• Body: Student NewsBy Grace Feinstein Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 2, 2022) — The Downtown Lexington Partnership (DLP) annual Christmas parade will be held on Main Street at 11 a.m. on Dec. 3.

    “We are so excited to enjoy a crisp morning downtown for this family-friendly opportunity to get Lexington into the holiday spirit,” said Laura Farnsworth, interim executive director of DLP. “The DLP and the University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication (ISC) students can’t wait to show everyone how hard we have been working the past four months.”

    Students in the ISC event planning class have been working hand in hand with DLP for the past four months to plan and organize efforts to make this year's parade the best it can be.

    Groups participating in the event include:

    • 2 Feathers Horses
    • Ale-8-One Bottling Company
    • Alpha Phi
    • American Red Cross Bluegrass Chapter
    • American Ideal Miss Kentucky
    • America's Majestic Miss National Teen
    • Bluegrass Corvette Club
    • Bluegrass Crime Stoppers
    • Bluegrass Mustang Club
    • Bourbon County High School Marching Band
    • Chief Weathers with D.A.R.E. police car
    • Dance Blue
    • Denali Towing
    • Eastside Technical Center (FCPS)
    • Fayette County Education Association
    • Fayette EF Girl Scouts
    • Fox 56
    • Frederick Douglass High School Dance Team
    • Girl Scouts of Kentucky, Troop 8003
    • Henry Clay High School Dance Team
    • Kentucky Horse Park Police
    • Kentucky Utilities
    • Kentucky's Miss Pageant Queens
    • KY Tenants
    • kynect
    • Lafayette High School Marching Band
    • LEX18
    • Lexington Catholic High School Dance Team
    • Lexington LGBTQIA+ Community
    • Lexington Lightening Cheer
    • Lexington Mounted Police
    • Lexington Ravens
    • Lexington Rotary Club Endowment, Inc.
    • Lexington Tap & Jazz Company
    • Lextran
    • Limelight Dance Company
    • Love on a Leash Central Kentucky
    • March Madness Marching Band
    • Marine Solutions, Inc.
    • Mayor Linda Gorton
    • Metro Towing, LLC
    • Military Freedom Float
    • Miss Kentucky Bluegrass Queens
    • Morning Pointe Seniors Got Talent
    • Mrs. Claus
    • NECCO Lexington
    • Oleika Shriners
    • Raising Cane's
    • RATP Dev USA, LLC
    • Ralph Colidiron with special guest Santa
    • Sponsor/Shop & Celebrate Banners
    • University of Kentucky Student Philanthropy Board
    • Summit Fast Pitch Softball Tarheels
    • Tates Creek Paving, LLC
    • The Bair Foundation
    • The Kidz Club
    • The Lantern @ Morning Pointe Senior Living
    • Thursday's Child Organization
    • Ugly Sweater Contest winner
    • UK 4 Paws for Ability
    • Unique Stars Dance Team
    • UK Rodeo Team
    • Wild Health
    • WKYT

    About DLP

    The Downtown Lexington Partnership (DLP) is the non-profit Downtown organization formed in 2017 to provide a single point of contact and accountability and a coordinated approach to downtown revitalization and management. DLP encourages responsible economic development, produces events, addresses issues on behalf of stakeholders and promotes downtown Lexington. DLP has over 175 members and produces many events for the public including Central Bank Thursday Night Live, The Rink at Triangle Park and more.

    Photo courtesy of Downtown Lexington Partnership.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Laura Farnsworth, laura [at] downtownlex.com Summary: The UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication's Event Planning class is hosting this year's Downtown Lexington Christmas Parade on Saturday, Dec. 3 at 11 a.m.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Mark Mozingo Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2022) — A University of Kentucky arts administration partnership with The Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center is giving students experience in event planning and management. 

    Students of AAD 390: Programming & Event Planning have volunteered at The Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center throughout the fall semester to experience real-world application of classroom instruction in the field of event management. Through the partnership between the UK Department of Arts Administration and The Lyric, executive director and UK alumnus Whit Whitaker visited AAD 390 students on campus to discuss the mission-driven work of The Lyric to prepare them for concerts and surrounding events. 

    Professor Jill Schinberg emphasized the importance of this “boots-on-the-ground" approach to community engagement, in alignment with the university’s land-grant mission and the College of Fine Arts’ collaborative relationship with Lexington institutions, often called a “town and gown” partnership. 

    “Students often lament that class assignments are hypothetical,” Schinberg said. “And they're right. It can be very challenging to truly synthesize what they are learning into independent thought without a tangible way to experience the assignment content. This partnership was set up to connect in-class discussions and reading assignments with the realities of event planning and management.” 

    Prior to their involvement with events like the Jeanette Harris Jazz Night and The Drifters anniversary concert, AAD 390 students took a guided tour of The Lyric to help contextualize the event programming with the mission and history of the arts and culture venue, and its importance to the surrounding East End neighborhood. 

    “Unfortunately, The Lyric is an under-resourced venue in Lexington,” Schinberg said. “So, in addition to valuable event experience to connect course content to a real-world experience, students were able to support a significant cultural institution in their community by lending their time and willingness to help — a hallmark trait of many arts administration students.” 

    Whitaker applauded the professionalism of the arts administration students.  

    "The students who volunteered for the Jeanette Harris and The Drifters concerts were stellar, well-prepared, eager to listen and learn, well-mannered, professional and such a pleasure to work with,” Whitaker said. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to be a part of their arts educational journey.” 

    Whitaker has served as the executive director of The Lyric since 2019 and received his bachelor’s degree in music performance and a master’s degree in arts administration from UK. As an artist and leader in Lexington’s arts community, he has worked with the Lexington Singers, the Kentucky Bach Choir and the American Spiritual Ensemble. He serves on community boards including LexArts, The Lexington Children’s Theatre and the KY 988 Mental Health Coalition. He is the president of the Lexington-Fayette NAACP and is a member of the Mayor’s Commission for Racial Justice and Equality.  

    Following their work at The Lyric, students debriefed as a class. Schinberg said that in addition to providing a valuable service to a local arts organization, among other things, they learned that not everything goes as planned. Additionally, arts administration requires a team that’s willing to pitch in wherever help is needed. Good customer service is important, but not always easy.  

    "Our students did a great job,” Schinberg said. “I required them to be there as part of the course, but they really embraced the experience. It was great to see them out in the world, in action, contributing time and effort to this important cultural institution. As if that weren't enough, they represented The Lyric, the department, the college and the university like rock stars — I'm so proud of them.” 

    Briann Cox, an arts administration and digital media design senior with minors in music performance and media arts and studies, feels it’s important that students are engaging with their community. 

    “There are several things that I have been able to do though my classes, and by hearing from professors and other faculty that I wouldn’t have known about if I was just out in the community. 

    “In class we spend time talking about all these aspects of art administration (event planning, fundraising, marketing, etc.) but some of us don’t really seek out internships for every field in arts administration, which means we don’t really get to put what we learn in class to action,” Cox explained. “I’m grateful that this partnership allows current UK students to work with alumni like Whit, and that it gives us a sense of what our degrees and hours of classes can allow us to achieve after we graduate.” 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationMusic

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    "> whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Arts administration students in Programming & Event Planning have volunteered at The Lyric Theatre and Cultural Arts Center throughout the fall semester to experience real-world application of classroom instruction in the field of event management. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy C. Lynn Hiler Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 21, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Nu Circle of the national leadership honor society Omicron Delta Kappa (OΔK) inducted 30 new members at a ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. OΔK recognizes superior leadership and exemplary character and encourages collaboration among members across the five phases celebrated by the society: scholarship, athletics, service, communications and arts.

    The UK circle was established May 2, 1925, and celebrates leaders across campus by co-hosting the Alumni Association Great Teacher Award and other honors like the Maurice A. Clay Outstanding Graduating Senior Award. In June 2022, UK hosted the organization’s National Leadership Conference.

    Abigail Elbert, Nu Circle student president says, “We have a stellar group of inductees this year, and I believe we will see some really great things coming from OΔK as a result of their leadership abilities and their drive to achieve.”

    Other student officers are: Hallie Rice, vice president/president-elect; Amelia Crotinger, activities chair; Kayli Bolton, membership chair; and Rich Hamlin, communications chair. Francisco Andrade, Ph.D., a professor in the College of Medicine, is the faculty advisor, and C. Lynn Hiler, the program coordinator in the Chellgren Center, is the staff advisor and Nu Circle coordinator.

    The 2022-2023 inductees are:

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    • Ginny Lyle

    College of Arts and Sciences

    • Sara Green
    • Ashley Bell Hamlet
    • Cameron Thomas Sauers
    • Nora Sypkens

    Gatton College of Business and Economics

    • Sarah Elizabeth Parker
    • John Clayton Webb

    College of Communication and Information

    • Kwame Amoa-Bosompem
    • Makel K. Taylor

    College of Engineering

    • Asa Clarence O'Neal
    • Naphason Phothong
    • Nathan Andrew Sanders

    College of Fine Arts

    • Karli Danielle Fee
    • Emmylou Tidwell

    College of Health Sciences

    • Emma Pastirik
    • Neyati Patel
    • Rachel Woods

    College of Nursing

    • Isabella Grace Williams 

    College of Public Health

    • Caitlin Leialoha Deffendall
    • E. Hamilton
    • Samantha Grace Jones

    College of Social Work

    • Beverly E Benoit
    • Mindi Fetterman
    • Stephanie Hernandez
    • Matthew Ryan Lunsford
    • Tyme Ramsey Glynn Nunn
    • Skylar Jo Richmiller
    • Richard Thomas Skeens
    • Chris La Berge Tylka-Olesen
    • Emily Winter

    Join OΔK on its social media accounts (@ODKatUKY on Facebook and @ukyodk on Instagram) for celebratory shout outs to our newest members.

    Omicron Delta Kappa is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Office of the Provost. For more information on membership, contact chellgrencenter [at] uky.edu.

    Recent Omicron Delta Kappa (OΔK) inductees. Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsHealth SciencesNursingPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Ryan Girves
    ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    "> ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    859-323-8464 Summary: The University of Kentucky Nu Circle of the national leadership honor society Omicron Delta Kappa (OΔK) inducted 30 new members at a ceremony on Sunday, Nov. 6, 2022. OΔK recognizes superior leadership and exemplary character and encourages collaboration among members across the five phases celebrated by the society: scholarship, athletics, service, communications and arts.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Catherine Hayden Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 15, 2022) — The 2022 James Madison Award recipient for service to the First Amendment is Elizabeth “Scoobie” Ryan, who has delivered high-quality journalism education and instilled in students the importance of their First Amendment rights as citizens and news media professionals as a deeply respected faculty member in the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky. The school and its Scripps Howard First Amendment Center present the award annually.

    Ryan earned her bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Missouri and master’s degree in telecommunications and First Amendment law from the Antioch School of Law in Washington, D.C. She was a radio reporter, producer, writer, editor and engineer during her broadcasting career at stations in Indiana, Massachusetts and Colorado. She taught part-time in the UK School of Journalism and Media starting in 1988, and joined the faculty as an assistant professor in 1996, eventually becoming associate professor and associate director of the school. In addition to teaching media law and broadcast journalism, Ryan has developed numerous courses that underscore the application of First Amendment principles that have bolstered the school’s curriculum, including law, media and sports, and media and diversity.

    “Scoobie brings a wealth of professional experience, legal discipline and enthusiasm for journalism to the classroom and her advising of students,” UK Extension Professor Al Cross said. “She has also been a most valuable player in the School of Journalism and Media, helping it advance its First Amendment mission.”

    School Director Erika Engstrom said, “Professor Scoobie Ryan lives and breathes the First Amendment and through her excellent teaching of its essence and high standards has fostered and encouraged in her students, both current and former, the highest ideals of press freedom and responsible journalism throughout her career as one of the best instructors at the University of Kentucky and indeed in the Commonwealth.”

    The James Madison Award is scheduled to be presented at the Scripps Howard State of the First Amendment Address, delivered by University of Kansas media law expert and scholar Genelle Belmas, 6 p.m. EST Thursday, Nov. 17, via Zoom. This year’s address will focus on free speech in social media and online gaming. Details of the event are posted at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/state-first-amendment-address.

    The James Madison Award is presented annually by the School of Journalism and Media to honor those who have made outstanding contributions to First Amendment rights. The award was created in 2006 and honors the nation’s fourth president, whose extraordinary efforts led to the ratification of the Bill of Rights. Awardees must have significant ties to Kentucky, and their efforts must have resulted in the preservation or expansion of freedom of the press and/or freedom of speech. The James Madison Award recognizes a long-term commitment to these ideals.

    Elizabeth "Scoobie Ryan" receives the 2022 James Madison Award.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Ryan has delivered high-quality journalism education and instilled in students the importance of their First Amendment rights as citizens and news media professionals as a deeply respected faculty member in the School of Journalism and Media in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Kody Kiser and Meg Mills Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 14, 2022) — For University of Kentucky Associate Director of Recruitment Clayton Abernathy, the year-round job of academic recruitment goes hand-in-hand with a lifelong love of UK.

    Originally from Crescent Springs, Kentucky, Abernathy graduated in 2016 from UK with a degree in broadcast journalism and political science. He notes that his time on campus also involved serving as president of Theta Chi fraternity, morale coordinator of DanceBlue and news director of student-run WRFL 88.1-FM, and that his involvement in campus organizations helped him grow as a student, person and leader.

    As a recruiter, he covers Kentucky resident recruitment in Bullitt, Oldham and Spencer counties, along with Michigan and Wisconsin. On this episode of "Behind the Blue," Abernathy talks about what recruiters do and how they help potential students and their families, advice for students navigating the challenge of choosing a college or university, important deadlines coming up for potential Wildcats, and more.

    ‘Behind the Blue’ is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

    For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue [at] uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue. Transcripts for this or other episodes of "Behind the Blue" can be downloaded from the show’s blog page.

    To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

    Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: On this episode of "Behind the Blue," Abernathy talks about what recruiters do and how they help potential students and their families, advice for students navigating the challenge of choosing a college or university, important deadlines coming up for potential Wildcats, and more.Media Embed: <iframe title="Embed Player" src="https://play.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/24909165/height/128/theme/modern/size/standard/thumbnail/yes/custom-color/0033a3/time-start/00:00:00/playlist-height/200/direction/backward/download/yes" height="128" width="100%" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" oallowfullscreen="true" msallowfullscreen="true" style="border: none;"></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Amy Brooks Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 7, 2022) Shawn Hils, director of communications for the National Basketball Association, will deliver the 2022 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, in the University of Kentucky’s Gatton Student Center Worsham Cinema. The program, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication and the College of Communication and Information. The 2022 talk marks the Bowling Lecture Series’ 23rd anniversary.

    Hils’ lecture will discuss crisis communications, including how the NBA has navigated the pandemic and the social justice protests of 2020.

    Shawn Hils serves as senior director in the communications department of the National Basketball Association in New York City, a global sports and media organization encompassing five professional sports leagues: the NBA, WNBA, NBA G League, NBA 2K League and Basketball Africa League. Since 2015, he has been charged with response management and specializes in research and crisis communications on both basketball and business matters. 

    Before joining the league in 2015, Hils served in senior roles in the U.S. Senate, on political campaigns and political committees, advising and developing strategy for candidates with national media attention in Ohio, Colorado and Washington, D.C. As special assistant in Sen. Mark Udall’s office and research director on Udall’s campaign, he advised the senator on policy and campaign strategy. At the Democratic National Committee, Hils served as deputy research director, leading a team of researchers in charge of reviewing the records of 18 presidential candidates.

    Hils graduated from Wittenberg University in Ohio with a bachelor's degree in political science. He lives in Brooklyn and spends his time outside of work riding his motorcycle, backpacking and traveling with friends.

    In addition to honoring the Bowling Lecturer-in-Residence, the series names an annual awardee for Excellence in Public Relations. This year's winner is Chip Polston, who spent 29 years with the Kentucky Lottery Corporation, 19 of those as vice president and senior vice president of communications, public relations and social responsibility.

    Polston was originally hired as a host of the lottery’s nightly televised draw show in 1993. While hosting the evening draw show, he spent 14 years as Broadcast News Services manager at the University of Louisville. He also freelanced extensively in the region as producer/writer/talent for national clients such as CNN, Outback Steakhouse and UPS. On top of his extensive media relations and communications work, his passion project became working to help those in Kentucky who are negatively affected by problem gambling.

    After a 29-year run at the Kentucky Lottery, Polston recently left the company to pursue a dream he’d had since high school: working full time in the television industry. KET recently named him as host of their Saturday evening flagship magazine show “Kentucky Life,” and he will host, write and produce for other programs on the network as well.

    The Bowling Executive-in-Residence Series began in 2000. It brings to UK nationally known public relations practitioners to deliver an address and meet with students interested in public relations careers; the daylong activities include the executive-in-residence visit; the Excellence in PR Award; and a scholarship for a senior integrated strategic communication major with an emphasis in public relations. The 2022 scholarship recipient will be announced at the lecture.

    The series honors James C. Bowling, the late retired assistant chairman of Philip Morris Companies Inc. He attended UK and later served the university as a member of the UK Development Council. In addition to serving on several national boards, Bowling also worked with the UK College of Agriculture (now UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment), UK Gatton College of Business and Economics and the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

    For more information, please contact amy.brooks [at] uky.edu.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Shawn Hils, director of communications for the National Basketball Association, will deliver the 2022 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 10, in the University of Kentucky’s Gatton Student Center Worsham Cinema. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Grace Feinstein Nov. 6, 2022

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 8, 2022) — For the second year, the Downtown Lexington Partnership (DLP) is partnering with students from the University of Kentucky’s integrated strategic communication (ISC) event planning class out of the College of Communication and Information.

    Students in the class are contributing to the planning and organizing efforts for this year’s parade under supervision of DLP Interim Executive Director Laura Farnsworth.

    “Downtown Lexington Partnership is excited to once again partner with the University of Kentucky students from the ISC Event Planning class to produce an exciting, family friendly event in downtown,” said Farnsworth. “We encourage all interested businesses, clubs and non-profit organizations to register for the parade downtown and bring Christmas joy to thousands of guests on a crisp, December morning.”

    As part of their class, students are helping register participants for the parade. The parade will be held 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 3, 2022, on Main Street. The deadline to register for this year’s parade is Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2022.

    Interested university bands and athletics should contact Mallory Burford (mabu262 [at] uky.edu) and Allison Broadhurst (akbr245 [at] uky.edu).

    Interested student organizations and philanthropies should contact Kate Maddox (kmma324 [at] uky.edu) and Kaelyn Wilson (kaelyn.wilson528 [at] uky.edu).

    Interested high school bands should contact Lucy Ferguson (lwfe224 [at] uky.edu) and Emily Potter (egpo224 [at] uky.edu).

    Interested high school dance and cheer teams should contact Mallory Burford (mabu262 [at] uky.edu), Allison Broadhurst (akbr245 [at] uky.edu), Lucy Ferguson (lwfe224 [at] uky.edu) and Emily Potter (egpo224 [at] uky.edu).

    Other floats and units that are interested should contact Anna Patterson (aepa235 [at] uky.edu), Emma Gayle (enga224 [at] uky.edu) and Reece Foley (jayden.foley [at] uky.edu).

    About DLP

    The Downtown Lexington Partnership is the non-profit Downtown organization formed in 2017 to provide a single point of contact and accountability and a coordinated approach to Downtown revitalization and management. DLP encourages responsible economic development, produces events, addresses issues on behalf of stakeholders, and promotes downtown Lexington. DLP has over 175 members and produces many events for the public including Central Bank Thursday Night Live, The Rink at Triangle Park and more.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 31, 2022) — Genelle Belmas, media law professor and First Amendment expert at the University of Kansas, will deliver the State of the First Amendment Address at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 17. The title of the address is “Wizards, Sentinels, and Mods: What Gamers Can Teach Social Media About Free Speech.”

    The address is free to the public and the University of Kentucky community live via Zoom. The Zoom link will be posted on the day of the event at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/state-first-amendment-address.

    Belmas, an associate professor at the William Allen White School of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Kansas, teaches media law, media ethics, qualitative research methods and gamification. Her research primarily focuses on media law and ethics. Several appellate and Supreme Court briefs have cited her work, which appears in Yale Journal of Online Law and Technology, Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal, Federal Communications Law Journal, Journal of Mass Media Ethics and Communications Law and Policy. She is the lead co-author of “Major Principles of Media Law.” She earned her bachelor's degrees in journalism and political science from the University of Wisconsin, master's degree in political science from the University of Wisconsin and doctoral degree in mass communication from the University of Minnesota. She’s also an avid gamer.

    This year’s address coincides with the offering of a new minor in video game design and development offered by the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media. UK's Scripps Howard First Amendment Center, housed in the school, is the sponsor of the address, delivered annually in celebration of First Amendment rights.

    Genelle Belmas, media law professor at University of Kansas, will deliver the address Thursday, Nov. 17, via Zoom.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: This year’s address coincides with the offering of a new minor in video game design and development offered by the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Mariah Kendell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2022) — As the United States grows more politically and socially polarized, fingers point in every direction in speculation of who or what is to blame.

    The accusations are limitless — poor social structures, careless media executives, unethical politicians and more. For Daniela DiGiacomo, assistant professor in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Information Science, a myriad of factors got us here.

    Perhaps the most relevant is the decline of civil discourse, what she refers to as a bedrock of democracy. Despite living in an era decades after schools were legally desegrated, too many Americans still live, work and go to school in siloed spaces. That, alongside less buy-in to the importance of voluntary associations and community building, has led to less engagement with people that look, sound and think differently. The ever rising spread of mis- and disinformation adds to this, creating a hostile environment for democracy to thrive.

    “We’re seeing a society in which, even when people are presented with new information, they don’t often change their views,” DiGiacomo said. “And when we have discussions without the same information, the ability to engage in civil discourse falls short.”

    Luckily, the solution to America’s division is not as convoluted. An expert of learning sciences and human development, DiGiacomo views information and media literacy curriculum in K-12 schools as one of the key answers. Information and media literacy, she says, is the ability to use critical thinking and reasoning skills in online spaces, like discerning fact from fiction and identifying trustworthy sources.

    In partnership with scholars at the Civic Engagement Research Group, DiGiacomo’s work analyzes the current state of information media literacy education policy, and engages in partnership with school districts around the country to study and improve local efforts, including Kentucky’s own largest and most diverse school district, Jefferson County Public Schools.

    Currently, all-encompassing information and/or media literacy curricula and policy are few and far between. In a recent study into the national landscape, DiGiacomo and her colleagues found that 92 bills referencing some sort of information and/or media literacy education were introduced by state legislators in 2021. Of those, only 23% were signed into law, and many of them only addressed risk management and safety issues. In this same study, they found that of the 11 states that do have existing K-12 information and/or media literacy education policy, only five of those states provide a clear definition of terms and even fewer speak to issues of equity, funding or plans for instructional support and resource development.  

    Based on their review of best practices and existing scholarship, DiGiacomo and her colleagues outline three aspects of successful media literacy curriculum. The safety and civility dimension centers on basic online safety measures; the information analysis dimension teaches students to consider the source, nature and purpose of information online; and lastly, the civic voice and engagement dimension encourages students to develop and share their perspectives effectively. Unfortunately, their recent study found that most of the existing legislation do not attend to these key dimensions.  

    Of note, Delaware is among the states with improvements in policy, recently signing a bill that requires schools to implement “evidence-based media literacy standards” in all disciplines. DiGiacomo hopes to see more policymakers take the lead as well. However, what’s most important to DiGiacomo is creating new opportunities for young people to civically connect with and learn from each other, despite growing up in an ever-polarized nation.

    “If everyone has routine and ongoing opportunities to learn and practice information and media literacy, especially at the K-12 level, we can all work toward a better, problem-solving democracy," DiGiacomo said.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: As the United States grows more politically and socially polarized, fingers point in every direction in speculation of who or what is to blame. The accusations are limitless — poor social structures, careless media executives, unethical politicians and more. For Daniela DiGiacomo, assistant professor in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Information Science, a myriad of factors got us here.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Gavin Colton Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2022) — On Friday, Sept. 23, 2022, the University of Kentucky Art Museum hosted patrons from across the country for a special exhibit — “RAUSCHENBERG: A Gift in Your Pocket from the Collections of Friends in Honor of Bradley Jeffries.”

    Robert Rauschenberg was one of the 20th century’s most significant artists, working in media that included painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography and performance. His inclusive practice spanned six decades, during which he combined traditional art materials with ordinary objects from the urban and beachfront environments in which he lived.

