the most exclusive tournament of the year, with only the top seven teams competing. Other teams participating include Harvard, University of Kansas, Northwestern, Emory, Wake Forest and University of Nevada, Las Vegas. This will be UK’s second time competing in three years.

    The UK Debate Team has established a noteworthy record of success in some of the nation’s most recognized tournaments. In 1986, UK won the National Debate Tournament. Since then, the team reached the semifinals of the National Debate Tournament seven times and was ranked seventh overall with 24 first round teams. In 1994, UK won the coveted Copeland Award, which recognizes the team for the best regular season record. In addition, UK has reached final rounds of every major invitational tournament, including Dartmouth, Harvard, Northwestern and Emory.

    David Arnett, the director of the UK Debate Team, has been with Kentucky since 2010. He is the 2015 American Debate Association Coach of the Year and has high expectations for this year’s squad.

    “From a competitive standpoint this was the strongest first semester we’ve had in my time at Kentucky. It is a testament to the countless hours of preparation the team puts in. It also speaks to what can be accomplished with a group that genuinely cares for each other and puts the team first,” Arnett said.

    In addition to being the director of the UK Debate Team, Arnett also overseas five national college and high school tournaments including the Tournament of Champions, which hosts more than 700 participants from 35 states and four countries.

    Arnett works alongside a distinguished team of leaders and past debaters, who have consistently led UK to victory. Head Coach Lincoln Garrett won the ADA National Tournament and reached the octafinals of the National Debate Tournament during his tenure on the team. Previous Assistant Coach Donnie Grassie is a UK graduate who was cleared at the National Debate Tournament three times, finished in the quarterfinals in 2016 and won speaker awards at each tournament. Leah Moczulski, the team’s current assistant coach, reached the final four of the National Debate Tournament in her senior year as a student.

    Arnett says the team’s competitiveness is not the only positive that should be recognized. He added, “Thanks to a very aggressive fundraising campaign, we’ve been able to increase the number of students attending tournaments. Debate is a powerful tool for empowering young people and the more students we can impact the better.”

    The UK Debate Team’s next tournament takes place in January at the U.S. Naval Academy.

    The UK Debate Team is housed in the College of Communication and Information. You can keep up with the team at http://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Debate Team is no stranger to success and the group's hard work is being rewarded. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jenny Wells Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 15, 2017) — Today, the University of Kentucky December 2017 Commencement Ceremonies will recognize the accomplishments of undergraduate, graduate and professional students who will have completed their degrees by the end of the fall 2017 semester.

    Two ceremonies will take place at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15, in Rupp Arena. Doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients are now recognized together based on their colleges.

    More than 1,000 students are expected to participate in the ceremonies. Overall, 1,797 undergraduate, 845 graduate and 116 professional degree candidates had their degrees approved by the UK Board of Trustees.

    Friday's ceremonies include:

    • 10 a.m.: ceremony for students in the Colleges of Agriculture, Food and Environment; Education; Engineering; Fine Arts; Medicine; Social Work; Public Health; Pharmacy; Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m.: ceremony for students in the Colleges of Arts and Sciences; Gatton College of Business and Economics; Communication and Information; Design; Health Sciences; Nursing

    Graduate Stories

    While all graduates are celebrated for their tremendous achievements, many have particularly interesting stories to share about their lives and time at UK.

    • Kevin Massey was a 16-year-old high school athlete at Indiana's Franklin Central High School when he received a frightening diagnosis: he had an inoperable brain tumor. While in the hospital and given no more than 24 hours to live, the lifelong UK fan was surprised with a visit from Coach John Calipari. Calipari told him if he could get out of the hospital and into UK, Massey would be part of his staff. Proving prognoses wrong, Massey made it through the night, and then a month, and then a year. After starting school at UK, he became the manager for the basketball team, and players and coaches became his second family. Massey will graduate Friday with a degree in health communication from the UK College of Communication and Information. Read more about Massey: http://uknow.uky.edu/student-life/brain-cancer-survivor-basketball-team-manager-set-graduate-uk.
    • After Martha Tillson graduated from high school in New England several years ago, she tried college life but determined it wasn't for her. That decision led to an adventure of hitchhiking across the United States, meeting people from various backgrounds, and accumulating myriad experiences. When Tillson hit Lexington, she decided to enroll at UK and is completing bachelor's degrees in both social work and psychology. Many of the people Tillson met in her travels struggled with substance misuse, which has informed her research interests. Tillson will share her story as the student speaker during the 10 a.m. ceremony. Read more about Tillson: http://uknow.uky.edu/student-life/december-graduate-finds-home-and-purpose-uk-college-social-work.
    • When Seth Johnson hasn't been fighting fires for the Georgetown Fire Department, he has been working toward his degree in international studies with a focus on Russia/Eurasia and comparative politics. Johnson, 38, will graduate this Friday. The full-time firefighter, who is also raising three children ages 3, 8 and 10 with his wife, has been attending UK part time since transferring from the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. He even studied abroad in Russia during the summer of 2014. Johnson is seeking a career on an international level, "advancing not only U.S. interests, but the interests of mankind."

    Honorary Degrees

    Jewell Deene Ellis, an educator and former teacher trainer, and L. Stanley Pigman, an engineer and entrepreneur, will receive honorary degrees at the 10 a.m. ceremony.

    Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/professional-news/ellis-pigman-receive-honorary-degrees.

    Student Speakers

    In addition to UK President Eli Capilouto, a student representative will address the audience at each of the ceremonies, as per UK tradition. Martha Tillson, from Lexington, is graduating with bachelor's degrees in both social work and psychology. She will give the Commencement address at the 10 a.m. ceremony. Sarah Gossett, from Taffy, Kentucky, is graduating with a bachelor's degree in integrated strategic communication from the UK College of Communication and Information. She will deliver the Commencement address at the 2 p.m. ceremony.

    Read more: http://uknow.uky.edu/student-life/tillson-and-gossett-deliver-december-2017-commencement-addresses.

    Livestream

    Both ceremonies will be streamed live at www.uky.edu/uknow, the university’s news website. Full video of each ceremony will be available within two weeks after Commencement on the university’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/universityofkentucky.

    Social media users are encouraged to use the hashtag #UKgrad.

    For more information about UK Commencement, visit www.uky.edu/commencement.

    Watch the December 2017 Commencement Ceremonies live. Please ensure your computer or device's software is up to date. UK Commencement Ceremony.Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The UK December Commencement Ceremonies will take place at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. today, in Rupp Arena. Watch live as more than 1,000 graduates walk across the stage and become UK alumni. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 15, 2017) The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team finished the fall semester of competition with another win at Transylvania University’s WYRD Invitational held Dec. 1-2. This is the third such victory for the team this semester. UK also won the John G. Fee Invitational held at Berea College and the Chief Justice Invitational held at Marshall University in October.

    The tournament at Transylvania University allowed competitors to choose from 16 different public speaking events. Students from UK earned at least one of the top three positions in 13 of these categories including winning communication analysis, extemporaneous speaking, informative speaking, persuasive speaking, poetry interpretation and prose interpretation. Students from UK also won four of the five pentathlon awards for success in individual sweepstakes and qualified another nine events for nationals.

    “This was a great way to end our fall season,” said Timothy Bill, director of the team. “Now we finish our finals and begin the last of our preparations for nationals in the spring."

    Over winter break, students will revise current speeches, polish performances and prepare a few new events for the spring semester. By the time the team attends nationals in March, students will be regularly performing nearly 60 speech events in addition to the team’s debate entries.

    A full list of awards won by UK students at the tournament can be found here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle Invitational held Jan. 19-20, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team finished the fall semester of competition with another win at Transylvania University’s WYRD Invitational.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 15, 2017) — A group of 19 students from China successfully concluded their semester-long study abroad program with the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media. The participants are students in the honors program at the School of Journalism and Communication at Nanjing University, which is consistently ranked among the top 10 of China’s institutions of higher learning.

    The program, which lasted from Sept. 6 through Dec. 7, offered the visiting students a unique educational experience incorporating classroom instruction, visits to sites of cultural and historical significance in Lexington and the surrounding area, and a plethora of diverse events on the UK campus.

    Special classes tailored to these visiting students included media research methods, intercultural communication, U.S. media culture, print and broadcast news reporting, and magazine writing and production, most of which are core areas of specialization within the School of Journalism and Media. Upon reflecting on his overall stay here, Jiang Bowen, one of the participating students, said, “We all have had a wonderful time studying here. Before we came (to UK), we didn't even know where this university was. Now, we have learned firsthand what a great university UK is, and we are so glad that we came here.”

    “I had a wonderful experience teaching the students from Nanjing. They were all very hard working and dedicated. I really appreciated how much they wanted to learn about broadcasting because they asked me more questions than any group of students I have had. They put a smile on my face every time I walked into class. They are a special group of students who I will always remember,” said Andrew Dawson, an instructor with the School of Journalism and Media, while assessing his classroom experience with the students.

    The students also visited the state capital of Frankfort, toured Buffalo Trace Distillery, watched horse racing at Keeneland Racecourse, took horse riding lessons at the Kentucky Horse Park and attended UK football, volleyball and basketball games. They also visited popular tourist sites including Mammoth Cave National Park, Natural Bridge State Park, Cumberland Falls State Resort Park and the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    This is the first year of a multi-year program based on an agreement between UK’s School of Journalism and Media and its counterpart at Nanjing University. The faculty director of the program is Zixue Tai, an associate professor with UK’s School of Journalism and Media. “This was a remarkable opportunity for the School of Journalism and Media. It promotes our reputation as a school with an international view. It expands the perspective of our faculty that they can take into classes with our own students. Dr. Tai did a remarkable job of organizing this program, and we believe it was a major success,” said Mike Farrell, professor and interim director of the School of Journalism and Media.  

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The program offered the visiting students a unique educational experience incorporating classroom instruction, visits to sites of cultural and historical significance in Lexington and the surrounding area, and a plethora of diverse events on the UK campus.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jenny Wells Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2017) — In what has become a University of Kentucky Commencement tradition, two students have been selected to serve as speakers for the UK December Commencement ceremonies this Friday, Dec. 15. Because doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients are now recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee accepted applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Martha Tillson will speak at the 10 a.m. ceremony and Sarah Gossett will speak at the 2 p.m. ceremony. Tillson and Gossett were selected among several candidates by UK President Eli Capilouto to represent the December 2017 graduating class.

    Tillson, from Lexington, is graduating with bachelor's degrees in social work and psychology. As a non-traditional student, she works as a data coordinator and research assistant at the UK Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. She also works closely with her mentor Michele Staton, an associate professor in the UK College of Medicine, to conduct research at the undergraduate level on substance misuse, something she witnessed firsthand before coming to UK when hitchhiking across the country.

    "I feel like the time that I was traveling and hitchhiking around the country exposed me to a lot of different issues, and substance misuse was definitely something that affected a lot of people," Tillson said. "So many people that I met and cared about have been affected by that issue and it felt like it was one of the factors that affected me the most strongly to come back to college and to finish my degree. I wanted to be able to make an impact in that area."

    Tillson said she was at first intimidated at the idea of delivering the UK Commencement address, but was encouraged by Staton and Kalea Benner, director of undergraduate studies in the College of Social Work.

    "I thought, if this is something that seems challenging to me, and this is something that kind of scares me, then I should probably do it, or at least try to do it, because that is what the past 10 years of my life has been," Tillson said. "For me, graduating is momentous. It has taken me 13 and a half years. So I am really excited for this opportunity."

    After graduation Tillson plans to continue working at the UK Center for Drug and Alcohol Research, and will eventually pursue a master's or doctoral degree program.  

    Gossett, from Taffy, Kentucky, is graduating with a degree in integrated strategic communication from the UK College of Communication and Information, with a minor in political science and a certificate in global studies. While at UK, Gossett has served as vice president for membership programming for Alpha Chi Omega sorority, a Student Government Association (SGA) senator for the College of Communication and Information and co-founder of Grehan Associates, a student-run communications agency. She is also a member of the Public Relations Student Society of America, the Student Leadership Council for the College of Communication and Information, the SGA Leadership Development Program and the Wellness Living Learning Program. Gossett also took part in UK Education Abroad, traveling to Cape Town, South Africa; Beijing, China; and London, England.

    "I’ve had some unique experiences, both good and bad, that have helped me become wiser when it comes to handling the ups and downs of life," said Gossett, who reflects on her late father in her speech. "I feel like a lot of graduation speeches focus on pushing yourself and having the drive to be successful, but it's important to also be reminded that sometimes bad things can and will happen, and it’s what you make of it that molds you into who you are becoming. Also, I felt like this was a great way to do something in memory of my dad. He was thrilled to hear that I was going to UK, so it's hard to know that he won’t be there for the big moments anymore."

    After graduation, Gossett plans to work full time and eventually pursue a job in international public relations, or attend Officer Candidate School for the Army.

    More than 1,000 students are expected to participate in Friday's ceremonies. Overall, 1,797 undergraduate and 956 graduate and professional degree candidates had their degrees approved by the UK Board of Trustees. The December Commencement ceremonies are as follows: 

    • 10 a.m.: College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; College of Education; College of Engineering; College of Fine Arts; College of Medicine; College of Social Work; College of Public Health; College of Pharmacy; Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m.: College of Arts and Sciences; Gatton College of Business and Economics; College of Communication and Information; College of Design; College of Health Sciences; College of Nursing

    Both ceremonies will be live streamed on UKNow.

    For more information about the December 2017 Commencement Ceremonies, visit www.uky.edu/Commencement

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: In what has become a UK Commencement tradition, two students have been selected to serve as speakers for the UK December Commencement ceremonies this Friday, Dec. 15. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Amy Jones-Timoney, Whitney Harder, and Kody Kiser Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2017) — His journey as a Wildcat began in an Indianapolis hospital room, with Coach John Calipari kneeling beside him, encouraging him to fight. He graduates this Friday, after overcoming obstacles, inspiring the Big Blue Nation and befriending everyone from professors to future NBA stars. But he will always be part of the University of Kentucky family.

    "It's so inspiring what he's been able to accomplish at this point in his life, with all the things that were thrown at him," Coach Calipari said.  

    Kevin Massey was a 16-year-old high school athlete at Indiana's Franklin Central High School when he received a frightening diagnosis: he had an inoperable brain tumor. While in the hospital and given no more than 24 hours to live, the lifelong UK fan was surprised with a visit from Coach Calipari. Calipari told him if he could get out of the hospital and into UK, Massey would be part of his staff.

    "The day I got accepted was the first day I ever saw my dad cry," Massey said.

    Proving prognoses wrong, Massey made it through the night, and then a month, and then a year. After starting school at UK, he became the manager for the basketball team, and players and coaches became his second family.  

    "You've got a whole gym full of people who are really proud of what he has done," said Coach John Robic, who oversees the managers and has become especially close with Massey. "When I came to my office the other day and saw his graduation announcement on my desk, I almost cried."

    It goes beyond the basketball team though. Massey's tenacity to let nothing, not even a brain tumor, get in his way of success (what he calls "just living life, basically") has inspired his advisors, classmates and countless members of the Big Blue Nation.

    "When I first started advising him I saw some of the difficulties he's gone through, and supporting him became a very personal thing for me," said Anthony Limperos, Massey's advisor and an associate professor in the College of Communication and Information.

    A communication major with a focus on health communication, Massey was committed to not just attending UK, but earning his degree. And he has no plans of quitting while he's ahead.

    "Graduating is just another step in life," he said. "I got bigger plans — I don’t just want to graduate and stop there. I got bigger plans and bigger goals and more people to help."

    For someone who has faced so many obstacles, Massey's outlook on life is purely optimistic.

    "It’s not a matter of what happens to you — because some things are going to happen to everybody … it’s all in your attitude and how there’s always something positive in situations," he said. "And there’s something in knowing that somebody has your back."

    That team effort to support Massey helped him get to where he is today — preparing to cross the Rupp Arena stage and complete his college career.

    "I'm already looking forward to asking him, 'okay, what's next?' What's he do next? Because it'll be something that inspires all of us," Calipari said. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: Kevin Massey's tenacity to let nothing, not even a brain tumor, get in his way of success (what he calls "just living life, basically") has inspired his advisors, classmates and countless members of the Big Blue Nation.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Sarah Geegan Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2017) — The campus community will have the opportunity to engage with the two finalists for University of Kentucky’s next provost at forums Thursday, Dec. 8, and Friday, Dec. 9.

    The schedule for the forums is:

    • Donna Arnett, dean of the College of Public Health, will appear at two public forums Thursday. The forums will be from 8:45-9:45 a.m., in Karpf Auditorium in Albert B. Chandler Hospital Pavilion A, and from 3-4 p.m., in Memorial Hall.
    • David Blackwell, dean of the Gatton College of Business and Economics, will appear at two forums Friday, from 8:45-9:45 a.m., in Karpf Auditorium in Albert B. Chandler Hospital Pavilion A, and then from 3-4 p.m., at Kincaid Hall in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    The candidates also will engage in conversations with a number of constituencies, including faculty and staff leaders, students and senior administrators. You can read more information about the finalists, the search committee, the search process and previous communication here. The search website also provides a way for the community to provide anonymous feedback about the candidates. All the forums will be live-streamed for those unable to attend.

    Earlier this year, UK Provost Tim Tracy announced he was leaving his position at the end of the calendar year to become chief executive officer of Aprecia Pharmaceuticals, a research and development company in Cincinnati. President Eli Capilouto announced his intent to conduct an internal search, given the number of pivotal initiatives ongoing at the university at this time. A search committee, along with Capilouto, reviewed the credentials of a number of candidates and interviewed them.

    “I remain convinced an internal search is the right approach,” Capilouto wrote to the campus Monday in an email. “And I assure you this has been a thorough and thoughtful process, even as we must move quickly to fill the role of provost by the end of the calendar year.”

    of Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArt MuseumArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLawLibrariesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan@uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Downloads:  Dean Donna Arnett Dean David BlackwellSummary: The campus community will have the opportunity to engage with the two finalists for UK’s next provost at forums Thursday, Dec. 8, and Friday, Dec. 9.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Matt Ian May Wednesday

    NEW YORK (Dec. 6, 2017) — University of Kentucky senior linebacker Courtney Love was named the winner of the 2017 Wuerffel Trophy, an award that honors college football’s top community servant, it was announced Tuesday at the National Football Foundation’s press conference at the New York Hilton Midtown Hotel in New York.

    The Wuerffel Trophy, known as “College Football’s Premier Award for Community Service,” is presented annually by the All Sports Association in Fort Walton Beach, Florida. Named after 1996 Heisman Trophy winning quarterback Danny Wuerffel from the University of Florida, the Wuerffel Trophy is awarded to the FBS (NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision) player that best combines exemplary community service with athletic and academic achievement.

    Love, a native of Youngstown, Ohio, leads the team in community service hours and has a passion for mentoring children, especially those living in a one-parent household or children who have parents who are incarcerated. Because of his passion, he currently volunteers at Amachi Central Kentucky, a mentoring program that seeks to pair caring, positive adults with children and youth in the Bluegrass who have one or both parents in state or federal prison or are affected by incarceration in some way.

    He also has served in a Skype mentoring program with area high school students, and has taken part in many events with Kentucky Children's Hospital, Read Across America and Special Olympics, along with many other service activities. In May of 2016, Love was chosen to participate in a service/educational trip to Ethiopia, where he helped build houses as well as shoe-shining boxes for men to be able to work and provide for their families. He also delivered food to impoverished families and visited with orphans and widows.

    In the classroom, Love was named to the 2016 SEC (Southeastern Conference) Academic Honor Roll, graduating in May with a degree in community and leadership development from the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. He is currently working on a second degree in communication in the College of Communication and Information. He also serves as one of UK football’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) representatives for the second straight season.

    On the field, he ranks second on the team in tackles with 82 and has started and been a captain in all 12 games. He is tied for 23rd nationally in fumble recoveries with two and has posted a career-high in tackles twice with 10 vs. University of Missouri and University of Louisville.

    Past winners of the Wuerffel Trophy are: 2016 Trevor Knight, Texas A&M University; 2015 Ty Darlington, University of Oklahoma; 2014 Deterrian Shackelford, University of Mississippi; 2013 Gabe Ikard, University of Oklahoma; 2012 Matt Barkley, University of Southern California; 2011 Barrett Jones, University of Alabama; 2010 Sam Acho, University of Texas; 2009 Tim Hiller, Western Michigan University; 2008 Tim Tebow, University of Florida; 2007 Paul Smith, University of Tulsa; 2006 Joel Penton, Ohio State University; and 2005 Rudy Niswanger, Louisiana State University.

    Love will be interviewed at “The Home Depot College Football Awards Red Carpet Show” on ESPNU and ESPN3 on Dec. 7, 2017, airing at 6 p.m. EST, featuring interviews with award-winners and finalists as they approach The Home Depot College Football Awards Show at the College Football Hall of Fame in downtown Atlanta. The presentation of the 2017 Wuerffel Trophy will occur at the 49th Annual All Sports Association Awards Banquet on Feb. 16, 2018, in Fort Walton Beach.

    The Wuerffel Trophy is a member of the National College Football Awards Association (NCFAA), which encompasses the most prestigious awards in college football. The 23 awards boast more than 800 years of tradition-selection excellence. Visit www.NCFAA.org to learn more.

    Courtney Love, 2017 Wuerffel Trophy Recipient.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Matt Ian May

    Susan Lax

    Summary: UK senior Courtney Love earns what is known as "College Football's Premier Award for Community Service."Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 4, 2017)  Where would you find winners of the Pulitzer Prize, Peabody and Emmy awards?

    Where would you find the first African-American woman to cover the U.S. Senate and the White House?

    Where would find men and women who have labored to tell the stories of Kentuckians, of Kentucky politics, of the struggle to improve the quality of life in the Commonwealth?

    You would find them in the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame housed in the School of Journalism and Media at the University of Kentucky's College of Communication and Information. The hall will induct new members on April 9 in Lexington. Nominations for the 2018 class of inductees must be emailed or postmarked by Sunday, Dec. 31.

    Guidelines for nominees to the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame are:

    • The individual should have practiced journalism after 1870. The hall includes a recognition of “Pioneers of Kentucky Journalism” before that era.
    • The individual should have made a significant connection to Kentucky and have been active in journalism long enough to establish that the contributions they have made to the profession are significant (the sole criterion for selection).
    • Those individuals who are Kentucky natives or were raised or educated in Kentucky but practiced journalism elsewhere are eligible for nomination and selection.
    • Posthumous nominations are welcome.
    • The nomination should include a letter explaining the person’s credentials and be accompanied by a resume and a minimum of two seconding letters. A portrait-style photograph of the nominee, or an easily accessible source for such a photograph, should accompany the nomination.

    Nominations should be mailed to John Cruz, School of Journalism and Media, 119 Grehan Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0042.

    More information about the Hall of Fame, the nomination form and information about reservations for the induction luncheon, as well as a list of past inductees, are available at http://ci.uky.edu/jam/kyhalloffame

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The hall, housed in the UK School of Journalism and Media, recognizes Kentuckians who have made significant contributions to the profession of journalism.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Nov. 21, 2017) For the first time in the team’s history, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team has won the prestigious Chief Justice Invitational tournament held by Marshall University. The tournament regularly hosts some of the top speech and debate teams in the nation, including current national champions Western Kentucky University. This year, 13 schools traveled to Huntington, West Virginia, for the competition.

    Over the course of two days, UK team members took part in 13 different public speaking events. Junior Matt Karijolic was awarded the title of tournament champion for accumulating more points across these events than any other single competitor. Additionally, students from UK placed first in rhetorical criticism, prose interpretation and improvisational duo. These performances led the way in the team placing first in the public speaking event sweepstakes and qualified an additional six events for the national tournament in April.

    The team also participated in parliamentary and public debate. In parliamentary debate, UK closed out the semifinal round of the competition, meaning all four debate teams were from UK. Students from UK also were awarded with six of the seven debate speaking awards. In public debate, UK closed on the final round as both competitors were also from the team and took the top speaking award in the category. Together, these victories propelled the team to a first-place finish in the debate sweepstakes competition.

    View a complete list of awards won by UK at the tournament here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. The team’s next competition will be the WYRD Invitational held Dec. 1-2, at Transylvania University in Lexington. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: For the first time in the team’s history, the UK Speech and Debate Team has won the prestigious Chief Justice Invitational tournament.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Darias Collins Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 13, 2017) — Three faculty members in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information have been recognized as being in the top 1 percent of prolific scholars in communication studies and scholarly research productivity.

    Brandi Frisby, associate professor of instructional communication and research, and Jessalyn Vallade, assistant professor of instructional communication and research, both in the School of Information Science, and Bobi Ivanov, associate dean of graduate programs in communication and a professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communications, were recognized in Communication Education, a quarterly academic journal covering speech and communication on college campuses. The study, “Scholarly productivity in communication studies: five-year review 2012-2016,” highlighted trends and characteristics of prolific scholarship and research productivity of 32 individuals who are considered prolific scholars across 24 journals, and nine individuals who are considered prolific across central journals.

    The study reports that out of the 3,889 scholars who claim one publication in the various journals studied, only 32 of these scholars who represent the top 1 percent have at least nine publications in various communication studies journals. 

    According to Communication Education, the study recognizes variables that could possibly produce faculty research productivity. After studying numerous communication studies of faculty from 2012-2016, the study indicates “data demonstrates that most prolific scholars in communications studies tend to come from institutions that support high research output.” Another variable included in research proliferation on an individual level is collaboration with other scholars.

    Frisby had 16 publications, Vallade had nine; and Ivanov had nine . Patric Spence, formerly of the School of Information Science, was also recognized with 13 publications.

    The full journal article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/03634523.2017.1385820

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Three professors in the the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information have been recognized for their scholarly productivity in communication studies.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Nov. 13, 2017) – For the fifth year running, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team won the John G. Fee Invitational speech and debate tournament held annually by Berea College. This year, 17 schools representing seven states participated in this two-day competition. UK earned the title of grand champion by amassing the most points from the speech and debate halves of the competition.

    “The hard work the team has put in so far this year has paid off,” said the team’s director Timothy Bill. “We’re on track for another great season.”

    In addition to winning the title of grand champion, UK also placed first in the large school division of individual events sweepstakes and the large school division of debate sweepstakes.

    To prepare for this competition, students from UK wrote and practiced 36 different speeches covering topics as varied as intergenerational trauma, climate change, evidence use in court and personal driving habits. Of these 36 speeches, 24 earned recognitions at this tournament including 17 that qualified for the National Forensic Association tournament in April. The team also entered seven debate entries with three advancing to quarterfinals or semifinals in their respective divisions.

    A full list of awards won by UK students at the tournament can be found here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website https://www.ukforensics.com.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: For the fifth year running, the UK Speech and Debate Team won the John G. Fee Invitational speech and debate tournament held annually by Berea College. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Mike Farrell Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 6, 2017) — Chris Poore, media adviser for the Kentucky Kernel, has chalked up another award for his efforts.

    Western Kentucky University’s (WKU) College Heights Herald honored Poore, a WKU alum, with its 2017 award for outstanding contributions to journalism. The award was given Saturday, Oct. 14, during the 67th annual Student Publications Homecoming Breakfast at Bowling Green.

    Poore received the Distinguished Newspaper Adviser Award at the National College Media Convention in 2015. Poore and the Kentucky Kernel have received several prestigious awards, most notably the National Pacemaker Award three times in the span of 10 years. This award is the highest honor that can be given to a college publication that is student-run.

    “The award from my college newspaper means a lot to me,” Poore said. “Being recognized by a place I loved, for doing a job I love, is altogether wonderful. I can’t imagine being more proud of an award.”

    Poore became media adviser for the university’s independent student newspaper in the summer of 2001 after working at a newspaper in Georgia and at the Lexington Herald-Leader. Since Poore moved to the Kernel, the newspaper has won repeated General Excellence Awards from the Kentucky Press Association, overshadowing WKU’s College Heights Herald.

    Rachel Aretakis, editor of the Kernel in 2013-14, said Poore is most deserving of the outstanding contributions to journalism award.

    “Chris taught us the practical skills we'd need for a career in journalism,” Aretakis, a digital producer for the Louisville Courier-Journal, said. “I will always remember how we made fun of him when he posted ‘news is now, not later’ posters around the newsroom. Now looking back, I know I couldn't be successful at my job without that sense of urgency he drilled into us. 

    “A couple things about Chris I really appreciate: He took me and the Kernel staff seriously, he pushed us to try harder, he didn't take our excuses and his story ideas were endless.” 

    Another former Kernel editor, Taylor Moak Poston, now a federal law clerk, also gives credit to Poore for the success of the student newspaper during her year at the helm.

    “During my year as editor-in-chief of the Kernel, my staff covered the men's basketball national championship, men's football breaking the drought against Tennessee, tuition increases, a devastating rash of tornadoes that swept across the eastern part of the state, and President Eli Capilouto's first year at the helm of the university.

    "Whether Chris is encouraging the staff to think creatively about how to cover UK Athletics or editing and offering suggestions on a long-form story, Chris helps young journalists to confidently report on issues facing the university, the community and the state. My year as editor-in-chief of the Kernel would have been far less rewarding without the examples all of my staff had to look up to in Chris and our other advisers."

    The Kernel is overseen by a board.

    "Chris has been such an outstanding adviser and mentor to Kernel staff members over the past 16 years, while at the same time working to elevate the Kentucky Kernel to even greater heights,” said Duane Bonifer, a UK journalism graduate who is chair of the board. “He constantly teaches students about what is relevant and important now in the profession while also keeping an eye on what's coming next. Because of Chris, working at the Kentucky Kernel is one of the best experiences a college student can have. A big reason the Kernel continues to be one of the best college newspapers in the country is because of Chris' leadership, vision and commitment to students."

    Another member of the Kernel board is Associate Professor of Journalism Scoobie Ryan.

    “Chris has been a tireless advocate for student journalists since he came to the Kernel,” Ryan said. “He’s patient, yet persistent. He lets students reach their own decisions about what stories to cover and how to cover them, but he’s always available for consultation.

    “Advising an independent student publication requires delicate balance, and I’m always amazed at how well Chris strikes that balance. Every editor has had a different style and personality, yet Chris has managed to gain each editor’s trust and help each one achieve his or her goals and keep the Kernel moving forward during very difficult times for all media and especially for student media,” Ryan said.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Western Kentucky University’s College Heights Herald honored Chris Poore, media adviser for the Kentucky Kernel, with its 2017 award for outstanding contributions to journalism.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Bridgette Sloan Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 1, 2017)  Phil Lynch, vice president and director of corporate communications at Brown-Forman, will deliver the 2017 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7, at the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics' Kincaid Auditorium.

    Lynch’s presentation is titled, “Managing Crisis Communications for Global Brands, or: What do a Feminist Crusader, a Hindu Deity, a Whiskey Thief, and U.S.-Russian Relations Have in Common?”

    Before the evening presentation, Lynch will address students in two public relations classes and meet with members of the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA).

    The Bowling Lecture Series, now in its 18th year, is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication in the UK College of Communication and Information and the Journalism and Media Alumni Association at UK. The lecture is free and open to the public.

    Lynch began his career at Brown-Forman in 1989 as manager of corporate communications. He was promoted within the company to the positions of senior manager, director and assistant vice president of corporate communications before accepting his current title in 2006.

    Lynch’s responsibilities at Brown-Forman include overseeing all internal and external communication, serving as the company’s international spokesperson and counseling the company on matters of corporate responsibility. Lynch also advises Brown-Forman on issues of alcohol policy, a topic he knows well as chairman of the Public Affairs Committee of the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States, the industry’s national trade association.

    In his early career, Lynch worked as a broadcast journalist after graduating from UK with a bachelor’s degree in political science in 1975. From 1981-1989, before joining Brown-Forman, he was press secretary for two Louisville mayors, Harvey Sloane and Jerry Abramson. 

    In addition to his career at Brown-Forman, Lynch has dedicated his time and service to many civic boards. Previously, he served on the boards of Maryhurst and the Kentucky Science Center. For 12 years, Lynch was on the board of directors for the Louisville Regional Airport Authority and was chairman from 2009-2014. He currently serves as vice chairman of the Kentucky Center for the Arts Foundation Board and is a member and former chairman of the Louisville Regional Development Board of the Commonwealth Fund for KET.

    In 2005, Lynch was inducted into the Public Relations Society of America and International Association of Business Communicators (PRSA/IABC) Landmarks of Excellence Hall of Fame for his demonstrated talent and dedication to his profession. Lynch has long enjoyed the dramatic arts and has performed as an actor with many Louisville theatres including Eve Theatre, Theatre 502, The Bard’s Town Theatre, the University of Louisville Theatre Department and Looking for Lilith Theatre Company. In 1979, he was a regular actor with Lexington’s Studio Players and served as its board president.

    Lynch is married to Lexington native and fellow UK alumna Susan McNeese Lynch, who graduated in 1978 with a bachelor’s degree in communication. The couple have two adult sons, Matthew and William “Alex” Lynch.

    This year’s recipient of the James C. Bowling Excellence in Public Relations Award is Thomas W. Harris, vice president of university relations at UK. Harris has served in this position since 2002 and his responsibilities include public relations and marketing, corporate partnerships, WUKY Public Radio, community engagement and university issues management.

    For more than 35 years, Harris has worked in public relations. Previously he served as senior manager of company communications for Honda of America Manufacturing in Marysville, Ohio; manager of corporate communications at Toyota Motor Manufacturing; and manager of community affairs for Kentucky Utilities Company. His extensive experience also includes time with The Preston Group, Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations, DataBeam Corporation and the Office of the Kentucky Lieutenant Governor.

    Harris, who is from Madisonville, Kentucky, is a UK graduate and earned his Accreditation in Public Relations (APR) from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA). He holds lifetime memberships in the National Eagle Scout Association, the UK Alumni Association and Sigma Chi Fraternity. He is also a UK Fellow.

    Harris currently serves on the boards of Commerce Lexington Inc. and the Downtown Lexington Partnership, which hosts many downtown events including the popular Thursday Night Live. Both organizations seek to create and foster economic development for the city.

    Harris resides in Lexington with his wife, Kay, and their two sons, Matthew and Jake.

    The James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence Lecture Series provides an opportunity for a distinguished public relations practitioner to address the campus community and meet with students who will be future professionals in the field. In addition to the lecture by Lynch, the excellence award will be presented to Harris and the Bowling Scholarship recipient will be announced. This scholarship is awarded to an outstanding senior student majoring in integrated strategic communication with a focus on public relations.

    The Bowling Lecture Series honors Bowling’s legacy and was founded through a generous donation from retired chairman of the board at Philip Morris, Joseph M. Cullman III. Bowling was a longtime executive with Philip Morris and served on the company’s board of directors from 1969 to 1986.

    Bowling, a native Kentuckian, attended UK and later supported the university as director of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging. He also worked closely with the College of Agriculture (now College of Agriculture, Food and Environment), the College of Business (now Gatton College of Business and Economics), and was a member of the UK Development Council.

     

    Phil Lynch (left) and Tom Harris. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Phil Lynch, vice president and director of corporate communications at Brown-Forman, will deliver the 2017 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence Lecture on Tuesday, Nov. 7. In addition to the lecture, the Excellence in Public Relations Award will be presented to Tom Harris, vice president of university relations at UK.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Adrian Ho Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2017) University of Kentucky Libraries is now accepting proposals for the 2018-19 Alternative Textbook Grant Program, which aims to encourage UK faculty to adopt open access textbooks or to create original learning materials for their courses. Faculty may apply for one of 10 grants of up to $1,500 each to implement curriculum change required for using an alternative textbook or to produce the content of an alternative textbook. 

    UK Libraries has held two rounds of the Alternative Textbook Grant Program since 2015. Eight of the funded courses had been taught by August 2017 with an approximate total enrollment of 1,535 students. Overall estimated savings for the students were $301,101, averaging $196.16 of estimated savings per impacted student.  

    Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that prices of college textbooks soared by 88 percent between 2006 and 2016. Studies reveal that exorbitant textbook costs hamper students’ access to essential resources for academic success. Alternative textbooks present a viable option for students and provide instructors with the flexibility to customize course content as needed. 

    “The grant recipients appreciated the opportunities to discover and adopt alternative textbooks for their courses,” said Mary Beth Thomson, UK Libraries senior associate dean. “Their feedback and the program outcomes demonstrated that teaching with an alternative textbook was beneficial to both the instructor and the students. UK Libraries is delighted to continue our support for the use of alternative textbooks.” 

    Current UK faculty teaching a course in academic year 2018-19 using a commercial textbook are eligible to apply for one of the 10 grants. UK Libraries’ academic liaisons can provide grant recipients with assistance in identifying open access textbooks and UK Libraries’ licensed information resources that are appropriate substitutes for traditional textbooks. 

    Proposals must be submitted via the program’s online form by Dec. 22, 2017. All applicants will be notified of the results in the spring of 2018. After teaching the specified course with an alternative textbook, each grant recipient is required to submit a description of the outcomes and an evaluation of their experience with the program. 

    Details about the Alternative Textbook Grant Program are available online here. Interested faculty can also contact Adrian Ho, UK Libraries director of Digital Scholarship, or Mary Beth Thomson, UK Libraries senior associate dean, for more information. 

    Data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that prices for college textbooks increased by 88 percent between 2006 and 2016.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLibrariesPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Libraries is now accepting proposals for the 2018-19 Alternative Textbook Grant Program, which aims to encourage UK faculty to adopt open access textbooks or to create original learning materials for their courses. Faculty may apply for one of 10 grants of up to $1,500 each to implement curriculum change required for using an alternative textbook or to produce the content of an alternative textbook. 
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jenny Wells Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 24, 2017) — As is customary at the University of Kentucky, two students will be selected to speak at the December 2017 Commencement ceremonies, which will take place at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15, at Rupp Arena.

    Since doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients are now recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Students interested in speaking must submit their application by Tuesday, Oct. 31.

    The students designated to address their fellow graduates will be chosen by the Commencement Speaker Selection Committee. Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

    Students applying for the position must be receiving a degree from UK at the December 2017 Commencement ceremony. Also, students must have contributed to the university through campus or community activities and within their field of study. Applicants must demonstrate strong public speaking skills.

    Students who wish to apply must submit a résumé, information sheet and a copy of their intended speech no longer than three typed, double-spaced pages. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the committee.

    Applicants may be contacted by the committee to conduct a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

    All graduating students must register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

    For information regarding caps and gowns, parking and travel, college receptions or other questions, visit the Commencement website.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Students interested in speaking must submit their application by Tuesday, Oct. 31.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2017) Kyra Hunting, assistant professor of media arts and studies at the University of Kentucky, has been selected to participate in the Television Academy Foundation’s 2017 Faculty Seminar Program. Members of the Television Academy selected just 25 professors from colleges and universities nationwide for the annual program. 

    The faculty fellows will gain the latest information on the television and content development industries from top entertainment professionals during a weeklong Southern California seminar Nov. 6-10.

    At the seminar, Hunting will learn from broadcast and cable networks’ programming and scheduling executives, legal experts and cutting-edge content creators. Private studio tours and trips to top Hollywood production facilities to meet with producers, observe production and firsthand updates on the latest in television technologies are also part of the program.

    Hunting teaches courses on media industries, media criticism and children's media in the UK School of Journalism and Media, within the College of Communication and Information. Her current research projects include work on Twitter and celebrity activism as employed by the Ian Somerhalder Foundation; a study of gender in animated films; a study on the representation of education in kid's television; and work on how digital content delivery platforms intersects with cultural ideologies about gender.

    First launched in 1987, the Television Academy Foundation's annual seminar offers faculty a comprehensive program designed to enhance knowledge and in turn enrich learning environments. The foundation was established in 1959 as the charitable arm of the Television Academy and is dedicated to preserving the legacy of television while educating and inspiring those who will shape its future.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Members of the Television Academy selected just 25 professors from colleges and universities nationwide for the annual program. 
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Darias Collins Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2017)  The National Research Foundation of Korea awarded Tae Hyun Baek, an assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, a $138,840 grant for a two-year research project on Culture and Sustainability Advertising.

    The purpose of this research project is to examine the persuasive impact of pro-environmental message features and the socio-cultural characteristics of the audience on sustainable consumption behaviors such as saving water and recycling. This project can help corporations, governments and nonprofit organizations successfully implement green advertising campaigns that will effectively capture their target audiences from different cultures.

    The National Research Foundation of Korea recognizes that there are cross-cultural differences in the perception of persuasive message strategies, and many global advertisers are often challenged when implementing certain communication strategies to promote sustainable practices. The research also aims to determine whether people from Eastern cultures and people from Western cultures differ in the way they react to pro-environmental advertising campaigns.

    “We are trying to keep up with the fast-changing green advertising industry,” said Baek. He said he is inspired by all industry issues, including those on a global level. “I want to help advertising practitioners and students to solve these environmental issues for the betterment of society,” he added.

    These problems include the challenge of targeting multiple cultures.

    The Culture and Sustainability Advertising project is a collaboration among five investigators from Korea and America. Baek is one of the co-investigators on the project. The principal investigator is Yeonshin Kim, a professor in the Department of Business Administration at Myongji University in Korea.

    Baek is also an external research fellow on the project.

    “My primary research focuses on how and why consumers respond to advertising that promotes socially and environmentally responsible behaviors and the role of digital/mobile/social media in advertising,” he said.

    His role as an external research fellow will be to collect, analyze and report data in the United States, a role he is very proud to perform, considering he is Korean-born and currently living in the U.S.

    “Research is the most rewarding experience of my life,” he said.

    The project seeks to make important academic and real-world contributions by extending prior work on advertising, marketing, persuasive communications and social/environmental/cross-cultural psychology. Several pilot studies are planned and experimental studies will be conducted. Baek and his fellow investigators are planning to publish manuscripts based on their research findings from a series of experimental studies in top-tier international advertising and marketing journals.

    This will not be the first time Baek’s work has been recognized and rewarded. He is the only person to win the “Best Paper Award” twice from the American Academy of Advertising conference.  Additionally, Baek received the 2016-2017 Faculty Research Award from the UK College of Communication and Information.

    Baek said he wants to take a step toward contributing knowledge and practices to the advertising field.

    “I’ve learned many things from other researchers and practitioners, so it’s my turn to give applied research back.” 

     

    Tae Hyun Baek, an assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Tae Hyun Back, an assistant professor in UK's Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, was awarded the grant for a research project on culture and sustainability advertising. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 16, 2017) — The Vietnam conflict may just be a unit in a history class to many college students, but its impact still reverberates in 2017.

    One of those impacts, in fact, has a strong bearing on the ability of the news media to publish and broadcast without the fear of government interference. That impact is the focus of “Remembering Vietnam: The Pentagon Papers,” a discussion of the Supreme Court decision in New York Times v. United States.

    Media law and ethics scholar Jane Kirtley, a journalism professor and the director of the Silha Center at the University of Minnesota, and Sanford Ungar, director of the Free Speech Project at Georgetown University, an adjunct professor at Harvard University and the author of a book about the case, will discuss the effort of the government to prevent publication of stories about the history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam.

    The program will be held at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the University of Kentucky's William T. Young Library. The event is free and open to the public.

    Outgoing Defense Secretary Robert McNamara authorized production of the history in 1967, but it wasn’t completed until 1970. Daniel Ellsberg, who had worked on the report, which turned out to be 47 volumes, believed the war would end quickly if the report was available to the public. When he failed to convince several office-holders to release the report, he handed 43 volumes over to The New York Times.

    Once the newspaper started publishing its stories, the government went to federal district court and a judge issued an order imposing prior restraint. The case ultimately ended up in the Supreme Court, which ruled the government had failed to prove that further publication would endanger national security.

    “We are indeed fortunate to have these two scholars bring a 45-year-old Supreme Court case to life and into 2017. As we have discussed their presentations, I have been amazed at how important that decision remains all these years later,” said Mike Farrell, director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and interim director of UK’s School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information.

    The program is presented by the School of Journalism and Media and the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: On Tuesday night, media law and ethics scholar Jane Kirtley, a journalism professor and the director of the Silha Center at the University of Minnesota, and Sanford Ungar, director of the Free Speech Project at Georgetown University, an adjunct professor at Harvard University and the author of a book about the case, will discuss the Supreme Court decision in New York Times v. United States. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Bridgette Sloan Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 13, 2017) Students from the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information swept the logo design competition at this year’s 2017 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference.

    ISC students won first, second and third places in the competition. First place went to Paige Heidorf, second place went to Jonathan Herrera and third place went to Alexi Mojsejenko. Heidorf’s design will be the official logo for the 2018 conference, which will be held Aug. 6-9, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

    For the past three years, ISC students have won individual AEJMC logo design awards, including first and second place two years in a row.

    The logo for the 100th AEJMC conference held recently in Chicago was created by UK ISC student Peter Smith, whose design won first place last year and features an interpretation of the Chicago skyline reflected on the iconic Cloud Gate sculpture. UK ISC student Stephanie Sherman also took second place at last year’s conference.

    The annual logo contest is a national competition for which students submit original designs. The winning student’s design becomes the official conference logo and is featured on all promotional materials for the conference, including print and web. The logo contest is sponsored by the Visual Communication Division of the AEJMC. Students who win first place receive a $100 prize.

    Adrian Grumbein, assistant professor in the ISC department, has served as faculty sponsor for all UK ISC students who have taken part in the competition over the last three years. The logos were created in her ISC 497 class, which focuses on graphic design for ISC. 

    “What I might be most proud of — it’s so hard to choose — is that, for many students, taking this graphic design class may be the first time they have ever dipped their toe into design and designing this logo may be the first time they have ever worked in Adobe Illustrator,” Grumbein said. “I have entered my students’ work in this contest for the past three years, and we have placed each year. This year, we took first, second and third! I am so proud of how much time and effort students put into understanding the theory, learning the programs and fine-tuning the details. Each year I challenge them, and each year they rise to the occasion."

    “Dr. Grumbein is one of the best teachers I've ever had! She pushed me to think about things differently, which has really helped with my design work and no other art class has ever helped me as much as her ISC class has!” Mojsejenko said.

    The 2017 AEJMC conference took place in Chicago from Aug. 9-12. The aim of this conference is to bring together journalism and mass communication educators, students and professionals to share the latest research, discuss best practices and promote communication in the field. The theme this year was “Closing the Gap: Media, Research, and the Profession.”

    UK ISC students won first, second and third place.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students from the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication swept the logo design competition at this year’s 2017 Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication conference.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 11, 2017) Al Cross, director of the University of Kentucky’s Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, led a delegation of American newspaper editors to China recently to meet with their counterparts to discuss community journalism, a rising element of the trade in both countries.

    Cross recruited Nicole Carroll, editor of The Arizona Republic in Phoenix, and Dennis Lyons, editor of The Daily Item in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, to accompany him to the third Sino-U.S. Community Media Symposium in Shanghai and nearby Wujiang, which included 200 Chinese journalists, community correspondents and business partners.

    The symposium at the Shanghai University of Political Science and Law was sponsored by the Xinmin Evening News, the largest newspaper in Shanghai, which has 50 community editions, and included a meeting at the Wujiang Daily. UK’s institute and the Xinmin Evening News co-sponsored the second symposium at UK in 2015; the first was held in Shanghai in 2013.

    “Many people in the United States might think there is not much for our countries to talk about when it comes to journalism, because we have such different political systems,” Cross said in the symposium’s keynote address. “Those differences are great, but they cannot obscure some fundamental human concerns: the people’s need for information that is relevant to their daily lives, their need to feel that they are part of a community, with shared interests, not just shared geography; and, of course, the need for newspapers to stay relevant and viable as sources of information by developing closer connections with their communities.”

    Tracing the evolution of community journalism in the U.S., Cross said it remains the healthiest part of the traditional news business, because there will always be a demand for local news. “We want to know what is happening in our area, in our neighborhood, and on our street,” he said. “It’s human nature, one that developed even before we developed language.”

    You You of Shanghai University, who helped facilitate the last two symposia and was a visiting scholar at the institute in 2012-13, said afterward, “Although they are in different political systems and development tracks, community media in both countries are facing similarly fundamental challenges. They should deepen their engagement in communities to build reader loyalty.”

    Zhou Chen, editor of the Xinmin Evening News’ community edition, said, “The lectures the American participants have given, and the information they have shared with us, provided us not only a chance to learn from them, but also a rare opportunity to reflect on what we have been doing in our professional capacity.”

    Cross said Carroll and Lyons' publications are two excellent examples of newspapers that have developed stronger connections with their communities to better serve their readers.

    Carroll edits the largest community news outlet in Gannett Co.’s USA Today Network, the nation’s largest journalism organization. She said its community-engagement efforts include live storytelling nights, which began in Arizona. She said the events generate sponsorship revenue and are “a great way to build audience and trust in our products, and in our journalists.”

    Citing the USAT Network’s recent gains in audience, Carroll said, “We’d like to be the primary and best news source for people, and this strategy feels right. We’re just scratching the surface of where we can go from here. I have great optimism going forward.”

    In a meeting with Wang Qing, editor-in-chief of the Wujiang Daily, Carroll was struck by the similarities of their newspapers: in similar-sized markets and facing declines from three primary advertising-revenue sources: automobiles, real estate and furniture.

    Lyons runs a much smaller newspaper, but with no less effort and ambition for engagement with readers, Cross said. It also sponsors events, has a community advisory board that meets monthly and provides story ideas, and holds roundtable discussions with community stakeholders before launching enterprise projects.

    “You want what we call ‘real people,’ people who may not have positions of authority or expertise, but who have experienced the issue about which you are reporting,” said Lyons, who was managing editor of USA Today before taking a buyout. The Daily Item is owned by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc., which owns 11 Kentucky newspapers. Lyons is also CNHI’s regional editor for Pennsylvania and Ohio.

    “I was proud to join these two great editors in representing American journalism in China,” Cross said upon his return to the School of Journalism and Media in the UK College of Communication and Information, where he is an associate extension professor. “We look forward to continuing the dialogue.”

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Al Cross, director of UK's Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, led a delegation of American newspaper editors to the Sino-U.S. Community Media Symposium, which included 200 Chinese journalists, community correspondents and business partners.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Melanie Barber and Gail Hairston Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 10, 2017) — The University of Kentucky James W. Stuckert Career Center along with 12 campus partners will host a Diversity Career Mixer 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

    The Diversity Career Mixer is a networking event that will provide students and alumni with an opportunity to connect with employers and learn about internships, full-time jobs and shadowing. All UK students and alumni are welcome to attend.

    “Students will want to prepare for the event by reviewing the list of employers on Handshake, UK’s new career management platform. Students already have an account pre-populated on Handshake and will simply use their Link Blue credentials to login,” said Melanie Barber, assistant director for employer relations and community partnerships at the Stuckert Career Center.

    Detailed information about the event is available at https://uky.joinhandshake.com/career_fairs/2750/student_preview.

    College students should prepare to enter the workforce by researching companies that interest them. Having knowledge of a company enables an informed conversation between the student and employer. 

    "Students and young alumni are encouraged to take this opportunity to network with industry-leading companies and learn more about their opportunities," said Barber.

    Business professional attire is encouraged and light refreshments will be provided.   

    Currently, companies attending the events include:

    • Aldi;
    • Allconnect;
    • C.H. Robinson;
    • Cintas Corporation;
    • Community Action Council for Lexington-Fayette, Bourbon, Harrison and Nicholas counties;
    • Crowe Horwath;
    • Enterprise Holdings;
    • Jackson Life Insurance Company;
    • Lexmark International;
    • Rogers Group;
    • Sherwin Williams;
    • Greater Louisville Inc.; and
    • Forester’s Financial Services.

    Campus partners include: CARES; Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives; College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Office of Diversity; College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Center for Student Success; College of Communication and Information; Engineering Career Development and International Programs; Gatton College of Business and Economics; James W. Stuckert Career Center; Martin Luther King Center; MANRRS; Office of LGBTQ* Resources; Office of Student Organizations and Activities; and the Graduate School.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineeringGraduate SchoolStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: The Diversity Career Mixer is a networking event that will provide students and alumni with an opportunity to connect with employers and learn about internships, full-time jobs and shadowing.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney and Kody Kiser Friday

    Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 6, 2017) — A University of Kentucky alumnus says he owes his successful garden design career to his college degree and a single business card.

    Those were the only resources University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus Jon Carloftis had at his disposal when he left his Kentucky home for New York City in the late 1980s.

    "I had the chance to move to New York for the summer," said the Rockcastle County native. "I made cards up that said 'Jon Carloftis Rooftop Garden Designer.' I'd never been on a rooftop in my life!"

    Nobody seemed to notice. The nationally known garden designer's ingenuity, coupled with the business communication classes he'd taken, drove his entrepreneurial spirit.

    "I gave them around the Upper East Side, to doormen and elevator men," Carloftis said. "I said 'give it to the person on top.' One person called me up and she gave me my chance."

    Through word of mouth, his career soared throughout New York City. He designed gardens for celebrities like Julianne Moore, Edward Norton and Mike Myers, as well as countless rooftops across the area.

    "I learned all the things from my professors at UK," Carloftis said. "I also learned (from) growing up in Kentucky about nature, beauty and the natural beauty, rather than the fake. My work was very popular in New York because that’s what they wanted. They wanted the real deal."

    Carloftis credits more than just the communication degree for his success. After his four years on campus, he decided to take an entire year to complete courses in horticulture where he learned about trees, shrubs, annuals and perennials at the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

    Today, after a successful 27 years in New York City, he's back in Lexington, living in Botherum, a historic home he helped renovate with gardens he designed.

    But that doesn't mean he's slowing down. Watch the video above to see what local landscapes he's currently designing. You'll also hear how much the University of Kentucky means to him. 

    of Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: UK alumnus Jon Carloftis is well-known for the gardens he designs across the country. After a successful 27-year career in New York City, he's back in the Bluegrass, designing landscapes for regional distilleries and local rooftops (not to mention his historic Lexington home that has been featured in Southern Living and Garden and Gun magazines). See why he's so thankful for his University of Kentucky degree. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Harder Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2017)  It's difficult to imagine how a child with cancer could escape the reality of the disease and their surroundings, but Nathan Stevens, a college media officer at the University of Kentucky, is trying to do just that through virtual reality.

    "The game will be simple, but engaging, transporting children from the hospital to another world," Stevens said.

    He's calling it "Arcadian Dream" and hopes it offers a distraction from cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation, which are especially stressful for pediatric patients. After putting on the headset, the game will allow children to explore, play games and communicate with others while in their "virtual world."  

    Stevens, who is the media officer in the UK College of Communication and Information, has worked extensively with virtual reality in the college's Co-Lab, a technology usability lab where students and faculty work together to test emerging technologies. He's also an expert on video games, teaching a course that gives an overview of the industry and its technological advances.

    After reading research that pointed to virtual reality as a stress-reliever and anxiety-reducer for patients with cancer, Stevens had the idea to create a virtual reality game for local children undergoing cancer treatment.

    "We're just wanting to take their minds off the disease and treatment for a few minutes," he said.

    Stevens and his team of UK students are in the initial phases of developing the game — designing the environment and building the software. The group is currently raising funds for the project, which will support programmers and equipment costs.

    "This is a completely nonprofit venture and we plan to offer the VR gaming experience free of charge to local hospitals and elsewhere once we're finished," Stevens said.

    To find out more or make a donation, visit https://uky.networkforgood.com/projects/36500-big-blue-crowdfunding-arcadian-dream-an-escape-from-pediatric-cancer.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A UK employee and students are creating a virtual reality game for pediatric cancer patients to play during chemotherapy and radiation. The team is currently raising funds for the project.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Harlie Collins Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2017) —  The University of Kentucky School of Information Science, part of the UK College of Communication and Information, is hosting a lecture titled "Lean UX in the Enterprise" at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 12, in the William T. Young Library's UK Athletics Auditorium.

    Austin Knight, senior UX (user experience) designer at HubSpot, an inbound marketing and sales platform, will deliver the presentation. Knight is a professional speaker and author at HubSpot, focusing on web, mobile, software-as-a-service (SaaS) and virtual and augmented reality (VR/AR).

    “User experience” or “user interface” design encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with the company, its services and its products. It focuses on having a deep understanding of users, what they need, what they value, their abilities and their limitations. User experience design has the overarching goal of improving the quality of the user’s interaction with end perceptions of a company’s product or related services.

    Knight’s lecture, "Lean UX in the Enterprise," will provide an in-depth look at HubSpot’s approach to UX design and take audience members through a real-world project.

    “Lean UX is an important approach to interaction design as it is tailor-made for today’s web and mobile-driven reality. It takes a solution-focused approach to solving real-world problems. It promotes collaborative work where technology designers and business partners are brought together to develop the best solutions in an ongoing way,” said David Nemer, assistant professor in the school’s information communication technology program.

    The lecture will cover how HubSpot, a public company with more than 1,600 employees across seven global offices, doubled its conversion rate on www.HubSpot.com, by leveraging a lean design process that is focused on rapid iteration and objectivity.

    “Knight’s talk will be a great opportunity for people who are interested in working more effectively with their teams and wanting to understand the difference a great UX can make," Nemer said.

    As a digital nomad, Knight works remotely and lives amongst different design communities throughout the world. He mentors students and startup founders at Columbia University in New York, co-hosts the UX and Growth Podcast in Boston, leads a study on South American design in Rio de Janeiro, and speaks at select international events every year. His talk at UK will introduce university and community members, developers, designers, marketers and learners to UX techniques and the design cycle.

    “UX design is a field that is about finding ways to improve the products that people use every day, through research, development and communication with consumers and other designers,” said Jesse Stallsworth, director of the CI CoLab and graduate student in the information communication technology program. “Next time you have a good experience with using a product or technology, thank a UX designer.”

    Space is limited. Please register via Eventbrite: https://leanuxlecture.eventbrite.com. This talk will be live streamed using Zoom, a video conferencing system. If you are unable to attend in-person and would like to participate virtually, please contact infosci@uky.edu

    Austin KnightOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Austin Knight, senior UX designer at HubSpot, will give a talk at UK on Thursday, Oct. 12. “User experience” or “user interface” design encompasses all aspects of the end-user’s interaction with a company, its services and its products.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Tiffany Molina and Gail Hairston Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 5, 2017) On Oct. 26, the University of Kentucky International Center will welcome Nicholas Kristof, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and well-known columnist with The New York Times. Kristof’s talk, “A Path Appears: How Students Can Change the World,” is sponsored by the Office of the Provost, the College of Arts and Sciences, the Gatton College of Business and Economics, and the School of Journalism and Media.

    Kristof’s talk will touch on themes that animate the book he co-authored with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn: “A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunities.” Kristof and WuDunn say that the purpose of the book is to “provide a unique and essential narrative about making a difference in the world … and a roadmap to becoming a conscientious global citizen.” Kristof will discuss how global problems can seem overwhelming, but there are practical ways that people — especially young people — can play a role in making the world a better place.

    Kristof has lived on four continents, and traveled to more than 140 countries, plus all 50 states, every Chinese province and every main Japanese island, so it is no surprise that his talk will include moving, firsthand stories from around the world.

    After attending Harvard University, Kristof studied law at Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, and then studied Arabic in Cairo and Chinese in Taipei. While he was a foreign correspondent for The New York Times, he reported world-changing events, including China’s Tiananmen Square democracy movement and the genocide in Darfur. In addition to his two Pulitzers, Kristof’s groundbreaking work advocating for human and women’s rights and bringing attention to the plight of the world’s marginalized has been recognized with prominent humanitarian awards, including the Anne Frank Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Price.

    UK Associate Provost for Internationalization Sue Roberts believes the address will be an opportunity for the campus and the Lexington community to learn more about the importance of being a globally aware citizen.

    “Kristof is recognized as a major voice of conscience,” Roberts said. “His columns are always informative and often provocative, and I am sure I am not the only professor who has used them to prompt discussion of major global issues in my courses. We are so excited that he will be speaking on UK’s campus, and I am really looking forward to seeing students especially take advantage of this opportunity to hear from one of America’s best journalists about how we are connected to the fate of others around the globe.”

    Kristof’s public address will take place in the Kincaid Auditorium of the Gatton College of Business and Economics at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 26. The event is free and open to all UK students, faculty, staff and the Lexington community.

    The New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner.Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Nicholas Kristof, two-time Pulitzer Prize winner and well-known New York Times columnist, visits UK to help students understand that they can change the world.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 2, 2017) He has been the voice of nearly every major sporting event for decades ­— eight Super Bowls, nine Rose Bowls, the World Series, Wimbledon and French Open tennis tournaments, the Ryder Cup, the Breeders’ Cup, the Masters and U.S. Open golf tournaments, and on and on.

    Fourteen national Emmy Awards grace his trophy case. He’s a member of the National Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame, the Pro Football Hall of Fame, the National Basketball Hall of Fame and the Baseball Hall of Fame.  He was only the fourth sportscaster to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

    He is Dick Enberg, and his credentials are the stuff of legends. Enberg, just starting his second year of retirement from 60 years of sports broadcasting, will deliver the annual Gidel-Lombardo Sports Lecture 7 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 4, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library at the University of Kentucky.

    The lecture is presented by the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information. The event is free and open to the public.

    “As a sports fan who has listened to the most respected professionals of sports broadcasting, names like Curt Gowdy, Al Michaels, Keith Jackson, Tom Hammond, Vin Scully and Cawood Ledford, I rank Dick Enberg right up there with the best,” said Mike Farrell, interim director of the School of Journalism and Media. “What a privilege to bring this man to campus and treat our students to the wisdom of such excellence.”

    His broadcasting career began in 1955 while he was a student at Central Michigan University. The pay was $1 per hour. He was hired as the first voice of the Indiana Sports Network and was earning a master’s degree and a doctoral degree at Indiana University. He then did play-by-play for the California Angels, the Los Angeles Rams and the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Bruins. He was the announcer as John Wooden’s Bruins won eight basketball national championships during the nine years Enberg called the games. In 2017, the media center at UCLA’s home court, Pauley Pavilion, was named in Enberg’s honor.

    He concluded his career serving as the voice of the San Diego Padres from 2010 until the 2016 baseball season ended.

    The former assistant professor has written two books, “Humorous Quotes for All Occasions” and his autobiography, “Oh My,” his trademark reaction to a great play.

    “Like all the best sportscasters and sportswriters, Dick Enberg is a great storyteller. He always told the audience more than what was happening in the sports arena. He made it real, and he made it personal,” Farrell said. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Enberg, who retired last year after 60 years of sports broadcasting, will present the School of Journalism and Media's annual Gidel-Lombardo Sports Lecture.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Hale Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 2, 2017) University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center recently organized, inventoried and made available the records of the Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass. The project was funded through the Southern Jewish Historical Society’s Scott and Donna Langston Archival Grant, which encourages the preservation of archival materials related to Southern Jewish history.

    The Langston Archival Grant provided funds to hire Erin Weber, a graduate student in the UK’s School of Information Science, to organize the records. The semester-long project resulted in 6.7 cubic feet of fully processed records from the Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass Inc. This community and religious-based organization, whose previous iterations date back to the late 1800s, plays an important role in supporting the educational, charitable, social and cultural activities of the Jewish community in Central Kentucky.

    The federation’s collection includes operational and administrative records, such as board minutes, event materials, newsletters, bulletins, reports and photographs. The records also include born-digital materials on diskettes, CDs and other media. Access to this collection will contribute to new scholarship and public understanding about the Jewish community in Lexington and Central Kentucky, an area that is underrepresented in the holdings of many Kentucky cultural heritage institutions.

    In 2015, the UK Libraries Special Collections Research Center partnered with the UK’s interdisciplinary Jewish Studies Program to launch an initiative to identify, collect, preserve and make available personal papers, organizational records, oral histories and other primary sources that document Kentucky’s Jewish heritage. The Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass records were the first donation to UK Libraries as part of this project.

    For more information on the Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass records, contact Megan Mummey, collections management archivist, at megan.mummey@uky.edu or 859-257-6942, or Sarah Dorpinghaus, director of Digital Services and curator of Jewish Kentucky Heritage, at sarah.dorpinghaus@uky.edu or 857-257-3329.

    The Special Collections Research Center at UK Libraries is home to a collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian Collection, the John G. Heyburn Initiative and ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Special Collections Research Center recently organized, inventoried and made available the records of the Jewish Federation of the Bluegrass. Access to this collection will contribute to new scholarship and public understanding about the Jewish community in Lexington and Central Kentucky, an area that is underrepresented in the holdings of many Kentucky cultural heritage institutions.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Gail Hairston Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 29, 2017) Organizers of the University of Kentucky’s Constitution Day activities last week have announced the winners of the essay contest associated with the national holiday.

    Political science freshman RyAnn Schoenbaechler won the 2017 Constitution Day Essay Contest with her article titled “Donald Trump: The Modern Day Killer of the First Amendment.”

    Schoenbaechler won $500 for her essay, which was evaluated by a panel of judges chosen by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. Their assessment was based on the following criteria: historical and legal accuracy of the content; the strength and logic of the argument; the original ideas presented; the organization of the argument, including the thesis; and the quality of the writing.

    The second place winner Kelsey Mattingly, a senior majoring in journalism, received a $300 cash prize for her untitled essay. Third place and its $200 prize went to Michael Di Girolamo, a sophomore majoring in foreign language and international economics, for his essay titled “The Fine Line Between Criticism and Control: How the Trump Administration is Weakening Freedom of the Press.”

    Honorable mentions went to Callum Case, a freshman history major; Emily Baehner, a junior journalism major; and Duncan Barron, a sophomore political science major.

    The essay contest for undergraduates was sponsored by the UK Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, the Office of the President and the Provost’s Division of Student and Academic Life. The essays were blind‐judged by former UK journalism students, who are now lawyers, UK professors and media law professors at other universities. 

    To read the UK undergraduate students’ essays, visit http://uknowledge.uky.edu/cdec/.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Winners of the UK Constitution Day Essay Contest have been announced.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 28, 2017)   A distinguished alumna of the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media, the woman who led the effort to create the University’s Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the first recipient of the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment by a Kentuckian will deliver the 12th annual State of the First Amendment Address.

    Judith G. Clabes, now publisher of two Kentucky online news sites www.KyForward.com and www.NKYTribune.com, will discuss “The First Amendment: On the Front Lines” at 6 p.m. tonight (Thursday), in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

    “No one is more qualified to speak on the state of the First Amendment today than Judy Clabes,” said Mike Farrell, director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the interim director of the School of Journalism and Media. 

    “She continues to press for government transparency, even going to court when necessary to fight for records that should be open to the public. She continues to hold government officials accountable for their actions. This has been a lifetime effort for her, and she is a true First Amendment soldier.

    “With persistent attacks on the news media from the president, the governor, politicians left and right, and the social media attacks, there has seldom been a more important time for journalists and all citizens to stand for liberty of the press. It is one of our greatest heritages.

    Clabes, who graduated from UK with degrees in English and journalism, was the first woman to edit a Scripps Howard newspaper at the Sunday Courier and Press in Evansville. Scripps promoted her to editor of The Kentucky Post in Northern Kentucky, a post she held for 13 years, transforming the newspaper into a community asset and working with others to build the three northern counties of the state into one cooperative community.

    While at The Post, she and her staff won a National Journalism Award, the Edward Willis Scripps award, for service to a free press in a year when the newspaper was engaged in open records and open meetings court battles with a number of different agencies.

    For 12 years, she was the president and CEO of the Scripps Howard Foundation, where she led the foundation to national prominence as a funder of journalism. In particular, she worked to build a strong journalism program at Hampton University, an historically black university in Virginia, as a way to address the diversity issue in journalism newsrooms.

    The State of the First Amendment Address will be the centerpiece of the program Thursday. The School of Journalism and Media will recognize eight distinguished alumni of the school, the First Amendment Center will present the James Madison Award to Deborah Yetter of the Louisville Courier-Journal, and the university will announce the winners of the Constitution Day Essay Contest.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Judith G. Clabes, now publisher of two Kentucky online news sites, will discuss “The First Amendment: On the Front Lines” at 6 p.m. tonight (Thursday), in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 29, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team started the new season on a strong note by finishing in seventh place at the Fall Fiesta Tournament hosted by Western Kentucky University. This tournament is the season opener for many of the top nationally ranked teams including the University of Alabama, Illinois State University, William Carey University and the hosts and reigning national champions, Western Kentucky University.

    The team’s seventh place finish is a new record for the university. Last year, the team placed 10th against an equally competitive field. In addition to improving the team’s overall performance, UK debuted 27 new speeches at the tournament, up from 22 the year before. The team has never fielded such a large entry this early in the season before.

    “It’s a fantastic start to the season,” said Timothy Bill, the team's director. “There’s no better way to know where we’re at as a team than to go up against the best as early as possible. It helps us to know where we’re strongest and where we need to put in more work.”

    Over the next few weeks, the team will prepare for a string of tournaments in October.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. The team’s next competition will be the John G. Fee Invitational held at Berea College in Berea, Kentucky, Oct. 13-14. UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    UK Speech and Debate Team at the Fall Fiesta Tournament.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team started the new season on a strong note by finishing in seventh place at the Fall Fiesta Tournament hosted by Western Kentucky University.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Bridgette Sloan Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 28, 2017)  Adriane Grumbein, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication within the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, was presented the 2017 Early Career Teaching Excellence Award at the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s (AEJMC) annual conference. This year’s conference was held in Chicago in August.