    Bradley Jeffries was born in Columbia, Kentucky, and graduated from UK in 1971 with a degree in journalism. After graduation, she settled in Sanibel, Florida, where she had a regular newspaper column and weekly spot on television news before becoming Rauschenberg’s studio manager in 1978.

    “RAUSCHENBERG: A Gift in Your Pocket from the Collections of Friends in Honor of Bradley Jeffries” brings together rare and unseen paintings, drawings and photographs that were gifted to Jeffries by the artist, as well as personal objects and ephemera that honor their friendship. The exhibit is free and open to the public through Jan. 7, 2023.

    The exhibition is curated by Jade Dellinger, director of the Bob Rauschenberg Gallery at Florida Southwestern State College. It showcases Jeffries’ life and career and demonstrates the marriage of fine art and communications disciplines. Stuart Horodner, director of the UK Art Museum, believes the education that Jeffries received as a journalism student at UK prepared her for a life in the art world, even if she never planned to work in the field.

    “The university expands your interests by sheer exposure to other subjects,” says Horodner. “All the things you learn at a place like UK becomes your ammunition when you go out into the world.”

    “The story behind how the exhibition came to be at the UK Art Museum and the connection with UK alumna, Bradley Jeffries, reinforces that all UK grads are prepared for whatever wildly possible opportunity that might be presented to them over their lifetimes,” says Mark Shanda, dean of the UK College of Fine Arts. “We celebrate the generosity of the Bradley Jeffries family in making possible this remarkable opportunity for all of campus and the Lexington community to enjoy.”

    Special thanks to the UK College of Communication and Information for partnering on this gift to the museum's permanent collection.

    “We are thrilled that this gift of art to the university allows us to honor the legacy of Bradley Jeffries, a UK journalism alumna who played such an important part in Rauschenberg’s career,” said Jennifer Greer, dean of the College of Communication and Information. “Bradley used her journalism training to organize information, communicate with Rauschenberg’s many publics and tell the story of his process and practice. Without Bradley’s central position in his world, we would have less insight into his work, and we possibly would have fewer works to enjoy. Her protection of his time allowed him to concentrate on creating the beautiful pieces you see in this exhibit — and hundreds beyond that. It was a true partnership, and I love that that partnership has brought this amazing work of art to UK through the gift from Bradley’s family.”

    ***

    Jeffries and Rauschenberg met for the first time on a beach in Captiva Island, Florida, and became fast friends. Shortly after their initial encounter, Jeffries began working for Rauschenberg as a studio assistant. Over time, she became his lead studio manager. Jeffries organized employees and access to Rauschenberg himself, who had 30 years of notoriety behind him and was in high demand in the art world, political sphere and celebrity circles that included names like Sharon Stone and Meryl Streep.

    “If you wanted to visit with Rauschenberg, you had to get through Bradley,” says Horodner.

    Though Horodner only learned about Jeffries after her death in 2021, he is sure that she was personable, intelligent and organized.

    “You don’t work for someone like Rauschenberg for 30 years without them trusting you, liking you and feeling like they understand you.”

    Jeffries’ cousin, Mary Lynn Houlihan, a two-time graduate of the College of Social Work, took great honor in learning the details of her cousin’s life through Jeffries’ writings and stories Jeffries’ friends shared. She took great pride in knowing Jeffries was a formidable woman.

    “At some points, not even American presidents could get past her,” says Houlihan. “I loved learning that about her.”

    Though Jeffries left no instructions on what to do with the works that Rauschenberg gifted her during her life, Houlihan and her mother, Ann Dupree, have tried to follow Jeffries’ wishes as closely as possibly by reading old letters and speaking with her friends. Dupree graduated from the College of Communication and Information with a degree in journalism in 1963, eight years before Jeffries. The two women had been raised like sisters in Columbia, Kentucky, and remained lifelong Wildcats.

    Houlihan believes Jeffries would be thrilled to be memorialized at UK and have Rauschenberg’s work featured in a collection where he was not fully represented.

    “Bradley would have made sure the art went into the hands of people who would love it or who knew and loved her,” says Houlihan. “I feel very privileged to have had the chance to participate in all of this.”

    While much of Jeffries life and career was devoted to maintaining Rauschenberg’s name and legacy, “RAUSCHENBERG: A Gift in Your Pocket” reflects more than just Rauschenberg rarities. 

    “The show represents a time and place for Bradley and Rauschenberg,” says Houlihan. “So many of the pieces he gave to her honored parts of her. This art is so different for him and for Bradley.”

    ***

    As part of the exhibition, which will travel to Black Mountain College in North Carolina — Rauschenberg’s alma mater — Jeffries’ family is also gifting one piece to each of the venues. At the conclusion of the traveling exhibit, UK Art Museum will receive a painting titled “Shore Hole (Urban Bourbon)” in honor of Jeffries.

    Horodner believes the opportunity to acquire a Rauschenberg painting is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for the university.

    “This is a very significant donation from Bradley’s family to our holdings. We are extremely grateful,” says Horodner. “We get offered a lot of things. We only say yes strategically, considering representation, diversity, excellence and significance.”

    If Horodner had had his pick, he would have chosen the “Urban Bourbon” piece. For Houlihan, the sense of Kentucky is rooted in the piece.

    “When I looked at the ‘Urban Bourbon’ piece the first time, it reminded me of Churchill Downs,” says Houlihan, “the way people take photos from the side when the horses are running down the track.”

    In reading Bradley’s correspondences and notes, Houlihan learned that her cousin remained a Wildcat fan her whole life, keeping up with UK men’s basketball results, tracking scores and documenting her thoughts on games.

    Jeffries had written expressly that upon her death, she didn’t want a service. Just a beach bon voyage on Captiva Island and a champagne toast. With the help of Jeffries’ friends, Houlihan orchestrated a celebration of her cousin’s life. Jeffries’ best friend and Rauschenberg’s fabricator, Lawrence Voytek, manufactured three rockets containing Jeffries’ ashes.

    “It was so incredible and terrifying,” says Houlihan. The explosions were artful, illuminating the sky above the golden beachfront, so full of color and energy like many of Rauschenberg’s works throughout his life.

    “Bradley’s whole life had revolved around Rauschenberg,” says Houlihan. “It was remarkable.”

    of Organizational Unit: Art MuseumCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    "> whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: “RAUSCHENBERG: A Gift in Your Pocket from the Collections of Friends in Honor of Bradley Jeffries” brings together rare and unseen paintings, drawings and photographs that were gifted to UK alumna Bradley Jeffries by the artist, as well as personal objects and ephemera that honor their friendship. The exhibit is free and open to the public through Jan. 7, 2023.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Stacey Gish Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2022) — More than 60 alumni and students were honored during the 31st annual Lyman T. Johnson Awards program Friday, Oct. 14 at the Gatton Student Center.  

    The University of Kentucky Alumni Association Lyman T. Johnson African American Alumni Constituency Group and the UK Office for Institutional Diversity hosted the awards luncheon as part of the 2022 Lyman T. Johnson Homecoming Celebration. The 2021 ceremony was postponed due to COVID-19 concerns, leading to a combined ceremony this year. 

    UK’s academic colleges and units selected at least one African American alumnus or alumna whose faith, hard work and determination has positively affected the lives of people on the UK campus, the city, state or nation to receive the Lyman T. Johnson Torch of Excellence Award. These units additionally chose at least one African American student within the college or department whose academic achievement and ability to impact the lives of others would warrant them to receive the Lyman T. Johnson Torch Bearer Award. 

    In addition, four students earned scholarships through the Lyman T. Johnson Endowed Scholarship Fund, providing financial assistance to students of color in pursuit of higher education. Freshmen Lauren Doucette, of New Orleans, Louisiana, and Joseph Palmer, of Clayton, North Carolina, earned a scholarship for the 2021-2022 academic year. Theatre and arts administration freshman Gabrielle Copeland, of Paducah, Kentucky, and journalism junior Bryson Steed, of Louisville, Kentucky, earned a scholarship for the 2022-2023 academic year. 

    Lyman T. Johnson was a pioneer who challenged the status quo in his landmark court case which opened the University of Kentucky to African American students in 1949. He dedicated his life to fighting against segregation and racial inequalities in Kentucky. The Lyman T. Johnson African American Alumni Constituency Group established an endowed scholarship in his name to provide financial assistance to students of color in their pursuit of higher education. 

    “Part of what the Lyman T. Johnson alumni group strives to achieve is to continue paving a path for minority students with the creation of the Lyman T. Johnson Scholarship fund,” said Lee Jackson, president of the Lyman T. Johnson African American Alumni Constituency Group. “Since 2008, we have awarded scholarships to deserving students and most recently we have endowed our scholarship to ensure these funds are available for generations to come.”

    Antoine Huffman, president of the UK Alumni Association, served as emcee for the event. “The University of Kentucky and the Commonwealth are better today because of the courage demonstrated by Lyman T. Johnson stepping foot on this campus as its first African American student 73 years ago,” said Huffman. “We must never forget his advocacy on behalf of his African American brothers and sisters. May we continue to be advocates for his mission and celebrate the accomplishments, contributions and dreams of the students that have walked on this campus and the alumni that have helped change our world.”

    UK President Eli Capilouto and UK Vice President for Institutional Diversity Katrice Albert provided remarks during the luncheon.  

    “The Lyman T. Johnson Excellence Awards are a powerful testament to the passion and tenacity with which torchbearers, strategic thinkers and action-oriented visionary leaders uphold Mr. Johnson’s precious legacy,” said Albert. “UK students and alumni continue to advance critical research, uplift and galvanize their communities and light the way on our path toward inclusive excellence. For 31 years, the Lyman T. Johnson Awards have honored those agents of change who left an indelible mark on our campus. We are made by our history. And we are so proud of and grateful for all those who have helped show us the world what is wildly possible with wide open doors.” 

    Learn about the Torch of Excellence and Torch Bearer recipients and their vast achievements by visiting www.ukalumni.net/ltjrecipients.

    The UK Alumni Association is committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association, visit www.ukalumni.netor call 800-269-2586.

    The UK Alumni Association Lyman T. Johnson African American Alumni Constituency Group and the Office for Institutional Diversity hosted the awards luncheon as part of the 2022 Lyman T. Johnson Homecoming Celebration. Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLawMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Ryan Girves
    ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    "> ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    859-323-8464 Summary: More than 60 alumni and students were honored during the 31st annual Lyman T. Johnson Awards program Friday, Oct. 14 at the Gatton Student Center.  
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Stacey Gish Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 12, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Alumni Association invites all December 2022 graduates to take part in Grad Salute 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Oct. 19-20, in the Grand Ballroom of the Gatton Student Center.

    December 2022 Commencement Ceremonies are scheduled for Friday, Dec. 16, at Rupp Arena at Central Bank Center.

    Grad Salute is the perfect opportunity for graduates to finalize all UK Commencement needs in one location.

    Representatives will be on hand to help students make final selections in the following:

    • ordering a custom cap, gown and tassel with measurements to ensure the proper fit;
    • verifying no stops or holds on records that could delay graduation;
    • obtaining career advice and discussing future employment opportunities;
    • registering for the Commencement ceremony;
    • answering questions regarding graduation;
    • receiving information to manage student loans;
    • ordering an official University of Kentucky class ring;
    • taking a complimentary headshot with a professional photographer (sitting fee waived);
    • purchasing a UK diploma frame;
    • ordering official personalized graduation announcements;
    • becoming an active member of the UK Alumni Association through a $25 gift to a fund of the student’s choosing; and
    • ordering a paver for display in Wildcat Alumni Plaza.

    Students are encouraged to register for Grad Salute to allow representatives to better assist with these needs. Additionally, those who register will be eligible to win prizes.

    For more information about Grad Salute, visit www.ukalumni.net/gradsalute, contact //samantha.seitz [at] uky.edu">Samantha Seitz or call 859-257-8700. For more information about UK Commencement, visit https://commencement.uky.edu.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The University of Kentucky Alumni Association invites all December 2022 graduates to take part in Grad Salute from 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Oct. 19-20, in the Grand Ballroom of Gatton Student Center.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Riley Fort Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 30, 2022) — University of Kentucky students Neima Moaven and Drew Rodriguez saw a need for a student organization to enhance UK’s curricular efforts aimed at helping students break into the sports industry. That organization, the Kentucky Sports Industry Conference, will hold its inaugural conference on Friday, Oct. 7, with a full slate of some of the industry’s biggest names.

    “If you think of Harvard, NYU and Columbia as the target schools for investment banking, we’re working to turn the University of Kentucky into the target school for the sports industry,” Rodriguez said. “Not only placing students in the industry, but shaping it, right here from Lexington, Kentucky.”

    The conference will feature panels and networking sessions with more than 15 recruiters and 20 guest speakers in the sports industry. These recruiters and speakers are traveling from throughout the nation to Lexington to represent their organizations, including EPSN, the NFL, Keeneland and more.

    UK Men’s Basketball Head Coach John Calipari and NFL Hall of Famer Steve Young are among the speakers who will discuss their journeys in the sports industry.

    Panels include Women Leaders in Sports, A New Era of Media in Sports (presented by the UK College of Communication and Information), A Bluegrass Tradition (presented by Keeneland), Esports 101 (presented by Gen.G Esports), Captivating Audiences: Sports Marketing (presented by Coca-Cola) and Pursuing Your Dream in Sports.

    “The College of Communication and Information signed on as a premier sponsor for this inaugural event as an extension of our curricular efforts in sports communication, journalism, production and promotion,” said Jennifer Greer, dean of the college. “UK is a leader in preparing students to enter sports industries through programs in CI and the colleges of Education, Business and Economics, Health Sciences, and more. We are proud to support a student organization that bridges these disciplines as we launch careers in sports with a UK degree.”

    The conference will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 7, at the Central Bank Center in downtown Lexington. Tickets to the Kentucky Sports Industry Conference can be purchased here.

    Attendees should dress in business casual attire and bring their resumes.

    About the Kentucky Sports Industry Conference

    The Kentucky Sports Industry Conference is a student-founded and led 501(c)(3) nonprofit with the vision to help students get jobs in the sports industry, and the mission to connect diverse talent to the top teams and companies in sports. Founded with the premise of establishing the University of Kentucky as the target school for the sports industry, KSIC has placed several students into internships and has established relationships with organizations in the sports industry across the nation.

    To learn more about KSIC and its upcoming conference, visit www.kentuckysic.com

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: University of Kentucky students Neima Moaven and Drew Rodriguez saw a need for a student organization to enhance UK’s curricular efforts aimed at helping students break into the sports industry. That organization, the Kentucky Sports Industry Conference, will hold its inaugural conference Oct. 7, with a full slate of some of the industry’s biggest names.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mariah Kendell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 29. 2022) — July 27, 2022 was an average night. Sara Baker, a 2018 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information journalism alumna and southern life and style influencer, went to bed in her home just outside of Lexington.

    At 2:30 a.m. the next morning, her mother sent frantic, broken text messages, praying for the flood waters to stop before entering their family home in Whitesburg, Kentucky. The area's cellular service was down shortly after. Baker and her family, like many Eastern Kentucky natives, are familiar with occasional flash flooding; but this time, it was different.

    "I lived in that house my whole life until I went to college," Baker said. "It's flooded (in Whitesburg) before, but it's never come close to getting to our house."

    Whitesburg, located in Letcher County, was one of the many cities devastated by the floods of July 28.

    When Baker woke at 6 a.m., the next few hours were riddled with hysteric phone calls, radar checks, Facebook scrolls and prayers for the safety of her parents and grandparents.

    "I felt sick all day. I couldn't eat. I didn't know what to do. I was helpless," she said.

    Thirteen hours and what felt like 1,000 unanswered phone calls passed before she heard from her family.

    The call finally came at 4 p.m. On the other side of the line was her family, who drove out of the area after the water receded. She learned that her grandparents escaped their flooded home with the help of their neighbors’ boat.

    "Sara, I'm blessed," said her grandfather whom, just a few hours earlier, was sitting on the kitchen sink, watching the water pour into his home while comforting his wife through her fear of drowning.

    Baker considers herself one of the lucky ones, and she knew she needed to step up for her community. She used her greatest tool — her social media platform — and shared her community's story. From Las Vegas to Florida, the support rolled in, allowing Baker to purchase and deliver water, food and cleaning supplies to the hollers of Eastern Kentucky. In total, she raised over $5,000 for supplies and support.

    "I could not have done any of it without them," she said. "I am so grateful for my little platform of people because they truly showed up for Eastern Kentucky."

    In her multiple trips to the region, what stood out most to Baker wasn't the damage, but the unity of Letcher County. Among the destruction — thick mud and debris — were community members and strangers tirelessly working side by side to help others.

    "It's almost like no one has really had the time to grieve, because as soon as it happened, everyone started coming together," she said. "If (someone) gets their part cleaned up, they will go and help their neighbors."

    Kassidy Stumbo, another 2021 journalism alumna and current UK J. David Rosenberg College of Law student from Floyd County, falls into that category. She first saw the damage during her morning social media rounds, where members of her community were checking in on each other.

    Like Baker, Stumbo utilized her social media platforms to organize relief efforts. In total, she and friends and family took eight loads of food, hygiene products and clothes to various areas in the region.

    “The pictures are horrible, but the pictures do not do it justice," Stumbo said. “However bad you think it is, it’s probably 10 times worse.”

    Although those like Stumbo and Baker are participating in important relief work, the work is far from over.

    "Now that we’re over a month out, I worry that there's going to be this forgetting that (the flood) happened," Stumbo said. "I want to remind people that it will take years to rebuild the area. We need the help of the entire state."

    To view the University of Kentucky’s response to the historic flooding in Eastern Kentucky, please visit https://uknow.uky.edu/campus-news/university-kentucky-providing-support-eastern-kentucky-after-severe-flooding.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLaw

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: July 27, 2022 was an average night. At 2:30 a.m. the next morning, alumna Sara Baker's mother sent frantic, broken text messages, praying for the flood waters to stop before entering their family home in Whitesburg, Kentucky.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Jesi Jones-Bowman Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 28, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) is now accepting submissions for the 58th annual Oswald Research and Creativity Competition. The competition accepts reports of all forms of creativity and scholarship by UK undergraduates.

    Established in 1964 by then-President John Oswald as part of the university’s Centennial Celebration, the Oswald Research and Creativity Competition encourages undergraduate research across all fields of study.

    Students who enter the competition will pick a category that most closely aligns with their project. The seven submission categories include:

    • Biological Sciences;
    • Design (architecture, landscape architecture, interior design);      
    • Fine Arts (film, music, painting, sculpture, video);
    • Humanities: Creative;
    • Humanities: Critical Research;
    • Physical and Engineering Sciences; and 
    • Social Sciences.

    The Design and Fine Arts student submissions will be displayed in the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library from Nov. 7-11, 2022.

    Eligibility
    Any current UK undergraduate (full- or part-time) who does not already have a four-year degree is eligible for this competition and is invited to submit papers and other projects. Students have the option of submitting multiple projects in different categories, but can only submit a single project in one category (e.g. report in Biological Sciences and photo project in Fine Arts).

    Selection, recognition and awards
    Student submissions are sent anonymously to faculty reviewers in related fields and are judged based on a rubric. Entries are judged on originality, clarity of expression, scholarly or artistic contribution, and the validity, scope and depth of the project or investigation. To view previous winning submissions, click here.

    A total of 14 student cash awards will be awarded. First place ($350), second place ($200) and honorable mention, if applicable, awards will be presented to winners in each category and announced during a special awards ceremony on Nov. 17 at 4:30 p.m. in the Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library.

    The deadline to submit is Oct. 30, 2022.

    For additional information on the call for entries and the submission form, click here.

    of Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationDesignEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreHealth SciencesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Lindsay Travis
    Lindsay.Travis [at] uky.edu
    "> Lindsay.Travis [at] uky.edu
    859-257-1076 Summary: The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research is now accepting submissions for the 58th annual Oswald Research and Creativity Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Meg Mills Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 23, 2022) — Members of the University of Kentucky community can now access The New York Times (NYT) and its educational resources free of charge.

    The UK College of Communication and Information, UK Libraries and the Student Government Association (SGA) have partnered with the NYT to provide the school-sponsored readership program to all students, faculty and staff.

    “UK Student Government is proud to expand access to reliable news through The Wall Street Journal and now The New York Times,” said UK’s Student Body President Andrew Laws. “Through this partnership, our students can receive unlimited free access to both of these renowned news sources, allowing them to stay informed on the day's events at all times. We look forward to ensuring all UK students get free access to these subscriptions throughout the year.”

    The university continues to offer a readership program with The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) free of charge, through a partnership with UK Libraries and SGA, first arranged by the Gatton College of Business and Economics in 2020. The partnership was renewed earlier this year. Both the WSJ and NYT agreements have been signed for three years.

    Jennifer Greer, dean of the College of Communication and Information, ran campus readership programs at two previous universities. As the WSJ was already on campus, she signed on with SGA and UK Libraries to add access to the NYT. Providing access to news produced by journalists who abide by professional ethical standards is important in an era of misinformation, Greer said.

    "These two papers also have varied editorial points of view, which helps set the stage for informed, robust debate essential for a functioning democracy," she said.

    UK Libraries is the key to providing UK access, handling the logistics so that anyone with an @uky.edu email address can access the papers.

    “UK Libraries is delighted to collaborate with the SGA, and the College of Communication and Information add access to The New York Times to the campus community,” said Kate Seago, director of acquisitions for UK Libraries. “These partnerships will bring a variety of perspectives on current topics and events. Both WSJ and NYT are rich resources for research.”

    With this newest partnership, members have full digital access to NYT at NYTimes.com and through the app. Additionally NYT is offering a variety of learning tools for faculty and staff to use in the classroom.

    Here is more the NYT readership program offers:

    • unlimited access on NYTimes.com
    • archives (dating back to 1851)
    • unlimited access to two great learning tools: The New York Times in Education website and The Learning Network
    • select events only open to subscribers
    • Spanish and Mandarin Chinese versions of NYTimes.com
    • all multimedia, including video, photography, VR features and new multimedia to come
    • newsletters
    • podcasts
    • Daily 360 content — two-dimensional, 360° views
    • augmented reality/virtual reality 

    How to activate your NYT membership:

    New subscribers to NYT can visit accessnyt.com to create an account (register). Simply, type in the University of Kentucky as the school name and follow the instructions. Email edu [at] nytimes.com with any questions.

    Existing registered subscribers with ACTIVE PAID subscriptions need to cancel their personal subscription by connecting with a chat agent on the site, or calling 800-698-4637 before creating an account. Once the subscription is canceled, they can visit accessnyt.com, type in the University of Kentucky as the school name and follow the instructions based on their location. Since the subscriber “Already has an account " they click “Log In" (found below "Create an Account"). Input their email address and the same “Password” created for their previous account. 

    Existing registered subscribers that DO NOT HAVE AN ACTIVE NYT subscription can visit accessnyt.com, type in the University of Kentucky as the school name and follow the instructions based on their location. Since the subscriber "Already has an account " they click “Log In" (found below "Create an Account"). Input their email address and the same “Password” created for their previous account.

    Questions can be emailed to edu [at] nytimes.com for help.

    More information about NYT can be found here.

    More information about UK’s WSJ readership program, including how to activate your account can be found here.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and InformationLibraries

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Members of the University of Kentucky community can now access The New York Times and its educational resources free of charge thanks to a partnership between UK College of Communication and Information, UK Libraries and the Student Government Association. The NYT program joins the already offered Wall Street Journal readership program.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy C. Lynn Hiler Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 19, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence is honored to announce the 2022 class of Chellgren Student Fellows and welcome the new director and endowed chair, Isabel C. Escobar, Ph.D.

    The Chellgren Center Student Fellows Program aligns with the university’s goal of cultivating undergraduate excellence. By providing experiences that go beyond the classroom, students become prepared for the next phase of their career, whether it be graduate school, a position in their field or a gap year dedicated to service. Created in 2005 with a gift from Paul Chellgren, a UK graduate, and his family, the Chellgren Center creates unique educational opportunities for outstanding undergraduate students and professors at the university. Chellgren’s commitment to undergraduate education at UK has impacted thousands by creating countless number of opportunities for UK students, staff and faculty.

    In addition to the new class, the Chellgren Center has a new director this year after the recent retirement of long-standing chair, Phil Kraemer. Isabel Escobar took the helm on July 1 after an internal search process. Escobar has been at UK since 2015 and has served in several leadership roles including associate director of the Center of Membrane Sciences and co-director of the College of Engineering Undergraduate Research Scholars Program. Escobar joins C. Lynn Hiler, program coordinator for the center, and Pat Whitlow and Emily Sallee of the Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, to bring enriching programs to all Chellows and award applicants.

    “I am honored to have been selected to be the director of the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence,” Escobar said. “I hope that I can inspire fellows and all associated with the center to make a positive impact on the world.”