    Grumbein is the inaugural winner of this award sponsored by the Advertising Division of the AEJMC. The award recognizes professors who demonstrate excellence in undergraduate teaching and are full-time faculty members in their second to seventh year of service. Recipients of the award also receive a monetary prize of $500.

    The selection process includes first and second round submissions of application materials to the AEJMC committee. For the first round, the committee requires a nomination letter explaining why the professor is an excellent choice. The criteria for selection cover subject mastery, classroom management, communication skills, creation of a positive learning environment, dedication to teaching and assessment of student learning. The nominated professors must also submit a statement of their teaching philosophy and how they implement this philosophy in their classroom.

    In reviewing Grumbein’s application, one committee member from AEJMC remarked, “I was struck by her humility, genuineness, enthusiasm, generosity of knowledge and time.” 

    In addition to her full-time faculty responsibilities, Grumbein regularly dedicates time to her students outside the classroom. She has served as a sponsor and advisor to ISC students competing at the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition and the Association for Educators in Journalism and Mass Communication’s National Logo Contest. Over the past three years, since beginning her teaching career at UK, Grumbein’s students have consistently placed and won awards in these national competitions.

    On earning this achievement, Grumbein said, “I am humbled and honored to win this award. As a professor, I work hard to hone my craft and find the best ways to teach my students. Hopefully, this award says I’m on the right track. Of course, being a good professor is much easier when you have great students. Luckily, I have the best.”

    Former ISC Department Chair Alyssa Eckman nominated Grumbein for the award and wrote her recommendation. 

    “Dr. Eckman is an incredible teacher in her own right," Grumbein said. "So, to be nominated by her is a huge honor. I’ve learned more from Dr. Eckman in my three years at UK than in any pedagogy class I ever took. Things like how to be tough, but fair, and how to care about my students. Her mentorship has profoundly shaped me as a professor, and I can’t thank her enough for the time, energy and dedication she has poured into me." 

    Adriane Grumbein receiving the 2017 Early Career Teaching Excellence Award at the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication’s (AEJMC) annual conference.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Adriane Grumbein, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication within the UK College of Communication and Information, is the inaugural winner of this award presented by the Association of Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Sheridan Broady Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 27, 2017) University of Kentucky Libraries has been working hard to expand several services designed to help students study more efficiently and affordably. Students and faculty may now reserve study rooms online, retrieve reproductions of articles electronically, arrange to pick up books and media directly from the circulation hold desk, and access hundreds of free online textbooks.

    Study Room Reservations

    William T. Young Library has announced the launch of a new online reservation system for study rooms. Previously offered only on a first-come, first-served basis, students now have the ability to use their mobile devices to reserve rooms up to a week in advance.

    To make a reservation, visit http://go.uky.edu/studyrooms, choose your room and time, and fill out the online form. For more information, including more detailed instructions on how to make a reservation, visit http://libraries.uky.edu/studyspaces.

    Article Express

    Graduate students may now use Article Express, a service previously offered only to UK faculty, staff and students with permanent or temporary disabilities. The service offers the convenience of electronically acquiring reproductions of articles, book chapters and law proceedings from the UK Libraries' collections.

    For more information on Article Express, visit http://libraries.uky.edu/ArticleExpress.

    Book & Media Express

    Book & Media Express, a service for faculty, staff and students, offers the delivery of books from any campus library as well as media material from the Young Audio Visual Services Media Library to a different campus library. It also provides delivery to a pick-up point for all patrons needing any material retrieved from Storage-Library Collections.

    UK faculty, staff and graduate students can now use Book & Media Express to request materials held in Young Library be delivered to the Young Library Circulation Department hold shelf for easier retrieval. The Science and Engineering Library and the Lucille Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center also offer same-site retrieval.

    For more information on the Book & Media Express service, visit http://libraries.uky.edu/BookExpress.

    Free Online Textbooks via InfoKat Discovery

    UK faculty and students can now find and access hundreds of curated free online textbooks by searching the library catalog, InfoKat Discovery. Written by experts, the textbooks cover a wide spectrum of subjects and are freely available through the Open Textbook Library.

    As the premier research library in the Commonwealth, UK Libraries provides ever-expanding access to quality information resources, services and programs. UK Libraries locations include the William T. Young Library, the Agricultural Information Center, the Hunter M. Adams College of Design Library, the Education Library, the John A. Morris Library (Gluck Equine Research Center), the Kentucky Transportation Center Library, the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center, the Medical Center Library, the Science and Engineering Library and the Special Collections Research Center.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsLibrariesPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK students and faculty may now reserve study rooms online, retrieve reproductions of articles electronically, arrange to pick up books and media directly from the circulation hold desk, and access hundreds of free online textbooks.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Bridgette Sloan Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 2, 2017) — The Department of Integrated Strategic Communication in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information will present its third annual Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising and Digital Media from 3:30-5 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 5, in the James F. Hardymon Theatre of the Davis Marksbury Building. 

    This year’s lecture will be delivered by Mark Carroll, partner at Bandy Carroll Hellige Advertising and Public Relations, and Dan Hartlage, principal at Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations.  

    Carroll and Hartlage will discuss how their agencies operate and the current and future role of digital media in advertising, marketing and public relations. 

    Carroll has 30 years of experience in advertising and public relations. In 1989, he founded the full-service agency Bandy Carroll Hellige with his partners, Susan Bandy and Tim Hellige. The agency has expanded to include an office in Indianapolis, in addition to their original Louisville location. Their list of clients includes the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Delta Dental, McDonald’s and Four Roses Bourbon. 

    Carroll graduated from UK with a bachelor's degree in journalism. He serves on the board of directors for the Center for Nonprofit Excellence in Louisville. This organization is dedicated to providing nonprofits in greater Louisville with professional development opportunities. In the past, he has also served as a board member for both the Beacon House, which provides assistance to men overcoming addiction, and the UK Alumni Association.

    Dan Hartlage graduated from the University of Louisville and has more than 20 years of experience in client and agency public relations. His experience includes account management, corporate communications, product publicity and media relations. Hartlage joined Guthrie/Mayes in 1993 and has managed several agency accounts with them. Their clients include Toyota, Philip Morris, A & W and the United Way.

    Previously, Hartlage was a sports writer for Bowling Green Daily News in Bowling Green, Kentucky, and was recognized by the Kentucky Press Association as a top feature writer. He also worked in network-affiliate television as associate director of WAVE-TV, an NBC affiliate in Louisville. 

    Hartlage is currently a member of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) and its Counselor’s Academy. He serves as a member in several community organizations, including the Rotary Club of Louisville, the Kentuckiana Basketball Officials Association and the Louisville Ag Club. In addition to these organizations, he is on the board of directors for the Main Street Association of downtown Louisville. 

    The Irwin Warren Lecture in Advertising and Digital Media honors the memory of Warren, who was the creator of some of the nation's most successful advertising campaigns. During an advertising career spanning more than 40 years, Warren worked at Doyle Dane Bernbach, BBDO and other leading agencies, before moving to McCann Erickson, the world's largest advertising agency, where he retired as senior creative director in 2006.

    The lecture series was established by Patrick Mutchler, a graduate of the UK School of Journalism and Media, formerly the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, who worked with Warren while in marketing with Johnson & Johnson.

    Mike Carroll (left) and Dan Hartlage. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: On Thursday, Mark Carroll, partner at Bandy Carroll Hellige Advertising and Public Relations, and Dan Hartlage, principal at Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations, will discuss the role of digital media in advertising, marketing and public relations. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Mike Farrell Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 26, 2017) — A journalist whose reporting on the deaths of children abused or murdered while under the supervision of a state agency is the 2017 recipient of the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment.

    Deborah Yetter, a reporter for the Louisville Courier-Journal, is the 12th recipient of the award given by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center in the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information. The award will be presented at the center’s annual First Amendment Celebration, which begins at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28, in the UK Athletics Auditorium on the first floor of the William T. Young Library.

    She was nominated by two previous winners of the Madison Award.

    “Debby has been the leading journalistic advocate for opening records of the Cabinet of Health and Family Services relating to severely abused children while under the supervision of the cabinet,” wrote Jon Fleischaker, the second Madison winner and the state’s leading media lawyer.

    “The litigation involving that effort lasted seven years, and Debby’s tenacious and superlative reporting on a regular basis was an important factor in generating public support for changing the way the Cabinet (of Health and Family Services) did business. As you know, this successful litigation included an unprecedented award of damages and attorneys’ fees, and I can assure you that Debby’s contribution was essential."

    David Hawpe, a former editor of the Courier-Journal, said Yetter is “a shining light in state government reporting. Her work has had a direct, powerful impact on the lives of Kentuckians — especially defenseless children who suffer at the hands of incompetent and irresponsible state bureaucrats.

    “Those choosing this year's Madison Award winner should, I believe, reward the courageous pursuit, the dogged reporting, the spotless reputation and the insightful commentary that have made Debby a gold standard for journalism directed at state government. Her work describes the arc from truly outstanding beat reporting on state health and welfare issues, which have been in the forefront of Kentucky news, to enterprise efforts that have helped produce important results.”

    Yetter reported and wrote a story on a 20-month-old boy under the supervision of the Cabinet for Health and Family Service, who died after ingesting drain cleaner. Attempts to review other records stemming from that story were denied by the cabinet and its lawyer. Eventually, the Courier-Journal and the Lexington Herald-Leader sued the state under the Kentucky Open Records Law. A Franklin Circuit Court judge and the Kentucky Court of Appeals panel ruled the records the newspapers sought, the records search that Yetter set off with her reporting, were indeed open to the public.

    Deborah Yetter earned a bachelor’s degree in humanities from the University of Louisville and then earned a master’s degree in journalism from Northwestern University. She began her journalism career as a news editor in Cumberland, and at the Tri-City News in Harlan County. In 1984, she began working at the Louisville Times, the former afternoon affiliate of the Courier-Journal.

    She joined the Courier a few years later when the Times ceased publication and the two staffs merged. During her time at the Courier, she has worked as a reporter, editor and editorial writer. She currently is a reporter covering state government, human services and health policy. 

    Yetter is a native of Louisville. She and her husband, Richard Yetter, have three adult children.

    The Courier won a Pulitzer Prize for its reporting on the Carrollton bus crash in May 1985. A drunken driver crossed onto the wrong side of I-71 in Carroll County, resulting in the deaths of three adults and 24 members of a church youth group returning from a day at Kings Island. Former editor Hawpe said Yetter’s reporting on the crash was “critically important, focusing on school bus safety problems that finally were addressed. But look at the list of her recognitions. Notice that it is long and consistent. She has done award-winning work on a regular basis.

    “What I love most about Debby as a journalist is that she has kept the vulnerable and the needy, especially including children, as the long-term focus of her work. Kentucky kids are safer, more secure today as a result of the journalism that she led. Her ultimate honor is not the respect and admiration with which she is regarded by other Kentucky journalists, but the thanks she has received for those she has helped.”

    The Madison Award presentation will precede the State of the First Amendment Address given by Judy Clabes, UK alumna, former CEO and president of the Scripps Howard Foundation, former editor of The Kentucky Post and the publisher of KyForward.com and NKyTribune.com.

    Eight alumni of the school will be awarded distinguished alumni status and the winners of the university’s Constitution Day essay contest will be announced.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Deborah Yetter, a reporter for the Louisville Courier-Journal, is the 12th recipient of the award given by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Susan Lax Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 22, 2017)  University of Kentucky football linebacker Courtney Love has been named to the 2017 Allstate Good Works Team selected by the Allstate Insurance Company and the American Football Coaches Association, it was announced Thursday.

    Love is one of 22 college football players overall and one of just 11 Football Bowl Subdivision players named to the prestigious team. This award shines a spotlight on the incredible stories of selflessness and community service displayed by these student-athletes and honorary head coach, and honors their dedication to volunteerism and enriching the lives of others.

    Love, a native of Youngstown, Ohio, shows his selflessness by volunteering his time to help others. He leads the team in community service hours and has a passion for mentoring children, especially those living in a one-parent household or children who have parents who are incarcerated. His passion for helping others was derived from his own childhood experiences. At the age of eight, Love ran away from a not-so-healthy relationship with his mother, and as a teenager was forced to deal with his father being incarcerated for two years. Because of his past, it was a perfect pairing when he found Amachi Central Kentucky. Amachi is a mentoring program that seeks to pair caring, positive adults with children and youth in the Bluegrass who have one or both parents in state or federal prison or are affected by incarceration in some way.

    “Since Courtney began mentoring through Amachi, he has exhibited compassion, kindness, leadership and love,” Amachi specialist Destini Engle said. “Working with him is one of the greatest honors of my life. He has changed and will continue to change so many lives through his story and his mentorship. I cannot think of a more deserving individual for this award."

    Love also has served in a Skype mentoring program with area high school students and has taken part in many events with the UK Children's Hospital, Read Across America and Special Olympics, along with many other service activities.

    In May of 2016, Love was chosen to participate in a service/educational trip to Ethiopia where he helped build houses as well as shoe-shining boxes for men to be able to work and provide for their families. He also delivered food to impoverished families and visited with orphans and widows.

    Love, who was named to the 2016 SEC (Southeastern Conference) Community Service Team, has also been nominated for several other national awards, including the Lott IMPACT Trophy, the Wuerffel Trophy and the Senior CLASS Award just to name a few.

    “I’m so proud of Courtney,” UK head coach Mark Stoops said. “He exemplifies everything you’re looking for in a student-athlete. The fact he’s being recognized on a national level doesn’t surprise me because of the way he serves other people. “

    In the classroom, Love was named to the 2016 SEC Academic Honor Roll, graduating in May with a degree in community and leadership development. He is currently working on a second degree in communication. He also serves as one of UK football’s Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) representatives for the second straight season.

    Love is the 14th player at UK, including the third under Stoops, to be named to the team in the award’s 26-year history. UK ties for second all-time with University of Nebraska in award winners behind University of Georgia (17).

    Earlier this season, sports information directors from Division I, Division II, Division III and NAIA schools across the country submitted nominations of players they felt best embodied the spirit of the Good Works Team® award, one of the most coveted off-the-field honors in college football. An esteemed voting panel consisting of former Good Works Team® members — including two-time national champion, Heisman Trophy winner and 2009 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® member Tim Tebow — and prominent college football media members narrowed down the nominees to the final roster.

    Tebow and the rest of the voting panel were faced with a list of 146 nominees with robust community service resumes that was narrowed down to the 22 student-athletes and an honorary coach named to the team. From helping to build homes overseas to providing resources to foster care children, the members of the 2017 Good Works Team® are changing the lives of others both locally and abroad.

    In addition to Tebow, the 2017 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® selection panel includes: Zaid Abdul-Aleem (Duke, 1994 team), Matt Stinchcomb (Georgia, 1997, 1998 teams), Brian Brenberg (St. Thomas, 2001 team), Mike Proman (Amherst, 2002 team) and Wes Counts (Middle Tennessee State, 1999 team); media members Kirk Herbstreit (ESPN), Blair Kerkhoff (Kansas City Star) and Paul Myerberg (USA TODAY); current AFCA President and University of Arizona head coach Rich Rodriguez; 2001 AFCA President and current athletic director at Virginia Union University Joe Taylor; and Thomas Clarkson, president of the west territory for Allstate Insurance Company.

    The 2017 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® will be invited to New Orleans to participate in a special community service project ahead of the 2018 Allstate® Sugar Bowl®, where the entire team will also be recognized on the field at halftime.

    In addition, Allstate will honor Good Works Team® players by creating special volunteer events in select markets throughout the season in conjunction with its All Hands In program, which encourages the college football community to come together and do good.

    The following players and honorary head coach have been named to the 2017 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®:

    Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS)

    Daniel Carlson - Auburn University

    Gabe Brandner - Duke University

    Mavin Saunders - Florida State University 

    Brent Stockstill - Middle Tennessee State University   

    A.J. Cole III - North Carolina State University  

    Brandon Smith - Pennsylvania State University

    Harrison Phillips - Stanford University    

    Shaq Jones - University of Alabama - Birmingham     

    Aaron Davis - University of Georgia

    Courtney Love - University of Kentucky 

    Tommy Openshaw - Vanderbilt University       

    Combined Divisions (FCS, II, III and NAIA)                

    Reece Foy – Amherst College 

    Josh Dalki - Bethel University (Minnesota)  

    Ryan Stratton - Edinboro University    

    Jake Daugherty - Ferris State University            

    Tyler Schubert - Franklin & Marshall College   

    Jacob Jenness - Northwestern College (Iowa) 

    Gunnar Orcutt - Peru State College     

    Will Gillach - Saint John’s University (Minnesota)    

    Jake Wieneke - South Dakota State University

    Patrick Mohorcic - The College of Wooster      

    Dillon Vaughan - West Texas A&M University 

    Honorary Head Coach

    Pat Fitzgerald - Northwestern University

    “The 2017 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team is a shining example of the great student-athletes that populate the rosters of college football teams all across the nation,” AFCA Executive Director Todd Berry said. “Since 2008, the AFCA takes great pride in working with Allstate to honor these 22 outstanding student-athletes, and honorary head coach Pat Fitzgerald, who go above and beyond to make their universities and communities a better place.”

    Fans are encouraged to visit www.ESPN.com/Allstate to vote for the 2017 Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® Captain now through Nov. 23, 2017. The team captain will be honored at this season’s The Home Depot College Football Awards on ESPN.

    Throughout the season, fans can also follow along and join in on the conversation by searching and using #GoodWorksTeam on their social media channels.

    About Allstate The Allstate Corporation is the nation's largest publicly held personal lines insurer, protecting approximately 16 million households from life's uncertainties through auto, home, life and other insurance offered through its Allstate, Esurance, Encompass and Answer Financial brand names. Other growth platforms include predictive analytics company Arity and consumer-product protection plan company SquareTrade. Allstate is widely known through the slogan "You're In Good Hands With Allstate®." Allstate agencies are in virtually every local community in America. In 2016, The Allstate Foundation, Allstate, its employees and agency owners gave $42 million to support local communities.

    About the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® The Allstate AFCA Good Works Team® was established in 1992 by the College Football Association, recognizing the extra efforts made by college football players and student support staff off the field. AFCA became the governing body of the award in 1997 and continues to honor college football players who go the extra mile for those in need. Allstate worked to present the award starting with the 2008 season.

    The SEC leads all conferences with 71 selections to the Good Works Team since it began in 1992. The SEC is followed by the Atlantic Coast Conference with 37 selections and the Big 12 Conference with 30 selections. University of Georgia is in first place with 18 honorees to the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team®. The Bulldogs are followed by UK and University of Nebraska with 14 honorees. Super Bowl XLII, XLVI and XLI champion quarterbacks Eli and Peyton Manning were members of the 2002 and 1997 Good Works Teams®, respectively.

    About AFCA The AFCA was founded in 1922 and currently has more than 11,000 members around the world ranging from the high school level to the professional ranks. According to its constitution, the AFCA was formed, in part, to "maintain the highest possible standards in football and in the coaching profession" and to "provide a forum for the discussion and study of all matters pertaining to football."

    Kentucky’s College Football Association “Good Works” Team Members

    1992 Doug Pelfrey, kicker

    1994 Leon Smith, split end

    1996 Kurt Supe, defensive end

    1998 Jimmy Carter, punter

    Kentucky’s All-Time AFCA “Good Works Team” Members

    1999 Seth Hanson, kicker

    2000 Matt Layow, defensive end

    2002 Antonio Hall, offensive tackle

    2004 Antoine Huffman, cornerback

    2006 Jacob Tamme, tight end

    2008 Tim Masthay, punter

    2011 Jake Lewellen, defensive end

    2014 Max Godby, offensive guard

    2015 Landon Foster, punter

    2017 Courtney Love, linebacker

    UK’s Courtney Love with children in Ethiopia. Photo by UK Athletics.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Susan Lax

    Carl Nathe
    carl.nathe@uky.edu
    859-257-3200 Summary: UK football linebacker Courtney Love has earned a very special honor for his work away from the field.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 25, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media, within the College of Communication and Information, will welcome home one of its outstanding alumni when Dana Canedy, recently named the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, returns to campus Wednesday, Sept. 27.

    “Dana Canedy: The road from UK to the Pulitzer Prizes” will feature a conversation with the woman who grew up near Fort Knox, Kentucky. Beth Barnes, former director of the school and a professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, will interview Canedy about the road she has walked, her successes and the obstacles she has overcome. Barnes will also ask questions submitted by members of the audience. The program will begin at 7 p.m., in the Kincaid Auditorium of the Gatton College of Business and Economics Building.

    Canedy graduated from UK with a bachelor’s degree in journalism in 1988. She worked at the Palm Beach Post in Florida for a year reporting on law enforcement and crime. The Cleveland Plain Dealer hired her to cover law enforcement, suburban government and local business. She worked as an editor for a year directing metropolitan coverage before leaving in 1996 to work for The New York Times.

    During her 20 years at the nation’s top newspaper, Canedy worked three years as a business reporter and three more as the Florida bureau chief, overseeing news coverage from the state, including the 2001 election. She also was a lead writer and editor on the series, “How Race is Lived in America,” which won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. The series looked at race relations in this country.

    Canedy also is the author of “A Journal for Jordan,” a best-seller on The New York Times Best Sellers List. The book told the story of her partner and father of her son, who wrote a journal for their child before returning to Iraq. He was killed in 2006, six months after Jordan was born.

    In July, Canedy was named the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes. She is the youngest person, the first woman and the first person of color to serve as administrator in its 101-year history. She is responsible for overseeing all aspects of the prestigious awards program in journalism, letters and the arts. She serves on its board of directors and is the spokesperson for the Pulitzers.

    Canedy also will be one of eight alumni of the School of Journalism and Media honored Thursday at a lunch for students, “Lunch with Our Stars,” and at the First Amendment Celebration at 6 p.m. Thursday, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

    The program Wednesday is being sponsored by the UK student chapters of the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society of Professional Journalists; the Bluegrass Chapter of SPJ; the School of Journalism and Media; the Diversity Committee of the College of Communication and Information; and UK’s Office for Institutional Diversity.

    The presentation is open to the public. A brief reception will follow. 

    Dana CanedyOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK alumna Dana Candy is the youngest person, the first woman and the first person of color to serve as administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes in its 101-year history. Hear her talk about her journey this Wednesday, Sept. 27.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Darias Collins Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 22, 2017) — Don Helme, associate professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Communication within the College of Communication and Information, along with a colleague at Wake Forest University School of Medicine, received a $50,000 joint grant from UK and Wake Forest’s Centers for Clinical and Translational Science. The grant will support their research and development of campaign message strategies to increase use of non-medical prescription drug disposal programs in Appalachian counties. Prescription drug disposal programs are an important component in helping to combat the opioid and prescription drug abuse crisis.

    Helme is the principal investigator of the UK portion of the study. The study is being conducted in partnership with Mark Wolfson of the Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy at Wake Forest University.

    The study seeks to identify community-focused strategies that are effective in reducing non-medical prescription drug use and increasing use of proper disposal facilities for unwanted or unused prescription medicines.

    Helme and colleagues plan to utilize those strategies to develop and test messages that will encourage the disposal of these “left over” prescription drugs and hopefully prevent these medications from being used for non-medical purposes.

    “The proposed project is an important first step in providing formative data that will help with our overall understanding of why disposal programs are not used and how to develop messages specifically to encourage use,” Helme said.

    The award will be split between UK and Wake Forest University with $25,000 going to each institution. The study will be conducted in two counties in Kentucky and two counties in North Carolina, as the primary focus of the study is Appalachia.

    The study will hold focus groups at health departments in Appalachian counties to gain input for message development, followed by community-wide surveys to test the messages. The project will last 18 months, with the goal of obtaining additional funding to implement the messages in a regional campaign to promote proper disposal of unwanted or unused prescription medications.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The project will aim to improve messaging of non-medical prescription drug disposal programs in Appalachian counties. Prescription drug disposal programs are an important component in helping to combat the opioid and prescription drug abuse crisis.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 7, 2017) The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team is just over a week away from the opening of their competitive season and expectations are strong. The top two partnerships from last season return this year to lead a strong team. The sophomore duo of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov return from a historic freshman campaign where they were ranked 13th in the nation. Seniors Theo Noparstak and Amar Adam hope to build on their 17th ranking from a year ago.

    Both teams reached the elimination rounds of the 2016 National Debate Tournament. UK teams reached the Sweet 16 or better at seven of the eight major national tournaments last season. That success included elimination-round victories over Harvard, Dartmouth, Emory, Northwestern, Berkeley, Michigan, Texas, Wake Forest and Georgetown.

    The squad is bolstered by returning members Jacinda Rivas, Maria Sanchez, Stephanie Lopez, Myles Powell, as well as newcomers Josh Kendrick, Veronica Martinez, and Genevieve Hackman, a sophomore transfer from Georgia.

    Director Dave Arnett credits the team’s recent success to recruitment and a strong commitment to research, which begins annually in June. The team officially arrived on campus a week before classes and spent 70 hours in the office preparing for the season.

    The team will open its season at Georgia State on Sept. 16-18, where more than 100 teams will compete. At the end of the month Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov will represent UK in the 46th annual Kentucky Round Robin. It will feature the top seven teams in the country. Other teams in attendance will include Harvard, Northwestern, University of Southern California, Emory, University of Central Oklahoma and the University of Kansas.

    The Intercollegiate Debate Team is housed in the UK College of Communication and Information.

    Follow the team at https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate.

     

    The UK Intercollegiate Debate Team arrived on campus a week before classes and spent 70 hours in the office preparing for the season. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UKIntercollegiate Debate Team is just over a week away from the opening of their competitive season and expectations are strong. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 1, 2017) Jeannette Sutton, director of the Risk and Disaster Communication Center at the University of Kentucky, will host a meeting at 9 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 5, to discuss the National Science Foundation's (NSF) RAPID Response Research. The meeting will take place in Room 224 in Grehan Building.

    In the wake of Hurricane Harvey, it is possible the NSF will request proposals to conduct research on the impact of the hurricane, similar to former requests following Superstorm Sandy in 2013, the earthquake in New Zealand and the earthquake and tsunami in Japan in 2011, earthquakes in Haiti and Chile in 2010, the Chinese Wenchun earthquake in 2008, and Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

    The RAPID mechanism is used to support activities having a severe urgency regarding availability of, or access to, data, facilities or specialized equipment, including quick-response research on natural or anthropogenic disasters and similar unanticipated events. A request for proposals has not yet been sent, but advanced preparation is of the utmost importance for short-term RAPID research.

    Sutton, also an assistant professor in the Department of Communication in the College of Communication and Information, will be advising UK faculty about steps to inquire, develop and submit RAPID proposals for the Hurricane Harvey crisis that continues to unfold. 

    She has been the recipient of three RAPID awards (for the Democratic National Convention in 2008, the L’Aquila Earthquake in 2009 and the New Zealand earthquake in 2011). Sutton is known for her expertise in crisis communication, specifically on social media, and has been interviewed frequently by national media outlets on the topic following Hurricane Harvey. She was also recently appointed to a three-year term on the National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee for the National Institutes of Standards and Technology in the U.S. Department of Commerce. 

    UK researchers across campus are invited to attend the Tuesday meeting to learn more about RAPID research. Please email Nancy Harrington, associate dean for research in the College of Communication and Information, to RSVP: nancy.harrington@uky.edu.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the Risk and Disaster Communication Center at UK and newly appointed member of the National Construction Safety Team Advisory Committee, will discuss the National Science Foundation's RAPID Response Research with U.K. researchers on Tuesday.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Hale Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 18, 2017) University of Kentucky Libraries has developed a self-paced Open Information Literacy course in Canvas, making it even more convenient for instructors to help students begin building solid information literacy skills right out of the gate. The course is open to anyone at UK and is especially easy for instructors to integrate into their classes.

    Covering a broad overview of important information literacy topics tailored specifically to UK Libraries, the full course takes about 40 minutes to complete. It can also be broken into separate modules to directly support work on a specific course assignment. Modules are mobile friendly and include text, videos and auto-graded, multiple-choice quizzes that can be imported directly into an instructor's own Canvas course shell. Each module is short, easy to navigate and focused on a specific information literacy concept that may be completed in any order.

    To enroll in the course, visit online at https://uk.instructure.com/enroll/HFM8FK. Instructors may enroll to review the course first and then have students use the same link to enroll directly for themselves. For questions about the Open Information Literacy course or how to use it, email Beth Kraemer, information literacy librarian, at kraemer@email.uky.edu, or Stacy Greenwell, instructional design librarian, at stacey@uky.edu.

    For the full range of information literacy and instructional support resources available from UK Libraries, stop by any of the campus libraries or visit online here.

    As the premier research library in the Commonwealth, UK Libraries provides ever-expanding access to quality information resources, services and programs. UK Libraries locations include the William T. Young Library, the Agricultural Information Center, the Hunter M. Adams College of Design Library, the Education Library, the John A. Morris Library (Gluck Equine Research Center), the Kentucky Transportation Center Library, the Lucille C. Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center, the Medical Center Library, the Science and Engineering Library and the Special Collections Research Center.

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHonors CollegeLibrariesPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Libraries has developed a self-paced Open Information Literacy course in Canvas, making it even more convenient for instructors to help students begin building solid information literacy skills right out of the gate.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 28, 2017) — The Kentucky Kernel, the independent student-run newspaper at the University of Kentucky, took home 11 awards at the 2017 Metro Journalism Awards hosted by the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ) Louisville Pro Chapter. 

    Louisville’s SPJ Pro Chapter annually judges work submitted by college and professional journalists in Kentucky in the print, online and broadcast categories.

    The Kernel’s honors covered an array of categories from best feature story to best news story and all three places in the in-depth reporting category. The entry period included portions of the 2016 and 2017 school semesters.

    “On the heels of their prestigious Pacemaker Award, the staff of the Kernel was able to produce another outstanding year of coverage of what happens on our campus,” said Mike Farrell, interim director of the UK School of Journalism and Media. “Under the leadership of editors Will Wright and Marjorie Kirk and media advisers Chris Poore, David Stephenson and May May Barton, they demonstrated their skills in writing and reporting, even cartooning. The faculty is extremely proud of the work our students have done, and we congratulate these award-winners.”

    Below is a complete list of awards received by the Kernel:

    First place - Editorial

    Winner: Kentucky Kernel Staff

    Entry title: "UK’s fight for secrecy leaves truth behind"

    Judge’s comments: Student newspaper taking on an important fight for public transparency and against university controls on student media. Timely and important case. Very contentious. Good for this publication for engaging in the fight and not wilting from the pressure.

    First place - Editorial Cartoon

    Winner: Ben Wade

    Entry title: "Rand Paul left out in the cold; exposing Trump’s fears; Carson’s campaign flatlines"

    Judge’s comments: Sharp humor and excellent technical skills with the illustrations.

    First place - Feature Story

    Winner: Marjorie Kirk

    Entry title: "Local Congolese community welcomes refugee"

    Judge’s comments: This story takes what could be a pretty ordinary piece about an immigrant/refugee student and really brings the narrative to life with rich details and interesting insights about the process behind the person being in the U.S.

    Third place - Feature Story

    Winner: Lexington Souers

    Entry title: "From seeing blue, to crying blue"

    First place - In-Depth Reporting

    Winner: Marjorie Kirk

    Entry title: "Kernel obtains withheld records; victims say UK trying to protect professor in sexual assault case"

    Judge’s comments: Excellent effort to put important public information in the hands of the public; this professor was given an opportunity to respond, but the really interesting aspect of this was the response of the university, putting into question who the institution ultimately serves. Well done, Kernel staff!

    Second place - In-Depth Reporting

    Winner: Will Wright

    Entry title: "The woman behind the mask"

    Third place - In-Depth Reporting

    Winner: Patrick Brennan

    Entry title: "Observing UK’s gender pay gap"

    First place - News Story

    Winner: Cheyene Miller

    Entry title: "Smoke fills Southern sky"

    Judge’s comments: The reporter reached many sources and was able to provide a complete picture of the event. The story is well organized, with a strong lead.

    Second place - News Story

    Winner: Katherine Manouchehri

    Entry title: "Students march to protest sexual assault at UK"

    Second place - Sports Feature Story

    Winner: Anthony Crawford

    Entry title: "From Chicago’s blacktop courts to Rupp Arena, Ulis has always exceeded expectations"

    Second place - Sports News Story

    Winner: Anthony Crawford

    Entry title: "UK Football honors SEC trailblazers in unveiling of new statue"

    All information on the awards and judges’ comments can be found at the SPJ Louisville Pro Chapter’s website: http://spjlouisville.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Kentucky Kernel, the independent student-run newspaper at the University of Kentucky, took home 11 awards at the 2017 Metro Journalism Awards.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 26, 2017) — University of Kentucky student Brady Trapnell, a journalism major in the College of Communication and Information, has received the Harry Barfield Scholarship from the Kentucky Broadcasters Association (KBA). Ethan Fedele, a digital media and design student in the College of Fine Arts, also had his Barfield Scholarship from the 2016-17 academic year renewed. Both students will receive $2,500 for the 2017-18 academic year.

    The scholarships are awarded through a competitive application process which includes academic achievement, the recommendation of a faculty member and extracurricular activities. The awards are renewable for a second year of undergraduate study provided recipients continue to meet specified criteria.

    "The KBA is proud to be able to help these talented students pursue their higher education," said Henry Lackey, president and CEO of KBA. "This year's total of $20,000 in scholarship awards means the KBA now has awarded a total of $265,000 in scholarships since the inception of the program in the 1992-93 academic year. Many of these recipients have gone on to successful careers in broadcasting and other related communications fields."

    The program is named in honor of Harry Barfield, the late president and chairman of WLEX-TV in Lexington. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts Administration

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A journalism student and digital media and design student will both receive scholarships named in honor of Harry Barfield.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 20, 2017) — The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is looking for a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment.

    The center in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media at the University of Kentucky is requesting nominations for its annual James Madison Award. The award, created in 2006, honors the nation’s fourth president, whose extraordinary efforts led to the passage and ratification of the Bill of Rights.

    The Madison Award recognizes someone who has worked in one or more of these areas: open government and open records; promotion of the watchdog role of the press; defense against government or private censorship; or robust debate in the marketplace of ideas. 

    Nominees must have significant ties to Kentucky, and their efforts must have resulted in the preservation or expansion of freedom of the press and/or freedom of speech. Dedication to the First Amendment principle of free expression is not accomplished in a day’s work but rather a lifetime. Thus the award recognizes a long-term commitment to such ideals.

    The deadline for nominations is Sept. 1.

    Honorees do not have to be journalists. Nominees may include, for example, educators, lawyers, judges, scholars, librarians, students or ordinary citizens.  The most deserving recipient will be someone who has made a significant contribution regardless of how much public attention it has received. 

    The nominator should submit a letter identifying the nominee, listing the nominee’s address, phone number and position, and explain why the nominee would be a worthy recipient. The letter should detail the specific efforts taken on behalf of First Amendment rights and should discuss obstacles and difficulties as well as the impact of the nominee’s efforts. The nominator may include up to three letters of support as well as other materials such as published or broadcast information.