    The Chellgren Center would like to extend a warm thank you to Luke Bradley for taking the reins from January to June during our leadership transition. 

    The Chellgren Center will be hosting an open house 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 27, on the second floor of Funkhouser Building (Rooms 224, 211 and 219/221). Stop by to welcome the new class of fellows, meet Escobar and learn more about the Chellgren Center, Office of Nationally Competitive Awards and campus partner the Office of Undergraduate Research. Please RSVP if you plan to join. 

    The 2022-23 Chellgren Student Fellows are:

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    • Ginny Lyle
    • Lizzie Rice
    • Gage Tucker

    College of Arts and Sciences

    • Ella Brown-Terry
    • Kailey Cain
    • Rohan Desai
    • Sara Dickens
    • Rachel Hwang
    • Cierra Ledford
    • Sandy Nino
    • Elliana Sanchez
    • Anna Stockstill
    • Connor Stuart
    • Emma Thyne
    • Madison Wade

    Gatton College of Business and Economics

    • Faham Hossain
    • Joshua Plain

    College of Communication and Information

    • Helena Arjona

    College of Education

    • Jada Lunsford

    College of Engineering

    • James Chen
    • Tiffany Clark
    • Nicholas Coffman
    • Elizabeth Corry
    • Asa O'Neal
    • Andres Phillips
    • Coleman Reed

    College of Fine Arts

    • Pascalle Le Roy
    • Emmylou Tidwell

    College of Health Sciences

    • Helena Weiss

    College of Public Health

    • Emma Grace

    The Chellgren Student Fellows Program is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Office of the Provost. To learn more about the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, please visit www.uky.edu/chellgren/.

    The Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence's 2022 class of Student Fellows.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringFine ArtsHealth SciencesPublic Health

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Ryan Girves
    ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    "> ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    859-323-8464 Summary: The Chellgren Center Student Fellows Program aligns with the university’s goal of cultivating undergraduate excellence. By providing experiences that go beyond the classroom, students become prepared for the next phase of their career, whether it be graduate school, a position in their field or a gap year dedicated to service. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Kody Kiser and Meg Mills Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 12, 2022) — Part of the mission of the University of Kentucky’s College of Communication and Information is to teach students how to communicate effectively, obtain and evaluate information, and to create, produce and disseminate effective communication messages. Implementing that mission into their careers, many of the college’s graduates are doing important work in their area of study that often takes them across the globe.

    Ashley Westerman is one such graduate. A 2010 journalism major from Western Kentucky, she has lived out her dream of working in public radio. Currently, she is a producer for National Public Radio (NPR) based in Kiev, Ukraine, where she and her team cover the current war there, and the stories of the Ukrainian people living day-to-day in uncertainty.

    On this episode of "Behind the Blue," Westerman talks about growing up in Kentucky and the importance of attending the University of Kentucky, how her career path took her from Washington, D.C., to southeast Asia and eventually Ukraine, and how her mentors and teachers at UK prepared her for the unpredictable path her career as a journalist has led her on.

    "Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify. Become a subscriber to receive new episodes of “Behind the Blue” each week. UK’s latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers will be featured, along with the most important news impacting the university.

    For questions or comments about this or any other episode of "Behind the Blue," email BehindTheBlue [at] uky.edu or tweet your question with #BehindTheBlue. Transcripts for this or other episodes of "Behind the Blue" can be downloaded from the show’s blog page.

    To discover what’s wildly possible at the University of Kentucky, click here.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: On this episode of "Behind the Blue," Westerman talks about growing up in Kentucky and the importance of attending the University of Kentucky, how her career path took her from Washington, D.C., to southeast Asia and eventually Ukraine, and how her mentors and teachers at UK prepared her for the unpredictable path her career as a journalist has led her on.Media Embed: <iframe title="Embed Player" src="https://play.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/24315651/height/128/theme/modern/size/standard/thumbnail/yes/custom-color/0033a0/time-start/00:00:00/playlist-height/200/direction/backward/download/yes" height="128" width="100%" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" oallowfullscreen="true" msallowfullscreen="true" style="border: none;"></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Stacey Gish Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Alumni Association announced the selection of 27 student representatives as Alumni Ambassadors for the 2022-23 academic year. Alumni Ambassadors serve as official student hosts of UK, promoting the university at numerous events in partnership between the Office of the President, Office of Philanthropy and the UK Alumni Association.

    Alumni Ambassadors represent the best and brightest of UK students, demonstrating high achievement in their collegiate careers and a dedication to the advancement of the university. Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA or higher and represent diverse backgrounds, cultures and areas of campus involvement.

    Alumni Ambassadors for 2022-23, including class, major(s) and hometown, are:

    • Elizabeth Akers, a communication sophomore, from Lexington;
    • Madison Argue, an agricultural and medical biotechnology sophomore, from Dayton, Ohio;
    • Dasha Boikov, an agricultural and medical biotechnology junior, from Nicholasville, Kentucky;
    • Isabella Bowling, an electrical engineering senior, from Dallas, Texas;
    • Isha Chauhan, a biology junior, from LaGrange, Kentucky;
    • Jordan Colella, a human nutrition junior, from Nicholasville;
    • Meredith Compton, a clinical leadership and management junior, from Columbia, Kentucky;
    • Abigail Elbert, a human health sciences senior, from Wildwood, Missouri;
    • Mary Grace Hemingway, a clinical leadership and management junior, from Owensboro, Kentucky;
    • Lauren Hickey, French and Francophone studies junior, from Lexington;
    • Jackson Huse, a pre-med computer engineering and computer science junior, from Louisville;
    • Christy Kirkham, a human health sciences junior, from Champaign, Illinois;
    • Grace McDonald, a human health sciences senior, from Somerset, Kentucky;
    • Lilly Meekin, a neuroscience senior, from Lexington;
    • Lily Messer, a communication junior, from London, Kentucky;
    • Veronica Murray, a marketing and art history and visual studies senior, from Dallas, Texas;
    • Shannon Nguyen, a biology and neuroscience junior, from Louisville;
    • Emily O’Dell, a human health sciences senior, from Ashland, Kentucky;
    • Madeline Pass, an integrated strategic communication senior, from Louisville;
    • Elizabeth Piipponen, a human health sciences and human nutrition senior, from Naples, Florida;
    • Julia Rhorer, a pre-med human health sciences junior, from Frankfort, Kentucky;
    • Autumn Rodgers, an agricultural and medical biotechnology senior, from Paducah, Kentucky;
    • Mattie Strode, a business management senior, from Bowling Green, Kentucky;
    • Tanner Thompson, an accounting, finance and management senior, from Monticello, Kentucky;
    • Rachel Weaver, a communications sciences and disorders senior, from Owensboro;
    • Lauren Weisert, a neuroscience senior, from Louisville; and
    • Caroline Youdes, a biology junior, from Louisville.

    The Alumni Ambassadors are available upon request to serve at university functions. Requests should be submitted at least two weeks in advance of the event and approved by UK Alumni Association staff.

    For more information on the Alumni Ambassadors and to request an ambassador for an event, visit www.ukalumni.net/AlumniAmbassadors.  

    The UK Alumni Association is committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 800-269-2586.

    The 2022-23 UK Alumni Ambassadors. Photo by Stacey Gish, UK Alumni Association. Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsArtHealth Sciences

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Alumni Ambassadors represent the best and brightest of UK students, demonstrating high achievement in their collegiate careers and a dedication to the advancement of the university.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Martin School Report Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2022) — One of the country’s best-known experts on Generation Z, John Della Volpe of Harvard University’s Kennedy School Institute of Politics, will deliver the University of Kentucky 2022 Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Lecture beginning 4 p.m., Oct. 11, in the Gatton College of Business and Economics’ Kincaid Auditorium.

    The lecture is hosted by the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration and co-sponsored by the College of Communication and Information. Volpe’s presentation will be followed by a Gen Z panel discussion moderated by UK’s Al Cross, journalism professor and director of the Institute for Rural Journalism.

    The lecture is free and open to the public.

    "We could not have a more timely or interesting subject for this year’s Ford Lecture," said Ron Zimmer, Martin School director. "Our program is exactly three weeks from the November midterm elections and there will be considerable interest in hearing John’s perspective on the role Gen Z voters may play in shaping the results."

    Volpe has led the Institute of Politics polling initiative on understanding America’s youth since 2000. He oversees the biannual Harvard Youth Poll, a survey of American youth and their political opinions, voting trends and views of public service.

    The Washington Post has referred to Volpe as “one of the world’s leading authorities on global sentiment, opinion and influence, especially among young Americans and in the age of digital and social media.” He is a frequent contributor on MSNBC’s "Morning Joe" program and has also appeared on "The Daily Show" with Trevor Noah.

    First held in 2014, the Ford Lecture is named for the late former Kentucky governor and four-term U.S. senator, who lectured at the Martin School after retiring from the Senate in 1999. Past speakers have included former Sens. Alan Simpson, Tom Daschle and Bill Bradley; former Kansas Gov. and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Pulitzer Prize winner and historian Jon Meacham, along with other well-known individuals with public policy expertise.

    Pete Comparoni | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationMartin School of Public Policy and Administration

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Danielle Donham
    danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    "> danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2660 Summary: John Della Volpe of Harvard University’s Kennedy School Institute of Politics, will deliver the University of Kentucky 2022 Wendell H. Ford Public Policy Lecture beginning 4 p.m., Oct. 11, in the Gatton College of Business and Economics’ Kincaid Auditorium.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 18, 2022) — The Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame will induct eight outstanding journalists during a reception from 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 22, in the Gatton Student Center’s Grand Ballroom on the University of Kentucky campus.

    The Hall of Fame Class of 2022 includes J. Scott Applewhite of The Associated Press, Jerry Brewer of The Washington Post, the late Melissa Forsythe of WHAS-TV, the late John B. Gaines of the Bowling Green Daily News, the late Bill Mardis of the Somerset's Commonwealth Journal, Mark Maynard of Kentucky Today, writing coach and retired editor Stuart Warner and Deborah Yetter of The Courier-Journal.

    Seating for the event is limited. Past inductees of the Hall of Fame and members of the news media may RSVP by 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2, by calling the UK School of Journalism and Media at 859-257-3904 or emailing pamela.edwards [at] uky.edu.

    The Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, founded by the UK Journalism Alumni Association in 1981, honors journalists who are Kentucky natives or have spent a significant portion of their careers working for Kentucky news-media organizations.

    More information about the Hall of Fame Class of 2022 is at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/events/2022-kentucky-journalism-hall-fame.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, founded by the UK Journalism Alumni Association in 1981, honors journalists who are Kentucky natives or have spent a significant portion of their careers working for Kentucky news-media organizations.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Lindsey Piercy and Steve Shaffer Wednesday

    Video produced by UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications and Marketing and Brand Strategy. To view captions for this video, push play and click on the CC icon in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen. If using a mobile device, click on the "thought bubble" in the same area.

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 17, 2022) It’s the moment every college senior anticipates.

    Meryum Siddiqi envisioned being dressed in a blue cap and gown while proudly walking across the Rupp Arena stage — putting one foot in front of the other until her outstretched hand reached that coveted diploma. There would be family members giving warm hugs without warning and genuine smiles being captured in countless photos.

    But those congratulatory gestures never came.

    “It was March of 2020. We had been sent home from school due to COVID-19,” Siddiqi said. “I thought, ‘this will blow over so quickly.’”

    But little did she know, days would turn into weeks, weeks would turn into months. The world as we once knew it drastically changed. The definition of normal disappeared — and so did Siddiqi’s plans for her final semester.

    She was left with questions, anxieties and fears about what the future would hold. So, Siddiqi decided to channel her energy into schoolwork.

    “In April, UK was offering remote learning devices for students,” she said. “Since I was already at home, I thought I would focus even more on school, so I requested the iPad. And that was the beginning of the unexpected.”

    *****

    The University of Kentucky strives to integrate technology in a way that supports students.

    A joint venture between Student Success and the EVPFA/IT offices, Smart Campus is an incubator for entrepreneurial ideas on how best to prepare students in new modes of thinking and contributing.

    With those goals in mind, the Smart Campus iPad initiative was launched in 2019. As a result, more than 19,000 UK-issued iPads are being used by sophomores, juniors, seniors, faculty and staff.

    “The iPad initiative is about equalizing the playing field so all students have access to state of the art technology,” Kirsten Turner, vice president for Student Success said. “Our students deserve to be the drivers of society — the Commonwealth needs a workforce and educated citizenry pushing at the edges of knowledge to solve the most intractable problems.”

    During the pandemic, UK wanted to expand upon efforts to use technology to maximize learning and support for students.

    It was an unprecedented transition — creating a “reimagined normal” for an entire campus community. But together, faculty, staff and students rose to the challenge. And technology was at the center of creating solutions.

    Almost overnight, Zoom went from being a somewhat niche platform to propping up the entirety of UK’s institutional operations, along with other enterprise technologies.

    To help students with the transition, UK offered iPads to those who didn’t have access to technology to complete schoolwork at home.

    “This initiative enabled the university to adapt during the COVID-19 pandemic, and Maryam Siddiqi’s story is a perfect example of why we continue to invest in technology for our students,” Rosa Crisantos, an ITS specialist who helps lead the Smart Campus Initiative, “In today’s interconnected world, students need technology to thrive. By putting these iPads in their hands, we are bridging the technology gap and ensuring they have the tools to succeed during their college careers and after leaving campus.”

    *****

    Siddiqi viewed the iPad as a faint silver lining during a dark time. But it quickly turned into much more.

    “Over the next two months, I was filling my time with creating tons of designs,” she said.

    Designs of daises, trees and rainbows in soothing pastels began to fill Siddiqi’s iPad. While confined to her house, Siddiqi’s creativity was unlocked and continued to blossom.

    “I really draw from things in nature — florals, rainbows, the sky — because nature reflects authenticity,” she explained. “But I find a way to make it bright and colorful, because that’s what draws people in.”

    This is where Siddiqi leaned in on the knowledge and skills she gained during her time at UK.

    In May of 2020, she earned a bachelor's degree in business administration from the Gatton College of Business and Economics and a bachelor’s degree in integrated strategic communication from the College of Communication and Information.

    Not long after Siddiqi began doodling on her iPad, her designs came to life on glass cups, notepads, stickers, totes and more. “It wasn’t a business at first, but my friends became interested,” she said.

    Siddiqi’s designs became products, and her products became a business — complete with a website, social media presence and a mission.

    “My vision became creating and sharing designs and products that would make people smile — even if just for a moment.”

    And it worked.

    Meryum Designs went viral — gaining thousands and thousands of followers on Instagram. Orders also came flooding in. The designs that brought a smile to Siddiqi’s face had done the same for others. 

    “It’s kind of crazy. I never expected drawing designs on my iPad to turn into an entire business.”

    *****

    Siddiqi’s senior year didn’t turn out as she’d always imagined it.

    But when she reflects on those months in 2020, Siddiqi thinks of the business she created. Though small, it continues to have a large impact on her outlook on life and on others.

    Now, Siddiqi is encouraging fellow students to embrace the unexpected.

    “UK giving these iPads to students is such a big investment in us,” she said. “If your someone who thinks outside of the box — which UK encourages us to do — you should explore the opportunities available to you through resources.”

    Meryum Siddiqi’s designs became products, and her products became a business — complete with a website, social media presence and a mission.Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    At the University of Kentucky, students are at the center of all that we do. From the moment you become a Wildcat through graduation and beyond, the Office for Student Success is committed to supporting you. Comprised of five areas and 25 units, together, they have one vision — to help students live a life of meaning. Student Success works through an equitable, holistic and inclusive lens to design and deliver unparalleled services and support a diverse community of learners in achieving their wildest ambitions. In the Office for Student Success this is what we do — this is who we are. You can explore resources available to you here. If you have additional questions, you can reach a Student Success team member by calling the helpline 859-218-YouK (9685).

    Contact Lindsey Piercy
    lindsey.piercy [at] uky.edu
    "> lindsey.piercy [at] uky.edu
    859-323-5613 Summary: "During the pandemic, UK was offering remote learning devices for students,” Meryum Siddiqi said. “Since I was already at home, I thought I would focus even more on school, so I requested the iPad. And that was the beginning of the unexpected.”Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy John Blaine Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 22, 2022) — Ubuntu is a Nguni Bantu term meaning “humanity” and is often translated as “I am because we are.” In that spirit, the University of Kentucky Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives and the UK Graduate School’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion invites graduate and professional students, staff and faculty to the sixth annual Ubuntu Orientation Celebration 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, in The Cornerstone Esports Lounge. One of the primary goals of Ubuntu is to connect diverse graduate and professional students (new and current) with university resources and support networks.  

    Students will have opportunities to network with faculty, staff, administrators and other students, as well as hear a powerful message from the keynote speaker Danelle Stevens-Watkins, Ph.D., vice president for research in diversity and inclusion and director of UNITE (United in True Equity) Research Initiative. In addition to building a strong sense of community and belonging, Ubuntu aims to equip diverse students with the resources and contacts to ease their transition into the University of Kentucky, the city of Lexington and life as graduate and professional students. This event is free, and spouses and children are welcome!

    The schedule for the event is as follows: 

    • 5-6:30 p.m.: Food, resource fair and networking 
    • 6:30-6:50 p.m.: Keynote speaker: Danelle Stevens-Watkins 
    • 6:50-7p.m.: Q&A with Stevens-Watkins
    • 7-8 p.m.: Ice cream social and games

    To register for the year's Ubuntu Orientation Celebration, click here

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLawMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkUK HealthCare

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Ryan Girves
    ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    "> ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    859-323-8464 Summary: The Center for Graduate and Professional Diversity Initiatives and the Graduate School’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion invites all staff, faculty, and graduate and professional students to the sixth annual Ubuntu Orientation Celebration 5-8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 26, in The Cornerstone Esports Lounge.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Catherine Hayden Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 25, 2022) — As the University of Kentucky and the United States at large started easing out of restrictions brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic, Kernel Media was able to make its way back to the office full time during the 2021-2022 academic year. The student journalists and content creators of the Kentucky Kernel and KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion could continue the traditions they had to abstain from since March 2020.

    The 2020-2021 Kernel and KRNL editors, Natalie Parks and Rachael Courtney, had their editorships upended by the dawn of the pandemic. However, their successors, Kernel Editor Rayleigh Deaton and KRNL Editor Allie Diggs, got to return to the newsrooms that have birthed award-winning content and esteemed journalists, photographers and designers.

    “I was incredibly thankful that restrictions were loosened when I stepped into the role of editor,” Deaton said. “I think we all needed this because it seemed to breathe new life into the staff. Friendships were rekindled and created, and I think we were a stronger staff and group of friends at the end of the year than when we started.”

    While it was refreshing to return to in-person operations, making a comeback didn’t come without its challenges. Masks, social distancing and potential COVID-19 infection remained alongside difficulties in access to venues and interviews. This made the already demanding task of planning a new staff and meeting print deadlines that much more taxing. 

    The way Diggs tackled this was by cutting back on KRNL’s staff. Although student interest in the magazine has been growing, she wanted to prioritize her staff’s safety above all else. This also gave ample opportunity for everyone on staff to be involved in at least one aspect of production.

    “Planning a safe interview or photo shoot was very challenging at times,” Diggs said. “People wanted to be involved in everything — which is fantastic— but we couldn’t allow too many people in one place. So executive members had to figure out a schedule for each team member.”

    Similarly, one of Deaton’s biggest concerns was ensuring her staff felt appreciated, needed and personally connected. Weekly production nights where half the staff all crammed onto one computer to lay out the paper were a hallmark of the pre-pandemic Kernel. Deaton said production night back in the office feels like a party with friends, just like she had hoped to foster.

    With in-person gatherings came better collaboration, something Student Media Advisor Ryan Craig said was evident in his students’ work.

    “Both staffs were younger and less experienced than previous years, but because they worked so hard, they were able to reach their goals and even surpass where they wanted to be when the academic year was over,” Craig said. “Because they are so young, there is a higher probability that they will be among the best for the foreseeable future.”

    This past school year, the staff of 2020-2021, along with a few of the newer 2021-2022 staff, were finally rewarded for their efforts in the form of around 80 awards.

    “With every award that comes out, I am relieved because I have something tangible I can point to and say all those sacrifices led to something,” Parks said.

    2020-2021 College Media Association Pinnacle Awards:

    Kernel, four national awards, earning one first-place finish.

    2020-2021 Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker Awards:

    Kernel, six national awards, earning four first-place finishes, six honorable mentions.

    KRNL, two national awards, three honorable mentions.

    2021-2022 Hearst Journalism Awards:

    Kernel staffers had three individual Top 10 finishes and one individual Top 20 finish, with awards earned in photojournalism, sports writing and multimedia digital news/enterprise. Managing and photo editor Jack Weaver was also a photojournalism finalist, allowing him to compete in the National Photojournalism Championship and finish as a runner-up. It has been decades since a Kernel photographer has made it to the national stage.

    2020-2021 Kentucky Press Association Awards:

    Kernel, a Certificate of Merit, 44 awards, sweeping six categories and earning 19 first place finishes. The newspaper also won General Excellence for the fourth straight year and Natalie Parks was named Collegiate Journalist of the Year for the second straight year.

    2022 Society of Professional Journalists Region 5 Mark of Excellence Awards: 

    Kernel, five awards, including the Corbin Gwaltney Award for Best All-Around Student Newspaper for Large Schools. The newspaper also won national awards for breaking news and editorial writing.

    KRNL, one award, earning Best Student Magazine finalist.

    Other awards in the past year:

    KRNL’s Kendall Boron and Addison Cave won two Silver ADDYs, Peyton Fike won a Gold ADDY and Emme Schumacher won a Silver ADDY from Ad Club Lexington’s American Advertising Awards.

    KRNL’s Addison Cave, Olivia Ford, Emme Schumacher and their all-female team finished in fourth place in the National Student Advertising Competition, UK’s best finish ever.

    KRNL’s Addison Cave won first place and Emme Schumacher placed third in the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication logo contest. Cave’s logo will be used for the 2023 AEJMC conference in Washington, D.C.

    Although the staffs don’t create their content with awards in mind, the recognition from awards committees — and, more importantly, the public they serve — are always welcomed and appreciated.

    “It always feels good winning awards and seeing hard work pay off, but as a staff we were just proud of the work that we did,” Courtney said. “We had many obstacles thrown at us.”

    Now that Kernel Media is back in full swing, people can expect even more top-notch, student-produced journalism — not that the pandemic ever stopped that. In March 2022, the editors for the 2022-2023 school year were selected. Deaton will be one of only a handful of repeat editors for the Kernel while Rana Alsoufi will carry on the torch for KRNL. Both had envisioned leading the charge of their respective offices and both look forward to continuing the legacy.

    “I often tell the students that all the awards in the world mean nothing if you aren't operating at the highest level of journalism you can,” Craig said. “Every day they ask themselves if they are doing the best they can do. They are learning, they struggle and sometimes they fail, but I never question their desire to tell the best stories possible. It is remarkable to watch.”

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: This past school year, the staff of 2020-2021, along with a few of the newer 2021-2022 staff, were finally rewarded for their efforts in the form of around 80 awards.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Lissette De la Cruz Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 8, 2022) — University of Kentucky Libraries recognizes exemplary faculty member Reinette Jones as the recipient of the 2022 Paul A. Willis Outstanding Faculty Award.

    Bestowed annually and named for former UK Libraries director Paul A. Willis, the Willis Award recognizes the outstanding achievements of a UK Libraries faculty member who stands out amongst their colleagues.

    “Reinette has had a profound impact that stretches beyond our campus and even our state, opening doors and creating pathways to knowledge that would otherwise be buried or inaccessible. I am thrilled that she is being recognized with the Willis Award,” said Doug Way, dean of UK Libraries.

    Special Collections Research Center (SCRC) librarian Reinette Jones received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and a master’s degree in library science from UK. She has served the university and Lexington community at several campus locations since joining UK Libraries in 1988.

    Currently serving as a member of the SCRC in community outreach, reference, research, and as an affiliate with African American and Africana Studies in the UK College of Arts and Sciences, Jones has developed several important resources for researchers at UK and beyond, including the research guide for lesbian studies and the Notable Kentucky African Americans (NKAA) Database.

    Co-founded by Jones and fellow UK librarian Rob Aken in 2003, the NKAA Database features entries with names, places, events, communities, and sources that share the often untold or marginalized stories of African Americans in and from Kentucky. Boasting over 450,000 visits in the past year, the NKAA Database serves today as a major resource for research and learning at the state level with a growing patron base nationally and internationally.