    Entries will be reviewed by a committee that will include previous winners and the director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. The committee will have the option of not selecting a recipient if it does not believe any candidate is deserving.

    The award will be presented at the annual First Amendment Celebration, 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28, in the William T. Young Library auditorium on the university campus.

    Nominations should be sent to Mike Farrell, Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, School of Journalism and Media, 120 Grehan Building, Lexington, KY 40506-0042, or emailed to farrell@uky.edu.

    For more information, contact Mike Farrell, director of the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, at 859-257-4848, or farrell@uky.edu

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is looking for a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment. The deadline for nominations is Sept. 1.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 19, 2017) — University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media alumna Dana Canedy, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former senior editor at The New York Times, will oversee journalism's most prestigious awards program.

    The Pulitzer Prize Board and Lee C. Bollinger, president of Columbia University, named Canedy as the new administrator last week. Her appointment began Monday, July 17.

    “It is an enormous honor to be chosen as the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes,” Canedy said in a news release. “As a journalist and author for more than 25 years, I have tremendous respect for the importance of the prizes in promoting the best in American journalism and arts and letters. In an era of warp-speed digital and social change in journalism and unsettling assaults on a free and independent press, the role of the Pulitzer Prizes is more vital than ever.”

    Canedy was a special projects reporter and editor at The New York Times, where she won a 2001 Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting on the series “How Race Is Lived in America." She also served as Florida bureau chief, covering the 2000 presidential election recount and the flight-school training of the 9/11 terrorists. She oversaw national breaking news coverage for The Times for four years and until recently led talent acquisition, management training, career development and diversity initiatives.

    She is also the author of "A Journal for Jordan: A Story of Love and Honor," a memoir based on her partner's journal for their unborn child. Her partner, First Sergeant Charles Monroe King, was killed in combat during the first Iraq war. Canedy's memoir has been published in 10 countries in eight languages and has been optioned for a movie by Columbia Pictures and Denzel Washington, according to the release.

    “For more than a century, Columbia's administration of the Pulitzer Prizes has signified our enduring commitment to both courageous journalism in the public interest and the highest achievement in American arts and letters,” said Bollinger, who is also a Pulitzer Board member. “There's no one who better reflects that commitment than Dana Canedy, a Pulitzer Prize-winner herself whose insightful writing and respected editing have set a consistent standard of journalistic excellence. We look forward to welcoming her to our campus and to the Pulitzers.”

    Canedy was born in Indianapolis and grew up near Fort Knox, Kentucky. She graduated from what is now the UK College of Communication and Information in 1988.

    "This appointment shows the respect and trust her journalism colleagues and the Pulitzer board have in Dana," said Mike Farrell, interim director of the UK School of Journalism and Media. "The Pulitzers are journalism's Oscars, and their integrity while journalism is attacked viciously and irresponsibly could not be more important. Dana's administration will protect that reputation. We are proud of Dana and proud to say she is one of our graduates."

    Canedy succeeds Mike Pride, who will retire after three years as administrator.  

     

    Canedy, named the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, graduated with a journalism degree from UK in 1988. Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK School of Journalism and Media alumna Dana Canedy, author and Pulitzer Prize-winning former senior editor at The New York Times, will oversee journalism's most prestigious awards program.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Whitney Hale Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 7, 2017) "If I was going to lie to you, I'd already be elected."

    If you ever attended a Gatewood Galbraith campaign event, it was likely you heard just those words from the perennial candidate.

    A Kentucky politician, activist, author and public figure, Galbraith had a one-of-a-kind and frequently frank delivery unlike any of his competitors.

    A current University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) exhibit, “Gatewood Galbraith: The Last Free Man in America,” explores the life and work of this Kentucky icon whose outsized life had an impact not only on the state, but also the country.

    “Gatewood,” as he was simply known throughout the Commonwealth, was a vocal advocate for ending the prohibition of cannabis, which resulted in close friendships with country singer Willie Nelson, politician Ralph Nader and actor Woody Harrelson, as well as a national reputation. Galbraith defended Rev. Mary L. Thomas in 2001 in the first felony medical marijuana case, where Judge John D. Minton Jr. granted a stay in the case after its denial by the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

    In addition to his advocacy and activism for cannabis law reform, Galbraith also believed in expanding gun rights, freezing college tuition, restoring hemp as an agricultural crop, stricter environmental protections, internet access for all counties, abolition of the income tax for those who earned $50,000 or less, job development and the prohibition of mountaintop removal mining in the Commonwealth. He strongly believed Kentucky needed to fight the “Synthetic Subversion” and return to the state's focus on agriculture rather than its agreements with wealthy corporations.

    The monumental task to capture, preserve and tell the story of Gatewood Galbraith was given to the SCRC staff by the Galbraith family not long after his death in 2012.

    Then-Associate Dean Deirdre Scaggs (now interim dean of UK Libraries) approached the family to see if they had any interest in sharing his papers with the public. Because he had achieved somewhat of a celebrity status, the family was very careful in considering what they wanted to do with his collection and spent time with Scaggs deciding how they wanted to ensure his legacy.

    “It was a comfort to the family to know that the representation of Gatewood’s life would be properly preserved, organized and made available at the UK Libraries SCRC,” Scaggs said. “Knowing that in addition to the papers being used for research and for education, we would ensure that Gatewood’s history would be there for generations of the Galbraith family yet to be born was really important.”

    In addition, it seemed ideal for UK to preserve his papers as Galbraith was a graduate of UK, earning both his bachelor’s and law degrees at the school.

    Scaggs is honored the Galbraith family chose to work with UK and is thrilled with what the collection means for its users.

    “There is a great deal of value in Gatewood’s papers. He was an authentic public servant, an advocate for personal liberty, passionate and active in many political issues and various groups. He had strong views on the legalization of marijuana, gun rights, constitutional freedoms and agriculture,” Scaggs said. “In UK Libraries SCRC it is critical that we preserve the range of political viewpoints to provide the opportunity for civil discourse and unbiased research.”

    The Gatewood Galbraith papers consist of 28 boxes of materials. To help introduce this collection to the public, Matthew Strandmark, education archivist at the SCRC, approached library science graduate student and research room assistant Natalie Bishop with the idea to curate an exhibit using the papers.

    Bishop admits she was excited about the opportunity for more reasons than one. “I have a print of Gatewood hanging in my living room, so he meant something to me personally going into this exhibit.”

    At the beginning of the spring 2017 semester, Bishop began sifting through the Galbraith papers. She didn’t make any final decisions about the exhibit until April.

    “I wanted to make sure that I took my time when selecting items and prints to use, but I also loved reading the newspaper and magazine articles about Gatewood included in the collection,” she said.

    Located on the first and second floors at M.I. King Library Building, the resulting free public exhibit features photographs, campaign posters, newspaper clippings, memorabilia and some personal items, including one that was a trademark of his Galbraith's own style.

    “My favorite item on display is Gatewood’s signature wide-brimmed fedora hat. To me, Gatewood’s fedora signified his strong sense of self. He could give a Huey Long-style stump speech, and in the same weekend, go on tour with Willie Nelson, all while sporting his signature headpiece and a tie. Gatewood was unapologetically Gatewood, and his fedora symbolized that.”

    What does Bishop want visitors to take away from this glimpse into the life of Gatewood Galbraith?

    “I hope visitors are reminded of the impact that Gatewood had on our Commonwealth as a political and community leader, and realize they too can become active in similar spheres.”

    The Galbraith exhibit will run through July 28.

    Louis Gatewood Galbraith grew up in Carlisle, Kentucky. An outspoken and quick-witted activist and politician, Galbraith’s interest in politics started as a young boy after he heard a speech by Gov. Bert Combs. Always running with limited fundraising and on the outskirts of mainstream politics, Galbraith ran for Kentucky’s agriculture commissioner post in 1983; Kentucky’s attorney general position in 2003; Congress in 2000 and 2002; and governor five times: in 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2011. At different points, he ran as a candidate for the Democratic Party, Reform Party and as an Independent. Galbraith never won more than 15 percent of the vote in any party primary.

    Galbraith continued his work as an attorney during his many campaigns. He famously quipped, “Losing statewide elections doesn’t pay worth a damn.”

    Although known widely for his humor, quips and legal knowledge, Galbraith’s friends, family and associates described him as a genuine, loving and good person, who cared about his community and the well-being of his neighbors.

    In addition to the Gatewood Galbraith papers, the Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History is home to 16 interviews with family and colleagues in its “Gatewood Galbraith Oral History project,” which researchers can also use to learn more about the famous Kentuckian.

    The SCRC at UK Libraries is home to a collection of rare books, Kentuckiana, the Archives, the Nunn Center, the King Library Press, the Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Research Center, the Bert T. Combs Appalachian Collection, the John G. Heyburn Initiative and ExploreUK. The mission of the center is to locate and preserve materials documenting the social, cultural, economic and political history of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLawLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: A current University of Kentucky Libraries Special Collections Research Center exhibit, “Gatewood Galbraith: The Last Free Man in America,” explores the life and work of a Kentucky icon whose outsized life had an impact not only on the state, but also the country. The free public exhibit is on display through July 28, in the M.I. King Library Building. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 7, 2017) — University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media students in the UK College of Communication and Information brought home 10 awards, including the prestigious Tom Peterson Memorial Scholarship, at the 2017 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Association Awards held in April.

    That’s quite a feat considering there are only eight (college) radio categories and eight (college) television categories.

    Leading the list of winners was a first place showing in the Best College TV Newscast category for a UK Student News Network broadcast produced by Noah Richard. He also took second place in Public Affairs TV for his story explaining the 2016 Kentucky Republican presidential caucus.

    Marc Thomas placed first in Best TV News Story with “Trinity Gay Memorial Service” about the shooting of the Lafayette High School student and track athlete Trinity Gay, daughter of Olympian and Lexington-native Tyson Gay.

    Sofie Tapia took second place in Best College TV Feature Story for her coverage of “Artisanal Crafts in Berea.”

    UK swept the Best Public Affairs Radio category. The judges awarded first place to the team of Noah Richard and Morgan Henry for “Campus Voices: Ovarian Cancer Awareness”; second place to Melissa Payne, Stepper Toth and Caitlin Schwartz for “Campus Voices: Student Debt and Graduation Rates”; and third place to Penny Schmitz and Caitlin Schwartz for “Campus Voices: Kentucky Rape Kit Backlog.”

    Richard also took second place in the Best College Radio Reporter category.

    Lee Mengistu rounded out the radio awards with a third-place finish in the Best Feature Story category for “Tikur Traveler: The Young Folks.”

    Mengistu was also awarded the Tom Peterson Memorial Scholarship, the first UK student to win that award.

    UK School of Journalism and Media Professor and Interim Director Mike Farrell noted that while the faculty are proud of the awards, they are more proud of the deserving students who earned them.

    “They are dedicated journalists, and, despite everything the critics say about the future, we are optimistic about our profession because of the young men and women, award-winners or no, who work hard in our classrooms and develop the skills, the passion and the commitment to make a difference in our world,” Farrell added.

    “I'm especially proud of our broadcast faculty — professors Kakie Urch, Scoobie Ryan, Mel Coffee and Andrew Dawson — who teach and mentor with that same passion and commitment,” Farrell said.

    The full list of award winners can be found here: http://discover.ap.org/contests/kentucky-broadcast.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in the UK College of Communication and Information brought home 10 awards at the 2017 Kentucky Associated Press Broadcasters Association Awards.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden May 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2017) — A student team from the University of Kentucky Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the College of Communication and Information has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world by earning one of only eight spots at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC).

    Each year, more than 130 schools participate in the AAF’s NSAC, beginning with competition in one of 15 districts. Each team creates a comprehensive campaign for the sponsor, based on a real-world marketing challenge the sponsor presents in a case study. This year’s NSAC sponsor was Tai Pei, a leading producer of Asian-style frozen entrees.

    Each student team creates a 27-page plans book and a 20-minute presentation to present to a panel of industry judges at the district competition to showcase their campaign.

    UK is in AAF District 5, which includes schools in Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The district competition was held in Lexington on April 7-8, where the UK team placed second and qualified for the national semifinals. The UK team is one of the eight national finalists that will now compete at ADMERICA, AAF's national conference June 8–10, in New Orleans.

    Each of the 19 teams invited to semifinals presented a five-minute pitch followed by a 10-minute question and answer session with judges from Tai Pei’s corporate marketing team. The national semifinal competition was conducted by a 15-minute video conference May 4.

    Finalists were announced the afternoon of May 5, less than two hours after 12 of the 13 team members walked across the stage in Rupp Arena to receive their bachelor’s degrees. Adriane Grumbein, assistant ISC professor and co-advisor of the NSAC team, said family and friends who were in town to attend graduation ceremony joined the team’s celebration as they heard the judge’s live announcement via conference call.

    “I am beyond proud of this talented team of students,” Grumbein said. “They poured their heart and soul into their work this semester — from primary research and strategy all the way to data analytics and creative executions. And, the result was an innovative, truly integrated campaign.”

    Alyssa Eckman, associate ISC professor and team co-advisor, said UK has competed in NSAC for more than 20 years. The team placed 13th at the national competition in 2013, and UK’s highest national finish at NSAC was in 2006 when its ISC team earned sixth place overall.

    “Just earning a spot in the NSAC finals is an impressive accomplishment,” Eckman said. “We are excited for our ISC students to represent UK in the Elite Eight at this prestigious academic competition.”

    The 2017 UK NSAC team members are:

    • Carli Ackerstein,
    • Laura Brower,
    • Madison Elder,
    • Megan Galage,
    • Alé Gibson,
    • Bailey Klutts,
    • Sarah Kosid,
    • Lauren Kowalski,
    • Danielle Mallory,
    • Alexi Mojsejenko,
    • Garrett Ringler,
    • Susan Schuldt, and
    • Joanna Sowa.

     

    2017 UK NSAC team members.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A team of 12 students from the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world, earning a spot at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden May 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 19, 2017) — A student team from the University of Kentucky Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC) in the College of Communication and Information has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world by earning one of only eight spots at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC).

    Each year, more than 130 schools participate in the AAF’s NSAC, beginning with competition in one of 15 districts. Each team creates a comprehensive campaign for the sponsor, based on a real-world marketing challenge the sponsor presents in a case study. This year’s NSAC sponsor was Tai Pei, a leading producer of Asian-style frozen entrees.

    Each student team creates a 27-page plans book and a 20-minute presentation to present to a panel of industry judges at the district competition to showcase their campaign.

    UK is in AAF District 5, which includes schools in Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. The district competition was held in Lexington on April 7-8, where the UK team placed second and qualified for the national semifinals. The UK team is one of the eight national finalists that will now compete at ADMERICA, AAF's national conference June 8–10, in New Orleans.

    Each of the 19 teams invited to semifinals presented a five-minute pitch followed by a 10-minute question and answer session with judges from Tai Pei’s corporate marketing team. The national semifinal competition was conducted by a 15-minute video conference May 4.

    Finalists were announced the afternoon of May 5, less than two hours after 12 of the 13 team members walked across the stage in Rupp Arena to receive their bachelor’s degrees. Adriane Grumbein, assistant ISC professor and co-advisor of the NSAC team, said family and friends who were in town to attend graduation ceremony joined the team’s celebration as they heard the judge’s live announcement via conference call.

    “I am beyond proud of this talented team of students,” Grumbein said. “They poured their heart and soul into their work this semester — from primary research and strategy all the way to data analytics and creative executions. And, the result was an innovative, truly integrated campaign.”

    Alyssa Eckman, associate ISC professor and team co-advisor, said UK has competed in NSAC for more than 20 years. The team placed 13th at the national competition in 2013, and UK’s highest national finish at NSAC was in 2006 when its ISC team earned sixth place overall.

    “Just earning a spot in the NSAC finals is an impressive accomplishment,” Eckman said. “We are excited for our ISC students to represent UK in the Elite Eight at this prestigious academic competition.”

    The 2017 UK NSAC team members are:

    • Carli Ackerstein,
    • Laura Brower,
    • Madison Elder,
    • Megan Galage,
    • Alé Gibson,
    • Bailey Klutts,
    • Sarah Kosid,
    • Lauren Kowalski,
    • Danielle Mallory,
    • Alexi Mojsejenko,
    • Garrett Ringler,
    • Susan Schuldt, and
    • Joanna Sowa.

     

    2017 UK NSAC team members.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A team of 12 students from the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication has qualified for the elite eight of the advertising world, earning a spot at the national finals of the American Advertising Federation’s National Student Advertising Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson May 5, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 5, 2017) The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information held its 17th annual Excellence Awards and Dinner on Friday, April 7, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

    The college recognized the following staff, faculty, alumni and friends:

    Friend of the College Award: Recognizes a person who has demonstrated support to the college or one of its units by volunteering, providing internships or by their involvement in programs supported by the college.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Craig Kurz, board member and mentor for the University of Kentucky’s Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNet); and
    • Jeremy Rogers, supporter of and mentor for the School of Journalism and Media and its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.

    Outstanding Alumnus Award: Recognizes an alumnus of the College of Communication and Information for their many contributions to the college and to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Jennifer Smith, graduate of the School of Journalism and Media.

    Faculty Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes faculty who not only demonstrate mastery of the subject matter, but also awareness of current developments, and a vision of what is to come. Recipients demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate that knowledge to students in ways that foster understanding, intellectual growth and a broadening of perspectives.

    This year the college honored:

    • Maria Cahill, assistant professor in the School of Information Science.

    Graduate Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes students who not only excel in their own studies, but they also demonstrate knowledge and expertise of their field through teaching undergraduate students.

    This year the college honored:

    • Nick Tatum, second year doctoral student specializing in instructional communication.

    Faculty Research Award: Recognizes faculty achievement in research that is important to both the college and the faculty member’s area of expertise.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Marko Dragojevic, assistant professor in the Department of Communication; and
    • Tae Baek, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

    Outstanding Staff Award: Recognizes outstanding work and contributions by a staff member.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Catherine Hayden, communications director for the College of Communication and Information; and
    • Harlie Collins, communications marketing specialist for the School of Information Science.

    Faculty Community Service Award: Recognizes achievements by our faculty in service to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Don Helme, associate professor in the Department of Communication.

    Outstanding Advisor Award: Recognizes the critical role played by advisors in fostering academic achievement, clearing pathways to graduation, and providing meaningful engagement on campus and in the community.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Suanne Early, student affairs director of the College of Communication and Information; and 
    • Brandi Frisby, associate professor in the School of Information Science and Instructional Communication.

    The College of Communication and Information also honored the following outstanding graduate students at the Excellence Awards:

    • Allie Thieneman, Bruce H. Westley Memorial Scholarship;
    • Audrey Smith Bachman, Dorothy M. Carozza Memorial Fellowship Fund, Palmgreen Fellowship;
    • Whitney Darnell, Carozza Graduate Fund for Excellence in Health Communication;
    • Sarah Scheff, Martha and Howard Sypher Memorial Graduate Fund;
    • Kaylee Lukacena, R. Lewis Donohew Graduate Fellowship;
    • Robert Rice, Crisis/Risk Communication Research Fellow;
    • Anna-Carrie “Annie” Beck, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Nicholas Tatum, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Emily Fox, Vivian J. and Melissa MacQuown Forsyth Fellowship Fund;
    • Amanda Neace, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship; and
    • Shawntel Ensminger, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship.
    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The College of Communication and Information recognized exceptional staff, faculty, alumni and friends at its annual Excellence and Awards Dinner.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy August Anderson May 5, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 5, 2017) The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information held its 17th annual Excellence Awards and Dinner on Friday, April 7, at the Hilary J. Boone Center.

    The college recognized the following staff, faculty, alumni and friends:

    Friend of the College Award: Recognizes a person who has demonstrated support to the college or one of its units by volunteering, providing internships or by their involvement in programs supported by the college.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Craig Kurz, board member and mentor for the University of Kentucky’s Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNet); and
    • Jeremy Rogers, supporter of and mentor for the School of Journalism and Media and its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center.

    Outstanding Alumnus Award: Recognizes an alumnus of the College of Communication and Information for their many contributions to the college and to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Jennifer Smith, graduate of the School of Journalism and Media.

    Faculty Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes faculty who not only demonstrate mastery of the subject matter, but also awareness of current developments, and a vision of what is to come. Recipients demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate that knowledge to students in ways that foster understanding, intellectual growth and a broadening of perspectives.

    This year the college honored:

    • Maria Cahill, assistant professor in the School of Information Science.

    Graduate Teaching Excellence Award: Recognizes students who not only excel in their own studies, but they also demonstrate knowledge and expertise of their field through teaching undergraduate students.

    This year the college honored:

    • Nick Tatum, second year doctoral student specializing in instructional communication.

    Faculty Research Award: Recognizes faculty achievement in research that is important to both the college and the faculty member’s area of expertise.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Marko Dragojevic, assistant professor in the Department of Communication; and
    • Tae Baek, assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

    Outstanding Staff Award: Recognizes outstanding work and contributions by a staff member.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Catherine Hayden, communications director for the College of Communication and Information; and
    • Harlie Collins, communications marketing specialist for the School of Information Science.

    Faculty Community Service Award: Recognizes achievements by our faculty in service to our community.

    This year the college honored:

    • Don Helme, associate professor in the Department of Communication.

    Outstanding Advisor Award: Recognizes the critical role played by advisors in fostering academic achievement, clearing pathways to graduation, and providing meaningful engagement on campus and in the community.

    This year the college honored two recipients:

    • Suanne Early, student affairs director of the College of Communication and Information; and 
    • Brandi Frisby, associate professor in the School of Information Science and Instructional Communication.

    The College of Communication and Information also honored the following outstanding graduate students at the Excellence Awards:

    • Allie Thieneman, Bruce H. Westley Memorial Scholarship;
    • Audrey Smith Bachman, Dorothy M. Carozza Memorial Fellowship Fund, Palmgreen Fellowship;
    • Whitney Darnell, Carozza Graduate Fund for Excellence in Health Communication;
    • Sarah Scheff, Martha and Howard Sypher Memorial Graduate Fund;
    • Kaylee Lukacena, R. Lewis Donohew Graduate Fellowship;
    • Robert Rice, Crisis/Risk Communication Research Fellow;
    • Anna-Carrie “Annie” Beck, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Nicholas Tatum, Interpersonal Communication Research Fellow;
    • Emily Fox, Vivian J. and Melissa MacQuown Forsyth Fellowship Fund;
    • Amanda Neace, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship; and
    • Shawntel Ensminger, Hallie Day Blackburn Scholarship.
    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The College of Communication and Information recognized exceptional staff, faculty, alumni and friends at its annual Excellence and Awards Dinner.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder May 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2017) — The week of graduation, most high school students are decorating their caps, writing last-minute yearbook notes and making fun plans for the summer.

    Lexington native Moran Nickodem wasn't so lucky — she spent her last week of high school heavily sedated in the hospital after meningitis, e. coli and a number of other bacterial infections attacked her already weak body. Doctors in Cincinnati gave her parents a prognosis: the situation was grave, and they should be prepared for the worst.  

    Moran came to on graduation day and was determined not to miss the ceremony, even as the day could be one of her last. She Skyped in to the Lexington Christian Academy graduation, and her brother walked across the stage to receive her diploma.

    Four years later, after beating the bleak prognosis time and time again, that determination led Moran to another graduation – her college graduation from the University of Kentucky. This time, she'll walk.

    "To walk across the stage at Rupp Arena, it's a really big deal for me and my family," she said.

    The challenges Moran faced to even get to college were not the usual teenager leaving home, figuring out what they want to do with their lives challenges. She faced those, too, but alongside them was the challenge of staying alive and healthy.

    She's been sick for her entire life, diagnosed at birth with Hirschsprung disease and hip dysplasia, and cared for by doctors in Cincinnati and a team of doctors at UK HealthCare and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington – including Drs. Ryan Muchow, Stephen Duncan and Henry Iwinski. Later, a UK emergency department doctor would diagnose her with anterior sacral meningocele, a rare form of spinal malformation.

    After she fought off the infections and continued to live past doctors' expectations, she underwent 19 back surgeries – in one summer. This was right before heading off to college; she had her bags packed for University of Mississippi.

    "We prayed about it and knew I couldn't go to Ole Miss," she said.

    Staying near her doctors, those in Cincinnati and in Lexington, Moran decided to attend UK, even while some family and friends worried about the stress and demand it would put on her body.

    "There was like no chance – how am I going to go to school when I was practically in a coma and had a wound vac?" Moran said, referring to the portable machine she wore to help her back heal after the surgeries.

    But she persevered, especially with the help of her mom. She let Moran go through sorority recruitment, pushing her around in a wheelchair to each sorority house.

    "On top of the wound vac, I had an IV machine hidden in my purse and I looked like a skeleton. The girls probably thought I was desperate to join," she said, laughing.

    It wasn't desperation though; it was just a desire to have a somewhat normal college life. She was adamant, too, about living on campus and getting as much room to grow into an independent young adult as she could.

    Shortly after joining Tri Delta and beginning class, it was Labor Day and time for her next procedure, a colostomy.

    "It's a brutal thing for anyone to deal with much less an 18-year-old college student," she said.

    Her holidays would continue like this – every school break, from Thanksgiving to Spring Break, Moran would undergo another surgery. So far, she's had around 40 surgeries throughout her life.

    While she traveled back and forth from Cincinnati to Lexington and from campus to Shriners Medical Center, taking 12 hours that first semester, somehow the integrated strategic communication (ISC) major in the College of Communication and Information barely missed a class.

    "It was hard though, going to class," she said. "The machines would go off, so I would try to conceal the noise and wore big clothing – no one knew. I didn't want to be known as the sick girl."

    After a difficult first year with an unsatisfactory GPA, things started to get better for Moran her sophomore year. She had become close to those living in her residence hall, Baldwin Hall, her Tri Delta sisters and her professors. As she began to share her story, she received a lot of encouragement in return.

    "My sorority sisters were my support system, and I made lifelong friends in my dorm," she said. "They all took care of me."

    She had her colostomy reversed, she no longer had a wound vac, and she had built a community of support around her – from her advisors to UK Transportation Services, which helped her with handicap parking and mobility around campus.  

    "And my ISC professors were unreal. I still have a lot of complications and there are days I wake up and can't get out of bed, and they didn't ask questions," she said. "They would say, 'come in my office when you feel better and we'll catch you up.'"

    Moran said the Disability Resource Center was also instrumental in her success, likening them to her on-campus parents. That year, she finally achieved her goal of making a 4.0 GPA. She continued to make a 4.0 each semester, even through a major hip surgery her junior year when Drs. Muchow and Duncan were able to lengthen one of her legs and greatly improve her limp.

    Looking back now, while she's as healthy as she can be, people ask Moran, "how in the heck did you do it? How did you go to school and have a social life? How did you even make it this far?"

    And it hits her, how much she has accomplished.

    "I'm like wow, that's insane to think about, but when you're going through it and you have the best support system – your teachers, your parents, your friends, your sorority – it's just like you don't have any other option. I just cannot imagine not being at UK during all this."

    Moran's most recent surgery was in January at Shriners Medical Center, and this week she went to her last Shriners appointment. As she graduates from UK, she is also graduating from Shriners. Moran will become a UK HealthCare patient, going just across the street from the new Shriners facility for her appointments, and will continue to see the same team of trusted doctors.

    As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude from UK tomorrow, landing a marketing and sales job in Michigan (and finally experiencing a new town), she's also excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned.

    "My life is always going to be centered around what I've been through," she said. "But I'm looking forward to not letting my health issues be the center of my world." 

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Morgan Hall, Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington, 859-202-1077, mwhall@shrinenet.org Summary: She's endured nearly 40 surgeries in her 21 years. Though Moran Nickodem received a grave prognosis at age 17 and wasn't expected to live a normal life past high school graduation, this Friday she will receive her bachelor's degree from UK. As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude, she's excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder May 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 4, 2017) — The week of graduation, most high school students are decorating their caps, writing last-minute yearbook notes and making fun plans for the summer.

    Lexington native Moran Nickodem wasn't so lucky — she spent her last week of high school heavily sedated in the hospital after meningitis, e. coli and a number of other bacterial infections attacked her already weak body. Doctors in Cincinnati gave her parents a prognosis: the situation was grave, and they should be prepared for the worst.  

    Moran came to on graduation day and was determined not to miss the ceremony, even as the day could be one of her last. She Skyped in to the Lexington Christian Academy graduation, and her brother walked across the stage to receive her diploma.

    Four years later, after beating the bleak prognosis time and time again, that determination led Moran to another graduation – her college graduation from the University of Kentucky. This time, she'll walk.

    "To walk across the stage at Rupp Arena, it's a really big deal for me and my family," she said.

    The challenges Moran faced to even get to college were not the usual teenager leaving home, figuring out what they want to do with their lives challenges. She faced those, too, but alongside them was the challenge of staying alive and healthy.

    She's been sick for her entire life, diagnosed at birth with Hirschsprung disease and hip dysplasia, and cared for by doctors in Cincinnati and a team of doctors at UK HealthCare and Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington – including Drs. Ryan Muchow, Stephen Duncan and Henry Iwinski. Later, a UK emergency department doctor would diagnose her with anterior sacral meningocele, a rare form of spinal malformation.

    After she fought off the infections and continued to live past doctors' expectations, she underwent 19 back surgeries – in one summer. This was right before heading off to college; she had her bags packed for University of Mississippi.

    "We prayed about it and knew I couldn't go to Ole Miss," she said.

    Staying near her doctors, those in Cincinnati and in Lexington, Moran decided to attend UK, even while some family and friends worried about the stress and demand it would put on her body.

    "There was like no chance – how am I going to go to school when I was practically in a coma and had a wound vac?" Moran said, referring to the portable machine she wore to help her back heal after the surgeries.

    But she persevered, especially with the help of her mom. She let Moran go through sorority recruitment, pushing her around in a wheelchair to each sorority house.

    "On top of the wound vac, I had an IV machine hidden in my purse and I looked like a skeleton. The girls probably thought I was desperate to join," she said, laughing.

    It wasn't desperation though; it was just a desire to have a somewhat normal college life. She was adamant, too, about living on campus and getting as much room to grow into an independent young adult as she could.

    Shortly after joining Tri Delta and beginning class, it was Labor Day and time for her next procedure, a colostomy.

    "It's a brutal thing for anyone to deal with much less an 18-year-old college student," she said.

    Her holidays would continue like this – every school break, from Thanksgiving to Spring Break, Moran would undergo another surgery. So far, she's had around 40 surgeries throughout her life.

    While she traveled back and forth from Cincinnati to Lexington and from campus to Shriners Medical Center, taking 12 hours that first semester, somehow the integrated strategic communication (ISC) major in the College of Communication and Information barely missed a class.

    "It was hard though, going to class," she said. "The machines would go off, so I would try to conceal the noise and wore big clothing – no one knew. I didn't want to be known as the sick girl."

    After a difficult first year with an unsatisfactory GPA, things started to get better for Moran her sophomore year. She had become close to those living in her residence hall, Baldwin Hall, her Tri Delta sisters and her professors. As she began to share her story, she received a lot of encouragement in return.

    "My sorority sisters were my support system, and I made lifelong friends in my dorm," she said. "They all took care of me."

    She had her colostomy reversed, she no longer had a wound vac, and she had built a community of support around her – from her advisors to UK Transportation Services, which helped her with handicap parking and mobility around campus.  

    "And my ISC professors were unreal. I still have a lot of complications and there are days I wake up and can't get out of bed, and they didn't ask questions," she said. "They would say, 'come in my office when you feel better and we'll catch you up.'"

    Moran said the Disability Resource Center was also instrumental in her success, likening them to her on-campus parents. That year, she finally achieved her goal of making a 4.0 GPA. She continued to make a 4.0 each semester, even through a major hip surgery her junior year when Drs. Muchow and Duncan were able to lengthen one of her legs and greatly improve her limp.

    Looking back now, while she's as healthy as she can be, people ask Moran, "how in the heck did you do it? How did you go to school and have a social life? How did you even make it this far?"

    And it hits her, how much she has accomplished.

    "I'm like wow, that's insane to think about, but when you're going through it and you have the best support system – your teachers, your parents, your friends, your sorority – it's just like you don't have any other option. I just cannot imagine not being at UK during all this."

    Moran's most recent surgery was in January at Shriners Medical Center, and this week she went to her last Shriners appointment. As she graduates from UK, she is also graduating from Shriners. Moran will become a UK HealthCare patient, going just across the street from the new Shriners facility for her appointments, and will continue to see the same team of trusted doctors.

    As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude from UK tomorrow, landing a marketing and sales job in Michigan (and finally experiencing a new town), she's also excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned.

    "My life is always going to be centered around what I've been through," she said. "But I'm looking forward to not letting my health issues be the center of my world." 

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Morgan Hall, Shriners Hospitals for Children Medical Center — Lexington, 859-202-1077, mwhall@shrinenet.org Summary: She's endured nearly 40 surgeries in her 21 years. Though Moran Nickodem received a grave prognosis at age 17 and wasn't expected to live a normal life past high school graduation, this Friday she will receive her bachelor's degree from UK. As she celebrates graduating magna cum laude, she's excited to announce that for the first time, in her 21 years of life, she doesn't have a surgery planned. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Harlie Collins May 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Information Science, within the College of Communication and Information, is excited to announce they will be offering a new track in their information communication technology degree.

    This track is an online degree completion, which will focus on applied skills in the field of information studies. Students who are interested in completing their degree need to have at least 60 hours completed at an accredited university.

    “I believe this is truly an opportunity for people to earn a UK-branded degree who are unable to attend class in Lexington," said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the School of Information Science. "Further, this opportunity provides less of a disruption for individuals who have already busy schedules."

    “I am so happy that we are moving in this direction at the University of Kentucky,” said Renee Kaufmann, an assistant professor in the School of Information Science. “Online learning provides students an opportunity to come back to a university they love and earn a degree in a field that will allow them to advance within a current position or gain employment in a job they desire. Plus, online learning allows students to take their courses whenever and wherever.”

    The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.

    The School of Information Science hopes that this option will help to increase the overall level of education among Kentucky residents and help increase retention rates. Some benefits of an online degree completion include: the ability to complete the degree while being geographically separated from the university, flexibility and support.

    Students who are interested in the IS Track should apply through undergraduate admissions at www.uky.edu/Admission/content/apply-uk by July 1.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a master's degree in library science, School Library Certification, master's degree in information communication technology, bachelor's degree in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Harlie Collins May 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 2, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Information Science, within the College of Communication and Information, is excited to announce they will be offering a new track in their information communication technology degree.

    This track is an online degree completion, which will focus on applied skills in the field of information studies. Students who are interested in completing their degree need to have at least 60 hours completed at an accredited university.