    Jones is the author of “Library Service to African Americans in Kentucky,” and co-author of “Special Libraries of the Bluegrass.” Her Black History Month Virtual Exhibits are available online in UKnowledge. Jones has also written more than 20 published articles on library history and Kentucky African Americans and has written several LGBTQ* short fiction essays. She has also created one of the most used research guides at the University of Kentucky Libraries, “Lesbian Studies.” The guide is one of very few academic research guides dedicated solely to lesbians.

    Jones has been recognized for her work with the LGBTQ* community. She has received the Lexington Fairness Hall of Fame Award for Lifetime Commitment Towards Achieving Fairness; Imperial Court of Kentucky – Michael Thompson Community Service Award; both the Trailblazer Award and the Appreciation Award from Bluegrass Black Pride Inc.; and the University of Kentucky LGBTQ* Alumni of the Year Award.

    “This award is about so much more than what I have done, it is a shared recognition to all of the contributors who keep on pushing. We thank you,” Jones said.

    Jones continues her work with NKAA Database, the LGBTQ* communities, African Americans in Kentucky history presentations and interviews, and her weekly vignettes on some aspect of Kentucky taken from the collection of Kentucky newspapers.

    Jones is honored alongside this year’s recipients of the Medallion for Intellectual Achievement, the Dean’s Award for Outstanding Performance and the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Scholarship.

    A 1963 graduate of the University of Kentucky, Paul A. Willis served as a library director for 41 years throughout the Southeast. He worked as a cataloger at the Library of Congress before beginning his master’s in library science. In 1966, he began as a circulation librarian at UK’s Law Library before becoming a university law librarian. He then served as director of UK Libraries from 1973 to 2003. He later served as the University of South Carolina’s dean of libraries from 2004 until 2007.

    During his career at UK, Willis created the Information Alliance consortium, planned the construction of the William T. Young Library, and expanded its collections and services.

    As the premier research library in the Commonwealth, UK Libraries empowers lifelong learners to discover, create and connect by providing ever-expanding access to quality information and collaborating with academic and creative communities worldwide to advance knowledge, enhance scholarship and preserve the history and culture of the Commonwealth. More information about UK Libraries can be found on its website.

    Special Collections librarian Reinette Jones. Photo by oral history archivist Kopana Terry. Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationGraduate SchoolLibraries

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Summary: University of Kentucky Libraries recognizes exemplary faculty member Reinette Jones as the recipient of the 2022 Paul A. Willis Outstanding Faculty Award.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Elizabeth Chapin Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 7, 2022) — The University of Kentucky’s $87 million HEALing Communities Study (HCS) to address the opioid epidemic in Kentucky is expanding to more communities across the Commonwealth.

    The second wave of the study, known as WAVE 2, was launched in Bourbon, Campbell, Carter, Greenup, Jefferson, Jessamine, Knox and Mason counties July 1. Through the HCS intervention, communities will implement new recovery, treatment and prevention strategies proven to reduce opioid overdose deaths.

    Launched in 2019, the ambitious four-year study includes a multidisciplinary team of more than 25 UK researchers and leverages existing resources and initiatives in partnership with communities to implement various strategies to reduce opioid deaths across Kentucky.

    The randomized study includes 16 Kentucky counties impacted by opioid abuse and is broken down into two waves of eight counties each. WAVE 1, which includes Boyd, Boyle, Clark, Fayette, Floyd, Franklin, Kenton and Madison counties, was launched in 2020.

    Evidence-based practices implemented by the HCS team in partnership with community and state behavioral/health and criminal justice agencies include delivery of medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD), overdose prevention education, distribution of naloxone, a lifesaving medication that reverses the effects of opioids, and reducing risky prescribing.

    “Through WAVE 2 the HEALing Communities Study will bring life-changing outreach and access to treatment to thousands of Kentuckians,” said HCS principal investigator Sharon Walsh, Ph.D., a professor in UK’s College of Medicine and College of Pharmacy and director for the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. “The intervention will also help us better understand what’s needed in each community and where to focus and ramp up efforts to best support individuals to reduce opioid overdose deaths. What we learn will create sustainable solutions for the opioid epidemic in Kentucky that can also be replicated in communities throughout the nation.”

    In 2021, overdose deaths reached an all-time high in Kentucky and the U.S., with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting 107,000 deaths nationally, with a record 2,250 in Kentucky. The HCS team has been adjusting intervention strategies to address the rapidly evolving opioid crisis, including increasing naloxone distribution and expanding outreach and services in communities of color.

    In the months prior to the launch of each wave, the HCS team worked with community partners to establish the infrastructure needed to support the intervention. Community coalitions were identified in each county to help guide the intervention and determine what strategies to implement based on individual community needs.

    The WAVE 2 intervention includes community engagement to assist key stakeholders in applying evidence-based practices and a communications campaign to build demand for treatment and reduce stigma toward people with opioid use disorder. The HCS team is also working with various pharmacies and health care providers to implement safer opioid prescribing and dispensing.

    A recent update shows the impact such strategies have had in WAVE 1 communities since the intervention was launched in 2020. WAVE 1 is now in a sustainability phase, which is intended to build capacity to help community coalitions and partner organizations sustain the evidence-based practices after the study ends.

    HCS researchers will now begin to analyze data from WAVE 1 and 2 communities over the past year, using pre-intervention usual care in WAVE 2 as a control. The comparison will show how evidence-based practices work within different settings in each community. The WAVE 2 intervention is expected to end in early 2024.

    Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UM1DA049406. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkUK HealthCare

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207 Summary: UK's $87 million HEALing Communities Study, led by Sharon Walsh, Ph.D., includes a team of more than 25 UK researchers who are working with Kentucky communities to implement new recovery, treatment and prevention strategies proven to reduce opioid overdose deaths. The second wave of the study was launched in Bourbon, Campbell, Carter, Greenup, Jefferson, Jessamine, Knox and Mason counties July 1. Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Meredith Weber Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 5, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Alumni Association recently announced its 2022-23 Board of Directors’ officers during its annual Summer Workshop. This year’s officers are Antoine S. Huffman, president; Janie C. McKenzie-Wells, president-elect, Robert “Rob” Crady III, treasurer; and Jill H. Smith, secretary. The new slate officially took office July 1, 2022, and will serve until June 30, 2023.

    Antoine S. Huffman of Prosper, Texas, was elected president of the UK Alumni Association. He received his bachelor’s degree in telecommunications in 2005. While at Kentucky, he was a three-year starter for the Wildcats football team, becoming a UK NCAA record holder. He was also a member of the UK Athletic Association Board of Directors. He served three years as the Student-Athlete Advisory Committee president, two years as chairman for the UK Athletics Outreach Committee and was a member of the ODK National Leadership Honor Society. In 2005, Huffman became the first Black person to be crowned UK Homecoming king. He is active in the community with Habitat for Humanity, Boys and Girls Club, Salvation Army, and is a motivational speaker at local churches, schools and special regional events. In 2002 to 2005, the Atlanta, Georgia, native was nationally recognized for his community service, academics and athletic achievement. In addition, he was a finalist for the Wuerffel Trophy. He received the ARA Sportsmanship Award, two-time ESPN The Magazine Academic All-America, four-time NCAA Academic All-American, four-time SEC Academic honor-roll, and was a member of the Good Works Team. Huffman has served as chairman for the Membership, Communications, Club Development, Nominating for Board of Directors, Finance & Investments and Governance committees within the UK Alumni Association. He served two terms as president of the Greater Nashville UK Alumni Club and served as the association’s treasurer this past year. He is a past recipient of the Joseph T. Burch Young Alumni Award. He is in the medical field as senior director, regional sales for Mizuho OSI, and he and his wife, Jessica Kibbe Huffman, who is a UK College of Education graduate, are Life Members of the UK Alumni Association. They have two sons, Jayden and Adonis.

    Janie C. McKenzie-Wells of Staffordsville, Kentucky, was elected president-elect of the UK Alumni Association. She graduated in 1983 from the UK College of Arts and Sciences with a bachelor’s degree in political science. She earned a law degree in 1986 from the UK J. David Rosenberg College of Law and competed on the UK National Moot Court Team. She was admitted to practice law in Kentucky in 1986 and has been admitted to practice before the U.S. Supreme Court, the 6th Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals and the U.S. District Courts for the Eastern and Western Districts of Kentucky. She is a certified general civil and family law mediator. She was also the first woman elected as 24th Circuit Family Court Judge. McKenzie-Wells is a member of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges and served as a delegate to the National Conference of State Trial Judges. She has served on the UK Alumni Association Board of Directors for several years as a representative from District VIII and the UK J. David Rosenberg College of Law and has been chairman and vice chairman of numerous committees. She is an active member and officer of the Big Sandy UK Alumni Club. McKenzie-Wells is a member of the UK Alumni Band and served as president and member of the UK Alumni Band Board. She received the 2006 UK Alumni Association Distinguished Service Award and the 2017 UK Law Alumni Association Distinguished Jurist Alumni Award. She is a member of UK Women & Philanthropy and served on the leadership council. She received the Boy Scouts of America 2013 Citizen of the Year Award in Johnson County, the SOAR 2014 Health Impact Award in the 5th Congressional District, and the 2017 Casey Family Programs Award. In 2016, she was inducted into the Paintsville High School Alumni Association Hall of Distinguished Alumni. She and her husband, Frank, have a daughter, Katherine Wells, M.D., a recent graduate of the UK College of Medicine.

    Robert “Rob” Crady III of Louisville, Kentucky, was elected treasurer of the UK Alumni Association. He received a bachelor’s degree in economics from the University of Kentucky in 1993. During his time at UK, he served as a member of the Freshman Representative Council and various other positions with the Student Government Association. He was a member of Phi Kappa Tau fraternity. To further his financial education, Crady studied for and received the Certified Trust and Financial Advisor designation from the American Bankers Association. He began his career with Fifth Third Bank’s Trust Department in Lexington, later moving to Louisville to work in the Trust Departments of Stock Yards Bank and National City Bank before returning to Lexington to manage National City’s Lexington Trust Department. Crady is a director with RW Baird (formerly Hilliard Lyons) and a founding member of the Wealth & Family Office Group. He has served on the board of directors of the Bingham Child Guidance Center as president and treasurer and is currently on the Board of Directors of the Cabbage Patch Settlement House and Nativity Academy at St. Boniface. Crady serves on the Planned Giving Committee of the Center for Women and Families. He is married to Holly Harris Crady, a 1997 graduate from the Gatton College of Business, and they have two children, Robbie and Abby.

    Jill H. Smith of Lexington, Kentucky, is secretary of the UK Alumni Association. She earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing and management from the University of Kentucky in 2005 and a master’s degree in career, technical and leadership education from the University of Kentucky in 2011. She began working at the UK Alumni Association in 2006 as a program coordinator and held four other positions at the association before becoming executive director in February 2020. She also serves as associate vice president for alumni engagement at UK and secretary of the UK Alumni Association Board of Directors. She has been an active volunteer with the Council for Advancement and Support of Education at both the state and district level. She is an advisor to the Delta Rho chapter of Delta Delta Delta, an active participant in Lexington area Tri-Delta alumni activities and is a Class of 2022 member of Leadership Kentucky. She is a Life Member of the UK Alumni Association, a UK Fellow and serves on several university committees. She and her husband, Ryan, who is a 2005 UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment graduate, have two children, Tanner and Emmy.

    The UK Alumni Association is committed to fostering lifelong engagement among alumni, friends, the association and the university. For more information about the UK Alumni Association, visit www.ukalumni.net or call 800-269-2586.

    (Back row, from left:) Jill H. Smith, secretary; Janie C. McKenzie-Wells, president-elect; and Robert “Rob” Crady III, treasurer. (Front Row:) Antoine S. Huffman, president. Photo by Mark Mahan.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationFine ArtsMusicGraduate SchoolLaw

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meredith Weber; 859-257-4439; meredith.weber [at] uky.edu

    Summary: The new slate officially took office July 1, 2022, and will serve until June 30, 2023.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 30, 2022) — From playing with the pros to working for the pros, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is proving that her leaving the court doesn’t mean she’s leaving sports.

    Nicole Britenriker, a 2010 integrated strategic communication graduate, came to UK to play collegiate volleyball and has graduated onto working in the professional sports realm. While she’s currently serving as a senior team talent advisor for the NBA, the road there didn’t always come as naturally as her athleticism.

    From the age of 5, Britenriker was absorbed by sports. She participated in just about everything: T-ball, soccer, gymnastics, tap dance, swim, softball, volleyball, basketball and track and field. And she didn’t just play — she dominated. From competing in the Junior League Softball World Series in middle school to getting recruited by Division I volleyball teams in high school, Britenriker’s affinity for sports grew right alongside her.

    “I was an athlete and blessed with athletic abilities that I was able to leverage across the board,” Britenriker said. “Sports were ingrained in me at every aspect, seasonally. So with just my love of being involved in sports, I didn’t know what it was going to be but I knew that when I got done with school and graduated that I wanted to be associated with sports and athletics with my career in some way.”

    After transferring to UK for her junior year, she began both her journey as a Wildcat volleyball player and an ISC major. While she knew what her player’s career would look like, peppered with national tournaments and time as an international professional, she knew less what her future career would be other than it would involve marketing and communications.

    Despite having played as a pro, it took Britenriker a year of hustling and making ends meet to finally get her foot in the door working for the pros. 

    For her first full-time job out of college, Britenriker got the opportunity to work with the Cincinnati Bengals. It was a dream job for her since that was her hometown team. There, she became acquainted with sales, working as a seasonal ticket sales representative, a ticket sales executive and a premium seating account executive over her three-year tenure.

    She then decided to pivot in sports sales by leaving tickets and instead going the sponsorship route. Through Learfield IMG College, Rupp Arena’s exclusive venue-media rights holder, Britenriker was reacquainted with UK and basketball. She spent over three years working in sales, first selling corporate sponsorships and then planning national sales. Making yet another pivot, Britenriker transitioned to Learfield’s human resources side. There she finished her seven-year tenure by managing talent acquisition and serving as the co-chair for the Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Task Force.

    When it came time for Britenriker to join the NBA, it was a natural progression that she was more than ready to take on.

    “When I set out on this sports career of mine, when I was still sitting at CATS (UK’s Center for Academic and Tutorial Services, where student-athletes can obtain academic support) at UK’s study table, working at a professional league office was a career goal,” Britenriker said. “To achieve that, with the NBA being the pinnacle place of preference, it’s obviously a bit of a career goal life achievement there. So, I was super thrilled and happy and once again on cloud nine in another time of my career.”

    As a senior team talent advisor, Britenriker serves as an overarching HR consultant to the HR departments of all 30 NBA teams, including the occasional WNBA team and NBA G League. Her job is all about talent management, retention and development, helping to ensure the NBA’s employees are always putting their best feet forward. She also leads the early- and mid-career talent acquisition programs from the recruitment standpoint.

    Although she’s only been with the NBA for a little over a year, Britenriker calls her experience with the organization a breath of fresh air. From being a leader in social responsibility to championing a diverse work environment, the NBA has more than lived up to Britenriker’s expectations. She says the support she has been given is empowering her to lead and drive her career further than ever before.

    “Just being in the room with an international, global brand and knowing the significance of our work on and off the court,” Britenriker said, “sometimes I have to pinch myself.”

    Nicole Britenriker, a 2010 integrated strategic communication graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: “Just being in the room with an international, global brand and knowing the significance of our work on and off the court,” Nicole Britenriker said, “sometimes I have to pinch myself.”Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 22, 2022) — What started off as a standard class presentation led to a University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alum finding a place for himself with one of the longest-running and best-selling American rock bands of all time.

    George Cranwell, a 2021 integrated strategic communication (ISC) graduate, joined the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band Chicago shortly after earning his degree from UK. He now serves as the band’s assistant production manager. How he got there though directly ties back to his time in the classroom. 

    During his senior year in an ISC event planning class, Cranwell got to meet the man who would help land him with Chicago, Beau Loendorf. As the co-founder and lead coordinator of the wedding planning business Big and Little Events, Loendorf gave a presentation to Cranwell’s class. Cranwell was so impressed with the presentation that he jumped at the opportunity when Loendorf was looking for a Big and Little Events intern.

    While serving as a Big and Little Events intern during his final semester of a five-year journey at UK, Loendorf approached Cranwell with yet another employment experience. Along with heading up Big and Little Events, Loendorf is also the director of VIP programming and touring planning for Chicago. After being impressed by Cranwell’s energy, passion for helping others and openness to learn, Loendorf offered the college senior a summer trial run with the band.

    Cranwell’s week and a half-long shadowing with the band was a success. In August 2021, he became a full-time member of the production team.

    “I’m so lucky that I found Beau and I reached out to him to apply for the internship and that he gave me the opportunity to work for him, intern for him,” Cranwell said. “For him to give me that opportunity further than the internship and invite me out to Chicago, I’m so thankful and so lucky for that. If I didn’t do a fifth year at Kentucky, I don’t think I would’ve met him. So maybe the fifth year was a good thing.”

    Since joining the band’s crew nine months ago, Cranwell has been thrust into tour life, traveling across the country to help the band entertain their legions of fans. Despite this being his first management and entertainment job, he has a hefty set of responsibilities on the road. 

    The band travels with three semi-trucks worth of gear, which includes 10 wardrobe cases that Cranwell is responsible for strategically organizing at the venues during load-in. In addition to setting up the band members’ dressing rooms to fit their necessary accommodations, he also handles the band’s hospitality, complimentary ticketing and post-show meals. Along with this, he runs the VIP experience before the show where he greets guests, gifts them swag bags, gives them a tour of the set along with information about the band and takes pictures of them on the stage. This experience is something friends and family of the crew and band can also experience with their guest passes, which Cranwell also helps to organize for the band. He said that sometimes it can be hard to coordinate things to the expected level of excellence at every venue, but that’s the name of the game. 

    “You gotta improvise, gotta do the best you can,” Cranwell said. “It’s all about making these guys happy and I think I’m doing a pretty good job at it.”

    Besides the bonus of traveling and meeting new people at every venue, Cranwell’s favorite part of the job is getting to personally know the band members and see first-hand the impact their music has made. From hearing stories about Chicago’s music playing at weddings to helping people power through chemotherapy, Cranwell learns more every day about how the band he works with affects people’s lives. Although he’s grateful for all the opportunities Chicago is giving him, he says his work doesn’t even feel like a job, and he wouldn’t have it any other way.

    “It’s really an honor to work for a group that is as incredible as Chicago,” Cranwell said. “These guys have been going for 55 years. It’s a great team out here, and we’re a family.”

    George Cranwell, a 2021 integrated strategic communications graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: George Cranwell, a 2021 integrated strategic communication (ISC) graduate, joined the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame band Chicago shortly after earning his degree from UK. He now serves as the band’s assistant production manager. How he got there though directly ties back to his time in the classroom. 
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 17, 2022) — For the third time in recent University of Kentucky history, and the second consecutive year, students in the College of Communication and Information’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication’s National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) team earned a place at the national finals, and UK’s best finish ever.

    This year’s team ended their history-making season with a fourth-place finish in the nation with their presentation and plans book for 2022 NSAC client Meta Quest 2, a virtual reality headset developed by Meta (formerly Facebook) Reality Labs.

    The NSAC provides college students from across the nation the opportunity to create a comprehensive strategic marketing/advertising/media campaign for a corporate client, offering real-world experience that students can earn while still in the classroom.

    Each client provides an assignment or case study outlining the history of its product and a current challenge. The case study reflects a real-world marketing challenge the student teams must research and then develop and test solutions. Student teams create a presentation and plans book and then “pitch” their solutions to a panel of judges, from the district to the national level.

    This year’s team, led by ISC Associate Professor Adriane Grumbein, won District 5, which encompasses American Advertising Federation college chapters in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia and was held April 22-23 in Toledo, Ohio. Around the nation, 107 teams competed in 15 national American Advertising Federation district events.

    This year was the 11th time a UK team won the District Five competition.

    After winning the district level, the team advanced to the semifinal round, held virtually May 5-6, where they competed against 19 other district winners from across the nation.

    The top eight teams in the semifinal competition moved on to the national competition, held June 2-5, in Nashville, Tennessee.

    After the votes were tallied, the UK team finished fourth, out of the more than 100 teams that entered this year’s competition, earning UK’s highest-ever finish.

    The team also won the AdMall by SalesFuel Best Research Award, given to the national finalist team deemed to have demonstrated the best marketing research in their presentation and plans book. The 2021 team also won this award, making UK only the fourth team to win this award twice in the award’s 18-year history, not to mention, consecutively.

    “Fourth place in the nation! I’m still in awe. But I’d be lying if I said I was surprised,” said Grumbein.

    “This team’s phenomenal placement is not a lucky break. It is the result of months of hard work, dedication and teamwork. I rarely encounter students with such talent, drive and commitment. To have 14 of them on a team together was truly a unique and wonderful experience. You better believe I’ll keep a close eye on this group — they are headed for great things, and I couldn’t be prouder!”

    ISC junior Emme Schumacher echoed the team aspect of this year’s success saying, “Not only have I grown personally and professionally, but I have also learned the value of working as a team.”

    “This team is full of so much talent and seeing us all come together to create this amazing campaign was definitely something special. I will forever be grateful for this experience and all the friendships I have made along the way,” Schumacher said. 

    The 2021-2022 all female NSAC team members were ISC students Camille Wright, Tori Smith, Grace Taylor, Kamryn Bogott, Emme Schumacher, Olivia Ford, Dani Jaffe, Katherine Yochum, Kate Maddox, Addison Cave, Makiyah Owens, Cat Kidman, Lauren McDowell and Julia Kimbrell.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: For the third time in recent University of Kentucky history, and the second consecutive year, students in the College of Communication and Information’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication’s National Student Advertising Competition team earned a place at the national finals, and UK’s best finish ever.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2022) — The sports industry is a multibillion-dollar global machine, and one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus is trying to channel that wealth to battle the end of cancer.

    Jeremy Jones, a 2011 communication graduate, is helping in the fight against cancer through The V Foundation for Cancer Research. The nonprofit was formed in 1993 by ESPN and late basketball coach Jim Valvano, known as Jimmy V, to award cancer research grants nationwide. Combining his passion for sports, love of marketing and affinity for philanthropy, Jones is working right in his sweet spot. 

    “I love what I do because it makes a difference,” Jones said. “I wake up every day and I still get to work in sports, but I’m also creating change, even if it’s a small piece. I’m on a team where our mission is Victory Over Cancer®, and that’s what we wake up for every day, and that’s our motto.”

    When Georgia-native Jones came to UK to play football, he wasn’t sure what his future path looked like. At the time, the university didn’t have a sports management track. Instead, Jones chose communication to enhance his people skills while taking as many sports-related classes as he could. Along with a virtual internship with a sports agency and a marketing internship with Learfield IMG College, formerly Rupp Arena’s exclusive venue-media rights holder, he said every move he made was calculated toward a career in sports.

    Marketing served as Jones’ entry point into the world of sports employment. After a few years brushing up on his marketing skills in real estate, he leveraged his communication skills to secure a spot as an account executive with the Brooklyn Nets. While many sports fanatics might have found working for a professional basketball team as a dream job, Jones knew after a year that his purpose lay somewhere else.

    Enter The V Foundation and an opening for a marketing manager for the Victory Ride cycling event. It was a short-lived role where Jones handled social media, marketing and promotion of the event, but he used his nine months on the job as the catalyst for his company career.

    It wasn’t long before he was promoted to engagement manager. In the three years he spent in the position, Jones managed the ambassador program, working with the likes of John Calipari, Dick Vitale, Kevin Durant and other celebrities. He helped these ambassadors share their cancer stories to help fundraise on behalf of The V Foundation. Some of these fundraisers included auctioning off game memorabilia and organizing fundraising dinners.

    His new position, director of brand and influencer partnerships, is a carry-over of the ambassador program. However, instead of just working with famous individuals, he also works with famous brands, specifically those geared toward millennials and Gen Z audiences. His goal is to bring a fresh face of donors to The V Foundation to complement their typical, big spending donor base.

    While Jones has had the opportunity to work with some of the biggest names in sports thanks to his job, he said treats everyone the same. This is a philosophy he has carried over into his role as the diversity, equity and inclusion committee chair. In summer 2020, he approached The V Foundation’s leadership team with the suggestion of starting a DEI committee to improve the organization’s hiring practices, events, invitees and sponsors. Although his term as committee chair is ending later this year, Jones said he has seen considerable efforts and progress within the nonprofit.

    “It’s still a learning process every day because even being a Black male, that doesn’t make me an expert,” Jones said. “But I just wanted to help make some sort of change and I think it’s been great so far.”

    Jones’ fight for change, both in diversity and cancer, goes deeper than just desire — it’s a lived experience. He has seen a cousin ravaged by lung cancer. So, he works not only for himself and his lost cousin but for a better future for all.

    “Not a day goes by that I don’t think about him, especially when I see the word ‘cancer,’ and that’s in our name — The V foundation for Cancer Research,” Jones said. “When I see those words, I just think of him. And I’m hoping that I’m making him proud.”

    Jeremy Jones, a 2011 UK CI graduate. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: “I love what I do because it makes a difference,” Jeremy Jones said. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Meg Mills and Kody Kiser Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 6, 2022) — Six of the University of Kentucky's passionate and accomplished educators were surprised earlier this spring by student nominators and the UK Alumni Association as 2022 Great Teacher Award recipients.

    Beth Barnes, Ph.D., is one of this year’s Great Teacher Award recipients. The UK College of Communication and Information (CI) professor strives to help her students find their path and passions in the communication field.

    “There's so much happening with strategic communication and it's so central to so many different fields. In fact, that's one of the things our students, I think, both celebrate but also struggle with is they've got so many options. I see it as part of my job to help them understand what those options are and help them start to think about where they might best fit in,” Barnes said.

    Barnes came to UK in July 2003 as director of the then-School of Journalism and Telecommunications. She went back to the faculty in Spring 2016 and has served as director of undergraduate studies for the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication (ISC).

    She has worked in both the advertising and public relation industries, co-authoring two textbooks (one on strategic communication campaigns and the other on advertising account planning) and has written articles on a range of topics, most related to ISC teaching issues. 

    Barnes is the executive director of international programs for CI — having taught a summer program in Cape Town, South Africa, for seven years and teaching a winter break program in London, England, every other year.

    “I've gotten to teach study abroad and that's just such a different relationship that you can then build with the students. And so, to be recognized with this award, that started with a student’s nomination, but at a place where I've had so many fantastic students and I have so many just really nice memories, both in the classrooms here on campus, but particularly with study abroad — it means the world to me, it really does.”

    Barnes retired this year after 19 years at the university.

    Learn more about why this UK Alumni Association 2022 "Great Teacher" loves to help her students find their passions in the video above, and check out this week's "Behind the Blue" podcast also featuring Barnes.

    Barnes is just one of the 2022 UK Alumni Association Great Teacher award winners. This summer, UKNow will highlight each of these Great Teachers. Watch their stories here.

    Initiated in 1961, UK’s Great Teacher Award is the longest-running UK award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selection. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and stipend.

    Get to know UK 2022 Great Teacher Beth Barnes. 2022 Great Teacher Beth Barnes. Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Six of the University of Kentucky's passionate and accomplished educators were surprised earlier this spring by student nominators and the UK Alumni Association as 2022 Great Teacher Award recipients. Watch how Beth Barnes, one of this year’s Great Teacher Award recipients, strives to help her students find their path and passions in the communication field.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section FeatureMedia Embed: <iframe title="Embed Player" src="//play.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/23310053/height/128/theme/modern/size/standard/thumbnail/yes/custom-color/0033a0/time-start/00:00:00/playlist-height/200/direction/backward" height="128" width="100%" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" oallowfullscreen="true" msallowfullscreen="true" style="border: none;"></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Lori Adams Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 3, 2022) — The University of Kentucky has released its Dean's List for the Spring 2022 semester. A total of 7,616 students were recognized for their outstanding academic performance. 

    To make a Dean’s List in one of the UK colleges, a student must earn a grade-point average of 3.6 or higher and must have earned 12 credits or more in that semester, excluding credits earned in pass-fail classes. Some UK colleges require a 3.5 GPA to make the Dean’s List.

    The full Dean's List can be accessed by visiting: www.uky.edu/PR/News/DeansList/.

    Pete Comparoni | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreLibrariesSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Summary: A total of 7,616 students were recognized for their outstanding academic performance. 
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Daniel T. Flener Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 25, 2022) The International Center at the University of Kentucky (UKIC) has announced the 2022 UK Global Impact Award winners.

    Recipients comprise faculty, staff, alumni and community members who have significantly contributed to the university’s global engagement through education, research and service, as well those who have fostered a culturally diverse, welcoming environment.

    “This past year has reinforced for us just how interconnected our world really is, and how critically important international collaboration is in research and higher education,” said Sue Roberts, associate provost for internationalization. “These individuals are making a wonderful and positive difference with their dedication to helping create a more global University of Kentucky.”

    This year, six awardees are being recognized with Global Impact Awards in six different categories, including UKIC’s first Community Partner Global Impact awardee.

    Community Partner Global Impact Award

    The University of Kentucky is pleased to confer the inaugural Community Partner Global Impact Award to the Kiwanis Club of Lexington. This valued community partner is the local chapter organization of Kiwanis International, a global community of clubs, members and partners dedicated to improving the lives of children one community at a time, with more than 550,000 members in 80 countries. Founded in 1920, the Kiwanis Club of Lexington has a long history of civic engagement and philanthropy. Since its very beginning, this club has supported the University of Kentucky by establishing a scholarship fund to assist students pursuing higher education.

    In 2006, the Kiwanis Club of Lexington began its ongoing partnership with UK’s Shoulder to Shoulder Global, which operates a health clinic in Santo Domingo, Ecuador, and provides invaluable inter-professional educational and clinical experiences for UK faculty, staff and students, while providing essential health care to underserved, largely indigenous populations in Ecuador. In the true spirit of partnership, the Kiwanis Club of Lexington has also fostered connections and rallied support from the Kiwanis Club in Santo Domingo, Ecuador, and Kiwanis International. 

    “From the Kiwanis Club of Lexington’s extensive history in partnership with UK to helping UK’s Shoulder to Shoulder Global program educate tomorrow’s health care leaders, it is with great camaraderie and pride that we nominate the Kiwanis Club of Lexington for the UK International Center’s Community Partner Global Impact Award,” said Melody Ryan, assistant provost for global health initiatives and professor and director of international professional student education in the UK College of Pharmacy.

    Thomas Young, of the UK College of Medicine’s Department of Pediatrics, added “Their sustaining support has been essential in our ability to continue the service and experiential learning opportunities for so many of our UK students. It is truly rare to have such a long-term commitment supporting UK programing.”

    UK Alumni Global Impact Award

    The 2022 Alumni Global Impact Award recognizes the outstanding career and achievements of William H. Jansen II (B.A., anthropology, 1971). After going on to earn his M.A. and Ph.D. in anthropology at the University of Wisconsin - Madison, Bill Jansen devoted a long and distinguished career to applying the strengths of anthropological inquiry and deep understanding of cultural context on pressing global health issues around the world. His work with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) led to extended stays in the Canadian Arctic, the Philippines, Bangladesh, Pakistan, Jordan, Morocco and Zimbabwe, as well as shorter tenures in Benin, Bolivia, Cambodia, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Egypt, Ethiopia, Ghana, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nigeria, Paraguay, Rwanda, Senegal, Sri Lanka, Tanzania, Thailand, Togo and Uganda. His work around the world addressed such critical issues as protection of indigenous ancestral lands, improving maternal and child health, controlling malaria and tuberculosis, and mitigating the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa.

    Most recently, Jansen has worked to strengthen capacities to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic in Senegal and Ukraine. In all these varied projects, he sought to bring a better understanding of the local social or cultural context to improve the program’s chances of success.

    In recommending Jansen for the 2022 Alumni Global Impact Award, George Smith, associate director of the Southeast Archaeological Center, National Park Service (retired), pointed out the “long-lasting contributions of his international research, public service, teaching, advising of graduate students, publications and sustainable development projects have impacted the understanding and addressing of global issues and concerns.” Smith describes Jansen as “one of the most dedicated, motivated and solid professionals I have had the pleasure of working with at both the national and international levels ... (who) represents the highest ideals of the University of Kentucky as well as the profession of anthropology.”

    UK Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievement in International Research and Scholarship

    Nikiforos “Nick” Stamatiadis (Department of Civil Engineering, College of Engineering) has been selected as the recipient of the 2022 Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievement in International Research and Scholarship. Stamatiadis first came to the United States as an international student pursuing graduate degrees at Michigan State University. He is a leading international expert on Context Sensitive Solutions (CSS), an approach to roadway design that emphasizes the importance of crafting holistic, participatory transportation solutions accommodated to the context in which they are built.

    Stamatiadis has maintained active research and educational collaborations with scholars and practitioners on every continent and has delivered CSS workshops to transportation officials and government ministries in Thailand, Sri Lanka, Greece, Italy, Mexico, Cyprus and China. A multiple Fulbright Scholar award winner, Stamatiadis has cultivated sustained institutional partnerships with the University of Catania in Italy and the National Technological University of Athens, among others. His passion for both research and education has also led Stamatiadis to serve as the faculty advisor for the UK chapter of Engineers Without Borders — a role that has led him to take UK student engineers to Ecuador, Honduras, Cameroon and Malawi.

    In nominating Stamatiadis for the 2022 Global Impact Award, Reginald Souleyrette, chair of UK’S Department of Civil Engineering, noted that his colleague’s impressive publication record, numerous engagements with researchers and transportation practitioners on every continent, and a resolute commitment to his students have significantly raised UK’s profile within the global civil engineering community.

    “He views the world as both a laboratory and classroom and urges those he works with to look at and analyze transportation challenges in a way that is mindful of their sociocultural context, but which does not neglect the more global and far-reaching implications of particular issues,” Souleyrette said.

    UK Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievement in Education Abroad

    The 2022 Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievements in Education Abroad recognizes the outstanding, career-spanning efforts of Beth Barnes (Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, College of Communication and Information). Barnes has facilitated highly impactful education abroad experiences in multiple countries for UK students. In addition to serving as a faculty director for annual summer and winter education abroad experiences in London and South Africa for more than 15 years, Barnes has served as the associate dean for undergraduate and international studies for the College of Communication and Information, as well as UK's interim assistant provost for internationalization. She has been an active member of the campuswide International Advisory Council, as well as the campuswide Education Abroad Committee and International Health, Safety & Security Committee.

    In nominating Barnes for the 2022 Global Impact Award, Chike Anyaegbunam, chair of the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, cited her love of leading UK students on transformative education abroad experiences.

    “Dr. Barnes combines lectures, use of guest speakers, visits to advertising/PR agencies, tours of historical and cultural sites, and experiential learning opportunities in her study abroad courses to expose her students to the complexities of strategic communication in the global arena. Her students come out of her study abroad classes not only with the skills of strategic communication honed from working with real-world clients and professionals, but also with a strong understanding of the complexities and nuances of communicating professionally in a different culture.”

    UK Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievement in Internationalizing the Curriculum

    Ann Kingsolver (Department of Anthropology, Appalachian Studies program, College of Arts and Sciences) is recognized with the 2022 Global Impact Award for Distinguished Faculty Achievement in Internationalizing the curriculum for her exceptional work in incorporating global perspectives in her teaching and mentoring. Kingsolver, an anthropologist of globalization, was recruited in 2011 to join UK’s College of Arts and Sciences specifically to bring a global perspective to Appalachian Studies and the Appalachian Center. She has developed the innovative “Global Appalachia” course, which she has taught for the past 10 years. In this course, she has connected her classroom virtually with classrooms at partner universities in Sri Lanka, India, Ireland and Italy. In 2019, Kingsolver reimagined the Global Dynamics in UK Core course, “Cultural Diversity in the Modern World," with a redesigned syllabus and revised course description and learning objectives. She offered the course to more than 650 students with overwhelmingly positive student feedback.

    Her work at internationalizing the curriculum has extended to co-curricular activities for international students right here in Lexington. She has organized bus trips to the Hindman Settlement School in Inez, Kentucky, and Natural Bridge State Park for UK international students, providing them with opportunities to interact directly with the people of Appalachia — enriching both groups. In nominating her for this 2022 Global Impact Award, Scott Hudson, chair of the Department of Anthropology, noted her deeply personal commitment to internationalization.

    “In every course Dr. Kingsolver teaches, there is strong attention to global and minoritized perspectives and to what can be learned through international comparisons.”

    UK Global Impact Award for Distinguished Staff Achievement in Campus Internationalization

    Summer Eglinski, director of Gatton Global Initiatives in the Gatton College of Business and Economics, has been named the winner of the 2022 Global Impact Award for Distinguished Staff Achievements in Campus Internationalization. Eglinski has been passionate about international education since first studying abroad in Greece after her freshman year of college and later teaching English at a high school in France for an academic year. She has served as director of global initiatives for the Gatton College since 2015 and works closely with both domestic business students seeking education abroad and international business students pursuing UK degrees in the college.

    During the past two years, amidst the significant challenges for student mobility caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, Eglinski has led several forward-looking and innovative initiatives to help Gatton College students meet those challenges, including virtual global opportunities. For incoming international students, she has worked to navigate challenging conversations with compassion, and has been a strong advocate for flexibility when travel restrictions or other circumstances have demanded creative solutions.

    In nominating her colleague for this award, Meg Marquis, assistant dean for undergraduate affairs, cited Eglinski’s long history of excellence in supporting international efforts in her time in the Gatton College of Business and Economics.

    “Whether through formal mechanisms such as classroom instruction or the more organic mentoring relationship she cultivates with her students, Summer’s advocacy and work contribute to an inclusive international mindset on this campus," Marquis said.

    About the UK Global Impact Awards

    The Global Impact Awards were established to recognize, highlight and celebrate the wide range of global engagement activities undertaken by UK faculty, staff and alumni.

    Nominees for the various award categories are reviewed by the International Advisory Committee and receive additional review from campus stakeholders, such as the Staff Senate.

    The 2022 recipients will be recognized at an event planned for this fall.

    Beth Barnes (top left), Ann Kingsolver (bottom left), Summer Englinski (middle), William Jansen (top right) and Nick Stamatiatis (bottom right).Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineering

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Sarah Geegan
    sarah.geegan [at] uky.edu
    "> sarah.geegan [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5365 Summary: The International Center at the University of Kentucky has announced the 2022 UK Global Impact Award winners. Recipients comprise faculty, staff, alumni and community members who have significantly contributed to the university’s global engagement through education, research and service, as well those who have fostered a culturally diverse, welcoming environment.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Meg Mills Friday

    UKNow is highlighting the University of Kentucky’s 2022-23 University Research Professors. Established by the Board of Trustees in 1976, the professorship program recognizes excellence across the full spectrum of research, scholarship and creative endeavors at UK. 

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 20, 2022) — Bobi Ivanov, Ph.D., professor of integrated strategic communication within the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, is one of the 14 University Research Professors for 2022-2023. The University Research Professorship Awards honor faculty members who have demonstrated excellence that addresses scientific, social, cultural and economic challenges in our region and around the world. 

    College leadership develop criteria for excellence within their area of expertise and then nominate faculty who excelled at these criteria. Each University Research Professor receives a one-year award of $10,000. 

    “Being named a University Research Professor feels incredible,” Ivanov said. “My immediate thoughts visited the names of research giants residing in our college and university. My mind went to all of their vast accomplishments and the profound mark they left on our discipline, academia and society. Being privileged to join their ranks provided a deep sense of reassurance that the effort expanded in pursuit of new knowledge and solutions to stubborn societal problems matters; the mark that I have left on the discipline, our college and university was not inconsequential. What more can a faculty member hope for while perusing a passion? As such, I am infinitely grateful for this award.”

    Ivanov’s research focuses on social influence (persuasion and resistance) and message design, processing and retention. His theoretical work focuses on the study of inoculation theory, images and attitudes and their composition, hierarchical structure and function as applied in various contexts including commercial, health, intercultural, instructional/educational, interpersonal, political and risk/crisis management.

    “My research has generally focused on pursuing strategic communication solutions to human problems,” Ivanov said. “These problems may be as simple as reinforcing the practice of brushing one’s teeth or as complex as designing a multi-faceted campaign to improve the sentiment toward, and the acceptance of, refugees, asylum seekers and stateless individuals.”

    Ivanov received his Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma where he studied strategic message design, consumer behavior and strategic communication. At UK he has primarily taught marketing, communication, research and strategic communication-related courses in a number of different departments/units.

    Ivanov’s work has appeared in numerous presentations, books, book chapters and top-tier journals including Communication Monographs, Communication Research, Human Communication Research, Journal of Communication, Health Communication, Journal of Public Relations Research, Communication Yearbook and Journal of Applied Communication Research. He has also worked as a market research analyst at Consumer Data Service and Insight Market Research and Consulting.

    “The continuous and unwavering support the university has provided for my work through intellectual stimulation, grants, Fulbright assignments and its support for our college and its people has created the impetus to pursue inspiring solutions to difficult societal problems,” Ivanov added.

    Bobi Ivanov is a 2022-23 University Research Professor. Mark Cornelison | UK PhotoOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Bobi Ivanov, Ph.D., professor of integrated strategic communication within the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, is one of the 14 2022-2023 University Research Professors.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Eric Sanders Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2022) — University of Kentucky students, staff and film enthusiasts gathered in the Worsham Cinema on April 29 to celebrate the creative works of UK student filmmakers. The University of Kentucky Student Film Festival returned to campus in collaboration with the Office of Student Organizations and Activities (housed in the Office for Student Success) and the Media Depot.

    The 18 showcased films were in the categories of fiction, documentary, animations and nonfiction (self-expression). Seven awards were presented; five were technical awards, one for each category and a best performance award, based on scores from judges that were consistent with local industry professionals and content creators. The other awards included the Audience Choice and an honorable mention.

    “The film festival was an amazing opportunity to meet peers with similar interests and passions and get the chance to watch the amazing work they have put together,” said Alyssa Harness, Honorable Mention recipient. “It also gave me the chance to put my work on the big screen to share with a large audience for the first time, so I am incredibly grateful for that.”

    All UK students were eligible to participate in the festival. Over 150 attendees came to support the filmmakers and cast their vote for the Audience Choice at the conclusion of the screenings. 

    “The festival was a lot of fun,” said Spencer Lamb, winner of the Audience Choice award. “This was my first ever submission to any sort of festival, so it was really reassuring to hear people enjoyed the work my friends and I did. I will definitely return next year”.

    Of the film submissions scored for technical achievement, Vyn Lane, a junior majoring in Art Studio was awarded Best of Show (Fiction) for ‘The Pretty Room’ and Best Animation for their animated infographic ‘Aphantasia.’ Lane was a two-time award winner from last year’s virtual UK film festival. Their film ‘Gone Fishing’ won Audience Choice and Best Performance in 2021.

    Scoring the highest in the Documentary category was ‘Rumble,' a film about an aspiring pro wrestler from the Cincinnati area co-directed by Christain Branham and Nicholas Volosky.

     “I am so thankful for the UK Film Festival and its respect and appreciation for filmmakers,” said Volosky.

    Best Performance was awarded to Wils Quinn for his powerful leading role in ‘Redmile directed by Nicholas Volosky.

    “Nick and I spent a while discussing the parameters of the character then we went out and just did it Nike style,” said Quinn. “Everything was improvised and organic which helped with the realism of the dialog.”

    Best of Show (Nonfiction) is a category highlighting a filmmaker's self-expression. This category portrays truth expressed by the filmmaker but does not follow a traditional documentary format. Films in this category can have performances by the filmmaker or performers that do not fall into a fiction narrative. Best of Show (Nonfiction) films can be art films, experimental films, visual poems, or any expression of truth by the filmmaker. This year Camille Wright, a double major in Integrated Strategic Communication and Digital Media and Design, was awarded Best of Show Fiction for ‘I am Tired.’

    The final award presented was Honorable Mention. ‘Terror of Taylor Ed’ was a mockumentary submitted by Alyssa Harkness on behalf of her MAS 412/ Video Production II team, Jack Billender and Caitlin Ferkile.

    The UK Film Festival will return in the Spring of 2023. Visit www.ukyfilmfestival.org or follow @ukyFilmFest on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube to find out more. 

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationStudent and Academic Life

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Grace Colville
    grace.colville [at] uky.edu
    "> grace.colville [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2294 Summary: UK students, staff and film enthusiasts gathered in the Worsham Cinema on April 29 to celebrate the creative works of UK student filmmakers.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Haley Simpkins Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 18, 2022) — Renee Kaufmann’s Spring 2022 information communication technology (ICT) 305 data detectives class encourages students to combine their communication skills with hands-on technology work in this semester’s new take on the class.

    This semester, Kaufmann, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s School of Information Science, organized the ICT class so that students would have the opportunity to partner with iFixit, a how-to website and online community which offers repair parts and step-by-step manuals to guide individuals in fixing their technology rather than disposing of it.

    “I really wanted to approach this class, which is a core requirement, in a different way than previously taught,” Kaufmann said. “My hopes were to provide students with hands-on technology projects that would highlight the importance of communication and writing in our field.”

    During their time in the class, students received technology and toolkits from iFixit and wrote proposals for replacement guides for that assigned technology. Kaufmann and her students worked in partnership with the UK Media Depot to take professional-level photos of each step in the repair process for students to include in their guides.

    “We were very lucky to work with Kirk Laird and his group in the Media Depot,” Kaufmann said. “They helped us with first-person perspective, lighting, balancing white space, taking action shots so that the students could select their best photos for iFixit review.”

    Once students drafted their guides, professionals from iFixit reviewed their work and provided feedback. In total, students went through a minimum of five reviews with the iFixit team and incorporated their feedback each time to improve on their guides.

    Kaufmann said this new class structure helped students gain experience with leadership, group communication, email communication, professionalism, audience analysis, visual communication, technical writing and mediated speaking, as well as problem-solving, critical thinking and time management.

    “The thing I liked most about this class was the opportunity to work hands-on with technology,” Isaac York, a sophomore ICT major, said. “Disassembling the technology and documenting the repair procedures was a very involved activity that stepped outside the theoretical approach I’ve had with many classes.”

    York enjoyed the new class format and said that the hands-on approach felt like the professor “took the training wheels off” and let the class problem solve on their own.

    This class also serves as the Graduation Composition and Communication Requirement (GCCR) for the ICT program. This requirement means Kaufmann focused much of the class on communication skills to help students master those skills learned in earlier classes like CIS 110, 111 or 112. Kaufmann’s focus on communication was well-received by students.

    “Having to communicate in a professional manner with iFixit's tech writing team will help me in my future professional endeavors,” Noah Baldwin, senior ICT major, said. “I am better now at communicating with other professionals in the field.”

    Communication skills learned also include technical writing skills, which students had to use in clearly writing steps for their guides.

    “[The guide] was very different from your standard college essay piece, and your client ended up reviewing what content you produced, then providing feedback to make it appear the way they wanted it to look,” said Cassie Hunter, senior ICT major. “It really showed how things might appear in a professional environment.”

    Students also worked on these guides in groups to encourage team communication and collaboration skills.

    “This class pushed me to develop my communication skills, especially when working in teams and providing feedback to my peers,” said junior ICT and Gender and Women’s Studies double major Quinn Troia. “I think I had a strong rapport with my teammates, and I feel much more confident working in groups than I did going into this semester.”

    Kaufmann said she hopes this class helps students gain applicable skills for their future careers. “I hope that students see the importance of communication and group work in this type of experience,” Kaufmann said. “More specifically, they are self-aware of their audiences and how to effectively communicate solutions to a problem.”

    ISC 305 students examine their tech and tools for their partnership with iFixit.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Haley Simpkins Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 11, 2022) — The National Student Advertising Competition (NSAC) team in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication is headed back to the national stage for the second consecutive year.

    The NSAC team recently won first place in the district five competition for the 11th time. District five encompasses American Advertising Federation college chapters in Kentucky, Ohio and West Virginia, and this year’s district competition took place in Toledo, Ohio, on April 23 with a total of 107 teams competing in 15 national American Advertising Federation districts.

    After winning the district level, the team advanced to the semi-final round, held virtually May 5-6, where they competed against 19 other district winners from across the nation.

    The top eight teams in the semi-final competition moved on to the national competition, which will be held June 2-5 in Nashville, Tennessee.

    The NSAC provides college students from across the nation with the opportunity to create a comprehensive integrated strategic campaign for a corporate client, offering real-world experience in the classroom.

    This year’s national client is Meta Quest 2, a virtual reality headset developed by Meta (formerly Facebook) Reality Labs.

    Each year, the client provides a brief that reflects a real-world marketing challenge. Student teams must conduct research and develop a multi-modal campaign that addresses the client’s ask. Student teams create a plans book and then pitch their solutions to a panel of judges, from the district to the national level.

    The team consists of 14 students: Camille Wright, Tori Smith, Grace Taylor, Kamryn Bogott, Emme Schumacher, Olivia Ford, Dani Jaffe, Katherine Yochum, Kate Maddox, Addison Cave, Makiyah Owens, Cat Kidman, Lauren McDowell and Julia Kimbrell.