    “I believe this is truly an opportunity for people to earn a UK-branded degree who are unable to attend class in Lexington," said Jeff Huber, professor and director of the School of Information Science. "Further, this opportunity provides less of a disruption for individuals who have already busy schedules."

    “I am so happy that we are moving in this direction at the University of Kentucky,” said Renee Kaufmann, an assistant professor in the School of Information Science. “Online learning provides students an opportunity to come back to a university they love and earn a degree in a field that will allow them to advance within a current position or gain employment in a job they desire. Plus, online learning allows students to take their courses whenever and wherever.”

    The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.

    The School of Information Science hopes that this option will help to increase the overall level of education among Kentucky residents and help increase retention rates. Some benefits of an online degree completion include: the ability to complete the degree while being geographically separated from the university, flexibility and support.

    Students who are interested in the IS Track should apply through undergraduate admissions at www.uky.edu/Admission/content/apply-uk by July 1.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a master's degree in library science, School Library Certification, master's degree in information communication technology, bachelor's degree in information communication technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The Information Studies Online Track will benefit students with an interest in information studies, technology or applied technology, who have discontinued their education, and for whatever reason are not able to complete their degree in a traditional on-campus format.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 26, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2017) — K'Quan McNease's time is split between studying journalism at the University of Kentucky and caring for his foster children. Most of their parents have abused opioids, he said, so the issue of the opioid epidemic in Kentucky hits close to home for him.

    The problem is well-known. Many Kentuckians are personally affected, and the epidemic — and the devastation it brings — is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But McNease wonders how many of those Kentuckians know how to help someone who has overdosed? Do they know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy?

    The UK senior, graduating this May, is hoping a project he's been working on with other UK students will get the word out about a life-saving tool developed by UK College of Pharmacy's Daniel Wermeling, professor of pharmacy practice and science.

    Led by UK School of Journalism and Media Associate Professor Kakie Urch, McNease and his classmates in a multimedia storytelling course, in collaboration with UK pharmacy students, produced public service announcements (PSAs) about obtaining and administering the nasal spray application of naloxone.

    "Opioid addicts and their loved ones across Kentucky are struggling with a complex — and deadly — disease," said Urch, who is involved in the local recovery community and teaches at the Hope Center. "Our work with the UK College of Pharmacy and its students let our fact-based storytelling in journalism multimedia go to work to get the word out."

    "Any person, with education, is qualified to be a life-saving first responder to an opioid overdose," Wermeling said. "The unmet need is that the public hears about tragedies and dramatic events but not what they can do to respond. In the 1990s the public health issue at the time was to train the public on what to do if they encounter a person in cardiac arrest, including CPR and use of defibrillators placed in public buildings. The same concept applies here."

    The need for quick response continues to grow as the number of overdose deaths rises. In Kentucky, that number reached 1,248 in 2015, according to the latest data available from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. Loved ones of those with an opioid addiction now have the option to quickly respond with the nasal spray, an easy-to-use and readily available antidote to be administered before EMS (emergency medical services) arrival. But to save lives, friends and family first must know about the tool and how to use it.

    Following Wermeling's development, legislation was passed to allow Kentucky pharmacists, acting under a physician-approved protocol, to fill naloxone orders without a physician's prescription. UK then trained pharmacists across the state on distributing the drug. The PSAs are the next step in getting the tool out into Kentucky communities with accurate information.

    "Messaging like this is important to get research and pharmaceutical developments out as laws change. Word of mouth starts somewhere — whether it is on late night or public access TV — or on social media shares of video," Urch said.

    McNease and 15 other UK journalism students in the College of Communication and Information teamed up with students in the College of Pharmacy's Rho Chi Honor Society to produce two PSAs. It's an unlikely partnership — journalism and pharmacy students — but after Wermeling approached Urch about the idea, both groups gained valuable experience.  

    Pharmacy students and Wermeling ensured the medical information was accurate and previewed the videos to other pharmacy students for their feedback. Urch and her students wrote scripts, developed storyboards, filmed and edited the PSAs. While journalism students learned about Kentucky's serious public health crisis, pharmacy students learned about media production and communicating important information effectively.

    Having a professional acting background and his own production company, McNease served as director. His goal was to keep things simple and to avoid confusing viewers. He acknowledged that the overdose scenes may make some feel uncomfortable. But he said sometimes "you need to make people uncomfortable" when speaking on important issues.

    "This is a bit of a different role for journalists, to make a PSA, because we're completely invested in this side of the issue," he said. "But we're able to help our community, our families, and give them some clarity."

    To do so, the students collaborated with community partners across Lexington. Playing victims, friends and EMTs (emergency medical technicians) in the PSAs are STEAM Academy interns and local EMTs in training. The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Office of Public Safety and the Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention program also lent support.

    Urch and her students hope to air the PSAs on the Lexington Public Access Channel, the UK Student News Network on Channel 16, local network stations and at the Kentucky Theatre as movie previews. Lexington Community Radio, on 93.9 FM and 95.7 FM, is also running Spanish and English audio versions of the PSAs.

    "Hopefully people watch and listen to these and don't feel intimidated to respond," McNease said. "We're letting people know it's okay to be scared, but here's how you can react when someone's life is on the line."

    The second PSA, "Family Matters," can be viewed at https://youtu.be/xlSbQbkdqa4. "Out of Body," above, can also be viewed at https://youtu.be/Q-9o80U6GAA.

    If you or someone you know is seeking facilities and services for substance use disorder in or around Lexington, visit http://gethelplex.org

    "Out of Body" is one of two PSAs produced by UK journalism students in collaboration with UK pharmacy students. of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationPharmacy

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Many Kentuckians are personally affected by the opioid crisis, and the epidemic is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But do people know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy? A group of UK journalism and pharmacy students are hoping a project they've been working on will get the word out. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 26, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 26, 2017) — K'Quan McNease's time is split between studying journalism at the University of Kentucky and caring for his foster children. Most of their parents have abused opioids, he said, so the issue of the opioid epidemic in Kentucky hits close to home for him.

    The problem is well-known. Many Kentuckians are personally affected, and the epidemic — and the devastation it brings — is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But McNease wonders how many of those Kentuckians know how to help someone who has overdosed? Do they know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy?

    The UK senior, graduating this May, is hoping a project he's been working on with other UK students will get the word out about a life-saving tool developed by UK College of Pharmacy's Daniel Wermeling, professor of pharmacy practice and science.

    Led by UK School of Journalism and Media Associate Professor Kakie Urch, McNease and his classmates in a multimedia storytelling course, in collaboration with UK pharmacy students, produced public service announcements (PSAs) about obtaining and administering the nasal spray application of naloxone.

    "Opioid addicts and their loved ones across Kentucky are struggling with a complex — and deadly — disease," said Urch, who is involved in the local recovery community and teaches at the Hope Center. "Our work with the UK College of Pharmacy and its students let our fact-based storytelling in journalism multimedia go to work to get the word out."

    "Any person, with education, is qualified to be a life-saving first responder to an opioid overdose," Wermeling said. "The unmet need is that the public hears about tragedies and dramatic events but not what they can do to respond. In the 1990s the public health issue at the time was to train the public on what to do if they encounter a person in cardiac arrest, including CPR and use of defibrillators placed in public buildings. The same concept applies here."

    The need for quick response continues to grow as the number of overdose deaths rises. In Kentucky, that number reached 1,248 in 2015, according to the latest data available from the Kentucky Office of Drug Control Policy. Loved ones of those with an opioid addiction now have the option to quickly respond with the nasal spray, an easy-to-use and readily available antidote to be administered before EMS (emergency medical services) arrival. But to save lives, friends and family first must know about the tool and how to use it.

    Following Wermeling's development, legislation was passed to allow Kentucky pharmacists, acting under a physician-approved protocol, to fill naloxone orders without a physician's prescription. UK then trained pharmacists across the state on distributing the drug. The PSAs are the next step in getting the tool out into Kentucky communities with accurate information.

    "Messaging like this is important to get research and pharmaceutical developments out as laws change. Word of mouth starts somewhere — whether it is on late night or public access TV — or on social media shares of video," Urch said.

    McNease and 15 other UK journalism students in the College of Communication and Information teamed up with students in the College of Pharmacy's Rho Chi Honor Society to produce two PSAs. It's an unlikely partnership — journalism and pharmacy students — but after Wermeling approached Urch about the idea, both groups gained valuable experience.  

    Pharmacy students and Wermeling ensured the medical information was accurate and previewed the videos to other pharmacy students for their feedback. Urch and her students wrote scripts, developed storyboards, filmed and edited the PSAs. While journalism students learned about Kentucky's serious public health crisis, pharmacy students learned about media production and communicating important information effectively.

    Having a professional acting background and his own production company, McNease served as director. His goal was to keep things simple and to avoid confusing viewers. He acknowledged that the overdose scenes may make some feel uncomfortable. But he said sometimes "you need to make people uncomfortable" when speaking on important issues.

    "This is a bit of a different role for journalists, to make a PSA, because we're completely invested in this side of the issue," he said. "But we're able to help our community, our families, and give them some clarity."

    To do so, the students collaborated with community partners across Lexington. Playing victims, friends and EMTs (emergency medical technicians) in the PSAs are STEAM Academy interns and local EMTs in training. The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Office of Public Safety and the Substance Abuse and Violence Intervention program also lent support.

    Urch and her students hope to air the PSAs on the Lexington Public Access Channel, the UK Student News Network on Channel 16, local network stations and at the Kentucky Theatre as movie previews. Lexington Community Radio, on 93.9 FM and 95.7 FM, is also running Spanish and English audio versions of the PSAs.

    "Hopefully people watch and listen to these and don't feel intimidated to respond," McNease said. "We're letting people know it's okay to be scared, but here's how you can react when someone's life is on the line."

    The second PSA, "Family Matters," can be viewed at https://youtu.be/xlSbQbkdqa4. "Out of Body," above, can also be viewed at https://youtu.be/Q-9o80U6GAA.

    If you or someone you know is seeking facilities and services for substance use disorder in or around Lexington, visit http://gethelplex.org

    "Out of Body" is one of two PSAs produced by UK journalism students in collaboration with UK pharmacy students. of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationPharmacy

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Many Kentuckians are personally affected by the opioid crisis, and the epidemic is frequently cited in local and national news stories. But do people know they can save someone's life with a product from their local pharmacy? A group of UK journalism and pharmacy students are hoping a project they've been working on will get the word out. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Sarah Geegan and Savanah Sellars April 24, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 24, 2017) — To continue with its charge, envisioning the future of the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for graduate education, the Blue-Ribbon Committee for Graduate Education will host an open forum to hear from members of the university community.

    The open forum will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building. The purpose of the forum is to answer any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date.

    The Blue-Ribbon Committee was formed in cooperation with the UK Graduate School and University Senate Council to perform a comprehensive analysis of graduate education at the institution. Ultimately, the Blue-Ribbon Committee is tasked with “envisioning the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for the University of Kentucky’s graduate education mission for the next 10-15 years.”

    After the final report is released and recommendations adopted, the colleges, necessary campus entities and deliberative bodies will begin implementation in January 2018. 

    Members of the Provost’s Blue-Ribbon Committee on Graduate Education are:

    • Carl Mattacola, College of Health Sciences, chair;
    • Brett Spear, College of Medicine, co-chair;
    • Mark Coyne, College of Agriculture, Food and  Environment;
    • Mark Lauersdorf, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Sarah Lyon, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Jenny Minier, Gatton College of Business and Economics;
    • Terry Lennie, College of Nursing;
    • Beth Barnes, College of Communication and Information; 
    • Greg Luhan, College of Design;
    • Beth Rous, College of Education;
    • David Puleo, College of Engineering;
    • Zach Hilt, College of Engineering;
    • Rachel Shane, College of Fine Arts;
    • Donna Kwon, College of Fine Arts;
    • Katie Cardarelli, College of Public Health;
    • Gabriela Jiskrova, student;
    • Kaylynne Glover, student;
    • Donna Arnett, dean of UK College of Public Health;
    • Kip Guy, dean of UK College of Pharmacy;
    • Mark Kornbluh, dean of UK College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Ann Vail, interim dean of College of Social Work; and
    • David Brennen, dean of UK College of Law (ex-officio).

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan@uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Summary: The open forum, which will serve to address any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date, will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Sarah Geegan and Savanah Sellars April 24, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 24, 2017) — To continue with its charge, envisioning the future of the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for graduate education, the Blue-Ribbon Committee for Graduate Education will host an open forum to hear from members of the university community.

    The open forum will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building. The purpose of the forum is to answer any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date.

    The Blue-Ribbon Committee was formed in cooperation with the UK Graduate School and University Senate Council to perform a comprehensive analysis of graduate education at the institution. Ultimately, the Blue-Ribbon Committee is tasked with “envisioning the graduate student experience and developing a rigorous intellectual vision for the University of Kentucky’s graduate education mission for the next 10-15 years.”

    After the final report is released and recommendations adopted, the colleges, necessary campus entities and deliberative bodies will begin implementation in January 2018. 

    Members of the Provost’s Blue-Ribbon Committee on Graduate Education are:

    • Carl Mattacola, College of Health Sciences, chair;
    • Brett Spear, College of Medicine, co-chair;
    • Mark Coyne, College of Agriculture, Food and  Environment;
    • Mark Lauersdorf, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Sarah Lyon, College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Jenny Minier, Gatton College of Business and Economics;
    • Terry Lennie, College of Nursing;
    • Beth Barnes, College of Communication and Information; 
    • Greg Luhan, College of Design;
    • Beth Rous, College of Education;
    • David Puleo, College of Engineering;
    • Zach Hilt, College of Engineering;
    • Rachel Shane, College of Fine Arts;
    • Donna Kwon, College of Fine Arts;
    • Katie Cardarelli, College of Public Health;
    • Gabriela Jiskrova, student;
    • Kaylynne Glover, student;
    • Donna Arnett, dean of UK College of Public Health;
    • Kip Guy, dean of UK College of Pharmacy;
    • Mark Kornbluh, dean of UK College of Arts and Sciences;
    • Ann Vail, interim dean of College of Social Work; and
    • David Brennen, dean of UK College of Law (ex-officio).

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLawMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan@uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Summary: The open forum, which will serve to address any questions related to the charge of the panel and what the panel has accomplished to date, will take place 4-5:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 25, in the Lexmark Public Room (Room 209) of the Main Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser April 21, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2017) — When you hear Sherali Zeadally teaching, it's obvious he has a passion for helping students learn. 

    "Teaching is one of the very few professions that actually gives someone the opportunity to have a profound impact," said Zeadally, a winner of the 2017 Great Teacher Award.

    Click on the video above to watch the moment Zeadally realized he won this prestigious teaching award and why he hopes to have an impact on students beyond the realm of academics.  

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, and authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctoral degree in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: UKNow is spotlighting each of this year's Great Teachers through a video featuring the award-winning professors with the students who nominated them. This week we feature Sherali Zeadally from the College of Communication and Information.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney, Gail Hairston, and Kody Kiser April 21, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 21, 2017) — When you hear Sherali Zeadally teaching, it's obvious he has a passion for helping students learn. 

    "Teaching is one of the very few professions that actually gives someone the opportunity to have a profound impact," said Zeadally, a winner of the 2017 Great Teacher Award.

    Click on the video above to watch the moment Zeadally realized he won this prestigious teaching award and why he hopes to have an impact on students beyond the realm of academics.  

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, and authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctoral degree in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, in Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: UKNow is spotlighting each of this year's Great Teachers through a video featuring the award-winning professors with the students who nominated them. This week we feature Sherali Zeadally from the College of Communication and Information.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Eric Lindsey April 20, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2017)Student-athletes from all of the University of Kentucky's winter teams combined to earn a total of 70 spots on the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Winter Academic Honor Roll, the league announced this week.

    UK had the fourth-most honorees in the conference and ranked in the top three in men’s basketball and men’s swimming and diving representatives.

    A total of 701 student-athletes were named to the 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll..The 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll is based on grades form the 2016 spring, summer and fall terms. It includes the sports of basketball, equestrian, gymnastics, and swimming and diving.

    Any student-athlete who participates in a SEC championship sport or a student-athlete who participates in a sport listed on his/her institution’s NCAA Sports Sponsorship Form is eligible for nomination to the Academic Honor Roll. The following criteria is followed: 1. A student-athlete must have a grade point average of 3.0 or above for either the preceding academic year (two semesters or three quarters) or have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or above at the nominating institution. 2. If a student-athlete attends summer school, his/her grade-point average during the summer academic term must be included in the calculation used to determine eligibility for the Academic Honor Roll. 3. Student-athletes eligible for the Honor Roll include those receiving an athletics scholarship, recipients of an athletics award (i.e., letter winner), and non-scholarship student-athletes who have been on a varsity team for two seasons. 4. Prior to being nominated, a student-athlete must have successfully completed 24 semester or 36 quarter hours of non-remedial academic credit toward a baccalaureate degree at the nominating institution. 5. The student-athlete must have been a member of a varsity team for the sport’s entire NCAA championship segment.

    Kentucky representatives:

    Student-athlete

    Sport

    Major

    Jonny David

    men’s basketball

    kinesiology

    Isaac Humphries

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Dillon Pulliam

    men’s basketball

    computer engineering

    Tai Wynyard

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Evelyn Akhator

    women’s basketball

    community and leadership development

    Makenzie Cann

    women’s basketball

    integrated strategic communication

    Makayla Epps

    women’s basketball

    social work

    Jessica Hardin

    women’s basketball

    health care communication

    Maci Morris

    women’s basketball

    exercise science

    Taylor Murray

    women’s basketball

    public health

    Rachel Potter

    women’s basketball

    agricultural biotechnology/biology

    Alyssa Rice

    women’s basketball

    accounting/finance

    Katie Carlisle

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Katrina Coca

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Sidney Dukes

    gymnastics

    marketing

    Alex Hyland

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Cori Rechenmacher

    gymnastics

    nursing

    Aubree Rose

    gymnastics

    communication

    Katie Stuart

    gymnastics

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Sydney Waltz

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Billy Azzinaro

    rifle

    mechanical engineering

    Jenna Bethea

    rifle

    public health

    Hanna Carr

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Carmen Fry

    rifle

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Heather Kirby

    rifle

    equine science and management

    Sonya May

    rifle

    media arts and studies

    Andrew Miller

    rifle

    business management/marketing

    Cathryn Papasodora

    rifle

    integrated strategic communication

    Jason Sharbel

    rifle

    forestry

    Jason Spaude

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Bowen Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Shane Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Tanner Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Andrew Aviotti

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance/accounting

    Matthew Beach

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Samuel Day

    men’s swimming and diving

    biosystems engineering

    David Dingess

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Brandon Flynn

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Cobe Garcia

    men’s swimming and diving

    mechanical engineering

    Jackson Gunning

    men’s swimming and diving

    political science

    Austin Haney

    men’s swimming and diving

    civil engineering

    Kyle Higgins

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Isaac Jones

    men’s swimming and diving

    middle level teacher education

    Jarod Kehl

    men’s swimming and diving

    anthropology

    Seb Masterton

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Noah Richter

    men’s swimming and diving

    mathematics

    James Stevenson

    men’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Mike Summe

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Josh Swart

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Walker Thaning

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Bridgette Alexander

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Morgan Belli

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kelly Berger

    women’s swimming and diving

    elementary education

    Kendal Casey

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kayla Churman

    women’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Courtney Clark

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing/finance

    Kendra Crew

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting/business management

    Ann Davies

    women’s swimming and diving

    social work

    Ally Dupay

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Kailey Francetic

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Rachael Freeman

    women’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Geena Freriks

    Women’s swimming and diving

    dietetics

    Danielle Galyer

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/political science

    Maddie Gordon

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

    Rebecca Hamperian

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/marketing

    Kate Kelly

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Haley McInerny

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Allie Peterson

    women’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Alaina Potts

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Meredith Whisenhunt

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

     

     

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Eric Lindsey

    Summary: The University of Kentucky again placed among the leaders in the number of student-athletes on the most recent edition of the SEC Academic Honor Roll.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Eric Lindsey April 20, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2017)Student-athletes from all of the University of Kentucky's winter teams combined to earn a total of 70 spots on the Southeastern Conference (SEC) Winter Academic Honor Roll, the league announced this week.

    UK had the fourth-most honorees in the conference and ranked in the top three in men’s basketball and men’s swimming and diving representatives.

    A total of 701 student-athletes were named to the 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll..The 2016-17 Winter SEC Academic Honor Roll is based on grades form the 2016 spring, summer and fall terms. It includes the sports of basketball, equestrian, gymnastics, and swimming and diving.

    Any student-athlete who participates in a SEC championship sport or a student-athlete who participates in a sport listed on his/her institution’s NCAA Sports Sponsorship Form is eligible for nomination to the Academic Honor Roll. The following criteria is followed: 1. A student-athlete must have a grade point average of 3.0 or above for either the preceding academic year (two semesters or three quarters) or have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.0 or above at the nominating institution. 2. If a student-athlete attends summer school, his/her grade-point average during the summer academic term must be included in the calculation used to determine eligibility for the Academic Honor Roll. 3. Student-athletes eligible for the Honor Roll include those receiving an athletics scholarship, recipients of an athletics award (i.e., letter winner), and non-scholarship student-athletes who have been on a varsity team for two seasons. 4. Prior to being nominated, a student-athlete must have successfully completed 24 semester or 36 quarter hours of non-remedial academic credit toward a baccalaureate degree at the nominating institution. 5. The student-athlete must have been a member of a varsity team for the sport’s entire NCAA championship segment.

    Kentucky representatives:

    Student-athlete

    Sport

    Major

    Jonny David

    men’s basketball

    kinesiology

    Isaac Humphries

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Dillon Pulliam

    men’s basketball

    computer engineering

    Tai Wynyard

    men’s basketball

    communication

    Evelyn Akhator

    women’s basketball

    community and leadership development

    Makenzie Cann

    women’s basketball

    integrated strategic communication

    Makayla Epps

    women’s basketball

    social work

    Jessica Hardin

    women’s basketball

    health care communication

    Maci Morris

    women’s basketball

    exercise science

    Taylor Murray

    women’s basketball

    public health

    Rachel Potter

    women’s basketball

    agricultural biotechnology/biology

    Alyssa Rice

    women’s basketball

    accounting/finance

    Katie Carlisle

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Katrina Coca

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Sidney Dukes

    gymnastics

    marketing

    Alex Hyland

    gymnastics

    exercise science

    Cori Rechenmacher

    gymnastics

    nursing

    Aubree Rose

    gymnastics

    communication

    Katie Stuart

    gymnastics

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Sydney Waltz

    gymnastics

    integrated strategic communication

    Billy Azzinaro

    rifle

    mechanical engineering

    Jenna Bethea

    rifle

    public health

    Hanna Carr

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Carmen Fry

    rifle

    merchandising, apparel and textiles

    Heather Kirby

    rifle

    equine science and management

    Sonya May

    rifle

    media arts and studies

    Andrew Miller

    rifle

    business management/marketing

    Cathryn Papasodora

    rifle

    integrated strategic communication

    Jason Sharbel

    rifle

    forestry

    Jason Spaude

    rifle

    agricultural and medical biotechnology

    Bowen Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Shane Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Tanner Anderson

    men’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Andrew Aviotti

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance/accounting

    Matthew Beach

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Samuel Day

    men’s swimming and diving

    biosystems engineering

    David Dingess

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Brandon Flynn

    men’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Cobe Garcia

    men’s swimming and diving

    mechanical engineering

    Jackson Gunning

    men’s swimming and diving

    political science

    Austin Haney

    men’s swimming and diving

    civil engineering

    Kyle Higgins

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Isaac Jones

    men’s swimming and diving

    middle level teacher education

    Jarod Kehl

    men’s swimming and diving

    anthropology

    Seb Masterton

    men’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Noah Richter

    men’s swimming and diving

    mathematics

    James Stevenson

    men’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Mike Summe

    men’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Josh Swart

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Walker Thaning

    men’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Bridgette Alexander

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Morgan Belli

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kelly Berger

    women’s swimming and diving

    elementary education

    Kendal Casey

    women’s swimming and diving

    economics

    Kayla Churman

    women’s swimming and diving

    biology

    Courtney Clark

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing/finance

    Kendra Crew

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting/business management

    Ann Davies

    women’s swimming and diving

    social work

    Ally Dupay

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Kailey Francetic

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Rachael Freeman

    women’s swimming and diving

    integrated strategic communication

    Geena Freriks

    Women’s swimming and diving

    dietetics

    Danielle Galyer

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/political science

    Maddie Gordon

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

    Rebecca Hamperian

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology/marketing

    Kate Kelly

    women’s swimming and diving

    exercise science

    Haley McInerny

    women’s swimming and diving

    marketing

    Allie Peterson

    women’s swimming and diving

    finance

    Alaina Potts

    women’s swimming and diving

    accounting

    Meredith Whisenhunt

    women’s swimming and diving

    psychology

     

     

     

     

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Eric Lindsey

    Summary: The University of Kentucky again placed among the leaders in the number of student-athletes on the most recent edition of the SEC Academic Honor Roll.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Mike Farrell April 17, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) If Terry Hunt ever decides to write his own biography, he could title it “From Bellevue to the White House.”

    The University of Kentucky journalism graduate, who covered four different presidents over 25 years for the Associated Press, will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.

    “Covering Reagan to Trump: A View from the Front Row” is the title of his address.

    Hunt, a native of Bellevue in Northern Kentucky, graduated from the University of Kentucky with a journalism degree in 1967. He served as managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel.

    He was drafted into the Army, returned to a summer internship with the AP in Louisville, then took a job in Providence, Rhode Island, as an AP correspondent. The wire service transferred Hunt to Washington at the height of the Watergate scandal in 1974. During the 1980 presidential campaign, he was asked to cover California Gov. Ronald Reagan for two days, an assignment that turned into the rest of the campaign. After the election, Hunt followed Reagan to the White House.

    During the presidencies of Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Hunt logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering the nation’s chief executive. He traveled to West Germany with Reagan, who stood at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” 

    Hunt left the White House near the end of the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy bureau chief in Washington to help manage the news agency’s largest bureau. 

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and into UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence. 

    Before Hunt delivers the Creason Address, he will be one of six recipients of the School of Journalism and Media Distinguished Alumni awards. The other recipients are Cathy Black, a CBS producer; Judith G. Clabes, newspaper editor, online news site creator and Scripps Howard Foundation president and CEO; the late William R. Grant, who produced award-winning programming for PBS; retired Courier-Journal editor David Hawpe; and Richard G. Wilson, one of the foremost education reporters for the Courier-Journal until his retirement in 1999.

    In addition, the seventh annual David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award will be presented to journalism senior Derek Terry for his story on former football star Zeke Pike.

    The Joe Creason Lecture is annually one of the highlights of the academic calendar for the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communicaton and Information. The lecture by a nationally prominent journalist honors the memory of Creason, an outstanding Kentucky journalist and an honored alumnus. The lecture series was made possible through a matching grant from the Bingham Enterprises Foundation of Kentucky and gifts donated by UK alumni and friends of Joe Creason.

    The university family and the public are invited. 

    Terry Hunt will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Terry Hunt, who retired last fall after a distinguished 46-year career with Associated Press including 25 years as chief White House correspondent, will deliver the Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium..
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Mike Farrell Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) If Terry Hunt ever decides to write his own biography, he could title it “From Bellevue to the White House.”

    The University of Kentucky journalism graduate, who covered four different presidents over 25 years for the Associated Press, will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.

    “Covering Reagan to Trump: A View from the Front Row” is the title of his address.

    Hunt, a native of Bellevue in Northern Kentucky, graduated from the University of Kentucky with a journalism degree in 1967. He served as managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel.

    He was drafted into the Army, returned to a summer internship with the AP in Louisville, then took a job in Providence, Rhode Island, as an AP correspondent. The wire service transferred Hunt to Washington at the height of the Watergate scandal in 1974. During the 1980 presidential campaign, he was asked to cover California Gov. Ronald Reagan for two days, an assignment that turned into the rest of the campaign. After the election, Hunt followed Reagan to the White House.

    During the presidencies of Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, Hunt logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering the nation’s chief executive. He traveled to West Germany with Reagan, who stood at the Brandenburg Gate in West Berlin and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” 

    Hunt left the White House near the end of the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy bureau chief in Washington to help manage the news agency’s largest bureau. 

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and into UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence. 

    Before Hunt delivers the Creason Address, he will be one of six recipients of the School of Journalism and Media Distinguished Alumni awards. The other recipients are Cathy Black, a CBS producer; Judith G. Clabes, newspaper editor, online news site creator and Scripps Howard Foundation president and CEO; the late William R. Grant, who produced award-winning programming for PBS; retired Courier-Journal editor David Hawpe; and Richard G. Wilson, one of the foremost education reporters for the Courier-Journal until his retirement in 1999.

    In addition, the seventh annual David Dick “What a Great Story!” Storytelling Award will be presented to journalism senior Derek Terry for his story on former football star Zeke Pike.

    The Joe Creason Lecture is annually one of the highlights of the academic calendar for the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communicaton and Information. The lecture by a nationally prominent journalist honors the memory of Creason, an outstanding Kentucky journalist and an honored alumnus. The lecture series was made possible through a matching grant from the Bingham Enterprises Foundation of Kentucky and gifts donated by UK alumni and friends of Joe Creason.

    The university family and the public are invited. 

    Terry Hunt will deliver the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: Terry Hunt, who retired last fall after a distinguished 46-year career with Associated Press including 25 years as chief White House correspondent, will deliver the Creason Lecture at 6 p.m. Tuesday, April 18, in UK's William T. Young Library auditorium..
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mike Farrell April 14, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2017) — The faculty of the University of Kentucky  School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information has voted to annually recognize graduates of the school who have had outstanding careers and made significant contributions to their communities and professions.

    “I am not sure many people realize the impact our graduates have had on our state and our country,” Lars Willnat, School of Journalism and Media director, said. “This first group includes some amazing people — reporters, editors, producers, many of them award winners in their field.

    “That’s quite a legacy from one school. And this is just the beginning. We have dozens more who deserve this award and dozens of recent graduates who are making their own marks.”

    The first six recipients of the Distinguished Alumni Award will be recognized Tuesday, April 18, at the school’s 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture. The lecture will be delivered by UK alumnus Terry Hunt, who retired last fall from the White House bureau of the Associated Press as deputy bureau chief. The event begins at 6 p.m. in the auditorium of the William T. Young Library.  The winner of the David Dick “What a Great Story Award” Storytelling Award will also be announced.

    These six graduates of the School of Journalism and Media will be recognized:

    Cathy A. Black (1985):  A graduate of the school’s telecommunications major, now known as the media arts and studies major, she is a senior producer at CBS News in broadcast marketing. Her responsibilities include the promotion and marketing of “CBS This Morning,” hosted by Charlie Rose, Gayle King and Norah O’Donnell, to the network’s affiliated stations.

    Previously, Black booked musical guests for the “Early Show” and “Saturday Early Show.” In that position, she produced concerts throughout the United States and overseas. She’s produced concerts and segments featuring performers including Prince, Garth Brooks, Sting, Adele, Rihanna, Kanye West, Katy Perry, Lenny Kravitz and Marc Anthony.

    Black also has covered many headline events, including the Gulf War, the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Hurricane Katrina and the Michael Jackson trial, as well as the 2012 and 2016 national political party conventions.  She joined CBS News in 1990, working on the assignment desk before becoming an assistant to “CBS This Morning” anchor Harry Smith.

    A native of Lexington, she lives in New York City.  

    Judith G. Clabes (1967):  This journalism graduate from Henderson, who also majored in English and education, has received numerous national, regional and state awards for her work in journalism, in community service and in philanthropy.  She earned a master’s degree in public administration from Indiana State University and has received four honorary doctorates, the most recent in 2010 from UK.

    During her 37-year career with the E.W. Scripps Co., she broke the glass ceiling as the first woman to edit a Scripps newspaper, beginning with the Sunday Courier and Press in Evansville, a post she held for five years until she became editor of The Kentucky Post.

    While editor of The Post, she founded the UK First Amendment Center, since renamed the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. In 1996, she was named chief executive officer and president of the Scripps Howard Foundation, the philanthropic arm of the E.W. Scripps Co. She retired in 2008.

    In retirement, she and her husband, Gene, founded KyForward.com, an online news site serving Kentucky.  In late 2013, she and Gene founded the Kentucky Center for Public Service Journalism and started planning to launch a daily online newspaper  for Northern Kentucky. The NKyTribune was launched Jan. 12, 2015.  She also founded the Kentucky Philanthropy Initiative to promote charitable giving.

    Judith Clabes was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1997 and the University of Kentucky Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 1989. She was the first recipient of the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment from the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center. She also is a member of the Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame. In 2006, she was given the Gerald Sass Distinguished Service Award from the Association of Schools of Journalism and Mass Communications.

    They live in Edgewood.

    William R. Grant (1966):  This native of Winchester served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel and was the first person to earn a master’s in mass communication at UK.  He lived a storied and successful career in print and broadcast journalism over more than four decades. He interned for The Courier-Journal, then after graduation covered politics for The Lexington Leader. The next stop was the Detroit Free Press, where he covered education.  He was a Nieman Fellow in 1979-80, a prestigious program that covers a year of study, innovation and experimentation at Harvard University. In 1980-83, he was an education writer for the San Francisco Chronicle. As a reporter, Grant’s writing won many national awards, including five from the National Council for the Advancement of Education Writing and two Charles Stewart Mott Education Writing Awards.

    Grant entered broadcast journalism in 1983. He was a major contributor to public television programming and served in numerous positions of increasing responsibility. He worked for two years as managing editor of “Frontline,” the investigative program of the Public Broadcasting System, and 10 years as executive editor of “Nova,” the long-running science program. He joined WNET in 1997, where he led the largest documentary production unit in U.S. public television, supervising development, funding and production of more than 50 hours of programming a year in the areas of natural history, science, history, and travel and adventure. He served as the executive producer for a number of highly acclaimed programs, including the mini-series “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow” and “The American President,” a 10-hour series.

    Programs produced under his supervision won 13 national news and documentary Emmy awards and eight George Foster Peabody awards. Grant co-founded the Jackson Hole Wildlife Film Festival in 1991, was named chairman in 2002 and continued to serve as chairman emeritus of the festival board until his death in 2016.

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2001. He was named to the University of Kentucky’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2005. His wife, Ellen, and his brother, William, will represent him. 

    David V.  Hawpe (1965):  His journalism career began with the Associated Press the year he graduated. He served as editorial writer for the St. Petersburg Times before joining The Courier-Journal in the Hazard bureau in 1969. Along the way he served as editorial writer, copy editor, assistant state editor and managing editor before being named editor of the state’s largest-circulation newspaper. In 2009, he retired, concluding a 44-year career. During his tenure in leadership positions, The Courier-Journal won four Pulitzer Prizes.

    Hawpe was a Nieman Fellow in 1974-75 at Harvard and taught there, as well as at the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville. He was president in 1990 of the Kentucky Press Association. He also was active in the Associated Press Managing Editors, American Society of Newspaper Editors and was a frequent lecturer at the American Press Institute and the Poynter Institute. He was a Pulitzer Prize juror four times.

    In 2009 he received the James Madison Award for Service to the First Amendment from the university’s Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and the Distinguished Service Award from the Associated Press Managing Editors (APME). He served as APME president and led the rewrite of its ethics policy, adding a mandate for diverse staffing and coverage by newspapers. His awards also included the 1999 Walker Stone Prize for Editorial Writing and that year's Anthony Lewis Media Award for Public Advocacy from the Kentucky Department of Public Advocacy.

    Since retirement Hawpe has served as a University of Kentucky trustee and a Morehead State University regent. He has worked in political campaigns, and beginning with the 2013 Kentucky General Assembly session he has been senior aide to Sen. Morgan McGarvey.

    Hawpe lives in Louisville.

    Terence P. Hunt (1967):  This former managing editor and executive editor of the Kentucky Kernel retired a year ago after 46 years with the Associated Press, 25 of them as its chief White House correspondent.

    He logged hundreds of thousands of miles covering Presidents Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush. He was in West Berlin when Reagan stood at the Brandenburg Gate and demanded, “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.”

    Hunt left the White House during the presidency of George W. Bush to lead AP’s coverage of the historic economic meltdown and Great Recession. Three years later, he was named deputy chief of the Washington bureau, the news agency’s largest bureau.

    He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1993 and UK’s Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2015. He also has been inducted into the Hall of Fame of the Society of Professional Journalists’ DC Pro Chapter. He is a former president of the White House Correspondents’ Association. He won both the Merriman Smith Award for presidential reporting under deadline pressure and the AP’s Gramling Award for reporting excellence.

    He lives in Kensington, Maryland, with his wife, Jeanie Johnson. 

    Richard G. Wilson (1966):  This graduate retired from The Courier-Journal with a reputation as one of the most respected journalists in the Commonwealth and was recognized nationally for his reporting on education.

    A Kernel editor and then its advisor after graduation, he reported for the Lexington Leader and The State Journal in Frankfort. He joined The Courier-Journal in 1967, and two years later moved to the newspaper’s Frankfort bureau. There he covered state government, education, politics and political campaigns for 16 years.

    In 1984, with Richard Whitt, Wilson won the Kentucky School Boards Association’s award for exemplary investigative reporting and the Kentucky Education Association’s School Bell Award for a series of stories, “What’s Wrong with Kentucky Schools.” In 1985, Wilson became chief of the Bluegrass Bureau in Lexington, continuing to cover higher education and regional issues throughout Central Kentucky. He remained in that position until he retired in 1999, ending a reporting career of almost 50 years, all in Kentucky.

    He served as interim director of the UK School of Journalism and Telecommunications, as it was then known, from July 1, 2002, until June 30, 2003. During that period, he led the school successfully through reaccreditation and instituted the Journalism Alumni Symposium, an annual event that brings the school’s graduates to campus to meet with students. He is a 1999 inductee of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, has served as an adjunct journalism instructor and has mentored numerous young journalists.

    He and his wife Deborah live in Frankfort. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Kathy Johnson
    kathy.johnson@uky.edu
    859-257-3155 Summary: The School of Journalism and Media will present its first Distinguished Alumni Awards to six journalists with outstanding careers. The presentation will be part of the 40th annual Joe Creason Lecture April 18.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Harlie Collins April 14, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 14, 2017) — David Jake Willis, a University of Kentucky student in the College of Communication and Information, is the first information communication technology (ICT) major invited to attend the 2017 National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR).

    NCUR is an annual conference for champions and practitioners dedicated to undergraduate research, scholarship and creativity in all fields of study. The conference receives more than 4,000 abstract submissions from students in a variety of disciplines every year. This year, 60 UK students were selected by the UK Office of Undergraduate Research to attend NCUR from April 6-8 at the University of Memphis in Tennessee, Willis among them.

    His research on behavior based wireless surveillance got its start last semester in the ICT ColLab, a research laboratory aimed at engineering solutions in networking, cybersecurity, human-computer interaction, social computing and related fields, under the direction of Michail Tsikerdekis, assistant professor of information communication technology in the School of Information Science and ColLab director.

    “Jake is an excellent collaborator and shows great commitment for insightful research," Tsikerdekis said. "He committed to exploring the ideas we established when we set this project up.”

    In brief, the project introduces a framework that enables an investigator to track a person of interest (POI) over time and allows them to establish a timeline without having to rely on Internet Protocol (IP) or media access control (MAC) addresses as identifiers. The framework can be applied to cases of surveillance where investigators need to monitor a POI passively.

    “Surveillance as it is performed on the internet or on telecommunication networks go beyond wiretapping a suspect’s phone or a security video system,” Willis said. “It can affect anyone who uses a smartphone, computer, internet of things (IoT) device, social media or transmits pictures, and even medical information, regardless of whether or not they are suspected of a crime.”

    Willis began testing a variety of techniques on wireless networks that could be used to collect information about network users without their knowledge. For example, he used already existing tools like Aircrack, a toolset used to assess Wi-Fi network security, and Pyshark, a Python library, to test evil twin attacks and packet analysis, respectively.

    “It was surprising to learn how so much information can be discovered from even just simple performance characteristics like wireless signal intensity. The reception or transmission of a laptop using Wi-Fi for example could be used to locate it relative to a sensor like a wireless access point,” Willis said.

    In the future, Willis plans to expand the research and try similar packet analysis techniques on Universal Mobile Telecommunications Service (UMTS) networks that are used by AT&T and T-Mobile, in addition to air interfaces other than Wi-Fi. To add, Willis hopes to make related open source contributions and seeks to eventually publish this research.

    Willis presented his research behavior based wireless surveillance at the University of Memphis on Friday, April 7. 

    “I believe as a student and professional he has the core elements required to be successful in the IT industry, not merely using technologies but having the passion for coding and for developing new solutions that aim to improve the current state of the art. I am extremely proud of Jake,” Tsikerdekis said.

    The School of Library and Information Science in the College of Communication and Information at UK became the School of Information Science on July 1, 2015. The name change follows the expansion of programs at the school (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) and the increasing diversity of professions in the information field. The Instructional Communication and Research program became a part of the school in 2013, and the Information Communication Technology program debuted in 2014. The school offers a M.S. in Library Science, School Media Certification, M.S. in Information Communication Technology, B.A./B.S. in Information Communication Technology and an undergraduate minor in information studies

     

    Willis presented his research on behavior based wireless surveillance at NCUR on April 7.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: David Jake Willis, a UK student in the College of Communication and Information, is the first information communication technology major invited to attend the 2017 National Conference on Undergraduate Research.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Monday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) – The media landscape continues to change in the digital and social world, impacting not only journalism, but also public and media relations. What do shrinking newsrooms, instant access and direct connection to audiences mean for public relations (PR)? Do these changes present a challenge or an opportunity?

    These and other questions will be addressed in a panel titled, "What a Changing Media Landscape Means for PR," at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, at the University of Kentucky.

    The panel will include public relations leaders from the office of Gov. Matt Bevin, office of Mayor Jim Gray, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK.

    The event, hosted by the UK College of Communication and Information, will take place in the Gatton College of Business and Economics' Kincaid Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

    Panelists include:

    Amanda Stamper, communications director for Gov. Matt Bevin. Prior to accepting her role in the governor’s office, she worked in corporate communications for Lexmark from 2014 to 2016. Stamper also served as manager of digital and social marketing for DecoArt from 2012 to 2014 and director of communications for Asbury Theological Seminary from 2008 to 2012. Outside of her communications role, she is also a small business owner. Stamper is a Lexington native and graduate of the UK's Integrated Strategic Communications program. She is married to David Stamper and has two children, Zach and Gracie.  

    Susan Straub, communications director for Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington. Straub also held this post in the administrations of Mayor Jim Newberry and Mayor Pam Miller. Previously, she worked for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio. Straub holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK. She lives in Lexington and has two sons and two grandchildren.

    Lisa Deffendall, district spokeswoman for Fayette County Public Schools. Deffendall taught science and math in New Orleans and rural Louisiana for four years as a Teach for America corps member. She was hired to cover public schools in 1996. She spent the next nine years covering K-12 education for newspapers in Houma, Louisiana; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Lexington, and garnering awards for hard-hitting investigative coverage. In 2004, she joined the Fayette County Public Schools with a directive to bring transparency to school district communications. Since then the district has received state and national accolades for its communication efforts. Deffendall majored in journalism, education and African-American studies at Northwestern University. The mother of nine- and 14-year-old girls, she is married to Matthew Deffendall, director of first generation initiatives for UK.

    Jerry Grasso, senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Lexmark International. Grasso has also served as vice president of corporate communications. In that position, he was responsible for public relations, internal communications and corporate creative services since joining Lexmark in 2008. Before Lexmark, Grasso was vice president of corporate communications at EarthLink Inc., one of the country’s largest internet service providers. Prior to EarthLink, he was director of corporate communications for Epoch Internet. Additionally, he has worked at the ARIS Corporation and with Sprint’s business division. Grasso holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Kansas State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Texas at Arlington. 

    Jay Blanton, executive director for public relations and marketing for the University of Kentucky. Blanton held this position from 2004-2008 and again from 2010 until now. Previously, he has worked in communications roles for former Gov. Steve Beshear, former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson and former Kentucky Treasurer Jonathan Miller. He also has worked for the Keeneland Association and the public relations firms Preston-Osborne and Guthrie/Mayes. Blanton received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK as well as his master’s in higher education. He and his wife, Carla, a communications consultant, live in Lexington.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: At 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, public relations (PR) leaders from Kentucky's Office of the Governor, Lexington's Office of the Mayor, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK will discuss challenges and opportunities for PR in a changing media landscape.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder April 17, 2017

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 17, 2017) – The media landscape continues to change in the digital and social world, impacting not only journalism, but also public and media relations. What do shrinking newsrooms, instant access and direct connection to audiences mean for public relations (PR)? Do these changes present a challenge or an opportunity?

    These and other questions will be addressed in a panel titled, "What a Changing Media Landscape Means for PR," at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, at the University of Kentucky.

    The panel will include public relations leaders from the office of Gov. Matt Bevin, office of Mayor Jim Gray, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK.

    The event, hosted by the UK College of Communication and Information, will take place in the Gatton College of Business and Economics' Kincaid Auditorium. The event is free and open to the public.

    Panelists include:

    Amanda Stamper, communications director for Gov. Matt Bevin. Prior to accepting her role in the governor’s office, she worked in corporate communications for Lexmark from 2014 to 2016. Stamper also served as manager of digital and social marketing for DecoArt from 2012 to 2014 and director of communications for Asbury Theological Seminary from 2008 to 2012. Outside of her communications role, she is also a small business owner. Stamper is a Lexington native and graduate of the UK's Integrated Strategic Communications program. She is married to David Stamper and has two children, Zach and Gracie.  

    Susan Straub, communications director for Mayor Jim Gray of Lexington. Straub also held this post in the administrations of Mayor Jim Newberry and Mayor Pam Miller. Previously, she worked for newspapers in Kentucky and Ohio. Straub holds a bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK. She lives in Lexington and has two sons and two grandchildren.

    Lisa Deffendall, district spokeswoman for Fayette County Public Schools. Deffendall taught science and math in New Orleans and rural Louisiana for four years as a Teach for America corps member. She was hired to cover public schools in 1996. She spent the next nine years covering K-12 education for newspapers in Houma, Louisiana; Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Lexington, and garnering awards for hard-hitting investigative coverage. In 2004, she joined the Fayette County Public Schools with a directive to bring transparency to school district communications. Since then the district has received state and national accolades for its communication efforts. Deffendall majored in journalism, education and African-American studies at Northwestern University. The mother of nine- and 14-year-old girls, she is married to Matthew Deffendall, director of first generation initiatives for UK.

    Jerry Grasso, senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Lexmark International. Grasso has also served as vice president of corporate communications. In that position, he was responsible for public relations, internal communications and corporate creative services since joining Lexmark in 2008. Before Lexmark, Grasso was vice president of corporate communications at EarthLink Inc., one of the country’s largest internet service providers. Prior to EarthLink, he was director of corporate communications for Epoch Internet. Additionally, he has worked at the ARIS Corporation and with Sprint’s business division. Grasso holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Kansas State University and a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Texas at Arlington. 

    Jay Blanton, executive director for public relations and marketing for the University of Kentucky. Blanton held this position from 2004-2008 and again from 2010 until now. Previously, he has worked in communications roles for former Gov. Steve Beshear, former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson and former Kentucky Treasurer Jonathan Miller. He also has worked for the Keeneland Association and the public relations firms Preston-Osborne and Guthrie/Mayes. Blanton received his bachelor’s degree in journalism from UK as well as his master’s in higher education. He and his wife, Carla, a communications consultant, live in Lexington.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: At 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 19, public relations (PR) leaders from Kentucky's Office of the Governor, Lexington's Office of the Mayor, Fayette County Public Schools, Lexmark and UK will discuss challenges and opportunities for PR in a changing media landscape.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (April 11, 2017) — For the third year in a row, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team has placed in the top 10 at the Pi Kappa Delta national tournament. Ten students representing UK traveled to Boise State University to participate in the 50th biennial National Tournament and Convention. Seventy-two programs from 30 states entered over 2,000 public speaking events and debate teams at this competition.

    UK Speech and Debate placed ninth in combined sweepstakes which totals points earned from both public speaking and debate events. This placing is the highest in UK’s history. The team also placed fifth in the public speaking sweepstakes competition, more than doubling the team’s performance in this category from this tournament two years ago. UK took home 12th in the debate sweepstakes competition.

    In addition to these impressive team performances, sophomore Veronica Scott was crowned national champion of communication analysis. Scott is the first national champion in the team’s history. Her speech examines how the rhetoric of gun violence influences instances of domestic assault. Additionally, freshman Laura McAllister placed second in after dinner speaking and senior Sam Northrup advanced to quarterfinals in public debate.

    “The team did so incredibly well at this competition,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “Each competitor poured their heart and soul into every performance over the past four days. They have worked for months on these events and I could not be prouder.”

    The Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament and Convention uses a unique scoring system for its events. Competitors in the top 10 percent of an event receive superior ratings, those in the next 20 percent receive excellent ratings, and the following 30 percent receive good ratings. Additionally, showcases are held instead of elimination rounds for the public speaking events.

    The full list of awards earned by UK competitors is available here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

     

    UK Speech and Debate placed 9th in combined sweepstakes, the highest in UK’s history.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Seventy-two programs from 30 states entered over 2,000 public speaking events and debate teams at this competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder April 7, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2017)  Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.

    Kirk is editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel for the 2016-17 academic year and was chosen for her pursuit of open records from UK. In January, a judge ruled in favor of UK's position in the case involving the privacy of victim survivors of sexual misconduct. The Kernel is appealing.

    Kirk, along with nine other winners, is profiled in the May issue of Glamour. The story is available online at www.glamour.com/story/2017-college-women-of-the-year-winners.  

    All winners receive a cash prize, a trip to New York City, introductions to top professionals in a variety of fields, national recognition in the magazine, and hair styling and makeup for the awards-ceremony luncheon.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Marjorie Kirk, a University of Kentucky journalism and international studies senior, was named one of Glamour's 2017 College Women of the Year.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden April 6, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2017)  University of Kentucky journalism majors will learn about “Taking the Right Steps to That First Job” on Thursday, April 6, at the annual Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium. Six graduates of the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information will discuss their job search and their careers at the symposium, which begins at 6 p.m. today, in the UK Athletics Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

    “We look forward to our graduates returning and sharing their experiences and perspectives with our students,” said Lars Willnat, director of the school. “Faculty have told me how this event really resonates with our students as they gain insight from other young journalists.”

    The program this year features five graduates working in journalism-related fields. Another graduate, who is a lawyer, will moderate.

    Eric Lindsey, who graduated in 2008, has just completed his ninth year working with UK Athletics and his third season as the primary contact for the men’s basketball program.

    Lindsey manages the overall publicity and promotional efforts for Kentucky’s men basketball program, which includes coordinating with Coach John Calipari and his coaching staff and making players available for interviews. Kentucky’s social media presence — under the direction of Lindsey — is regarded as one of the nation’s leaders in popularity, ingenuity and creativity. 

    Before joining Kentucky’s media relations staff full time, Lindsey served as the editor of CoachCal.com from 2011-14. Lindsey managed all social media content. Site traffic increased by more that 400 percent. He worked directly with Calipari in providing exclusive content, while also assisting in the production of The New York Times best seller “Players First: Coaching From the Inside Out.” 

    As an undergraduate, he served as a reporter and editor for the Kentucky Kernel. Lindsey was honored in 2009 by the Kentucky Press Association for the Best College Sports Story, Best College Sports Column and Best Sports Feature in the state. A story he wrote placed fourth nationally in the Associate Collegiate Press Newspaper Awards in 2009. 

    Casey Parker-Bell works as part of Kentucky Educational Television’s public affairs team. He reports on the General Assembly for “Legislative Update” on Kentucky’s statewide Public Broadcasting System (PBS) network. He has produced “Comment on Kentucky” and “Kentucky Tonight,” where newsmakers and journalists discuss the issues confronting Kentuckians, and continues to produce special programming on Kentucky’s politics, government and important topics.

    He graduated from the University of Kentucky in 2015, earning a degree in journalism with an emphasis on broadcasting and a minor in business. Before becoming a journalist he had a variety of careers, most notably working as a general contractor in charge of multiple construction projects in Western Kentucky. He said he could not be prouder of his decision to change careers.

    Sabirah Rayford, a 2016 graduate, started working for WKYT in October 2015 as a multimedia journalist. She had worked an internship at the station during her sophomore year and interviewed former UK stars John Wall, Anthony Davis and Darius Miller when she helped cover the Pelicans vs. Wizards NBA preseason game.

    In 2015, she won Feature of the Year at the Kentucky Associated Press Broadcaster Awards for a story about a former state Supreme Court justice who transitioned from a man to a woman at the age of 65. She also received Best in Show for her work that year.

    Racial tensions at the University of Missouri led Rayford to Frankfort, Kentucky, where she found the first black student to attend the University of Missouri. She talked to him about racial issues during his time at the university and compared them to the diversity concerns students have today at UK.

    Ben Roberts, who graduated in 2005, covered the UK men’s basketball team for two seasons while at the Kentucky Kernel. He won a Hearst Award in 2006 for his story on the legacy of former University of Kentucky basketball coach Adolph Rupp.

    He has been a sports reporter for the Lexington Herald-Leader since 2012, primarily covering recruiting, UK men’s basketball and football.

    He has worked for the Herald-Leader in various roles since 2005, starting as a freelance sports reporter, spending four years as a sports copy editor and also creating the “Next Cats” recruiting blog, which chronicles the latest news on UK’s basketball and football recruits. In 2012, he was hired as the newspaper’s first full-time recruiting reporter.

    Roberts worked in Washington, D.C., from 2010 to 2012 as a sports copy editor and designer for Stars and Stripes, the newspaper serving the U.S. military community. He was also part of the Washington Center for Politics & Journalism in the fall of 2005, reporting on local and national politics out of the Washington, D.C., bureau of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch.

    Roberts, a Frankfort native, graduated with a degree in journalism and political science.

    Adam Sichko, who served as editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel in 2005-2006, is senior reporter for the Nashville Business Journal. He covers the booming real estate and economic development scene in the city. Before that he reported for the Albany (N.Y.) Business Review for six years. Both newspapers are owned by the American City Business Journals, one of the nation’s largest employers of business journalists.

    He has twice won national awards from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers for his reporting.

    Kate Carpenter will moderate the symposium discussion. She is an attorney in Louisville with Fulton and Devlin. She graduated from UK in 2012 with a bachelor's degree in journalism. She is licensed to practice law in Kentucky and is a member of the Kentucky Bar Association. Her interests include cycling, reading and spending time with family and friends.

    The first Journalism Alumni Symposium was held in 2003 and organized by Dick Wilson, at the time the interim director of what was then the School of Journalism and Telecommunications. Wilson, one of the school’s distinguished graduates, brought successful graduates back to connect with current students. He raised money so that the program could continue and this is the 15th annual symposium. The UK Journalism Alumni Association named it the Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium in appreciation for his many contributions to the school.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Six graduates of the UK School of Journalism and Media will discuss their job search and their careers at the Richard G. Wilson Journalism Alumni Symposium, which begins at 6 p.m. today, in the auditorium of William T. Young Library.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Lily Johnson and Amy Jones-Timoney April 5, 2017

    Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area. 

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2017) — Hannah Ellis has been a true blue fan her entire life.

    Growing up in the small town of Campbellsville, Kentucky, rooting for the Wildcats was instilled in her from a young age. Her love for the Cats continued to grow when she decided to attend the University of Kentucky. As Ellis studied integrated strategic communication in UK's College of Communication and Information, she finally understood what it was like to experience the Big Blue Nation (BBN) first hand.

    Upon graduation, Ellis' dreams led her out of her comfort zone of the Bluegrass State she loved and to the city of Nashville to purse her long-desired career in music. She is currently working on recording her debut EP (extended-play recording), which should be released this summer. Recently we talked to Ellis about what her life and career in Nashville is all about and why she still treasures her UK experience.

    UK: What was your reaction when you found out your song “You Were Never Gone” was going to be featured on the hit MTV show “Teen Wolf”?

    Ellis: I won't lie, I was very excited. That is one of the biggest outlets that a song of mine has been played on, and I was so honored it was used in such a poignant moment in the show. The feedback I have received since the episode aired has been nothing short of amazing. 

    UK: Was there a certain epiphany type moment when you realized you were set on moving to Nashville or was it a gradual plan throughout college?

    Ellis: I would definitely say it was an epiphany type moment. It happened a few months before I graduated high school and I cried and told my parents I felt called to pursue a career in music. And they backed me 100 percent. 

    UK: What were you most apprehensive/nervous about when deciding to leave the comfort of your home state and pursuing your dreams in Nashville?

    Ellis: If I am being honest I think the fear of failure. That somehow my music and artistry wouldn't measure up and I would have to end up going home defeated. Once I got to Nashville I realized it doesn't work that way, and that I had a lot more say in my success than I thought. 

    UK: What is the most surprising thing you’ve experienced living in Nashville that you didn’t anticipate?

    Ellis: How tight-knit the community is. I expected it to be so competitive it would be hard to make and keep friends, but everyone cheers for each other and only wants the best for their peers. It is truly a family in country music. 

    UK: When you’re not working on your music what is your favorite hobby?

    Ellis: This sounds silly, but I love scrapbooking. I see life as one big adventure, but sometimes it's the little moments that you look back and are so grateful that you captured them. 

    UK: When stress starts to build, what is your favorite way to clear your head and relax?

    Ellis: I would say it's a pretty even three-way split between working out, getting lost in a fiction novel or cooking basically anything. 

    UK: What country music star do you look up to and admire most?

    Ellis: Although she is a pop star now, I have always admired how connected Taylor Swift has always stayed to her fans, and how true she stays to herself. I believe she is both a smart business woman and a talented and kind person. 

    UK: What has been the biggest obstacle you’ve had to overcome when working on your first album?

    Ellis: Paperwork, LOL. People do not know how much goes in on the back end to make sure everything is done right and everyone involved is taken care of. Making the music is the fun part. 

    UK: Thus far in your career what are you most proud of?

    Ellis: The songs I am about to release this year. I have fought so hard to find and become the artist that I am and to know what I want to say to my fans, and now I am so ready for everyone to hear what we have been working on. 

    UK: How did your education/experiences at UK prepare you for your career in Nashville? 

    Ellis: The idea that nothing comes without hard work. I took some classes in college that were probably out of my league, but I fought hard to get the grades and learn as much as possible. The music industry requires that type of diligence and tenacity or it would become very frustrating very fast. 

    UK: Looking back at your time spent at UK what are some of your favorite memories? 

    Ellis: Oh, man. I have a list of people you could ask, LOL. No, honestly just nights I spent with my friends learning who I was and making memories that shaped me. I would never trade those years for anything and I will forever be grateful for the education I was provided in and out of the classroom at UK. 

    This video is part of a bi-monthly UKNow series. We want to tell “see blue.” stories about our alumni to show how the University of Kentucky prepares students to succeed after graduation. If you know of any UK alumni who should be featured, please email us. We might choose your suggestion for our next “see blue.” alumni story on UKNow.  

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Summary: Since UK alumna Hannah Ellis arrived in Nashville to chase her dreams of writing and recording country music, a lot has changed. Her song, "You Were Never Gone," was featured on the hit MTV show "Teen Wolf," and she has been hard at work on her debut EP (extended-play recording). But one thing hasn't changed — her love for her alma mater. Click here to learn why her UK degree is helping Ellis build her career. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor April 4, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 4, 2017) Six University of Kentucky communication majors from the College of Communication and Information recently volunteered as judges for elementary and middle school speech competitors at the Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Communications Event.

    The CI students gave written feedback to competitors in the public speaking and demonstrations categories, rating them on a scale of 1-5 based on their delivery, presentation, content and overall performance, as well as giving additional comments when necessary.

    Traci Letcher, a senior lecturer in the college, reached out to her former students to see if they would be interested in judging the young students.

    “I was thrilled when so many of our students immediately replied and wanted to be a part of this event,” Letcher said.

    Senior organizational communication major Madalyn Klika was among the UK students that volunteered and noted that it was a really neat experience to be able to help the younger students.

    “I did not think I was qualified to judge a speech competition, but when it came to it I found I actually did have a lot of valuable advice to give them,” Klika said.

    The UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment Fayette County Extension Office was so pleased with the UK students help that they asked the students to return in April to judge the state competition.

    The Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H Youth Development Program hosted the event Thursday, March 23. The program strives to create opportunities and supportive environments for youth and adults to become capable, competent and caring citizens. They focus on hands-on learning in the youth’s areas of interest with the help of parents, adult volunteer leaders and professional staff. 

    The CI students gave written feedback to competitors in the public speaking and demonstrations categories.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK communications students recently lent their expertise and gave valuable advice to elementary and middle school students participating in a Fayette County Cooperative Extension’s 4-H speech competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Gail Hairston March 31, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 31, 2017) The University of Kentucky will send 59 undergraduate student-researchers to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) at the University of Memphis April 6-8.

    The UK group joins young researchers from around the world to showcase their research findings through poster and oral presentations. Each student will be given the opportunity to discuss their display and share their research results, illuminating how their work will have an impact on future research development. UK has been an active NCUR participant since the mid ’90s.

    One of the first things these young researchers learn is that most research is not conducted in the traditional laboratory with bubbling beakers and flaming Bunsen burners. But modern research spans all disciplines and majors, and includes a wide variety of activities.

    “For some students, this will be their first exposure to research displayed on a national stage. An experience such as this gives UK’s young researchers the opportunity to professionally present the results of their research projects and to talk with others who share their interests. They will come home with a much wider view of the world and their own intellectual potential. It will greatly expand their idea about what’s possible,” said Evie Russell, assistant director of the UK Office of Undergraduate Research, Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence.

    “These students represent the best of our best, and UK should be proud of each one of them.”

    The UK students will present their research on a wide range of topics and fields of study. The following is an alphabetical list of the 59 UK students traveling to Memphis with their name, grade, college, major and title of abstract.

    • Sara Assef, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “An examination of the differences in the level of dependency between dual and conventional tobacco users throughout each trimester of pregnancy”
    • Alexis Axtell, freshman, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Correlating Knee Flexion Angles and Shoulder Range of Motion During the Tennis Serve”
    • Tiwaladeoluwa Adekunle, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies, “Afropolitanism: Unraveling the 'Pre' and 'Post' Dynamics of Decolonization”
    • Ibrahim Khalil Appleton, junior, College of Engineering, electrical engineering, “Quantification of Factors Contributing to Cross-Programming in Radio Frequency Identification Applications”
    • Elizabeth Barajas, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “A Drosophila Puparial Skin Protein That Is Regulated Through the Ligand Binding Pocket of Drosophila USP (RXR)”
    • Christopher Barrow, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-bar Experimentation”
    • Esias Bedingar, junior, College of Public Health, public health/neuroscience, “Brainwave Signatures for Detecting Malingered Neurocognitive Deficit (MNCD)”
    • Alyssa Bertoni, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science and international studies, “Syrian Refugees and the Difficulties of Seeking Asylum in Spain”
    • Nikita Birbasov, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Accurate Prediction of the Colloidal Nanoparticles Aggregation in an Implicit Solvent with Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics”
    • Evan Blanford, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Trade-off Between Survival and Reproduction for Female Beetles: How Is Death-feigning and Mate Search Mediated by the Number of Previous Mates?”
    • Shelby Brown, sophomore, College of Social Work, social work, “Ahlan wa Sahlan: Examining the Difficulties and Success of Resettled Syrian Refugee Women in Lexington, Kentucky”
    • Tori Buckley, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, "Single Cardiac Myocytes From the Left and Right Ventricles Respond Similarly to Isoproterenol and Omecamtiv Mecarbil”
    • Madison Calhoun, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science and sociology, “Roll-call Voting in the State Legislature: A Study of Kentucky and Louisiana”
    • Yujie Ding, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Effects of PCN on Cognition and Motor Function in hAPP-Overexpressing Mice”
    • DeAnna Duffy, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Academic Discrimination on Adolescent Women on Academic Performance and Attitudes in the STEM Fields”
    • Ted Ferguson, junior, College of Engineering, computer engineering, “Hardware Implementation of Synapse Using Memristors”
    • Allison French, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Association of Symptomatology and Engagement with Learning in a Narrative Comprehension Intervention for Third Graders At-risk for ADHD”
    • Vince Gouge, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Hairy-related 9 (Her9) and Vasculogenesis in the Vertebrate Retina”
    • Cannon Hanebuth, junior, College of Health Sciences, pre-physical therapy, “Comparison of Academic Performance Between Rural and Urban Physical Therapy Students”
    • Kaylee Hicks, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies, “Racial Bias in Epidemic Control in Modern Peru”
    • Hannah Himmelmann, senior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, animal science, “Effects of Electrolyte Water on Digital Dermatitis”
    • Katherine Huffman, senior, College of Communication and Information and College of Arts and Sciences, business communication and political science, “Understanding Political Trauma and How It Can Shape Terrorism”
    • Marcus Irvan, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-Bar Experimentation”
    • Joslyn Isaac, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Differential Effects of Isoproterenol and Omecamtiv Mecarbil on the Contractile Properties of Unloaded Myocytes”
    • Hayden Jinright, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Complementary and Alternative Medicine Uses in Physical Therapy”
    • Zachary Jones, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, international studies/anthropology, “Racism in Japan and its Effects on Japanese Society”
    • Garcia Jordan, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Integrated Computational Design of Tunable 3D CNT/Graphene Hybrid Nanomaterials”
    • Ned Katz, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Social Media and Depressive Symptomatology”
    • Ashley Keen, senior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Physics Based Modeling of Fibrous Insulation Using Comparative Cut-Bar Experimentation”
    • Josephine Kim, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Combining Natural Compound ß-glucan with Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy to Promote Antitumor Immunity”
    • Justin King, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Computational Simulation of Ionic Liquids at Mesoscale with Accurate Prediction of Dynamics Using Coarse-Graining Approach”
    • Taylor Lewis, senior, College of Nursing, nursing, “Relationship Between Psychosocial Factors and Their Influence on the Intention to Breastfeed During Pregnancy”
    • Daniel Ma, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology/neuroscience, “Ganging Enzyme-Coated Microelectrode Sites Produces Greater Sensitivity to an Analyte in a Biosensor”
    • Ashley McGar, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Stressful or Traumatic Events and Self-Concept Among College Women”
    • Hillary McLean, junior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, dietetics, “Higher Unsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Aerobic Training Are Related to Lower Intramyocellular Lipid in Older Adults”
    • Timothy Melton, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “Foreign Direct Investment's Effect on Political Stability in Developing Countries: Solving the Endogeneity Problem”
    • Gregory Milburn, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, chemistry/biology, “Effects of Ethynylestradiol on Carotenoid Allocation”
    • Samuel Northrup, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “The Political Role of Humanitarian Aid in Conflict Zones”
    • Stephanie Obieroma, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, political science, “Republicans and the Art of Gerrymandering: A Match Made in Political Heaven?”
    • Alexander Parmley, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, English/philosophy, “The Impact of Vlogging on Modern Web Based Media”
    • Joshua Preston, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Maternal Nicotine Exposure Prior to and During Pregnancy and Nursing Increases Offspring Obesity Risk”
    • Haley Reichenbach, senior, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, equine science, “Comparison of DX613 Copper Sulfate Acidifier Footbath to a 5 Percent Copper Sulfate Footbath for Prevention of Digital Dermatitis Lesions in Dairy Cattle”
    • Alberto Rondon, sophomore, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, agricultural biotechnology, “Protein Engineering to Efficiently Degrade Carbohydrates for Biofuel Production”
    • Kevin Royal, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, physics, “Hybrid Shielding for Magnetic Fields”
    • Abby Schroering, senior, College of Fine Arts, theatre and English, “Moments of Being: Escaping Performativity in Virginia Woolf”
    • Samantha Scott, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology/biology, “Triboelectric Potentiation of Beta Amyloid Plaque Formation in Alzheimer’s Disease”
    • Brock Sigler, senior, College of Health Sciences, human health sciences, “Trends for Success”
    • DaHee Son, senior, College of Fine Arts, art studio and arts administration, “Reference Points for Intimacy”
    • Sarah Stewart, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Perceived Peer Support on Depressive Symptoms in Victims of Bullying”
    • Tyler Stoffel, junior, College of Engineering, mechanical engineering, “Effects of Interlayers on Effective Moduli and Interfacial Stress Transfers of Graphene-polymer Nanocomposites”
    • Stephanie Strothkamp, sophomore, College of Arts and Sciences, neuroscience, “Brainwave Signatures for Detecting Malingered Neurocognitive Deficit (MNCD)”
    • Michelle Tam, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “Inequality in Early Social Development: The Effects of Income on Infants’ Processing of Emotion in Bodies”
    • Ravyn Tanner, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, psychology, “The Effects of Family Characteristics on Coping Strategies with Sexual Harassment in Adolescent Females”
    • Martha Tillson, senior, College of Social Work, social work/psychology, “Early Risk Behaviors as Indicators of Rural Women’s High-Risk Drug Use”
    • Benjamin Troupe, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, philosophy with minor in political science, “An Earth Ethic for the New Millennium: Investigating the Moral Status of the Natural World”
    • Olivia Utley, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Hungry House Sparrows: Communicating Need in Passer Domesticus”
    • Madeline Weltzer, junior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology, “Maternal Exercise Alters Lipid Accumulation in Offspring”
    • David Willis, senior, College of Communication and Information Science, information communication technology, “Behavior Based Wireless Surveillance”
    • Sai Charaan Yalla, senior, College of Arts and Sciences, biology and neuroscience, “Cocaine Choice: Dissociating Preference From Intake”
    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsArtTheatreHealth SciencesNursingPublic HealthSocial WorkStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: UK will send 59 undergraduate student-researchers to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research at the University of Memphis April 6-8.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Whitney Harder March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) — Paidin Dermody, a University of Kentucky journalism and English sophomore with a minor in photography, has been named the Kentucky Kernel's editor for the 2017-2018 school year.