    “Winning District 5 for the NSAC was truly one of the most memorable moments I’ve ever had,” Cat Kidman, senior integrated strategic communications and digital media double major, said. “I can’t say enough how thankful I am for my incredible team and advisor; we all constantly motivated and inspired one another to develop this beautiful campaign, and I am so excited to see where we head from here!”

    The team was led by faculty advisor Adriane Grumbein, associate ISC professor.

    “It has been an absolute honor to work with this incredible team of women,” Grumbein said. “This semester, they have shown up again and again, pouring their heart and soul into creating awe-inspiring work. I have also seen each one of them grow both personally and professionally. But, beyond that, I have seen them grow as a team, learning to trust their teammates and work together to create something bigger than they thought possible.”

    The National Student Advertising Competition team Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 10, 2022) — From working with books to writing her own, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is proving her degree can be taken down untraditional paths.

    Jill Grunenwald, who earned her master’s degree in library science in 2008 from the School of Information Science, has published three books since graduating from UK. From captioning photos of her hometown to writing about placing last in races and working in a prison library, she has no shortage of stories to tell just as there is no shortage of stories to read in her line of work. Her stories also happen to be award finalists.

    Grunenwald embarked on her journey to librarianship before even starting college. In high school, she started working for the Hudson Library and Historical Society, in her hometown library of Hudson, Ohio. She fell in love with librarianship while there, which effectively set the tone for her future education and career. 

    As a librarian, Grunenwald has not just a love of reading but a love of writing as well. As a self-proclaimed “antisocial introvert” who has always gravitated to books, her affinity for the written word has been ingrained in her since she was a child. She’s written plays, poetry, fiction and memoirs, even going so far as to get a Bachelor of Fine Arts in creative writing.

    “I just love writing in any form,” Grunenwald said. “In whatever avenue I can, I’ll write whatever.”

    It was her combined interest in writing and her experience with her hometown library that helped Grunenwald complete her first book in 2015, “Images of Modern America: Hudson.” The pictorial history book highlights the last 50 years of Hudson, Ohio. While she mostly wrote the captions for the photos she collected from residents, she also conducted a lot of archival research at the library to fully and accurately encapsulate the town’s changes, and what had remained largely the same.

    In 2017, Grunenwald published her second book, “Running with a Police Escort.” The memoir recounts her experiences as a runner, one who often placed last in races. She wanted to bring the lesser told story of a slow runner to contrast the plethora of fast runner narratives. By highlighting an often-underrepresented perspective, her book celebrates all the voices in the running community.

    Championing the underdogs was also a theme in Grunenwald’s 2019 memoir, “Reading Behind Bars.” The book details her time working as a librarian in a men’s minimum-security prison. While the story’s focus is primarily her experience on the job, it also shines a humanizing light on incarcerated people — something Grunenwald learned first-hand working so closely with them. She knew on her last day of work at the prison that this story needed to be told — although it took her 10 years — to combat the inaccurate portrayals of prison life that pop culture had cemented in the media.

    “It was never a job I ever would’ve ever expected to get myself hired for and wasn’t even on my radar, but it was really meaningful for me, and I hope for them too,” Grunenwald said.

    “Reading Behind Bars” has become Grunenwald’s most successful book yet. It was a Wall Street Journal bestseller and a finalist for the 2020 Ohioana Book Awards and the 2020 In the Margins Social Justice and Advocacy Book Award. Although the accolades are flattering, she’s more pleased to know her writing has a reading base.

    “It’s such a solitary activity,” Grunenwald said. “You put it out in the world, and you don’t know how anyone is going to respond. So, when you get positive responses, especially from readers, organizations or awards that have meaning to you personally, that just means a lot.”

    Although Grunenwald is making headway as an accomplished writer, she hasn’t given up on librarianship. For nearly seven years, she has worked at OverDrive, an app for libraries that digitally distributes eBooks, audiobooks, online magazines and streaming video titles. She serves on the marketing team, creating marketing materials for a variety of libraries.

    Along with being a staff librarian for the company, she is also the creator and a co-host of OverDrive’s “Professional Book Nerds Podcast.” Episodes are posted weekly, every Monday and Thursday. On Mondays, she and two co-workers interview authors, whether they’re emerging, Pulitzer Prize winners or otherwise. On Thursdays, they have a book chat of differing themes, from things they’ve read to future releases.

    “I get paid to talk about books,” Grunenwald said. “There’s really not much to not love about it.” 

    While Grunenwald’s career path hasn’t been what most library science graduates would traditionally strive toward, she doesn’t believe a straight and narrow path is for everyone. Her experience in UK’s program taught her that her education can be used wherever life takes her — and that’s exactly what she plans to continue doing.

    University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna Jill Grunenwald Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Haley Simpkins Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 16, 2022) — University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus Duncan King danced straight into the judges’ hearts during the Rotary Club of Lexington’s 2022 Dancing with the Lexington Stars event at The Kentucky Castle on April 30, 2022.

    The event included a ballroom dance competition and silent auction in which all proceeds went to benefit the Lexington Rotary Club Endowment Fund and its main beneficiary, Surgery on Sunday, a nonprofit that provides essential outpatient procedures at no cost to income-eligible individuals who are either uninsured or under-insured and do not qualify for federal or state assistance. This year’s show included local on-air personalities like ABC 36’s Erica Bivins, FOX 56’s Kristen Pflum, LEX 18’s  Angie Beavin and WKYT’s Jim Caldwell. Professional dancers like King participated as representatives of Lexington Arthur Murray dance school, a partner of the event.

    King served as the professional dance partner to local Lexington businesswoman Caitlin Neal. The duo took home the Millon Dollar Star Award, a special award for the combined dancing talent and money raised, which this year surpassed $1 million in proceeds raised from the event from the time it started.

    After discovering his hidden talent and love for dancing following a 2011 dance lesson with his mother at the Lexington Arthur Murray dance studio, King was invited to participate in the first rendition of the event in 2012.

    “Lexington Arthur Murray is about so much more than just teaching people to dance but really trying to impact lives and create positive change both on a personal level and within our community,” King said. “That’s why I continue to dance and teach because I feel like I get to make a positive change in people's lives.”

    King graduated with a communications degree in 2014, to which he credits his success in ballroom dance.

    “Communicating to create understanding is an invaluable skill in all walks of life,” King said. “We talk in the communication program about sending and receiving messages and making sure that we are all on the same page while being able to adapt our speech or even our nonverbal communication. Now as I teach or communicate in my everyday life, I’m always striving to communicate for understanding, which makes my teaching much more efficient and allows me to be more understanding when listening.”

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy C. Lynn Hiler Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 6, 2022) — The University of Kentucky chapter of Phi Beta Kappa (PBK) recently inducted 49 new members into the prestigious academic honor society. This year’s induction ceremony was held Wednesday, April 13, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

    “We are extremely proud of the students admitted to Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Kentucky,” said Anna Bosch, chapter president and professor of linguistics. “This honor recognized their hard work and their commitment to a broad liberal arts education in the humanities, social sciences and natural sciences.”

    Celebrating excellence in the liberal arts and sciences, Phi Beta Kappa is the oldest and the most prestigious honor society and opens many doors over the course of members’ careers. It contributes to opportunities for life-long learning and rounded lives outside of career, which follows the society’s motto “Love of Learning is the Guide to Life.” Phi Beta Kappa elects more than 15,000 new members a year from 290 chapters across the United States. There are also nearly 50 active alumni associations across the country that allow members to continue active affiliation with the society after graduation.

    “It is a great honor to be inducted into Phi Beta Kappa, and to be recognized for our academic achievements in the liberal arts and sciences,” said senior history major Robert Vaughan. “Credit for this accomplishment must be shared with the professors and loved ones who guided and supported our pursuit of scholarship. We are privileged to stand alongside the members of this prestigious Society as proud UK graduates, working together with curiosity and creativity toward the betterment of our world.”

    The UK Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa would like to encourage the many faculty, staff and graduate students who are Phi Beta Kappa members to get involved with the campus chapter. With an invigorated PBK chapter on campus we can develop campus-wide programming and take advantage of opportunities offered by the national office, such as their visiting scholars program. If you would like to engage with the UK chapter or receive communications from us, please reach out to C. Lynn Hiler, program coordinator for the Chellgren Center, clynnhiler [at] uky.edu or Anna Bosch, anna.bosch [at] uky.edu.

    The 2022 inductees are: 

    College of Arts and Sciences

    • Sinclair Ashley
    • Chloe Bales
    • Rachel Bandy
    • Zachary Bannon
    • Sarah Barth
    • Drew Beecham
    • Kimberly Bosh
    • Hanako Boucher
    • Carla Bravo
    • Johana Campos Sanchez
    • Supriya Challa
    • Jorden Coon
    • Sophia Cosgrove
    • Sereniti Coulter
    • Carmen Cox
    • Robert Crawford
    • Percival Devereaux
    • Riley Droppleman
    • Meghan Goins
    • Abigail Harkness
    • Ryan Hassel
    • Mihir Kale
    • Eleni Karelis
    • Stephen Mason
    • AnaLiese Mitchell
    • Olivia Morris-Bush
    • Jade Nicely
    • Lauren Nieman
    • Casey Ott
    • Elijah Raymond
    • Brooke Saurer
    • Jason Sikes
    • Peyton Skaggs
    • Elli Spanier
    • Megan VanGilder
    • Robert Vaughan
    • Natalie Vincent
    • McKayla Weaver
    • Elias Weekley Cope
    • Kaitlyn Williams
    • Anika Anil Yadav

    College of Communication and Information

    • Olivia Ackermann
    • Rayleigh Deaton
    • Maya Elias
    • Mallory Quisenberry

    College of Engineering

    • Dina Birioukova
    • Elijah Rice

    College of Fine Arts

    • Isabelle Pethtel
    • Patricia Saunders

    UK’s Phi Beta Kappa chapter is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Office of the Provost. For more information on membership, contact chellgrencenter [at] uky.edu.

    Recent Phi Beta Kappa Inductees. Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine Arts

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Summary: The University of Kentucky chapter of Phi Beta Kappa recently inducted 49 new members into the prestigious academic honor society.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Riley Fort Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2022) — Carly Jessup, a May 2022 library science master’s graduate in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Information Science, brought a Little Free Library to the University of Kentucky’s campus as way to provide students and families in UK Graduate and Family Housing with 24/7 access to books.

    The Little Free Library, based in Hudson, Wisconsin, is a nonprofit organization that promotes book exchanges across the nation with the goal of expanding book access for all.

    Jessup, a resident of UK Graduate and Family housing herself, wanted to provide students and families with a resource to improve their literacy, as well as an opportunity to connect with their neighbors and build community. Thus, she started the process of bringing a Little Free Library to campus.

    “I noticed that this area was home to many international students and families. I also noticed that there are English conversation classes held here regularly, as some students, or their spouses or children, are likely still working on their English literacy,” said Jessup. “I thought that building a Little Free Library might help those working to improve their English.”

    Also, recognizing that the transition from undergraduate housing to graduate and family housing can be difficult, Jessup aimed to build community for residents who are adjusting to the graduate housing lifestyle.

    “People tend to have more responsibilities here, and meeting others in the community can be hard, which is amplified if there is also a language barrier,” said Jessup. “My hope is that this Little Free Library will introduce neighbors who otherwise would not have met.”

    The Little Free Library is now open 24 hours a day, seven days a week and is accessible to all. It is located on the playground between the Shawneetown and Greg Page apartments near Kroger Field.

    Students and members of the UK community are welcome to take books from the Little Free Library and are encouraged to donate books to the Little Free Library in return.

    Jessup was awarded this library through the Little Free Library Impact Program. Read more about the program here. For a full list of Impact Library Program recipients, including Jessup, click here

    “I am excited to be giving back to the community that has been my home during my time at the University of Kentucky,” said Jessup. “The diversity of the community here is truly special, and I hope that it continues to flourish long after I graduate.”

    Carly Jessup, a May 2022 library science master’s graduateOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Leah Holton Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (May 3, 2022) — The University of Kentucky’s UNited In True racial Equity (UNITE) Research Priority Area will host its inaugural research showcase on Wednesday, May 4. The 2022 UNITE Research Showcase is centered around elevating and promoting the importance of racial equity research at UK, across the Commonwealth and beyond.

    The event will take place 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 4, at the Gatton Student Center. While the event is free, registration is required for all attendees. The showcase is open to UK faculty, staff, students, affiliates and academic partners.

    Throughout the showcase, UK researchers will feature their racial equity work during breakout sessions designed to illustrate the relevance and impact of their ongoing scholarship. Highlights include:

    Achieving Equitable Education: Holistic Approaches to Academic Success

    UK College of Education Professor and Associate Dean for Inclusion and Internationalization Kenneth Tyler, Ph.D., will moderate a student success panel including College of Education Assistant Professors Zitsi Mirakhur, Ph.D., and Isaac Woods, Ph.D., and College of Public Health Assistant Professor Sarah Cprek, Ph.D.

    Mirakhur’s presentation, “Building Evidence to Advance Meaningful Integration in New York City,” will provide an overview of the conditions that prompted Community School District (CSD) 15 to implement its particular desegregation and integration plan, assess the extent of desegregation and integration in district middle schools, and outline key supports and barriers to this process.

    Woods’ presentation, “Contributions of Professional Associations to Advancing Social Justice and Anti-racism,” will review how words like social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion are contextualized by professional associations of various school-based professionals in their professional ethics. 

    Cprek will present, “Adverse Childhood Experience (ACEs) and Undergraduate Student Success,” an exploration of the relationship between ACEs and undergraduate degree completion among a random sample of students at a state-funded university in the U.S., as well as implications for the effectiveness of resiliency programming in supporting student success.

    Sustainable Social Justice Advocacy

    College of Social Work Assistant Professor Keith J. Watts, Ph.D., College of Education Assistant Professor Thais Council, Ph.D., and College of Arts and Sciences Associate Professor Keiko Tanaka, Ph.D., will present on the social justice panel moderated by College of Arts and Sciences Professor Anastasia Curwood, Ph.D.

    Watts’ presentation, “LGBTQ+ Mental Health & Well-Being: The Intersections of Identity and Outcomes,” will explore the relationships between identity-based community belongingness, coping, minority stress, mental health, and well-being for Black LGBTQ individuals in addition to implications for social work practice and education and future research.

    Council’s presentation, “Community Work is Soul Work: Navigating Community-Engaged Participatory Research through a Social Justice Lens,” highlights community-engaged participatory research as a humanistic, collaborative, rigorous research approach to promote social and reparatory justice for equity in historically disenfranchised, long dispossessed communities.

    Tanaka’s presentation, “Model Minority, Inconvenient Minority, Loneliest Minority, or Perpetual Foreigners? ‘Asian Americans’ as a category during the COVID pandemic,” will include a discussion of ongoing Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Kentuckian scholarship launched by a community member and a group of UK faculty.

    Structural Racism and Its Impact on Wealth Acquisition

    William L. Matthews, Jr. Professor of Law Melynda Price, J.D., Ph.D., will moderate a panel examining wealth inequities including Gatton College of Business and Economics Assistant Professors Lala Ma, Ph.D., and Benjamin Rosa, Ph.D., and the Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs Associate Professor in the College of Law Christopher G. Bradley, J.D., Ph.D.

    Ma’s presentation, “Environmental Justice: Causes and Consequences of Inequitable Pollution Exposure,” discusses the research documenting correlations between pollution and demographics and the potential causes of these correlations from an economics perspective, including policies or regulations that may unintentionally exacerbate existing inequities.

    Rosa will present “Subcontracting Requirements and the Cost of Government Procurement,” which will illustrate how subcontracting policies affect procurement auctions using data from New Mexico's Disadvantaged Business Enterprise Program. 

    Bradley will present “Remote Justice in the Bankruptcy Courts,” an analysis of survey and interview data gained from experienced parties in the consumer bankruptcy system to assess the costs and benefits of remote hearings both before and after the sudden shift brought on by COVID-19.

    Advancing Health Equity with Evidence-Based Research

    College of Communication and Information Assistant Professor Diane Francis, Ph.D., College of Arts and Sciences Assistant Professor Lauren Whitehurst, Ph.D., and current Lymon T. Johnson Postdoctoral Research Fellow Shemeka Thorpe, Ph.D., will present on a health inequities panel moderated by College of Medicine Professor and UK Associate Vice President for Research, Health Disparities, Nancy Schoenberg, Ph.D.

    Francis will present “Communication Strategies to Encourage Healthy Behaviors and Advance Health Equity for Black Populations,” which focuses on culturally appropriate messages and communication strategies for the prevention of communicable and chronic diseases in minority and low-income populations.

    Whitehurst will present “Sleep Is Not A Luxury: Leveraging Sleep As A Tool For Health Justice,” which will review the role sleep plays to maintain health and vitality across the lifespan and discuss the costs to health when we do not get adequate sleep.

    Thorpe will present “Exploring Patient-Provider Communication Among Black Women Experiencing Sexual Pain,” which seeks to explain the patient-provider communication process and the pathway to treatment among premenopausal Black women in the southern U.S. through qualitative analysis and a conceptual framework of patient-provider communication about sexual pain.

    For more information, including the full event agenda, visit: https://www.research.uky.edu/unite-research-priority-area/2022-unite-research-showcase

     

    The inaugural UNITE Research Showcase takes place Wednesday, May 4, 2022. Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationLawMedicinePublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Jenny Wells-Hosley Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 29, 2022) — Today, the University of Kentucky Board of Trustees approved 14 University Research Professorships for the 2022-23 academic year. Established by the Board of Trustees in 1976, the professorships program recognizes excellence across the full spectrum of research, scholarship and creative endeavors at UK.

    “It is truly gratifying to recognize these distinguished experts who have made significant contributions across the breadth of research fields at the University of Kentucky,” said Lisa Cassis, UK’s vice president for research. “The 2022-2023 University Research Professorship Awards honor 14 faculty members who have demonstrated excellence that addresses scientific, social, cultural and economic challenges in our region and around the world.”

    College leadership developed criteria for excellence within their area of expertise, and then nominated faculty who excelled at these criteria. Each University Research Professor receives a one-year award of $10,000 to be used to further their research, scholarship and creative endeavors.

    The 2022-23 University Research Professors are:

    • Merlin Lindemann: Animal and Food Sciences; College of Agriculture, Food and Environment
    • Theodore Schatzki: Geography; College of Arts and Sciences
    • Carrie Oser: Sociology; College of Arts and Sciences
    • Bobi Ivanov: Integrated Strategic Communication; College of Communication and Information
    • Lindsey Fay: Interiors; College of Design
    • Susan Chambers Cantrell: Curriculum and Instruction; College of Education
    • Alexandre Martin: Mechanical Engineering; College of Engineering
    • Yuha Jung: Arts Administration; College of Fine Arts
    • Kristine W. Hankins: Finance and Quantitative Methods; Gatton College of Business and Economics             
    • Judith L. Page: Communication Sciences and Disorders; College of Health Sciences
    • Nancy Schoenberg: Behavioral Science; College of Medicine
    • Peter Nelson: Sanders-Brown Center on Aging; College of Medicine          
    • Daniela C. Moga: Pharmacy Practice and Science; College of Pharmacy
    • David W. Fardo: Biostatistics; College of Public Health

    This summer, the university will feature a 2022-23 University Research Professor each week on UKNow. Learn more about each professor’s area of research and how they are addressing scientific, social, health and economic challenges in Kentucky and beyond.

    From left: Lindsey Fay, Merlin Lindemann, Nancy Schoenberg, Daniela Moga, Kristine Hankins, Bobi Ivanov, Yuha Jung, Susan Chambers Cantrell, Judith Page, David Fardo and Carrie Oser. Not pictured: Theodore Schatzki, Alexandre Martin and Peter Nelson.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsHealth SciencesMedicinePharmacyPublic Health

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Established by the Board of Trustees in 1976, the professorships program recognizes excellence across the full spectrum of research, scholarship and creative endeavors at UK.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Duane Bonifer Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 27, 2022) — Three Pulitzer Prize winners, a groundbreaking TV journalist, a national sports columnist and three legendary community journalists make up the 2022 class of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame. This year’s induction ceremony will be held later this year at the University of Kentucky.

    This year’s eight inductees are:

    • Former Kentucky resident Scott Applewhite, a four-decade and Pulitzer Prize-winning senior photojournalist with The Associated Press based in Washington, D.C.;
    • Paducah native Jerry Brewer, a national sports columnist for The Washington Post;
    • The late Melissa Forsythe, who was who news anchor and reporter for WAVE-3 and WHAS-11 in Louisville;
    • The late John B. Gaines of Bowling Green, who was president and publisher of the Bowling Green Daily News for six decades;
    • The late Bill Mardis of Somerset, a Taylor County native who served more than 50 years as a reporter, editor and columnist at the Commonwealth Journal;
    • Mark Maynard of Kentucky Today, an online news service published by the Kentucky Baptist Convention, who also had a distinguished 45-year career at The Daily Independent in Ashland, Kentucky; 
    • Lexington native Stuart Warner, whose five-decade career included serving as Lexington Herald-Leader sports editor and a Pulitzer Prize-winning editor at the Plain Dealer of Cleveland; and
    • Louisville native Deborah Yetter, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter and editor who has spent more than decades at The Courier-Journal, and before that the Louisville Times.

    Created by the UK Journalism Alumni Association in 1981, the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame honors journalists who are Kentucky natives or have spent a significant portion of their careers working for Kentucky news-media organizations. More than 200 individuals, both with and without formal ties to UK, have been inducted into the Hall of Fame.

    Details about the 2022 induction ceremony will be released later this year. For more information, contact the UK School of Journalism and Media at 859-257-3904 or via email at jam [at] uky.edu.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Three Pulitzer Prize winners, a groundbreaking TV journalist, a national sports columnist and three legendary community journalists make up the 2022 class of the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Kate Maddox Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2022) University of Kentucky junior Rayleigh Deaton, a communication and political science major from Charleston, South Carolina, has been awarded an English-Speaking Union (ESU) Scholarship presented by the English-Speaking Union Kentucky Branch. The scholarship will cover Deaton’s expenses for summer study at the University of Oxford, where she will study English literature.

    ESU scholarships are awarded for studies in English literature, history and social sciences at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge or Edinburgh. Scholarship winners, selected through an essay and interview process for the program, are expected to become articulate lifelong ambassadors for British/American cultural exchanges.

    “The chance to travel and study abroad will help me gain a more holistic, global perspective on the world and current events,” said Deaton, the daughter of Tim and Becky Deaton, of Charleston. “I hope that this opportunity will give me a new view of the world and a unique experience that I can use in my writing.”

    In addition to her double major, Deaton also minors in journalism. During her undergraduate studies, she has served as the editor-in-chief of the Kentucky Kernel, UK’s independent student-run newspaper. She also interned at the Lexington Herald-Leader as a reporting intern.

    “I’ve always had a passion for writing and knew that I wanted to have a job that would allow me to write. In middle and high school, I loved writing research papers where I would take a wealth of information, dissect it and reassemble it in a cohesive and understandable way,” Deaton said. “Journalism allows me to learn more about the world around me, talking with different people and hearing about their lives, while informing the public.”

    Deaton credits her academic advisor Schyler Simpson for inspiring her to apply for the ESU Scholarship and serving as a mentor throughout her college career.

    “Every conversation I have with Schyler leaves me feeling so inspired and excited for the future, and I owe so much to her for where I am today,” she said.

    Deaton also credits her success to her journalism professor, Jennifer Smith.

    “I took Jen’s JOU 101 fall semester my freshman year, and from the first day of class, I knew that she was someone I wanted to get to know and learn from,” she said.

    Deaton also plans to apply for the Fulbright and Rhodes Scholarship programs and hopes to earn her master’s degree in journalism in England. She says she is thrilled to visit the United Kingdom this summer to see if she would like to continue her education there.

    The Kentucky Branch of the English-Speaking Union awards a limited number of scholarships to qualified Kentucky college students for courses offered at institutions in the United Kingdom. The Kentucky branch was chartered in 1923 by local business and civic leaders. Since 1964, more than 500 Kentucky teachers and college students have been awarded scholarships by the Kentucky branch of the ESU.

    Deaton applied for the ESU Scholarship through the UK Office of Nationally Competitive Awards, part of the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence. The office assists current UK undergraduate and graduate students and recent alumni in applying for external scholarships and fellowships funded by sources (such as nongovernment foundation or government agency) outside the university. These major awards honor exceptional students across the nation. Students who are interested in these opportunities are encouraged to contact the office well in advance of the scholarship deadline.