    “I feel lucky — opportunity met preparation, and I now have the great responsibility of following a talented line of editors-in-chief to continue the storied history of the Kernel as one of the pre-eminent student publications in the country,” Dermody said in a Kernel story last week. “Good people and great journalism will deliver an evolved, enlightened and entertaining product to our readers.”

    The Kernel Board selected Dermody, currently the managing editor, "for her detailed plan to expand the Kernel’s digital footprint, while continuing to offer a weekly print edition formatted like the KRNL magazine, the Kernel’s once-a-semester fashion magazine," the story reported.

    Dermody will receive a $10,000 editor's scholarship funded by former editor-in-chief Jack Guthrie.

    News editor Kat Manouchehri was also a candidate for the editor-in-chief position, and will work alongside Dermody next year as managing editor.

    Paidin Dermody. Photo provided by Kernel photo staff.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A UK journalism and English sophomore with a minor in photography has been named the Kentucky Kernel's editor for the 2017-18 school year.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Kathryn Macon March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) The University of Kentucky Department of Arts Administration in conjunction with the College of Communication and Information is encouraging undergraduate students to venture out and capitalize on the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking (iNET).   

    The program aims to provide a convenient way for students to receive the certification along with their current workload. Students enrolled in the program need only take four additional courses; two required classes and two electives that will prepare them for future entrepreneurial endeavors.

    “The iNET certificate offers our students a new way to think about their futures," said Rachel Shane, chair of the Department of Arts Administration in the UK College of Fine Arts. "When they start realizing that they can make a difference in their community through innovation and entrepreneurship, their options for careers expand.”

    To enroll in the program, students must contact their academic advisors to set up an appointment. To earn the certificate students must take:

    • COM 381: Communication, Leadership and Entrepreneurial Thinking;
    • EXP 455: Capstone Experience in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking; and  
    • two approved elective courses from an extensive list.

    Participation in this program also provides students valuable connections with other entrepreneurial thinkers, as well as local entrepreneurial mentors.

    “I encourage our students in Arts Administration to add the iNET certificate so that they can gain experiences working with students in different majors to accomplish like-minded goals,” Shane said.

    For more information on the Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking program contact Kimberly Parker, iNET academic director, at kimberly.a.parker@uky.edu.  

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArts Administration

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Department of Arts Administration in conjunction with the College of Communication and Information is now offering undergraduate students the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Innovation and Entrepreneurial Thinking that will help prepare them for future entrepreneurial endeavors.   
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Lars Willnat March 30, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 30, 2017) — Nine new members will join the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame Friday, April 28. They will be inducted at a luncheon ceremony sponsored by the University of Kentucky’s School of Journalism and Media and the UK School of Journalism Alumni Association.

    The new inductees being recognized for their contributions to journalism are: 

    • Tom Butler, retired vice president of news for WPSD-TV in Paducah, a mentor to several outstanding broadcast journalists and an advocate of strong journalism during his 35 years there.
    • Lewis Conn and William Matthews, whose 1968 creation of the Newspapers Inc. chain changed the way Kentucky community newspapers were owned and published. (Conn is deceased and will be inducted posthumously.)
    • Ron Daley of Hazard, former editor and publisher of the groundbreaking Troublesome Creek Times in Hindman, now strategic partner lead for the Kentucky Valley Educational Cooperative.
    • Mike Farrell, professor of journalism at the University of Kentucky, director of its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center and former managing editor of The Kentucky Post.
    • Bill Francis, retired reporter and anchor for WDRB-TV, who covered Louisville for 42 years and was the first full-time business reporter for a Kentucky television station.
    • Mary D. Ferguson, who became the first female reporter for Hopkinsville’s Kentucky New Era in 1962, then a columnist and the Pennyrile area’s unofficial historian until her death in 2016 (posthumous induction).
    • Bettye Lee Mastin, a retired Lexington Herald-Leader reporter and author whose writing about historic architecture helped lead to the preservation of many historic structures in the Bluegrass.
    • Joe Palmer, a Lexington native and UK graduate whose thoroughbred racing coverage for the New York Herald Tribune in the 1940s and 1950s was hailed by many contemporaries as the best (posthumous induction). 

    The nine honorees will join more than 200 other journalists and news-media executives who have joined the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame since its 1981 inception. Members are chosen by a committee representing the state’s news media, Hall of Fame members, the UK Journalism Alumni Association and the School of Journalism and Media, part of the UK College of Communication and Information. Nominees must be either Kentucky natives or journalists who have spent the bulk of their careers in the state.

    To reserve a seat for the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame induction luncheon on Friday, April 28, go to www.ukalumni.net/journalismhalloffame. For more information, call Cheryl Edwards at 859-257-1730. UK’s annual Joe Creason Lecture in Journalism, which has usually been held the same day as the luncheon, is now a stand-alone event. It will be held April 18 and feature Terence Hunt, recently retired deputy Washington bureau chief and senior White House correspondent for The Associated Press.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Lars Willnat, 859-257-1730 Summary: The nine honorees will be inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame at a ceremony on Friday, April 28.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden March 27, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 27, 2017) — Twelve students enrolled in the Chinese Media and Society course at the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media visited the Chinese capital city of Beijing from March 10 through March 20 as part of the study abroad requirement for the class. Students had the opportunity to visit and experience top media and high-tech venues, prominent college campuses, and world-renowned historical sites during the trip.

    It was an eye-opening and rare firsthand learning experience for the participants in sites visits and face-to-face interactions with media professionals involving organizations such as the China National Radio (CNR), a global leader in multi-platform broadcasting in the new media era; iQiYi, the most popular online video sharing site in China with their in-house studios whose programs are available via smartphones, PDAs, and conventional TVs; Beijing Language and Culture University Press, a niche university publisher in multi-format delivery of educational content to a global audience; Huanqiu.com, a popular news site in China that exerts a voice to a global base of readership; and Baidu, often nicknamed China’s Google and a world leader in incorporating artificial intelligence in its breakthrough apps and inventions.

    Students also visited top-ranked Chinese universities such as the Communication University of China (CUC) and Tsinghua University, and had lengthy conversations with their Chinese counterparts on a wide range of issues and topics from campus life, journalism and media practices, to personal hobbies. Among popular tourist hotspots, the students went to the Great Wall, the Forbidden City, the Summer Palace, the Temple of Heaven, and various sites for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The group also had the unbeatable experience of enjoying Beijing roast duck at the world-famous Quanjude Restaurant in the busy commercial street of Wangfujing

    "Visiting China was an amazing experience in so many different ways," said Morgan Lloyd, a broadcast journalism major in the school. "Not only did we all gain a better cultural understanding of China, but by visiting the different media businesses we were able to compare and contrast the media industry in China versus the United States. The people we interacted with gave invaluable insight that will benefit all of the students' understanding of global media."

    The faculty director of the program is Zixue Tai, an associate professor in the School of Journalism and Media.

    “The United States and China will have vital roles to play on the global stage in the 21st century," Tai said. "For students of media and communication, it is critically important to develop an intimate and firsthand understanding of China as they prepare for a career to rise to the evolving challenges and emerging opportunities. There is no better place to start that process than Beijing, a city that spans a history of over 3,000 years and lies at the center of China’s ongoing cultural and economic transformation."

    This is the first time that a study abroad program targeted China as its destination in the UK College of Communication and Information, of which the School of Journalism and Media is a unit. The trip has been co-sponsored by the UK Confucius Institute and the Division of Confucius Institute Development at Beijing Language and Culture University.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students had the opportunity to visit and experience top media and high-tech venues, prominent college campuses, and world-renowned historical sites during the trip.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 22, 2017) — “How to Be Ethical in the Age of Fake News,” the next program in the “Challenges to Journalism” series created by the University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media, will feature one of the profession’s most important voices on ethics.

    Andrew Seaman, the chair of the Ethics Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), will discuss how the assault on truth and the news media requires ethical behavior.

    The program begins at 6 p.m. Wednesday, March 22, in Woodward Hall in the Gatton College of Business and Economics. Light refreshments will be available before the event.

    Seaman, the senior medical journalist for Reuters Health in New York City, served on the Ethics Committee when the Code of Ethics was revised during 2013-2014.

    At the conclusion of the process, he was named the committee chairman. He led the effort to make the code interactive for the first time. Members of the Ethics Committee compiled supporting documents to expand the explanation of the code’s principles. The goal is to increase understanding, and therefore adherence, to the Code of Ethics.

    “Ethical journalism is clearly defined by the SPJ Code of Ethics, a standard used throughout journalism,” said Lars Willnat, director of the School of Journalism and Media. “This is a great opportunity for our students and faculty to continue our discussion of the threats to journalism with one of the leading voices for ethical journalism.”

    The program is being sponsored by the school, which is part of the UK College of Communication and Information, the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, the UK chapter of the Society of Professional Journalism and the Bluegrass SPJ chapter.  

    SPJ is the largest professional organization of U.S. journalists. It ethics code — available at www.spj.org/ethicscode.asp — has been translated into eight languages.

    Before his current assignment with Reuters, Seaman covered health policy and the White House from its Washington, D.C., bureau. He was previously a contract writer with USA TODAY.

    His undergraduate degree was earned at Wilkes University in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. As a scholar at the Toni Stabile Center for Investigative Journalism, Seaman earned his master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City. He currently sits on its alumni board.

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Andrew Seaman, chair of the Ethics Committee of the Society of Professional Journalists and senior medical journalist for Reuters Health, will speak about how to be ethical in the age of fake news today at 6 p.m.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Hale Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 20, 2017) The University of Kentucky Libraries, along with co-sponsors from the School of Information Science, the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies, the School of Art and Visual Studies and the student organizations ACM-W (Association of Computing Machinery Women's Chapter) and LISSO (Library and Information Science Student Organization), will host an Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon today (Monday), March 20. The event, which individuals may drop by for any period of time, will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.

    This international event is designed to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and to encourage female editorship. The edit-a-thon will include tutorials for the beginner Wikipedian, ongoing editing support, reference materials and refreshments. People of all gender identities and expressions are invited to participate, particularly transgender and cisgender women.

    In a 2011 survey, the Wikimedia Foundation found that less than 10 percent of its contributors identify as female. A lack of female participation has led to a dearth of content about women and art in Wikipedia, but Art+Feminism’s edit-a-thons and other initiatives make an impact on the gender gap through crucial improvements to art- and feminism-related subjects. Since 2014, over 280 Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thons have taken place across the world, creating and improving an estimated 4,600 articles.

    This will be the second Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon held at the University of Kentucky. The first was held in March 2015, during which participants created or updated articles about regional artists including Adele Brandeis, Ann Stewart Anderson and Jane Burch Cochran.

    This year, the UK Libraries edit-a-thon will continue to add and improve articles about female artists from Kentucky, many of whom currently have no Wikipedia entry, or whose current entries are brief stubs. The Little Fine Arts Library will bring specialized works from their collection to aid researchers at the edit-a-thon, such as reference books on women artists, exhibition catalogues, and historic dictionaries of artists and notable women in Kentucky.

    The UK Libraries Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon is organized by Abbye Allan, Ida Sell, Karyn Hinkle, Melissa Adler and Kathryn Lybarger. They are excited to bring attention to underrepresented artists from the region and to help make the world’s most popular online encyclopedia a more inclusive source.

    For more information on the Art+Feminism Wikipedia Edit-a-thon at UK, contact art librarian Karyn Hinkle at karyn.hinkle@uky.edu.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: This international event, designed to improve coverage of women and the arts on Wikipedia and to encourage female editorship, will run from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. today, at Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 13, 2017) For the third year in a row, the University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team has placed second at the Kentucky Forensic Association State Championship Speech and Debate Tournament. This competition tests students in 13 public speaking events and two forms of debate. Students from UK won four of the championship titles across these events, setting a new team record for best performance.

    This year, 10 teams from across the Commonwealth met at Owensboro Community and Technical College to compete for the state championship in speech and debate including Western Kentucky University, the current national champions. At this tough competition, the team from UK placed second in the grand champions sweepstakes division, second in the public speaking sweepstakes division for large schools, second in the parliamentary debate sweepstakes division for large schools, and second in the public debate sweepstakes competition for large schools.

    “I’m so proud of all of these students,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “Each year, they keep getting better and better. I’m continually moved by the passion and dedication they show for their speeches and the issues for which they’re advocating.”

    In addition to the team sweepstakes awards, five individuals placed in the individual sweepstakes competition, which combines scores from all of a competitors public speaking events. Junior Rachel Brase placed third, sophomore Matt Karijolic placed fourth, sophomore Veronica Scott placed fifth, junior Kaylon Kennedy placed sixth, and freshman Laura McAllister was awarded top novice. Brase was also elected the student president of the Kentucky Forensic Association. Team members earned another six qualifications for the National Forensic Association national tournament and Scott earned a qualification to the Interstate Oratorical Association nationals.

    The full list of awards earned by UK competitors is available here.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Students from UK won four of the championship titles across these events, setting a new team record for best performance.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: For the third year in a row, the UK Speech and Debate Team placed second at the Kentucky Forensic Association State Championship Speech and Debate Tournament. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Jordyn Comitor Thursday

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 9, 2017) — Laura Ungar, an investigative journalist with 26 years of reporting experience, is coming to the University of Kentucky on Monday, March 20, to address students in the College of Communication and Information about the current journalistic climate and the need for more high-impact journalism.

    Joined by her colleague Sujoy Dhar, the pair will give a lecture, "Making a Global Difference: The need for high-impact journalism in the world’s largest democracies." The lecture will focus on the importance and practice of journalism in two rapidly changing democracies and the need for more in-depth media, particularly in regards to investigative, health, environmental and other high-impact journalism that makes a difference.

    The lecture will take place at 10 a.m., March 20, in the Niles Gallery on the first floor of the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center. The lecture is free and open to the public. Following the lecture, the two will visit a set of journalism classes focused on investigating and reporting and a health communication class to discuss how technology is transforming medicine.

    Ungar met Dhar in 2007 while on a month-long fellowship in India. They found common ground over their shared experiences going to universities and talking with students, which spurred their working relationship. In 2009, they began traveling to universities together to discuss the need for global connection and understanding in the media between developed nations like the U.S. and developing ones like India. Ungar and Dhar have visited the University of Kentucky, Eastern Kentucky University and Bellarmine University among others in the Kentucky/Indiana region as well as universities in New Delhi and Kolkata, India.

    Ungar is currently based at the Courier-Journal in Louisville and is a member of USA TODAY’S national investigative team. She specializes in health care investigations and has previously worked on stories about lead in water, cervical cancer in India and prescription drug abuse in Kentucky. She has won more than 30 national, regional and local awards along with six fellowships.

    Dhar is a senior journalist and editor of an independent news service in India and was a former correspondent with Reuters. In addition, he freelances for many media outlets around the world such as The Washington Times and the Global Times. He specializes in the environment, health, human rights, geo-politics and human interest stories. 

     

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Journalist Laura Ungar, based at the Louisville Courier-Journal and a member of USA TODAY’S national investigative team, and Sujoy Dhar, senior journalist and editor of an independent news service in India and former Reuters correspondent, will speak at UK on March 20. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Amy Jones-Timoney and Kody Kiser Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Mar. 9, 2017) — On Feb. 28, the University of Kentucky Alumni Association held a dinner to honor this year’s recipients of the Great Teacher Award. Six UK professors have been named winners of the award for 2017:

    Since 1961, when the program was started, 283 faculty members have been honored as Great Teachers. The award holds special significance for the winners, because it is entirely student nominated. It is the oldest, continuously-given award for teachers at the University of Kentucky. Recipients are selected by a committee appointed by the UK Alumni Association’s Board of Directors and representatives of the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa. In addition to the awards dinner, the winners received a plaque, a cash stipend, and were recognized at center court on the floor of Rupp Arena during this season’s final home UK men's basketball game.

    On this episode of "Behind the Blue," each of the 2017 Great Teacher Award winners discuss what it was like to be presented with this honor, their teaching philosophies, their thoughts regarding their students here at UK, and more.

    Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” when they're released. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

    If you have questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email us at BehindTheBlue@uky.edu, or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationHealth SciencesMedicine

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Amy Jones-Timoney
    amy.jones2@uky.edu
    859-257-2940 Kody Kiser
    kody.kiser@uky.edu
    859-257-5282 Summary: This week's "Behind the Blue" podcast gets to know the 2017 Great Teacher Award winners at UK.Media Embed: <iframe style="border: none" src="//html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/5148961/height/90/width/640/theme/custom/autonext/no/thumbnail/yes/autoplay/no/preload/no/no_addthis/no/direction/backward/no-cache/true/render-playlist/no/custom-color/0033a0/" height="90" width="640" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen webkitallowfullscreen mozallowfullscreen oallowfullscreen msallowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Dominique Page Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2017)  Only one week remains before the March 15 deadline for the inaugural Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship being awarded by the University of Kentucky Libraries.

    Students who have completed projects demonstrating information literacy skills and the effective use of library resources are considered well-rounded applicants for this scholarship. Submissions are encouraged from all disciplines and may include: a documentary, performance or studio art project, recorded presentation in any field or discipline, or a written essay. 

    A cash prize of $1,000 will be awarded to the student winner. The winner and their faculty sponsor(s) will be honored at a special event in the spring.

    Eligibility for this award requires students meet the following criteria:

    • current full-time undergraduate enrollment status at the University of Kentucky;
    • projects must be original work, not previously published, and not co-authored;
    • completion and submission of an original research project for a UK credit-bearing course or for a faculty mentored project, in any format or medium; and
    • projects must be completed during the time period from the beginning of the spring 2016 semester to the submission date during the spring 2017 semester.

    Applicants applying for the Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship, must submit the following by March 15:

    • an application cover sheet;
    • a project abstract (250-300 words);
    • a 750-1000 word reflective essay;
    • a final version of the project including a complete bibliography in a standard publication style consistent with the discipline; and  
    • a supporting statement from their faculty sponsor(s).

    All application material should be emailed to Matt Strandmark at mstrandmark@uky.edu.

    For more information about the timeline, general criteria, and submission requirements, see the UK Libraries Dean's Award Guide at http://libguides.uky.edu/UGRA.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArt MuseumArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLibrariesNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Only one week remains before the March 15 deadline for the inaugural Dean's Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship to be awarded by UK Libraries.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 8, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team won the first Tri-State Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament held at Gateway Community and Technical College. Thirteen schools from Kentucky, Ohio, North Carolina and Tennessee gathered in Florence, Kentucky, for the competition. UK placed first in the combined sweepstakes division, which totals points earned for each team from both the speech and debate events. UK also placed first in the speech events sweepstakes and second in debate sweepstakes.

    In total, competitors from UK earned top awards in nine of the 14 events offered at the tournament including winning both divisions of parliamentary debate. Sophomore Matt Karijolic also placed first in the individual sweepstakes competition and was awarded the title of tournament champion. Much like the team sweepstakes competition, individual sweepstakes totals all of the points earned by a competitor from all of their public speaking events. Team members from UK earned five of the six awards in this category. Junior Rachel Brase placed second, senior Sam Northrup placed third, junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, and freshman Laura McAllister earned top novice in individual sweepstakes.

    “It was a great way to conclude our regular season this year,” said Director of Speech and Debate Timothy Bill. “We’ve had a wonderful year so far. Now we have two weeks to finish preparing for nationals.”

    A full list of awards earned by UK competitors can be found here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States.

    The team’s next competition will be the Pi Kappa Delta National Tournament and Convention held at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, March 21-25.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website at www.ukforensics.com

    In total, competitors from UK earned nine of the 14 events offered at the tournament including winning both division of parliamentary debate. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team concluded its regular season by winning the Tri-State Invitational Speech and Debate Tournament.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Ashley Murphy Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 7, 2017) Being able to apply what is learned in the classroom in a real-world setting is one of the most valuable experiences that a student will have during their college career. The University of Kentucky Confucius Institute (UKCI) and Education Abroad encourages students to apply their education on a global scale, by offering students the opportunity to travel to China on four different trips, including a new trip during spring break that will host its first group of students this upcoming March.

    The four trips include Education in Chinese Culture, Chinese Conversation, Young Leaders Understanding China for Gaines Center Fellows and Media and Culture in China, which is a new program offered this year to students in the College of Communication and Information. Each trip gives students a unique and different educational experience, for example, in the case of Media and Culture in China, students will engage in face-to-face interactions with professionals from U.S. media outlets such as The New York Times, CNN and The Wall Street Journal, to learn about reporting on China to American audiences. 

    Student engagement and understanding of Chinese culture, history and contemporary life is essential to helping lay out a strong foundation for a successful professional career, and to know the relationship between the United States and China. “The Sino-American relationship is perhaps the most strategically important relationship of the 21st century. UKCI and Education Abroad are doing its best to enhance that relationship through generous opportunities it provides highly-motivated UK students,” said Philip Harling, interim director of UK Honors College and director of Gaines Center, who co-led one of the trips to China last summer.

    Each trip values the engagement of professionals currently in the field with students, so they can best learn how to practice in their chosen field from a global perspective, and continue to grow as a student. Those who have traveled in the past described the experience as eye opening and that the trip has left a lasting impact on their educational efforts and life. “This is truly a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, and I am so grateful to have visited our largest Eastern neighbor,” said international studies senior Kaylee Hicks, of Versailles, Kentucky, who traveled to China through the Young Leaders trip last summer. “China is shockingly different from home, but I am already thrilled to know another corner of the world to be a little more in tune with what the rest of the planet experiences.”

    Hicks is just one of the countless students who has personally been impacted by participating in a trip to China, and many more will get this kind of experience in the upcoming trips. Education Abroad has seen an increase in applications and student interest for the trips to China offered in the summer, while the Media and Culture China trip offered during spring break has 12 students planning to travel to Beijing this March.

    UK Confucius Institute and Education Abroad support trips to China in order to encourage student engagement and an enlarged outlook of China. Each trip targets different interest and offers learning experiences for all students. “If you are serious about learning the Chinese language in addition to experiencing its culture and history, these are your programs,” said Liang Luo, associate professor of Chinese studies.

    For more information on each trip visit, Media and Culture in China, Education in Chinese Culture and Chinese Conversation.

    If you’re interested in these trips, contact seanjmcclure@uky.edu.

    A gateway for Chinese language, culture and art to the people of Kentucky, UK Confucius Institute provides leadership, support and coordination for Chinese language and programs in K-12 schools as well as on UK's campus; assists and facilitates establishing and maintaining faculty and student exchanges between UK colleges and Chinese universities; conducts Chinese language and cultural exchange; and promotes education about China on campus, across the Bluegrass region, and throughout the Commonwealth. To keep up with UK Confucius Institute and future events, join the institute's listerv and follow them on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat (UKConfucius).

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationStudent and Academic Life

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale@uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: UK Confucius Institute and Education Abroad encourages students to apply their education on a global scale, by offering students the opportunity to travel to China on four different trips, including a new trip during spring break.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Gail Hairston, Amy Jones-Timoney, and Kody Kiser March 1, 2017Video produced by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

     

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 1, 2017) ― Six University of Kentucky educators were named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2017 Great Teacher Award Tuesday night.

    The recipients are:

    • Richard Andreatta, College of Health Sciences - Communication Sciences and Disorders
    • Gitanjali Pinto-Sinai, College of Dentistry - Restorative Dentistry
    • Jeff Reese, College of Education - Educational, School and Counseling Psychology
    • Michelle Sizemore, College of Arts and Sciences - English
    • Nathan Vanderford, College of Medicine - Toxicology and Cancer Biology
    • Sherali Zeadally, College of Communication and Information - Information Science

    Award recipients were honored at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner last night at the Hyatt Regency in Lexington. They were also recognized during the Vanderbilt vs. Kentucky men’s basketball game last night.

    The Great Teacher Award, started in 1961, is the longest-running University of Kentucky award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selections. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and a monetary reward.

    Andreatta is an associate professor in the Division of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) and in the Rehabilitation Sciences Doctoral Program, both located within the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences in the College of Health Sciences. He is also a faculty associate with the Spinal Cord and Brain Injury Research Center at the UK Medical Center. Currently, Andreatta serves as the director of undergraduate studies for the CSD program and as the director of graduate studies for the Rehabilitation Sciences Doctoral Program.

    Andreatta is also director of the Laryngeal and Speech Dynamics Lab. This shared facility contains several specialized hardware and software systems for testing, recording and analyzing orofacial sensory perception, orofacial muscle force, vocal tract aerodynamics, and trigemino-facial brainstem-level evoked reflexes. Other capabilities of the lab include stroboscopic laryngeal imaging (ridged and flex-scoping), EGG, acoustic analyses of speech, and respiratory kinematics. 

    Andreatta received his doctorate in speech physiology and neuroscience in 1999 from Indiana University, Bloomington. Postdoctoral work in animal laryngeal neurophysiology was completed at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke at the National Institutes of Health, Bethesda.

    Pinto-Sinai is an assistant professor in the UK Division of Restorative Dentistry of the College of Dentistry. She received her dental training and DDS from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo in 2001. She completed a two-year general practice residency program at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Connecticut. After six years in private dental practice in New York and Chicago, she relocated to Lexington.

    She began her career as a dental educator at UKCD in 2009. After three years as a part-time faculty member she accepted a full-time position in 2012. She divides her time between clinical and pre-clinical instruction of student dentists. She is the course director for a dental simulation lab course which focuses on the restoration of teeth with dental crowns. She also continues to practice as a general dentist at the UKCD Faculty Practice Clinic.

    In addition to serving as a formal mentor to students, Pinto-Sinai is the faculty advisor for the Delta Sigma Delta (DSD) dental fraternity. She volunteers with DSD and the Hispanic Student Dental Association, both providing dental treatment and supervising student dentists treating uninsured patients at the Mission Lexington Clinic in downtown Lexington.

    Reese is professor and chair of the Department of Counseling, School and Educational Psychology in the UK College of Education. He received his doctorate from Texas A&M University in 2000. Reese’s research interests are psychotherapy process/outcome, psychotherapy supervision and training, and telehealth. His current research is focused on investigating the process of client feedback and the use of technology to provide counseling services to underserved populations. 

    He currently serves on the editorial boards for the Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, and Psychotherapy. Reese teaches Counseling Techniques I, Supervision and Consultation, and Practicum. His theoretical orientation is grounded in a psychodynamic-interpersonal process approach that draws upon cognitive-behavioral, solution-focused, and family systems strategies. He is a licensed psychologist in Kentucky.

    Sizemore is an assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences Department of English. She earned her doctorate at the University of Wisconsin. She received the 2015 Outstanding Teaching Award, with special recognition for excellence in teaching large courses. Her success in the large classroom has fostered shifted attitudes in the English department from initial concern about undertaking large lecture courses to a recognition of the potential benefits of such classes.

    Sizemore teaches American studies, English and social theory. Her academic and research interests lie in the fields of colonial America, literary theory, political theory, time studies, affect studies, literature and para-religion, and literature and science.

    To date, her writing has encompassed invitational reviews and book chapters, and journal articles. However, her first book is scheduled for publication in August 2017. “American Enchantment: Rituals of the People in the Postrevolutionary World” investigates the phenomenon of “enchantment” through social and political rituals and literary and cultural discourses. She notes that writings of the post-revolutionary period recognize the role of people as “not simply a flesh-and-blood substance but also a quasi-mystical force.”

    Vanderford is an assistant professor in the Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, assistant director for research in the Markey Cancer Center and assistant dean for academic development in the College of Medicine. He earned his doctorate at the University of Kentucky with a postdoctoral fellowship at Vanderbilt University.

    Vanderford’s research interests include epidemiology and molecular etiology of lung cancer, research administration, technology transfer and entrepreneurship, and science pedagogy and career development. One of his most recent publications (in the Journal of Research Administration) detailed a case study at the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center focused on enhancing faculty productivity through a centralized communications and project management infrastructure. In another article published by Science in July 2016, Vanderford described the unusual paths he took to secure a nontraditional faculty position at UK. Vanderford secured his initial opportunity at the Markey Cancer Center as a science writer and editor and, from there, he took on leadership roles that contributed to his transition into a unique tenure-track faculty position. 

    Zeadally is an associate professor in the School of Information Science in the UK College of Communication and Information. He has edited or authored six books as well as over 20 international peer-reviewed international conference or workshop proceedings, authored or co-authored more than 277 refereed publications including 164 international peer-reviewed journal papers and 32 refereed book chapters. He has also co-guest-edited over 30 special issues of international refereed journals. Zeadally is the editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed international journals. He also currently serves as associate editor or editorial board member for more than 25 international refereed journals.

    In addition to a 2016 University Research Professor Award, in the last five years, Zeadally was the recipient of one other university award, 11 international awards and two national awards.

    He earned his doctorate in computer science at the University of Buckingham, England, and conducted postdoctoral work at the School of Engineering at the University of Southern California, Los Angeles. He joined the faculty of the UK School of Information Science in 2013. Zeadally’s research focuses on computer network and information security.

    The UK Alumni Association is a membership supported organization committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association or to become a member, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 1-800-269-2586.

    The 2017 Great Teachers (L-R) Sherali Zeadally, Gitanjali Pinto-Sinai, Nathan Vanderford, Richard Andreatta, Michelle Sizemore, Jeff Reese. Photo by Tim Webb. Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationDentistryEducationHealth SciencesMedicine

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Six University of Kentucky educators were recently named recipients of the UK Alumni Association 2017 Great Teacher Award.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Connie Sapienza Feb. 28, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 28, 2017) In keeping with University of Kentucky tradition, a student will be selected to speak at each of the four UK Commencement ceremonies this May.

    Since doctoral, master's and baccalaureate degree recipients will now be recognized together based on their colleges, the selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in past years.

    Students receiving a doctoral, master's or undergraduate degree in December 2016, May 2017 or August 2017 at the May 2017 Commencement ceremony interested in speaking must submit their application by Monday, April 3. Students who wish to apply must submit a resume and a copy of their three-five minute proposed speech no longer than three-typed, double-spaced pages. In addition, applicants must have contributed to the university through campus, community activities or through their chosen field of study and show evidence of demonstrated public speaking ability. Incomplete applications will not be considered by the selection committee. The committee may contact any applicant for a 15-minute interview and speech demonstration.

    Applications are available online at www.uky.edu/Commencement/speakers.html.

    To accommodate rising numbers and to provide a better experience for UK graduates and their families and friends, the university will hold four ceremonies over the course of two days. All four will be held at Rupp Arena.

    Friday, May 5:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; College of Communication and Information; College of Public Health; The Martin School of Public Policy and Administration; The Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce
    • 2 p.m. - College of Business and Economics, College of Health Sciences, College of Fine Arts, College of Nursing, College of Pharmacy

    Sunday, May 7:

    • 10 a.m. - College of Arts and Sciences; College of Social Work; College of Design 
    • 2 p.m. - College of Education; College of Engineering; College of Medicine

    Read more about the May 2017 Commencement schedule here.

    All May graduates should register for Commencement at www.uky.edu/Commencement.

    Jared Scott speaks at the May 2016 Commencement ceremony.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Jenny Wells
    jenny.wells@uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The selection committee will accept applications from students with all degree types, not just undergraduate students as in years past. Students interested in speaking must submit their application by Monday, April 3.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Feb. 22, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 22, 2017) — Interiors graduate student Marissa Wilson and finance and accounting December graduate Omer Tariq won the University of Kentucky Venture Challenge with their idea for i-Remember, a website and app to help connect, communicate and form personal relationships with people who have memory problems. They will share $1,500 in scholarship prize money and will represent UK at the state competition in April.

    Placing second on Saturday at the William T. Young Library auditorium was Kai Zhang, a second year doctoral student in pharmacology. Zhang won $1,000 for Welcome Home, a service to assist international students in finding housing before they arrive in the United States.

    Third place and $500 went to the UNi Software team of Xi “Bill” Chen, biochemistry and statistics; Tom Johnston, communication and media studies at Georgetown College; Charles Smith, mechanical engineering; and Randall Smith, English. They are developing an app that will unify higher education communication through a personalized platform.

    All three winning teams will go on to Idea State U, the state competition.

    “I want to congratulate these three winning teams, all of whom were participants in the UK Venture Studio Entrepreneurial Bootcamp this past fall,” said Warren Nash, executive director of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship. “I also want to commend each of the teams competing in the UK Venture Challenge. These teams came from varied academic backgrounds within UK and exhibited great passion for their ideas. The judges provided very valuable feedback, which I hope all of the teams will utilize as they continue their entrepreneurial journey.”

    Chandni Joshi, a chemical engineering student at the UK Paducah Campus, won $50 for the most online votes. Her venture is The Sustainable Products Company.

    Other students in UK Venture challenge included:

    • Team GreatJob! – Josh Cochran, accounting and finance; and Will Hibbard, economics;
    • Team Impact LEX – Olivia Burkett, Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce;
    • Team Pacific Peach – Alex Carrabre, management and marketing; and
    • Team Radventurous Rewards  – Logan Jones, finance.

    Judges included: Jo Ellen Hayden, engineering and industry/government senior manager, Bluegrass Angels; Dan Hollingshead, founder/CEO, Connected Patients; and Joe Noonan, sales leader and entrepreneur/investor, Bluegrass Angels.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    The Venture Challenge sponsors are: the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Two talented UK students won the UK Venture Challenge with their idea for i-Remember, a website and app to help connect, communicate and form personal relationships with people who have memory problems. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) — The University of Kentucky is rooted in history from its esteemed alumni to its storied basketball program. Just take a quick walk through campus and it won’t take long to spot a vintage, copper signpost sharing a story of the university’s past. One such piece of history, lesser known to the average student or alumnus, but deeply rooted and just as prestigious, is the Tournament of Champions put on by the Kentucky Debate program.

    Founded in 1972 by J.W. Patterson, the Tournament of Champions (TOC) is regarded as one of the most prestigious high school speech and debate tournaments in the country. Held on UK's campus at the end of April each year, the TOC hosts the fiercest high school speech and debate competitors from across the country. In last year’s tournament over 900 students competed from 36 different states and four different countries, including China. 

    In 2012, the National Speech and Debate Association (NSDA) founded NSDA China, which oversees the domestic operations of the speech and debate organization in China: a burgeoning extracurricular activity for students. The NSDA is the largest speech and debate organization in the United States with the largest network of professional coaches and school members.