    Rayleigh Deaton has been awarded an English-Speaking Union (ESU) Scholarship by the English-Speaking Union Kentucky Branch. The scholarship will give Deaton the opportunity to study English literature at the University of Oxford this summer.Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: University of Kentucky junior Rayleigh Deaton, a communication and political science major from Charleston, South Carolina, has been awarded an English-Speaking Union (ESU) Scholarship presented by the English-Speaking Union Kentucky Branch.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Katie Humphries Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2022) — This summer, the University of Kentucky’s Bluegrass Debate Coalition (BDC) will host its annual summer camp. The BDC summer camp introduces middle and high school students in Kentucky to the fundamentals of competitive debate, public speaking and critical thinking.

    The BDC Summer Debate Camp will take place in-person from Monday, June 20, through Saturday, June 25. Tuition for the BDC Summer Debate Camp is $250. Students will practice their skills in argumentation and public speaking throughout the week, with the opportunity to showcase them during a camp-wide competition on Saturday.

    During the week, students will learn the fundamentals of leadership, argumentation, persuasive writing, research and public speaking. Students will also have the opportunity to learn about current events from the experts that study them. Through a variety of fun activities, lively discussions and practice debates, students will become more critical thinkers and confident public speakers. In addition, experienced debaters will have the chance to refine their abilities and learn advanced debate strategies. The skills learned through debate encourage achievement in school, success in the workplace and meaningful engagement with our communities and the world around us.

    The Bluegrass Debate Coalition summer debate camp is open to all middle school and high school students in Kentucky. The camp is designed for students who are new to debate and more experienced debate students. No prior debate experience is required, and students do not need to be a member of a school's debate team to attend. Novice, intermediate and advanced tracks are offered. 

    Not sure if debate is for you? Camp is a great way to try out debate in a supportive, fun and non-competitive environment. Whether you want to be the next debate state champion or are just looking for a fun, educational way to spend a week of your summer break, the BDC camp is right for you.

    Register by May 15 to guarantee a spot. Learn more about the camp and register at https://bluegrassdebate.org/debate-camp/.

    The BDC is part of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate, housed in the UK College of Communication and Information.

    The BDC Summer Debate Camp will take place in-person from Monday, June 20 through Saturday, June 25. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Elizabeth Chapin Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 20, 2022) — More than two years into the University of Kentucky’s $87 million HEALing Communities Study (HCS) to address the opioid epidemic in Kentucky, it is possible to see the life-changing impacts it has already made in the eight counties of the study’s first wave.

    Launched in 2019, the ambitious four-year study includes a multidisciplinary team of more than 25 researchers spanning seven colleges across UK, and leverages existing resources and initiatives in partnership with communities to implement various strategies to reduce opioid deaths across Kentucky. 

    Evidence-based practices implemented by the HCS team in partnership with behavioral/health and criminal justice agencies include effective delivery of medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD), overdose prevention education, and distribution of naloxone, a life-saving medication that reverses the effects of opioids. The team has also been working with various pharmacies and health care providers to implement safer opioid prescribing and dispensing.

    The randomized study includes 16 Kentucky counties impacted by opioid abuse and is broken down into two waves of eight counties each. The first wave, collectively known as WAVE 1, includes Boyd, Boyle, Clark, Fayette, Floyd, Franklin, Kenton and Madison counties. Community coalitions in each county determined what interventions to implement based on individual community need.

    With WAVE 1 nearly complete, current metrics illustrate the project’s impact so far. In partnership with 146 agencies in WAVE 1 communities, HCS has:

    • dispensed 55,147 units of naloxone to 166 locations that have so far distributed 40,243 units to individuals in high-risk populations.
    • assisted 38 MOUD treatment facilities with financial support for staff and transportation.
    • assisted 38 agencies with implementation of peer support programs and 28 agencies with care navigation programs.
    • expanded capacity for MOUD treatment, as well as linkage and retention programs in criminal justice venues including sheriff departments, pretrial services, home incarceration, drug courts, jails and probation and parole programs.
    • provided 206 individuals with opioid use disorder with financial support to address barriers preventing them from getting medication treatment, including transportation, vehicle repairs, jail communication service fees and utility bills.
    • provided 16 individuals with housing assistance including rent and emergency housing.
    • provided transportation assistance to link and retain individuals in treatment. As of March 10, 1,531 rides to treatment programs and recovery-related appointments have been provided to 121 unique individuals for a total of 80,007 miles.
    • installed medication receptacles at 35 pharmacies, with more than 1,400 lbs of medication incinerated to date.
    • led educational sessions on safer opioid prescribing and dispensing for more than 150 health care professionals including dentists, primary care providers and pharmacists.

    “The evidence-based practices implemented by the HEALing Communities Study team, along with state and community partners, have made an impact on thousands of lives across WAVE 1 communities. As the study continues, their work will help us better understand what’s needed in each community and where to focus and ramp up efforts to best support patients to reduce opioid overdose deaths,” said HCS principal investigator Sharon Walsh, Ph.D., a professor in UK’s College of Medicine and College of Pharmacy and director for the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research. “Our goal is that the changes implemented in these communities develop into sustainable solutions for the opioid epidemic in the Commonwealth and throughout the nation.”

    The intervention also includes community engagement to assist key stakeholders in applying evidence-based practices and a communications campaign to build demand for treatment and reduce stigma toward people with opioid use disorder.

    The WAVE 1 intervention ends this summer, with the sustainability phase beginning in July. This phase is intended to build capacity to help community coalitions and partner organizations sustain the evidence-based practices after the study ends. Walsh says this includes community staff and budget planning, and that HCS is also working with state partners at the Kentucky Opioid Response Effort (KORE) on sustaining naloxone distribution.

    The intervention for WAVE 2 communities - Bourbon, Campbell, Carter, Greenup, Jefferson, Jessamine, Knox and Mason - begins July 1. WAVE 2 is currently in the preparation phase, which is intended to establish the infrastructure in communities to support the interventions. So far, the HCS team has had 134 meetings with 174 stakeholders and has identified 85 potential coalition members for WAVE 2.

     

     

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationEducationMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkUK HealthCare

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207 Summary: More than two years into UK’s $87 million HEALing Communities Study to address the opioid epidemic in Kentucky, it is possible to see the life-changing impacts it has already made in the eight counties of the study’s first wave.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Ryan Clark Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 19, 2022) Shelley Ferrin remembers exactly when everything started to make sense — the idea, the need and the simplicity of the solution. It all came together at once and seemed so clear.

    It was last fall when she and Patrick Kitzman had met to discuss the progress he’d made regarding Toys with a Purpose, a lending library that supports child development and promotes learning through play by improving access to free adapted toys in eastern Kentucky.

    Kitzman, Ph.D., is a professor in the University of Kentucky Department of Physical Therapy and the founding director of The Kentucky Appalachian Rural Rehabilitation Network. For years, he has been organizing and bringing on people to help like Ferrin, a health education coordinator and interprofessional health education specialist at the UK Center for Interprofessional Health Education.

    Suddenly, one thing Kitzman said made it all fall into place.

    “He talked about how some children can’t turn the pages of books,” she said. “And he described how we can put popsicle sticks on the pages to make them easier for the children to turn. This was a ‘light bulb’ moment for me — it just became so clear how we can all help and how easy the solutions can be.”

    Working with a grant from the Commonwealth Council on Developmental Disability, Kitzman and his colleague, Keisha Hudson — a rural project manager at the Center of Excellence in Rural Health who will oversee that site — have truly made the project a collaboration between departments, schools, communities and regions. The local Half Price Books store donated more than 250 volumes, while classes helped to affix the popsicle sticks. Naomi Maloney’s students in the UK College of Communication and Information devised a marketing plan, slogan and logo.

    And local high schools in Perry County, along with senior citizens and veterans, have offered mentoring, community engagement and development strategies to grow the lending library. Children would be able to receive toys for free, play with them, then return them and allow someone else to do the same.

    “Play is part of normal child development and is essential for developing creativity, imagination, dexterity and physical, cognitive and emotional strength,” Kitzman said. “In addition, play helps with language, math and social skills and even helps children cope with stress. Toys are integral to play, yet children with disabilities are often unable to use off-the-shelf toys and purchasing manufacturer-adapted toys can be very expensive.”

    So, as Ferrin said, the answer is simple. The toys must be fixed.

    But therein lies the newest challenge: Toys with a Purpose needs toys. Things like:

    • Toys that make lights, sounds and music
    • Wood puzzles like fire engines and motorcycles, especially with sounds
    • Battery-operated stuffed toys
    • Picture books for young kids — the more the better

    Now, the public can help. Beginning this week, donation boxes have been placed at three sites:

    • At the Center for Excellence in Rural Health on the Hazard Campus
    • At the UK campus outside the Starbucks in the Healthy Kentucky Research Building on Press Avenue
    • At Bluegrass Community and Technical College

    Additionally, there are other ways to contribute. Kitzman has set up an Amazon Wishlist site here.

    “Turning these toys into adapted toys are very low-tech fixes,” Kitzman said. “Usually, those are the best fixes, the simplest ones. Now we just need to let people know how they can help.”

    For more information on Toys with a Purpose, contact Patrick Kitzman at phkitz1 [at] uky.edu or 859-218-0580.

    Existing toys often just need a simple fix to become adaptive toys — like adding popsicle sticks to books to help children who have difficulty turning pages.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationHealth Sciences

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Mallory Olson
    mallory.olson [at] uky.edu
    "> mallory.olson [at] uky.edu
    859-257-1076
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Riley Fort Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 18, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, concluded the 2022 debate season at the 76th National Debate Tournament. This year’s tournament featured 45 schools from 24 states and was the first in-person competition the team has competed in since March 2020.

    In the preliminary rounds, the sophomore pairing of David Griffith and Jordan Di had impressive wins over Tufts University, Trinity College and Michigan State University. The duo reached the round of 32 before losing to UC Berkeley. The first-year pairing of Jared Adam and Austin Kiihnl also finished the tournament with a strong 4-4 record.

    This year marked the 48th year that UK has qualified for the National Debate Tournament and the eighth year in a row the team reached the elimination rounds, which ties a school record set in the 80s. The team also continued its streak of ranking in the top 16 nationally and earning an automatic first-round bid, a feat it has achieved each year since 2016.

    With an impressive run at the National Debate Tournament, the team concluded a successful debate season. This season, four separate partnerships reached elimination rounds at major national tournaments and one partnership made a final round appearance at the Georgetown University tournament. Now, the team will prepare to host the High School Speech and Debate Tournament of Champions.

    “This was a young team with a lot to figure out," said UK Director of Debate Dave Arnett. “Having a strong finish is really a testament to the hard work put in by the coaching staff and the growth of the students. We’re all looking forward to what next season brings.”

    Follow UK’s Intercollegiate Debate Team’s journey by visiting https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    UK’s Intercollegiate Debate TeamOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 15, 2022) — While it can take years for aspiring filmmakers to see their first film’s premiere, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information senior got to live out this dream before even graduating — and that’s just the beginning of his budding entertainment media career, as he already has a position lined up after graduation.

    Matthew Dunlap, a senior media arts and studies major (MAS), premiered his film at UK’s Worsham Cinema on Dec. 3, 2021. The 27-minute motion picture titled “Burning in Trial” is a thriller featuring two strangers stuck in purgatory who lose their memories while trying to survive the horrors of the outside world. While this was a short film, it was Dunlap’s biggest project to date with him serving as writer, producer, director and editor.

    “When I graduate in May, I wanted to have something I was really proud of,” Dunlap said. “I wanted to use all my resources and kind of go for it. And that’s what I did.”

    Dunlap developed his love for filmmaking at a young age. He grew up acting out plays and recording music videos and skits with his sister and cousins. It wasn’t until high school though when he was making films with his friends that he decided to turn his passion into a career.

    He enrolled at UK as an MAS major to get as much experience in media as possible. During his freshman year, he also joined the UK Film Club. Throughout his time in college, he made and helped create many films, from thrillers and comedies to dramas and documentaries. He also made tons of film junkie friends.

    It was with one of these friends that Dunlap first brainstormed “Burning in Trial.” The idea behind the quarantine-style horror plot was birthed right before COVID-19 hit, but the script for the film took about a year to finalize. After putting his vision to paper, it took long hours, lots of hard work and a little bit of luck for Dunlap’s film to come to fruition.

    The filming process totaled four days over the course of two weekends. About 20 of Dunlap’s friends formed the production crew, lending free helping hands. The male lead in the film was recruited by one of these friends, and his family owned the land and abandoned house in Red River Gorge that served as the setting for the film. Even Dunlap’s cousin, who works in sound production, got a piece of the action by making the film’s music.

    “I kind of had everyone helping out where they could so I could spread the wealth,” Dunlap said. “That’s what I love so much about all my friends because I surround myself with people who love film as much as I do. We all just love making it, and we know that by making it we’ll just only get better, so we all just help each other out for free.”

    Although he got as much help as he could, it took him five months to edit the movie together on his own. For nearly five hours a day over the course of a semester, he edited over 600 gigabytes of footage, including sound effects, color and visual effects. It was the lengthiest and most challenging part of the project with a big learning curve, but the result is something he’s proud of.

    The premiere of his film in front of all his family and friends was a moment Dunlap described as surreal, overwhelming and undoubtedly his favorite part of college. The positive reactions have only helped to encourage him to continue pursuing film. Thankfully for him, that isn’t far from his future.

    While searching for career advice in a Los Angeles film industry Reddit community, Dunlap was presented with a job recommendation and free reference from an employee at Deluxe. The Academy Award-winning company is an international, multidisciplinary service provider in the entertainment media industry.

    Jumping at the opportunity, Dunlap managed to secure himself a remote position with the company that he’ll start soon after graduating. He has been assigned to Deluxe’s Disney Team as an account coordinator. He will schedule talks between studio executives who work on subtitles and dubbing Disney+ content for other countries. 

    Although this job isn’t quite yet seeing Dunlap in another role of creative control, he’s excited to get his foot in the door. It’s his hope that later in his career he’ll be back in the director’s chair, but for now, he’s looking forward to seeing where this takes him.

    “There are so many different paths you can take,” Dunlap said. “I just want to make stuff that I love and make it with people I love, and hopefully, other people will love it too.”

    To watch a trailer of Burning In Trial, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tXXXhjjJe-c.

    Matthew Dunlap (right) and his crew work on the set of "Burning In Trial" on location in the Red River Gorge.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 12, 2022) — Although his first love was football, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus has turned his second love, basketball, into a nearly 20-year career.

    Scott Tomlin, a 2002 communication graduate, joined the Dallas Mavericks just two years after graduating from UK and has been with the NBA team ever since. After almost two decades with the franchise, he worked his way up from communications manager to vice president of basketball communications.

    “I’ve never looked back,” Tomlin said. “I love it. I love the NBA. I love the people that I’ve gotten to meet, the people that I’ve gotten to work with and the things that I’ve gotten to experience. So I will say that basketball has treated me very well.”

    Tomlin’s affinity for sports public relations came from his time with UK Athletics. He joined its media relations department as a student volunteer, helping with the variety of sports UK has to offer. His experience there pushed him to pursue communication to progress toward a career in sports.

    By his junior year, he was already putting in 40 hours of work each week for the UK Athletic Department while also studying as a full-time student. His experience helping the UK basketball teams would also set the tone for his future career.

    “I think I figured out very quickly that there was a career there that I don’t think I knew existed when I was growing up in Maysville, Kentucky, and that sports could be your corporate America,” Tomlin said. “And I very quickly decided that’s what I wanted to do.”

    Within a few months of graduating, Tomlin scored an internship with the New Orleans Hornets. Since it was the team’s inaugural year, there was a lot of groundwork establishing the NBA franchise that he wouldn’t have gotten to experience otherwise. He credits his association with the well-known and well-respected UK Athletics Department for getting him a year-long internship.

    He then had another short stint with a professional sports team but this time in the NFL. Working for the Denver Broncos, Tomlin spent his Sundays completely dedicated to the team. However, having grown up as a Bengals fan, he quickly became disillusioned working in what he called the “corporate machine” of professional football.

    Luckily for him, he got a call from the Mavericks, bringing him back to the NBA. With the league’s pace, environment, personalities and small family feel, Tomlin said the career move has been a natural fit.

    Throughout his tenure with the Mavs, he has steadily worked his way up the ladder. He started as a coordinator who was responsible for statistics and getting players interviews. The longer he stayed on, the more he was able to work with star players like Dirk Nowitzki, for whom he handled all local, national and international media requests. He also handled Mavericks Owner Mark Cuban’s media as well as the head coach and general manager.

    In fall 2019, Tomlin was charged with heading up communications for the team as the vice president. While COVID-19 has had him and the NBA constantly changing their ways of operation, Tomlin has also had the responsibility of introducing new Head Coach Jason Kidd and new General Manager Nico Harrison to the franchise. As Tomlin grows more seasoned in his role, he plans on making changes to his own game plan. 

    Although his career has so far been successful, it hasn’t been all work and no play. Some of Tomlin’s favorite memories include the Mavs winning the NBA Finals in 2011, watching Nowitzki’s career take off and getting to travel to and meet people from all over the world. Growing up, he would have never thought these sorts of opportunities were possible, but now he couldn’t see himself without them.

    “I think my tenure here sort of speaks for itself,” Tomlin said. “Over 18 years, there were plenty of times where I could’ve maybe moved on or I could’ve said, ‘Hey, this isn’t for me,’ or I could’ve said, ‘The amount of hours, the amount of time that I spend in this, is it still worth it?’ But I never asked myself those questions. When my alarm goes off in the morning and I put on sweats and go work in a gymnasium, I’m the happiest person in the world.”

    After almost two decades working with the Dallas Mavericks, Scott Tomlin (left) worked his way up from communications manager to vice president of basketball communications.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jay Blanton Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 13, 2022) — The University of Kentucky is widely regarded as an intercollegiate sports powerhouse.

    But UK also, increasingly, is known for its ability to leverage athletics and partnerships with the private sector for academic and career success for students.

    That’s the idea behind a distinctive partnership led by UK’s College of Communication and Information to create a 20,000-square-foot studio, production center and learning/research laboratory in Rupp Arena at the Central Bank Center in the heart of downtown Lexington.

    The state-of-the-art facility – a partnership with the college, UK Athletics and JMI Sports – will create a high-tech collaborative space where students can learn alongside media production and sports marketing and communication professionals, said Jennifer Greer, dean of UK’s College of Communication and Information.

    "We’ve been training students in broadcasting and media production for more than 70 years in various spaces across the campus,” Greer said. “This space represents a significant step forward in providing a collaborative place where our educational programs can be taken to the next level through an innovative partnership with athletics and the university’s media-rights partner, JMI Sports.”

    The college has an established a Sports Communication path within its Department of Communication and recently launched a sports track within the School of Journalism and Media. The space in Rupp will provide opportunities for training and instruction in those areas in addition to opportunities for faculty and graduate students to conduct research, Greer said.

    “We believe deeply in the imperative to put students first in everything that we do,” said Tim Bernal, executive associate athletics director/external operations for UK Athletics. “That extends to our students on the field and court as well as those who are working alongside us in media and sports production. Our goal is to be best-in-class in every sport and in every program. This studio aligns with that goal to provide the best opportunities for all of our students.”

    All three partners envision the facility as a truly collaborative space, allowing students, faculty and staff interested in sports across the campus to work with UK’s media production and marketing teams. UK has growing sports opportunities in many colleges, including Business, Education, Health Sciences, Arts and Sciences. In addition, area production companies and sports industry firms should be attracted to working alongside UK’s students, media professionals and researchers in the space, Greer said. 

    “JMI Sports is committed to delivering innovative partnerships to advance the academic and athletics mission of the University of Kentucky,” added Kim Shelton, UK Sports and Campus Marketing president. “This studio and production space presents an opportunity for the College of Communication and Information to be more actively involved with the UK Sports Network in a highly visible facility in the heart of downtown Lexington, demonstrating a collaboration between athletics, campus and the downtown community,”

    The college also has developed coursework in video game design and development, and other programs have related areas, which provides opportunities for students to explore work in rapidly growing areas such as eSports and virtual gaming. UK already has some of the best eSports space in the country at the Cornerstone Building on campus.

    “This space in venerable Rupp Arena will not only bring visibility to these growing programs in our college and in others, but it also will allow our students to work side-by-side with professionals producing sports programming and promotions as well as other digital content for distribution,” Greer said.

    Under an expansion of the mutually beneficial Right of Use Agreement between Central Bank Center and UK and JMI Sports, the first floor of the Pavilion will be utilized to house the laboratory, as well as expanding opportunities for partners and sponsors under the agreement.

    "Central Bank Center has long enjoyed a tremendous partnership with the University of Kentucky,” said Bob Elliston, chairman of the Lexington Center Corporation. “Utilizing the transformative investments that have been made in the expanded Central Bank Center campus as part of the educational opportunities for university students is a natural extension of that partnership, and we commend the college, Athletic Department and JMI for their leadership"

    The new studio in Rupp Arena will allow the college to replace the roughly 6,000 square feet of studio space it has used for decades in the Taylor Education Building. That space will now be repurposed for other uses.

    Greer said the college anticipates beginning to use the studio in Fall 2023.

    A state-of-the-art studio, production center & learning/research lab will be located in Rupp Arena at Central Bank Center. UK College of Communication and Information, in partnership with UK Athletics and JMI Sports, will begin using the space in 2023.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky is widely regarded as an intercollegiate sports powerhouse. But UK also, increasingly, is known for its ability to leverage athletics and partnerships with the private sector for academic and career success for students. That’s the idea behind a distinctive partnership led by UK’s College of Communication and Information to create a 20,000-square-foot studio, production center and learning/research laboratory in Rupp Arena at the Central Bank Center in the heart of downtown Lexington.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April. 8, 2022) — Nishita Chaduvula started volunteering for the Bluegrass Debate Coalition (BDC) as part of her school club’s volunteer requirement. However, her time at the BDC soon morphed from an assigned obligation into an unprompted desire to help. She now serves as one of the organization’s most helpful volunteers.

    The BDC, overseen by the University of Kentucky's championship Intercollegiate Debate Team housed in the College of Communication and Information, is an organization that works with Kentucky schools to make competitive debate available to all elementary, middle and high school students. Since September 2020, the coalition has worked to increase academic performance, enrich college and career opportunities and provide the intellectual and networking tools for youth to thrive as active, responsible leaders in their communities.

    The Louisville-based Meyzeek Middle School seventh grader first joined the BDC as a sixth-grade student soon after the organization’s launch. She attended debate workshops and camps to supplement the work she was doing in her school’s debate club. After also joining her school’s Beta Club this school year, and learning about its volunteer mandate, Nishita saw an opportunity to give back while doing something she loved.

    “I love the idea of teaching other kids how to debate and helping them with their debating,” Nishita said. “So, I decided that for some of my hours, I would volunteer at the BDC.” 

    As a BDC volunteer, Nishita serves as a junior curriculum developer, researcher, mentor and judge for the elementary students. Once given a topic or skill to create a lesson plan for, she uses research and her personal debate experience to create slideshows and video presentations. She then helps distribute the workload in the larger online classes by splitting up the students and giving them a topic to debate, providing them real-time advice. She also provides feedback as a judge during elementary events.

    “Nishita has been a tremendous asset to our organization,” Bill Eddy, director of the BDC, said. “Volunteerism is at the heart of what we do at the BDC. Not only do we arrange for classes and events, but we also must staff those activities with qualified mentors. As part of our commitment to providing a deeper learning experience, we employ an apprenticeship style learning experience where more experienced students assist us in the teaching/learning process by working with less experienced students.”

    While Nishita was in the role of teacher, she also found herself as a student among her quick-learning and talented mentees. After she started volunteering with the BDC, she realized attending more workshops could also help her grow as a debater just as much as they were helping her elementary students. 

    Her school’s debate club started its season in September 2021 with Nishita’s first tournament taking place in December. She won two of three debates, a vast improvement since her sixth-grade season. Her father, Rameswara Chaduvula, said that her involvement with the BDC has not only improved her debate skills but her communication and teaching skills as well.

    Although Meyzeek’s Beta Club only requires Nishita to put in 30 hours of volunteer work in a school year, and she is already more than halfway through the requirement, she doesn’t plan on this limiting her involvement with the BDC. She has loved both the learning and teaching experience the BDC has given her, not to mention the personal connections she’s made along the way. 

    “I hope to have an impact on the kids that I help, even if it’s really small,” Nishita said. “I want to help them in their journey because if I had that much help when I was younger in fourth and fifth grade, I felt like I would be so much better. So, I hope that they at least can learn from me and I can help them in their journey.”