    This summer, Dave Arnett, director of the UK Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, and director of the Tournament of Champions, traveled to Shanghai, China, to meet with representatives of NSDA China about the future of their organization and to begin tournament preparations.  

    One of those aspirations was to host their own Tournament of Champions.

    On his trip, Arnett had a brief meeting with the vice president of NSDA China, Jeff Zhu, where they discussed future plans, including hosting a Tournament of Champions in China and all that it would entail. Arnett was encouraged by China’s enthusiasm.

    “A TOC seemed like the next piece of the puzzle for them,” Arnett said.

    However, as English-speaking debate is relatively new in China, he saw this project as part of a five-year plan, so to speak. After all, China sent their first students to Lexington to compete in the TOC just two years before his meeting with NSDA China over the summer.  

    But lo and behold, a mere six months later, the first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai Jan. 22-24.

    Nearly 150 students from some of the best high schools in China competed in this three-day event. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.

    “It was a very exciting and successful event that opened the door for more collaborations between China, the debate team and the university at large," Arnett said.

    While relatively small in size, with just around 5,000 English-speaking debaters, the potential for NSDA China is incredibly large. In the next two years, the organization hopes to double in size, and they believe that bringing the TOC to China as a yearly event will help to increase those numbers.

    A key component of NSDA China’s growing numbers are their esteemed coaches, all of whom are American.

    “The American coaches are an important marketing strategy for them, because they are trying to sell their brand to parents who want to send their children to American universities,” Arnett said.

    A significant amount of the schools that NSDA China works with are international schools where the students are native English speakers and over 90 percent of the league’s debaters will come to American universities.

    “Students that choose to pursue their education in America are often fascinated by the history and culture of the United States and adapt pretty seamlessly to both the new environments and the debating styles,” Arnett said. “And because most of them come from international schools, they are already native English speakers.”

    The US Tournament of Champions will be held April 29–May 1, 2017 at UK.

    For more information on the Tournament of Champions, visit www.uktoc.com.  

    The first international Tournament of Champions was held in Shanghai last month. of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK helped host the first international Tournament of Champions (TOC) in Shanghai last month. The top performers qualified for the American TOC in Lexington this April and as many as 40 Chinese students are expected to attend.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Whitney Harder Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 15, 2017) Nathan Stevens, media officer in the  University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, is often sought out for his expertise in media and electronics. Not only by the college, but also by companies across the U.S.

    Last semester, he was one of the first individuals to try out the new "Skylanders Imaginators" video game, a must-have toy for the holiday season. Stevens runs a video game and movie review website and the company reached out to him before launch. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company. His creation: Connor Meow. A cat, of course. The game was later named a 2016 Best Family Game in the Game Critics Awards.

    In the College of Communication and Information, he produces media and helps direct the CI Collective, a technology usability lab where students and faculty work together to test emerging technologies. The primary purpose of the CI Collective is to support interdisciplinary research on human-computer interaction and related areas in understanding how people use communication technology and learn from information systems.

    Technology developers might have one use in mind, but consumers of all ages may find that a technological device may be used to fill a separate and distinct need. Research conducted in the CI Collective will help determine how users interact with technology.

    Stevens has made sure to connect his contacts in the video game and electronics industry to the college and UK students. In addition to being college media officer, he teaches MAS 435, "The History of Video Games and The Industry," and gives an overview of the industry and an examination of the technological advances in both software and hardware.

    In one lecture, he had a representative from Bethesda Softworks LLC, a large computer entertainment software company, Skype in to the class. Several of Stevens' connections have also reached out to get involved in the usability lab.  

    Stevens recently attended the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, where he sought out new technology and contacts for usability testing and research. This year’s show had a lot of focus on virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and the 360-degree camera.

    Stevens said the industry seemed to know that VR and AR are here to stay, not only in an entertainment capacity, but also for storytelling and marketing usage. "The health technology was also intriguing with different ways to maintain your own health at home without really the need for doctor intervention, on a smaller less urgent level of self-checkups," he said. "All in all, it was quite an amazing show with a lot of neat gadgets on display. A geek’s dream."

    Nathan Stevens was one of the first individuals to try out the new Skylanders Imaginators video game. The game allows players to design their own game characters and order a 3D printed version from the company.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Nathan Stevens, media officer in the UK College of Communication and Information, is bringing his experience and connections in the video and electronics industry to UK students.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Whitney Harder Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 14, 2017) — The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media will host a discussion, "The Cure for Fake News Disease: Truth and Fairness," with journalists on Wednesday, Feb. 15. The program is set for 3-4:30 p.m. in the Maggie Room of the Enoch Grehan Journalism Building.

    The event is part of the school's "Challenges to Journalism" series. It will be a panel discussion among two of the state’s most accomplished political journalists; a faculty member who has been a newspaper editor and helped start radio stations; and a conservative critic of Kentucky news outlets. They will explore whether the meanings of fairness and balance in journalism have changed, or need to change.

    Panelists will be:

    • John Stamper, politics and government editor of the Lexington Herald-Leader;
    • Joseph Gerth, metro columnist and former political writer for the Courier-Journal;
    • Kakie Urch, associate professor of new media and former Gannett Co. editor; and
    • Richard "Rick" Nelson, conservative media critic and director of the Commonwealth Policy Center.

    The panel will be moderated by Al Cross, director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, associate extension professor in the School of Journalism and Media, political columnist for the Courier-Journal and former national president of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

    The program is co-sponsored by SPJ’s campus chapter and the Department of Communication. The School of Journalism and Media and the Department of Communication are part of the UK College of Communication and Information.

    Refreshments will be available. 

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Accomplished political journalists, a UK faculty member and a conservative media critic will discuss fairness and balance in journalism at UK tomorrow.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Gail Hairston Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Committee on Social Theory hosts public lectures and faculty presentations throughout the academic year, including lecture series each fall and each spring, that give the public access to lectures by international scholars visiting the university campus.

    The College of Arts and Sciences’ noteworthy Social Theory Spring Lecture Series is created by a teaching team. Each of the instructors of the team invites an esteemed academic to lecture on a topic that intersects with both social theory and with the topic of that semester's course theme.

    This spring’s theme is “The Archive,” and team members include Melissa Adler of the School of Library and Information Science; Mónica Díaz of the Department of Hispanic Studies and Department of History; James Ridolfo of the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and Richard Schein of the Department of Geography.

    This Spring Lecture Series schedule includes:

    Kimberly Christen, Washington State University

    “Sovereignty in Practice: Digital Archives and Technologies of Protest”

    2 p.m., Feb. 17

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

    Archives have their origins in assertions of state power. Colonialism thrived on the simultaneous fiction of the erasure of natives from the landscape and their memorialization in the archival memory of the nation. Current technologies shine a light on the long history of documentation and discovery used to uphold and validate violence, removal and conquest. Christen will examine how community digital archives, archivists as activists, and the practices of local archival documentation undo this colonial erasure through the purposeful use of technologies of protest.

     

    Jorge Camizares-Esguerra, University of Texas at Austin

    “On Archives, Imperial Historiographies, and Forgotten Epistemologies”

    2 p.m., March 10

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    Michelle Caswell, University of California, Los Angeles

    “Past Imperfect: Imagining Our Way Out of Annihilation in Archives”

    2 p.m., April 14

    William T. Young Library Auditorium

     

    All Social Theory lectures are free and open to the public. The spring lecture series is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences; the Department of Writing, Rhetoric and Digital Studies; and the Special Collections Research Center of UK Libraries. 

    The Archive: Social Theory Spring Lecture SeriesOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationLibraries

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Gail Hairston
    gail.hairston@uky.edu
    859-257-3302 Summary: Friday's speaker for Social Theory's Spring Lecture Series is Kimberly Christen of Washington State University. She will discuss how archives can be the reflection of state power. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2017) — Have you written or produced a story that just cries out for recognition? Then we have a contest for you. The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information is seeking entries for its seventh annual David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Awards.

    The award honors the best in Kentucky storytelling — stories that enlighten and inform while capturing the attention of the audience. Storytellers can inspire a heart or break it. Entries may be hard news, features, advocacy journalism, personality profiles, columns and even obituaries. No matter the form, the story should be well-developed and free from errors, possess sound journalistic mechanics and exhibit high ethical standards.

    Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 

    The student award is open to UK journalism majors for work published or completed through student media, at an internship or at any recognized media outlet (radio, TV, newspaper, magazine or independently edited website). 

    Work published during 2016 is eligible for the 2017 awards. Entries for the award will be accepted through March 3, 2017, at this web address: https://ci.uky.edu/jat/webforms/david-dick-storytelling-award.

    The school established the David Dick "What a Great Story!" Storytelling Award to honor the memory of David Dick, professor emeritus and former director of the school, who died in July 2010.

    “The School of Journalism and Media is all about telling great stories,” said Lars Willnat, director of the school. “This contest is a special way to recognize the career of one of the better storytellers of his generation and to encourage today’s storytellers.”    

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 1987 and the UK Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2000. He earned both his undergraduate and master’s degree at UK. After retiring from CBS, he taught in the school before becoming its director from 1987 until 1993.

    Dick, an award-winning broadcaster for CBS for 19 years, was a champion of great journalistic storytelling.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Two awards are given: one recognizes a UK student journalist and the other a professional journalist working in Kentucky. The winners will be recognized at the annual Creason Lecture and will receive a cash award. 
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Feb. 8, 2017) The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22. While the tournament was named for the infamous feud between two families on the Kentucky-West Virginia border, the competition was friendly but fierce. Schools from seven states as far away as Michigan and Georgia traveled to UK for the tournament.

    The Saturday half of the tournament was named the McCoy Invitational and was hosted by UK. To help facilitate the tournament, the upperclassmen from UK’s team did not compete, but helped with other tournament hosting duties. UK’s freshmen class did compete and had a very successful tournament. Laura McAllister and Alec Foust placed fourth and fifth in quadrathon, a category which takes the cumulative total of all points earned in all the events in which a student competes. McAllister and Foust also won improvisational duo and took second in duo interpretation. Will Brennan was the top speaker in public debate and Josh Finley placed second in persuasive speaking.

    On Sunday, Marshall University took over to host the Hatfield Invitational, and UK’s full team participated in the competition. UK placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University. Junior Kaylon Kennedy and sophomore Matt Karijolic won duo interpretation, Kennedy also won program oral interpretation, Karijolic placed second in rhetorical criticism, sophomore Veronica Scott won persuasive speaking and broadcasting, and senior Sam Northrup placed second in impromptu speaking. In total, the team qualified another five events for nationals.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The University of Kentucky Speech and Debate Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Kentucky Forensic Association state tournament held at Owensboro Community and Technical College in Owensboro, Kentucky, Feb. 17-18, 2017.

    UK Speech and Debate is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website at www.ukforensics.com.

    The UK Speech and Debate Team placed second in team sweepstakes behind Bowling Green State University.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Speech and Debate Team, formerly the UK Forensics Team, partnered with Marshall University to host the inaugural Hatfield and McCoy speech and debate swing tournament Jan. 21-22.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HealthCareBy Allison Perry Feb. 2, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 2, 2017) – Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall.

    Much of Lowy's visit focused on research. During the morning session, nine UK faculty members gave presentations on major research initiatives and programs at Markey, ranging from efforts in cancer prevention and control to drug development and discovery. Major topics of discussion centered around the cancer types which affect Kentuckians the most: lung cancer, colon cancer, cervical cancer/HPV and the hepatitis C virus, which is linked to liver cancer.

    After meeting with a group of UK Markey Cancer Center junior faculty members, Lowy learned more about the UK HealthCare enterprise and its support of Markey from Dr. Michael Karpf, executive vice president for health affairs. Lowy finished the day with a tour of clinical space in UK Chandler Hospital's Pavilion A – future home to Markey's Hematology and Blood & Marrow Transplantation inpatient floor – and a dedicated cancer research lab in the UK College of Pharmacy.

    "We were honored to have Dr. Doug Lowy visit us today at the UK Markey Cancer Center to learn more about our patients and the research we do here," said Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center. "It was a wonderful opportunity to engage with the NCI, and with Dr. Lowy, so that they better understand some of the difficulties we have in delivering care to our patient population."

    Kentucky is home to the highest cancer incidence and mortality rates in the country, a major health problem that Markey is dedicated to change. In July 2013, Markey received a prestigious NCI designation, which allows the center access to more research funding, trials, and treatments.  

     

     

    NCI Interim Director Dr. Doug Lowy visited the UK Markey Cancer Center on Monday to learn more about research and patient care. of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationMedicinePharmacyPublic HealthMarkey Cancer Center

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Allison Perry
    allison.perry@uky.edu
    (859) 323-2399 Summary: Dr. Doug Lowy, interim director of the National Cancer Institute, recently visited the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center, continuing a dialogue on Kentucky cancer disparities following Lowy's visit to Hazard, Ky. last fall. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jordyn Comitor Feb. 1, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 1, 2017) — Lexington Youth Soccer Association’s (LYSA) TOPSoccer was awarded the inaugural top honor at this year’s University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information CIS 112 Service Learning Thank You Breakfast.

    Held each year in December, this breakfast serves as a thank you to all the service le­­­­arning organizations that partner with the CIS 112 course, an accelerated communication and composition class at UK with a service learning component that requires students to complete 10 hours of community service over the course of the semester.   

    This year, for the first time, TOPSoccer received an award for its commitment to welcoming and engaging UK students. Many of the UK students who work with TOPSoccer for their course requirement complete more than the 10 required service hours and will often continue to work with the organization well after the course has ended.

    Janice Birdwhistell, the former development director and chief of staff for the College of Communication and Information and avid TOPSoccer volunteer, accepted the award on behalf of TOPSoccer.

     “TOPS is very honored by the award,” Birdwhistell said. “Volunteers are invaluable to our program and we could not exist without them.”

    TOPSoccer (The Outreach Program for Soccer) is a community-based soccer program designed to meet the needs of young athletes with physical, developmental and/or intellectual disabilities. US Youth Soccer, the nation’s largest youth sports association, started this organization in 1991 with the goal to improve the overall fitness, self-esteem and social skills of these athletes.

    “TOPS is a great service program. It gets students involved in the community, but it also connects them to a specific community that they would not have gotten to know otherwise,” said Sam Asbell, a CIS 112 student who volunteered with TOPS last semester. 

     TOPSoccer’s Lexington program began in 2009 under the leadership of Birdwhistell’s daughter Jessie, then a graduate student at UK. She worked with various youth sports associations like the Lexington Youth Soccer Association and the Kentucky Youth Soccer Association (KYSA) for initial support and funding, as well as garnering support and volunteers from various businesses and individuals in the Lexington community. 

    “We love working with CIS 112 and love having their students volunteer with us,” Janice Birdwhistell noted. "TOPSoccer is a labor of love for our volunteers, and our goal is to pass that love on to the CIS 112 students that choose to work with our program.”  

    Janice Birdwhistell, right, accepted the College of Communication and Information's award on behalf of TOPSoccer.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: UK College of Communication and Information honors organizations that partner with the college's service learning course.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place on Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium on Saturday, Feb. 18 to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community who evaluate their presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete.

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture on Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Special thanks to our sponsors: the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Deb Weis Jan. 19, 2017

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 19, 2017) Registration is open for this year’s University of Kentucky Venture Challenge, the university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The challenge will take place Saturday, Feb. 18, at the William T. Young Library's UK Athletics Auditorium.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students — undergraduate, graduate and doctoral — an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. They gain valuable experience, contacts and mentors in the local entrepreneurial community as they go through UK’s annual Venture Challenge competition.

    The public is invited to the Young Library auditorium Saturday, Feb. 18, to see the students pitch their ideas to a panel of entrepreneurs from the Lexington community.  The entrepreneurs evaluate the students' presentations as potential investors would.

    There are three requirements to compete:

    1. Register your team/click on Participate.
    2. Write a three- to five-page proposal by Tuesday, Feb. 7. (proposal guidelines)
    3. Pitch your venture Saturday, Feb. 18, at Young Library.

    The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500. All three winning teams will represent UK at the state competition, Idea State U, sponsored by the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development.

    The public is invited to vote for their favorite student venture. The popular vote winning team will receive $50.

    UK Venture Challenge is organized by iNET, the Innovation Network for Entrepreneurial Thinking, in the College of Communication and Information, with the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship and the Lexington Office of the Kentucky Innovation Network in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    Other sponsors are the Bluegrass Business Development Partnership, an economic development partnership between UK, Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government and Commerce Lexington; the Gatton College of Business and Economics; and the College of Communication and Information.

    For more information, contact: Deb Weis, Warren Nash or Mariam Gorjian.

    The UK Venture Challenge gives all current UK students – undergraduates, graduates and Ph.D.s – an opportunity to show off their entrepreneurial spirit and pitch innovative ideas. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Registration is now open for the Feb. 18 university-wide competition for student entrepreneurs. The first place team wins $1,500, second place wins $1,000, and third place wins $500.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Friday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Timothy Bill Jan. 13, 2017

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 13, 2017) — The University of Kentucky Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. The team placed first in combined sweepstakes which takes the cumulative score of all public speaking events and debate entries. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition. Of the 47 speeches and debate teams entered in the tournament, 39 advanced to an elimination round and were recognized at the final awards ceremony.

    Individual team members also achieved a number of impressive honors. Four students placed in the individual sweepstakes competition which totals the scores from all of their public speaking events. Sophomore Matthew Karijolic was crowned tournament champion by placing first in this category. Junior Kaylon Kennedy placed fourth, junior Rachel Brase placed fifth and freshman Laura McAllister placed sixth in the category. Karijolic also earned the special Taylor Deaton Award for the most points accumulated by an individual competitor across the public speaking and debate competitions, a first for a competitor from UK.

    Read the full list of awards UK students earned at the tournament here.

    The UK Forensics Team is committed to training the next generation of civic leaders who are passionate about effecting change in their communities. To foster these skills, the team takes part in competitions throughout the southeast region of the United States. The team’s next competition will be the Bulldog Battle speech and debate tournament held Jan. 14-15, at Butler University in Indianapolis, Indiana.

    UK Forensics is a student organization in the School of Information Science in the College of Communication and Information. The team regularly competes in 12 public speaking events and three forms of debate. To find out more, please visit the team’s website www.ukforensics.com.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The UK Forensics Team finished the fall semester with another win at the WYRD Invitational hosted by Transylvania University. This is the third year in a row that UK has won this competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchThe Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Casis Thursday

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: The Research BlogBy Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis Jan. 5, 2017

    When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did—“Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. She was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today Sutton, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media—focusing on messaging about disasters and other public safety concerns on Twitter.

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks and the 2012 Colorado wildfires. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    Watch the video to learn what makes people more likely to share a message in an emergency and how Sutton’s research can help us stay safe.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information Contact Alicia Gregory
    alicia.gregory@uky.edu
    859 257-2980 Summary: Jeannette Sutton, director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media.Media Embed: <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Cbckl5GUiMw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 20, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 20, 2016) University of Kentucky students displayed their philanthropic sides by volunteering as coaches and running buddies to train third grade to eighth grade girls for the Girls on the Run (GOTR) 5K race at Keeneland Race Course Dec. 3.

    GOTR is a program for adolescent girls that inspires girls to be joyful, healthy and confident using a fun curriculum that creatively integrates running into lessons on things like anti-bullying, gossiping, body image and how to be a positive role model, all while improving their endurance and fitness.  At the end of the season, GOTR teams from all over Kentucky join together and run in a 5K.

    On the day of this year’s 5K race, UK students who spent their semester volunteering for the GOTR nonprofit organization had the opportunity to see all of their selfless work pay off by running alongside and cheering on the girls they mentored throughout the year.

    “Many of the students were running buddies," explained Heidi Guckenberger, the nonprofit’s coordinator for the Central Kentucky region. "They participated in the 5K and helped encourage the girls as they ran. They also helped with registration, face painting, cheer stations and water stops."

    For many of these GOTR student volunteers, their work was a result of enrollment in UK's CIS 112 course, a service-based learning course in the College of Communication and Information. The 350+ students enrolled in this course give back to the community by collectively volunteering for more than 40 different, mostly nonprofit, organizations, in the local community. This year, about 30 of those students dedicated their volunteer efforts to the Girls On The Run organization.

    Each CIS 112 student is required to complete at least 10 hours of service for one of the service learning organizations chosen by the professor each semester. Student volunteer Maddie Romines said the mandatory hours never felt like an obligation to her, however.  

    “The whole experience was enjoyable and I looked forward to seeing the girls every lesson,” Romines said.

    What begins as a mere class assignment for many of these CIS 112 students involved in local philanthropy work often results in long-term connections between the students and the local causes with which they work. Take Kylie Russ for example. Russ volunteered with GOTR as part of her CIS 112 class initially, but has continued volunteering for the organization for more than a year since her class ended.

    “Last year, I was assigned to volunteer with third to fifth graders at GOTR at Seton Catholic School," Russ said.  “We were required to get a certain number of hours for the class, but it did not feel like I was just 'counting hours' because as I committed to GOTR, I quickly fell in love with it.”

     “My CIS group and I were running buddies, meaning that we ran with the girls at each practice and got to simply talk with them while exercising,” she said.  “I loved getting to know each one, and once I had formed these relationships I knew I wanted to volunteer again on my own.” Russ was recently named a “Volunteer of the Week” for the local Girls on the Run chapter.

    The work done by UK students to give back to so many local nonprofit organizations is changing the efficiency in which the organizations can function, but the organizations are not the only ones benefiting from these partnerships. The partnership between CIS 112 students and Girls on the Run, in particular, is one from which everyone involved has something to gain.

    “The most rewarding aspect of Girls on the Run was definitely seeing the direct impact of my time at the 5K at the end of the season,” said Kristen Snider, another CIS 112 student volunteer.

    Snider ran with a girl who did not particularly enjoy running, so the pair walked most of the race and finished toward the back of the pack.

    “This is what makes Girls on the Run such an amazing program; it didn’t matter that she was one of the last girls to finish. She still received the same medal and had the same bright eyes and wide smile as all the other girls,” Snider said.

    Snider said the girl was so proud of herself and that was all that mattered. “Girls on the Run empowers girls to believe in themselves and to love who they are, which is a lesson that will follow them for the rest of their lives.”   

    Guckenberger is excited about the mutually beneficial relationship UK students build with Girls on the Run. Guckenberger added that GOTR depends on volunteers and would love for more students to be involved either through volunteering to serve as mentors for the third through eighth grade girls participating in the program or through internships available with the organization.

    More information about how to become involved with Lexington’s Girls on the Run chapter can be found at www.gotrcentralky.org.    

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Students in a College of Communication and Information course spent time this semester as coaches and running buddies to third through eighth grade girls.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 16, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 16, 2016) — The Buell Armory transformed into a scene straight out of a "Grey's Anatomy" episode on Monday afternoon as University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) Associate Professor Shari Veil's students prepared to respond to a simulated emergency situation.

    Developed in 2013 by Veil herself, "COM 316: Emergency and Disaster Communication" aims for students to develop an “applied understanding of communication and life skills for high-stress situations.”

    “Throughout the course students learn about emergency preparedness, hazardous materials, active shooter events, self-defense, disaster psychology, emergency first aid, public health emergencies and how to communicate warning and response messages,” Veil said.

    “In class we focus on CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training and we have lots of guest speakers come in from different emergency response places to teach us how to handle different situations,” said Jennifer Branscum, a senior in Veil’s class studying human communications. 

    The entire semester of learning culminates in a final assignment where Veil creates a life-like emergency scenario, in which her students must apply their newly acquired knowledge. The catch is that upon entering the disaster scene, students have no idea what they might encounter. By experiencing what it's like be first responders, the idea is that students will be better equipped to communicate emergency situations.

    This year, the situation involved a devastating tornado blowing through the Buell Armory during a study abroad fair leaving students and faculty members with some very serious and even fatal wounds that needed attending.

    Fifteen of the 40 students in class volunteered to be victims in the simulation and arrived to class early for moulage: the application of fake wounds and injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams.

    After the mock student victims (and a few generous CI faculty and staff members who volunteered for the activity) assumed their injured positions, it was go time. The students in the class acting as first responders rushed into the armory, armed only with the knowledge that a tornado hit during a study abroad fair.

    With the incident commander and safety officer taking the lead, first responders were divided into different emergency response teams for triage, transport and treatment and wore different color vests to indicate their affiliation.

    Throughout the semester, students engaged in activities related to emergency and disaster planning such as developing emergency evacuation plans, preparing emergency kits and learning medical triage and first aid, and now they were able to put those learning exercises to the test.

    “If you can hear me, walk to me,” mock first responders said as they tried to weed out the less severe injuries from the more serious ones. They paced around the disaster scene with four different colored ribbons tagging victims with minor, walkable injuries (green); injuries that required observation, but were stable (yellow); ones that needed immediate attention (red); and victims who had passed (black).

    Using real wraps, bandages and gauze, treatment team members helped victims with broken limbs, cut and bruised faces and a plethora of unseen injuries as well as dealing with other complications like hearing loss, patients in shock, a missing child, a pregnant woman and victims who didn’t speak English.

    Sam Shannon, a senior communication major in the class was one of the volunteer victims who suffered from both a serious arm and abdomen injury. “I really dedicated myself to the role of a victim, which made the situation feel really realistic,” Shannon said. “The simulation was a great way for everyone in the class (victims and first responders) to participate and understand course concepts.”

    Along with Veil, Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department and Clayton Oliver, a CSEPP (Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program) planner for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management, observed the simulation, took notes on what they saw and led a debrief at the conclusion of the activity.

    Both positives and negatives of the activity were discussed during the debrief, and one theme ran true for all the parties involved: talking about the material in class is one thing, but applying that material to an actual situation is an entirely different experience.

    “You can’t really be prepared for what they teach you until you actually get to do it,” said Elizabeth Farmer, another student in Veil’s class.

    Veil’s knowledge in this subject area comes from extensive research on crisis communication and emergency preparedness that has been supported by over $1.4 million in grants and contracts and resulted in over 80 scholarly publications.

    Veil also serves as the associate dean for undergraduate affairs in the College of Communication and Information, a Lexington Community Emergency Response Team member and on the Lexington-Fayette County Emergency Planning Committee.  

    Capt. Rob Larkin of the Lexington Fire Department participated in the simulation and led a debrief with Clayton Oliver of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Division of Emergency Management.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Applying their textbook to the real world, UK students in Shari Veil's disaster communication class ran through an emergency simulation for their final exam on Monday.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy August Anderson Dec. 14, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 14, 2016) A semester-long collaboration between University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication majors in the College of Communication and Information and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra (LexPhil) culminated in a successful Candy Cane Concert enjoyed by local families on Nov. 27, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.  

    Marc Whitt’s ISC 471 event management class dedicated its entire semester’s worth of work to promotion and execution of the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra’s Candy Cane Concert through a variety of integrated strategic communication campaigns. As director of philanthropy communications for the UK Office of Philanthropy, Whitt was especially invested in assigning this project to his students due to LexPhil’s status as a nonprofit organization.

    “I’m a big believer in service-learning projects for upperclassmen,” he said.

    The class assignment was a “win-win” for both parties involved; students gained hands-on experience with public relations efforts and the Lexington Philharmonic benefited from an increase in concert engagement from families due to the students’ creative event strategies. 

    “I think it was very rewarding to see the happiness from the families,” said Lexington Philharmonic’s Marketing Manager Vince Dominguez, when asked about the major successes of the event. “The patrons were really grateful and excited to see a lot of positivity and good feelings surrounding this event and I hope the memories taken away from the Candy Cane Concert were really enhanced by this whole collaboration.”

    One of the main focuses of the students in producing this event was generating creative ways to engage attendees in an enhanced experience that would create memories outside of just listening to the music. Students designed interactive pre-concert activities for attendees to participate in before the concert itself began.

    “Working for a nonprofit organization taught us a lot about budgeting and how to make the most of what we have,” explained ISC senior Meredith Trent, who co-chaired the project’s Design Team and organized the craft/photo room at the event. “Getting creative and designing simple crafts that kids could put their touch on with markers, stickers and so on, made for great pre-concert activities. Overall, it was a great experience that our class and our instructor, Marc Whitt, had a lot of fun planning. We learned and worked together as we truly took part in the public relations field for a day."

    Another student in the class, senior ISC major Conner Mackowiak, also had the opportunity to play an instrumental role for this project as a co-chair for the group’s Communication and Promotion Team.

    “Without a doubt, the most rewarding aspect of the experience was seeing the whole event come together. While there were some hiccups along the way, all groups were able to come together and cohesively work as a team, which resulted in a wonderful performance, and many happy families," he said.

    The ISC 471 event management course is designed each year so that students have the opportunity to engage in a semester-long project with a local business, but this year’s collaboration with LexPhil stands out as an especially positive campaign that resulted not only in a successful event, but also in a close relationship between UK and a local nonprofit that is likely to continue for event management efforts in the years to come.

    Allison Kaiser, executive director of the Lexington Philharmonic, summed up the students’ involvement by saying, “Thank you and your amazing students for an excellent job on developing and executing public relations strategies and special fun activities for the children and families who attended the Lexington Philharmonic’s Candy Cane Concert! The future of communications is in great shape with these fine students!”

    The ISC 471 Event Management class at the Candy Cane Concert.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: A semester-long collaboration between UK College of Communication and Information students and the Lexington Philharmonic Orchestra recently culminated in a successful event enjoyed by local families.
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student LifeBy Jordyn Comitor Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 8, 2016) — The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.

    Their season started at the Georgia State University tournament where, for the fourth year in a row, the team made it to the Sweet 16 round of competition: a recurring achievement for the team this semester. Out of the 105 teams there, the team of Theo Noparstak and Holmes Hampton finished as the 17th overall seed and the team of Bannister and Trufanov finished as the 12th overall seed.

    Bannister, a political science major from Saint Paul, Minnesota, was the 19th overall speaker in the Georgia State competition and the only freshman to make it into the top 20 speakers. Additionally, Kentucky had four of the top 30 speakers in a field of 210 total debaters.

    In the Run of the Roses Round Robin held at the University of Kentucky, the Trufanov and Bannister team continued their exciting freshman campaign with a 4-4 record, and finished as the 10th overall seed out of 141 teams at the Henry Clay Invitational, also held at UK. Two other Kentucky teams also made it to the elimination rounds of the Henry Clay Invitational and the team of Noparstak and Amar Adam finished as the 14th overall seed.

    Next, the team traveled to Gonzaga University where two teams reached the Sweet 16 round. They finished out the semester at Wake Forest University, ending on a strong note. The team of Bannister and Trufanov reached the Sweet 16 round for the fourth straight tournament and the Noparstak and Adam team reached the quarterfinal round by defeating the top seeded team from Wake Forest.

    For the second year in a row, Kentucky has two teams in the top 16 heading into the second semester of competitions where they will travel to the U.S. Naval Academy and Northwestern University, before heading into the National Debate Tournament. But first, the team is heading to sunny California over winter break for the California Swing tournament.

    Dave Arnett is the director of the Debate Team, which is housed in the College of Communication and Information. The co-ed team has 12 members ranging from freshmen to seniors, pursuing majors in various fields such as political science, economics, and environmental and sustainability studies. To follow along with the team as the compete next semester, head to their website: https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/

    The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: The University of Kentucky Debate Team had a strong first semester of their 2016-2017 season, led by the exceptionally strong freshmen team of Dan Bannister and Anthony Trufanov.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk information. Another tip Sutton gives to public communicators and emergency managers: use the hashtag that has surfaced so that messages are “in one stream of information.”

    “The message content makes a real difference, but the style in which it’s delivered also makes a difference,” she said.

    Before the 9/11 attacks, disaster scholars focused primarily on natural and technological hazards. Technological hazards include such things as nuclear events, like the Three Mile Island accident, train crashes, and train derailments with chemical spills — all having long-term impacts on communities.

    But after 9/11, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), which oversees responses to federal disaster declarations, was absorbed into the Department of Homeland Security.

    “And that really changed the nature and the shape of disaster response as well as disaster research,” Sutton said. Now scholars study a wider range of event types.  

    The practical implications of Sutton’s research has allowed her to meet with practitioners — including those from the National Weather Service and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — to offer research-based guidance, helping them build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. And by contributing to their success, she continues to help people directly impacted by disasters get the information they need in the most effective way.    

    This video feature is part of a monthly series called "see discovery: The People Behind Our Research." The videos, produced by REVEAL, highlight the important work being conducted at the University of Kentucky by telling the stories of our researchers. The idea is to discover and share what motivates our faculty, staff and students to ask the questions that lead to discovery. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    UK is the University for Kentucky. At UK, we are educating more students, treating more patients with complex illnesses and conducting more research and service than at any time in our 150-year history. To read more about the UK story and how you can support continued investment in your university and the Commonwealth, go to: uky.edu/uk4ky. #uk4ky #seeblue

    Contact Whitney Harder
    whitney.harder@uky.edu
    859-323-2396 Summary: Over the past several years, Twitter has become a crucial tool in emergency response and crisis communication. UK's Jeannette Sutton has collected and analyzed millions of these tweets. As director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center, she offers research-based guidance, helping practitioners build strategies based upon evidence, not intuition. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Whitney Harder and Alicia Gregory Dec. 6, 2016

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 6, 2016) When tragedy struck on 9/11, Jeannette Sutton was a graduate student. She remembers receiving the same calls as many others did — “Turn on your TV.” But shortly after, she received another call that would change the trajectory of her career and research path.

    The call, from her department chair, was an opportunity for any scholars on her campus interested in doing research in response to the terrorist attacks. Soon after, she was instructed to put together a proposal, “because we’re sending teams into the field as soon as it’s safe.”

    Today, the director of the UK Risk and Disaster Communication Center is helping transform the ways crises are communicated in real-time on social media — focusing on messaging about disasters, specifically, warnings and other public safety concerns on Twitter and other short messaging devices. 

    She has studied and reported on the use of Twitter by officials following the Boston Marathon attacks, the 2012 Colorado wildfires and other events. For the past several years, Sutton and her research team have been collecting and analyzing millions of tweets.

    “In a warning, we know that people need information about the hazard itself and the population it’s going to affect. And, really importantly, what people need to do to protect themselves at the time,” said Sutton, who is also an assistant professor in the UK College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication.

    Sutton said a lot of the 140-character messages she studies include that information, but many emergency tweets include something that hinders the dissemination of the message — a link to a website.

    “Which, you would think, would be a great way to give additional information,” she said. “But what we’ve found is that when a link is included, it decreases the likelihood that someone will pass it on.”

    The researcher attributes that to today’s sound bite society — “people’s willingness to get an entire message in 140 characters” — and people’s unwillingness to click on a link because of spam or slow website loading times on mobile devices. She has also found that including a visual is important for increasing retweets, but only if it includes actionable risk infor