    To learn more about the BDC, visit https://bluegrassdebate.org/. If you would like to help support the BDC, visit https://bluegrassdebate.org/supporters/

    Nishita ChaduvulaOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 7, 2022) — The 2022 Creason Lecture held by the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, will be delivered by John Lansing, president and CEO of National Public Radio (NPR). The title of his lecture is “Bearing Witness in the Age of Disinformation: Public Service Journalism and Why It Matters More Than Ever.” The lecture is scheduled for 6 p.m. on Monday, April 25, via Zoom.

    A long-time media executive and journalist with roots in Kentucky, Lansing heads one of the nation’s iconic news organizations. As president and CEO of NPR, he oversees a network of award-winning broadcast journalists and 17 international bureaus to fulfill its public service mission to create a more informed public. Prior to NPR, Lansing served as CEO of the U.S. Agency for Global Media. Lansing began his career in media at WPSD-TV in Paducah. He was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2021.

    “We are thrilled to have John Lansing of NPR deliver this year’s Joe Creason Lecture,” said Erika Engstrom, director of the School of Journalism and Media. “The importance of NPR as a news source cannot be overstated. We invite the entire UK community and all who value a free and open democracy to join us for this event.”

    This year’s virtual lecture will be available via Zoom at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/creason-lecture.

    Click here for more about John Lansing and his career in journalism.

    The Joe Creason Lecture Series honors the memory of outstanding Kentucky journalist and honored alumnus Joe Creason. Made possible through a matching grant from the Bingham Enterprises Foundation of Kentucky and gifts donated by UK alumni and friends, the Joe Creason Lecture Series Fund was established in 1975. Information about past Creason Lecture presenters is available at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/creason-lecture

    John Lansing, president and CEO of NPR, will deliver the 2022 Joe Creason Lecture.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Katie Humphries Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 6, 2022) — The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, continued its strong start to the spring semester by adding another championship under its belt.

    The Public Forum Debate Team competed at the March Invitational hosted by the Collegiate Public Forum League on March 12, 2022. UK debaters competed against teams from across the country.

    Sophomores Eriel Burns and Caroline Koontz took first place. Burns and Koontz finished preliminary rounds as the first overall seed, with a 4-0 record.

    In elimination rounds, Kentucky competed against teams from California State University, Fullerton and California State University, Northridge in the semi-final and final rounds respectively. Burns and Koontz championed the final round on a 3-0 decision.

    Burns also received the Top Speaker Award.

    “We’ve been working for so long to win one of these tournaments,” Koontz said. “Being able to finally win feels like a dream.”

    The team is continuing to work hard for the next competition, the CPFL National Championship in April.

    The Public Forum Debate Team is part of the nationally-ranked Intercollegiate Debate program housed in the UK College of Communication and Information. For more information about UK Debate, visit https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Amy Brooks Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2022) — Phil Duncan, a 1987 art studio graduate and chief design officer for Procter & Gamble (P&G), will deliver the 2022 Irwin Warren Lecture, titled “Building Brand Experiences for the Future,” from 5-6:30 p.m. Monday, April 18, in 118 White Hall Classroom Building. The program, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication and the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information.

    Duncan leads P&G’s global design discipline in transforming the strategies of the company’s 10 product categories into holistic consumer experiences, applying design thinking and technical expertise to all aspects of product, package, retail, digital and environment design.

    In addition, Duncan leads company-wide immersive and reputation-building initiatives, including P&G’s worldwide Olympic sponsorship and consumer electronics show experience. He is also one of the original founders of P&G Ventures, an entrepreneurial group within P&G that works with internal and external innovators and entrepreneurs to create new brands, technologies and business models.

    “It’s always great to welcome UK grads back to campus, so it’s a particular honor for ISC to host Phil Duncan,” said Beth Barnes, ISC’s director of undergraduate studies. “The Warren Lecture allows our students to hear from leaders in the strategic communication field. With the series’ focus on advertising and digital media, it’s a chance to explore topics from many aspects of the strategic communication spectrum.” 

    Barnes added that Duncan, as point person for P&G’s ongoing Olympics sponsorship, “will be able to give our students a behind-the-scenes look at what goes on in a major global sponsorship effort, and how P&G’s Olympics work plays out across the company’s strategic communication efforts. There’s not a much bigger stage for brands than the Olympics, and so this year’s lecture is a great fit with the focus of this lecture series.”

    The Warren Lecture in Advertising and Digital Media honors the memory of Irwin Warren, who created some of the nation's most successful advertising campaigns. During an advertising career spanning more than 40 years, Warren worked at Doyle Dane Bernbach, BBDO and other leading agencies, before moving to McCann Erickson, the world's largest advertising agency, where he retired as senior creative director in 2006.

    The lecture series was established by Patrick Mutchler, a graduate of the School of Journalism and Media, formerly the School of Journalism and Telecommunications, in the UK College of Communication and Information, who worked with Warren while in marketing with Johnson & Johnson.

    Past Warren lecturers have included Chuck Brymer, chair, DDB Communications Group (2019); Mark Carroll, partner, Bandy Carroll Hellige Advertising and Public Relations (2017); Dan Hartlage, principal, Guthrie/Mayes Public Relations (2017); JoAnn Sciarrino, Knight chair in Digital Advertising and Marketing, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (2015); and Jim Alessandro, senior vice president, Marketing and Sales Strategy, Walt Disney Parks and Resorts (2015).

    More information can be found here.

    Phil Duncan will present the 2022 Irwin Warren Lecture.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine Arts

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Phil Duncan, a 1987 art studio graduate and chief design officer for Procter & Gamble (P&G), will deliver the 2022 Irwin Warren Lecture, titled “Building Brand Experiences for the Future,” from 5-6:30 p.m., Monday, April 18, in 118 White Hall Classroom Building.
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Gianna Ross Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 5, 2022) — Students from a University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication course, ISC 471, have spent the spring semester planning an event for the Lexington Philharmonic and UK’s Opera Theatre. Those plans will finally come to fruition 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 9, at the Singletary Center for the Arts.

    Marc Whitt, instructor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, teaches the course, which is designed for students interested in event planning. Each semester, Whitt chooses an organization for students to plan an event. 

    The event is queen-themed and explores how queens, power and games have inspired composers to make music. Some featured music will be from "The Queen’s Gambit," a television show based in Lexington, and the history of Ellington’s Queenie Pie. The program will also include a performance by members of the UK's Opera Theatre.

    "I’m excited about this collaboration with the Lexington Philharmonic. Our upper-level students are perfect for these sorts of opportunities," UK Opera Theatre Director Everett McCorvey said. "Many of our master’s and doctoral students are already working as professionals and it’s so nice to be able to see them perform for a hometown audience while working with the professional musicians of the Lexington Philharmonic.  

    "We also have some of our faculty members – Dr. Michael Preacely and Dr. Angelique Clay as well as some of our UK Alumni – Dr. Sarah Klopfenstein, Dr. Eric Brown and Dr. Jeryl Cunningham, as well as a member of the American Spiritual Ensemble and Broadway performer Samuel McKelton." 

    The ISC 471 students are working alongside the Lexington Philharmonic on school relations, event planning, social media and public relations. Each student was assigned a team and will focus on their duties up until the event date.

    Adult tickets range from $25-$75 and youth and student tickets are $11. Tickets are on sale at the door or through the Lexington Philharmonic website.

    The concert should last one hour with no intermission.

    For more information, go to the Lexington Philharmonic website at https://lexphil.org/queens-rule.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 1, 2022) — The 17th biennial Kentucky Conference on Health Communication (KCHC) is right around the corner, and this year’s conference will honor a scholar who first attended KCHC as a graduate student.

    This year’s conference, titled “Communication Strategies to Promote Comprehensive Well-being,” will be held on April 7-9, at the Hyatt Regency Lexington. Jessica Myrick will be presented with the 2022 KCHC Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar in Health Communication Award.

    This award is named in honor of Lewis Donohew who was on the faculty in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s Department of Communication from 1964 to 1999. Recipients of the award, like Myrick, are recognized for their outstanding research contributions to the health communication field. 

    “It’s an award that means a lot to me and such big names in the field have won it before and I was surprised, and happily so,” Myrick said. “It was a really humbling feeling, but also I’m so grateful for the friends and colleagues and mentors that I’ve had. And it’s a nice reminder to stop and think about all those people that helped. Even though it’s only my name on the award, it really has the influence of a lot of great people that I’ve known.”

    Myrick, professor in the Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications at The Pennsylvania State University, is a health communication scholar interested in the role of emotions in shaping responses to media messages about health. She particularly studies emotional tactics and appeals other than fear in an effort to understand the complexity of emotions people feel toward health messages.

    In 2012, Myrick attended her first KCHC as a doctoral student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She presented a paper with friend, colleague and Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar in Health Communication award recommender Jessica Willoughby, associate professor in the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University. The pair has continued to collaborate on numerous projects since then, demonstrating that the conference experience helped set the stage for their scholarly careers.

    “KCHC was the first health communication-specific conference I went to and got me really, really interested in the field,” Myrick said. “It was just so interesting and invigorating to have all these really prominent health communication scholars in the same place, and they were all so accessible and asking questions and really involved. I think that’s a good model for doing good science too, to be kind and supportive and ask questions in a way that fosters discussion. So it really sort of helped me see the positive in research and health communication research.”

    A national and international audience of about 250 people will attend the conference. Attendees include faculty members and graduate students from a variety of academic institutions and disciplines, healthcare providers and practitioners, and representatives from government and private entities.

    Thursday’s pre-conference will be a highly interactive day that addresses strategies to promote academic-clinical research partnerships in health communication. Attendees will hear from research teams and practitioners, engage in small and large group discussions and activities, and gain insight into applying for and managing extramural grants to support academic-clinical research. 

    On Friday, Professor Kasisomayajula “Vish” Viswanath of Harvard University, will deliver the keynote address to start the conference. Competitive papers, posters and panel sessions will round out this day. Authors represent 37 U.S. states, the District of Columbia, Canada, Egypt, Germany, Nigeria, Singapore, Switzerland and Taiwan, as well as more than 100 institutions and organizations.

    The conference will conclude Saturday afternoon with an awards luncheon, during which Myrick will receive the Donohew award and make a research presentation. Awards also will be given for top poster, top student paper, top early-career scholar paper and top conference paper.

    To view the full program, visit https://comm.uky.edu/kchc/program/schedule/2022

    “The number one thing I hope people take away from KCHC is inspiration,” said Nancy Harrington, KCHC director and associate dean for research in the College of Communication and Information. “I want people to be inspired by the excellent health communication research that’s presented and the outstanding scholars they meet. I want folks to have the opportunity to catch up with old friends and make new ones, enjoy intellectually stimulating conversations, generate new ideas for research and collaborations, and have an overall outstanding conference experience. I want them to leave KCHC 2022 with happy memories and look forward with excitement to KCHC 2024.”

    Funding for KCHC is made possible in part by a grant from the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research in addition to support from the UK Vice President for Research and UK HealthCare

    If you would like to learn more about KCHC, visit https://comm.uky.edu/kchc/

    Nancy Harrington (left), KCHC director and associate dean for research in the College of Communication and Information, with KCHC Lewis Donohew Outstanding Scholar Julia van Weert (right), pose with the award’s namesake, the late Lewis Donohew, in 2018.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Riley Fort Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 23, 2022) — Makiyah Owens, an integrated strategic communication senior in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, was selected as a fellow in the Multicultural Advertising Intern Program (MAIP).

    MAIP is a talent development program that combines real-world experiences, training and networking to diversify the advertising industry and help participants launch their advertising careers. Students selected to participate in the 10-week program will gain invaluable networking and professional development opportunities.

    “For many young people of color, it can be hard to get your foot in the door and get people to see that you offer value to a professional space,” Owens said. “MAIP is the helping hand that bridges the gap between young multicultural talent and established industry professionals.”

    Owens was originally hesitant to apply to the selective program, but after meeting with a recruiter and doing her own research, Owens knew the program would be a step in the right direction for her career.

    “I've learned that you have very little to lose and everything to gain by applying to programs that you think you might not be qualified for,” Owens said. “Sometimes we miss out on opportunities because we don't see our potential, but you never know what could happen. This shows the importance of networking and how having a conversation with someone in the industry could be the start of an amazing opportunity.”

    This summer, Owens will work as a social impact and philanthropy intern for Sony Music Group. She will be responsible for creating social media content, conducting research and developing grantee stories — all to demonstrate Sony Music Group’s philanthropic and social impact.

    Owens noted she is most excited to gain real-world experience in the advertising industry and develop relationships with other fellows.

    “I’ve chatted with some of the fellows, and they are all so great and passionate about what they do,” Owens said. “I’m excited to be immersed in an environment with such a diverse set of young, creative minds where everyone is eager to break into the advertising industry.”

    The ISC department played a key role in Owens’ acceptance to MAIP by well-preparing her for a career in advertising and helping her discover her passion for the field.

    “The department really helped me realize my passion for advertising and developing creative campaigns, specifically those that drive social change,” Owens said. “The ISC department has helped me gain creative confidence, and without that I wouldn’t have bothered applying to MAIP.”

    Faculty in CI were excited to learn about Owens’ acceptance to MAIP.

    “I am over-the-moon excited that Makiyah was chosen for a MAIP fellowship. This internship validates how hard she’s worked during her time at UK and gives her a chance to continue learning on such a big stage,” Associate Professor Adriane Grumbein said.

    Owens is waiting to hear from a supervisor at Sony Music Group regarding the status of this summer’s program. Though the program is currently virtual, Owens will travel to Los Angeles for the summer if it is switched to a hybrid platform.

    Owens will graduate in May 2022 with a degree in integrated strategic communication and a minor in English.

    Makiyah OwensOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 22, 2022) — Aiming to “move the needle” within the Big Ten, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is taking the helm and bringing a fresh perspective to her university.

    Pamela Whitten, who earned a master’s in communication from UK in 1986, is making history as the first female president of Indiana University. Though she never dreamed of having this title since female presidents weren’t common when she was growing up, she’s glad to be in a position to make a difference.

    “I think that many people like me never thought about or planned or aspired to be a university president,” Whitten said. “I think what happens is as you are in the role as a faculty member and you begin to assume more service-type responsibilities and you gain great satisfaction out of that, you begin to realize that you’re driven to tend to move the needle at an institution. And then from that, you move into these formal leadership roles.”

    Whitten’s road to becoming the highest-ranking officer within IU’s academic administration began when she started her Ph.D. program at the University of Kansas, nearly a decade after graduating from UK and working in corporate communications. As a CI student, she had known that she would eventually pursue her doctorate after getting a glimpse at Ph.D. courses. At 30, with a five-year-old and a newborn, Whitten earned her doctorate and began a string of public university leadership roles.

    From 1995-98, she served as the inaugural director of information technology services at the University of Kansas Medical Center as well as a research and assistant professor in the Department of Family Medicine. She then moved her family to Michigan to begin a traditional college professorship at Michigan State University. Between 1998 and 2014, she took on several positions and promotions, from assistant professor and research fellow to dean of the College of Communication Arts and Sciences. In 2005, she also had a one-year stint as a professor at Purdue University in addition to her MSU duties. From 2014-18, she served as vice president for academic affairs and provost at the University of Georgia. 

    Once her tenure as a UGA provost was over, Whitten transitioned into her most senior roles. From 2018 to early 2021, she was president of Kennesaw State University, a large, urban university in Georgia. 

    The scope of KSU helped ease Whitten’s 2021 transition to the even bigger university that IU is. IU has seven campuses and two regional centers. Its flagship campus, IU-Bloomington, is an R1 research institute, meaning their research activity is classified as very high, while the IUPUI campus is R2, with research classified as high. The university also boasts over 90,000 students and the largest medical school in the country. 

    As IU’s 19th president, Whitten is one of only five women among the 14 presidents making up the Big Ten’s Council of Presidents and Chancellors. Along with representing her university on the world stage, she has a broad range of responsibilities, including ensuring a positive student experience, attending to all fiscal matters, heading up community outreach, handling relationships with government entities and more. However, although she is the leader on campus, she knows she can’t tackle everything by herself.

    “It’s such an important part of being successful as a leader, surrounding yourself with people that are smarter than you that can help formulate and then implement your vision,” she said.

    Although she’s less than a year into her presidency at IU, Whitten has found the experience thus far to be engaging and exciting. Being at IU for her is like combining her previous university jobs into one. And despite this not being her first time in the top spot, her ultimate goal has stayed as simple as ever — to serve the community in which she leads.

    “In the end, it’s all about the success of students, ensuring that we do things to enhance their success and experience,” Whitten said, “and also facilitating the environment of the faculty so they are able to be successful in their scholarship, and that we serve the state well.”

    Pamela WhittenOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Riley Fort Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 11, 2022) — On Feb. 25, Ad Club Lexington hosted its annual American Advertising Awards (ADDYs) to recognize and reward the creative spirit of excellence in advertising. At the awards ceremony, 20 University of Kentucky integrated strategic communication students won a total of eight awards.

    The student competition, which is similar to the industry professional competition, allows college students at accredited universities across the country to enter their creative work at the local level, then advance to the regional and national judging levels.

    The winners are:

    Kennedi Beam – Gold ADDY (The Marker that Grows with You)

    Peyton Fike – Gold ADDY (Wabi Sabi Brand Identity)

    Ashley Fisher – Silver ADDY (Sharpie, the Marker that Gives Back)

    Emme Schumacher – Silver ADDY (Fahrenheit 451 Cover Redesign)

    Victoria Smith – Silver ADDY (OCD)

    Hunter Adams, Nicole Baelum, Wren Dickson and Victoria Smith – Silver ADDY (Philosophies 2022 Program)

    Aliyah Austin, Kendall Boron, Nia Brown, Addison Cave, Grayson Dampier, Katelyn Dougherty, Emily Fay, Peyton Fike, Annie Gillenwater, Haley Heisler, Jeremy Middleton, Zachary Neighbors, Michael Noble, Chaney Willett and Olivia Zidzik – Two Silver ADDYs (Better with Your Flame Campaign)

    The 15 students who won ADDYs for the Better with Your Flame Campaign were part of the National Student Advertising Competition team that finished fifth at the national competition in June 2021.

    “I am thrilled at how many students submitted work. Just having the confidence to submit work is a huge accomplishment. But seeing that work win an award is a whole other level,” Adriane Grumbein, associate professor of integrated strategic communication, said. “Our winners will always remember the first time that an outside judge — not their professor, but a top-level industry professional — recognized and rewarded their work. It’s a feeling like no other. Watching students win will never get old for me.”

    With over 40,000 entries each year, the ADDYs are the advertising industry’s largest competition, with the local phase being the first of three tiers. Winners from the Lexington Ad Club will move forward to the second tier to compete against winners from other local clubs.

    Left to Right: Camille Wright, Adriane Grumbein, Emme Schumacher, Victoria Smith, Elizabeth Spencer, Kennedi Beam Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: After his double lung transplant in 2021, Dave Hoover donated his damaged lungs to the UK College of Medicine, giving researchers the unique opportunity to study the disease on a molecular level.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 10, 2022) — After cementing his passion for information technology during his undergraduate career, a University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information and Gatton College of Business and Economics alumnus has secured a spot at one of the biggest names in tech — Google.

    Matthew Luce, a 2021 information communication technology (ICT) and marketing graduate, will be joining the Google Cloud Team as a cloud technical resident in June 2022. Following his graduation from the University of Texas at Austin McCombs School of Business, he will be working and living out his childhood fantasy at Google’s office in Austin, Texas.

    “I remember my dad taking me to work, and we would pass by the server room and when I was growing up, I would always talk to the IT guys,” Luce said. “I was always interested in how that stuff worked and kind of how I could bring that home and set up a mini version of it myself.”

    For years Google has consistently been rated by Fortune as the United States’ Best Company to Work For. Google’s parent company, Alphabet, is also in Fortune’s top 10 largest U.S. companies and top 25 largest global companies. For techies like Luce, working for Google is a significant career milestone.

    Luce’s road to the tech giant started at Amsted Rail the summer before college. Interning there was just meant to get his foot in the door for IT, but it turned into a five-year affair that set the tone for his profession. Despite management being his primary major, ICT was where his true passions lay. 

    But even before finding a home with ICT, Luce joined the Student Activities Board (SAB). Throughout his tenures as SAB’s director of media, director of information technology and vice president of promotions, he not only carved a place for himself on campus, but he helped make the campus a better place for others as well. By instituting tech innovations like mass text message promotions, moving SAB to a higher capacity hosting server and adding closed captions to events, Luce helped give students more opportunities to be involved in campus activities.

    “Accessibility is something that in college became really important to me and really relevant,” Luce said. “The reason it became so important to me was that I realized I was very homesick when I came to Kentucky. I lost a lot of weight; I wasn’t enjoying it. Then I joined the Student Activities Board and that really changed my experience. And I am a fully-abled person. How do these experiences vary for people with varying levels of ability? How can we capture these groups that don’t have the same abilities and have different experiences so that they’re still able to interact with our events?”

    Connecting with others through technology was one of the main reasons why Luce was attracted to his ICT major. Unlike computer science or engineering, interacting with people is at the core of ICT. In fact, human psychology plays a large part in cyber security, one of the main IT subcategories and one of Luce’s two passions in IT. 

    Had it not been for a cyber security class with CI Professor Sherali Zeadally, Luce might have missed out on discovering his interest in the large subfield. He also might not have been as prepared for his career moving forward. He credits Zeadally’s difficult but insightful classes for where he is today.

    "Matthew took several ICT courses with me,” Zeadally said. “He has always been diligent, hardworking and dedicated to these courses. He would always aim for the highest score possible in any quiz or exam and would never settle for less. He seeks perfection and likes to seek advice where he needs it. I am sure he will excel in whatever he does in the future."

    Luce’s other passion, infrastructure, is what he will be working on at Google. The Cloud Technical Residency is a year-long position that goes through three rotations. For the first four months, Luce will be trained on Google systems. For the second four months, he will work in customer engineering acting as the liaison in pre-sales. For the final four months, he will work as a technical account manager, again acting as a liaison but this time in post-sales. Following his year-long tenure, he will transition into one of the two previous positions in a permanent role.

    While Luce is excited to start his journey with Google, he’s even more excited about the prospect of what he can accomplish there. With the company’s “20% time” rule, where employees are encouraged to use 20% of their work time on innovative passion projects, Luce plans to dedicate his efforts toward making Google more accessible, carrying on the work he started at UK. It is his hope that his work will continue to help make the internet a more welcoming place for all.

    Matthew Luce, a 2021 information communication technology and marketing graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Riley Fort Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March. 9, 2022) — In fall of 2021, the Bluegrass Debate Coalition, which is part of the University of Kentucky’s championship intercollegiate debate team in the College of Communication and Information, hosted a guest lecture series featuring speakers from several colleges and schools across UK’s campus.

    The goal of the BDC is to provide students with deeper learning opportunities so they can develop real-world skills and grow as responsible leaders in their communities. By inviting lecturers from across UK’s campus to participate in the guest lecture series, the BDC gave students a broader understanding of debate subjects, as well as intellectual and networking tools.

    The BDC guest lecture series is hosted virtually, using Zoom, and then made available to the public via the BDC’s YouTube channel.

    The first guest lecture featured Clayton Thyne, chair of the Department of Political Science in the College of Arts and Sciences. He discussed the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and its relationship with members, particularly the Baltic States. This was Thyne’s second time speaking for the BDC.

    “I strongly believe in the mission of this program and was delighted to support its fine work,” Thyne said. “I was blown away by the students’ eagerness to learn and their passion for debate.”

    Thyne’s lecture can be found here.

    The second guest lecture featured Shane Hadden, deputy chair of students and lecturer in the Department of Finance in the Gatton College of Business and Economics. Hadden discussed United States regulations on cryptocurrency.

    “This was a great opportunity to expand my knowledge on cryptocurrency,” a student participant noted. “I learned a lot of facts that I can add to my debate case, and I loved how Professor Hadden simplified things for us to comprehend easily.”

    Hadden’s lecture can be found here.

    For the third installment of the guest lecture series, Caroline Weber, assistant professor in the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration, discussed drug legalization. Weber reviewed the pros and cons of marijuana legalization through the lens of an economist, discussing ideas like taxation and enforcement, as well as potential effects of drug usage.

    “I enjoyed the expert insight on why it is important to consider the legalization of drugs,” says Rachna Tibrewal, a parent of two sons who participate in the BDC.

    Weber’s lecture can be found here.

    The BDC’s collaboration with the Gatton College of Business and Economics, the College of Arts and Sciences and the Martin School of Public Policy and Administration demonstrates UK’s commitment to helping the BDC use debate as a vehicle for change in Kentucky education and in the lives of students. Because of this partnership, students across the Commonwealth are becoming better prepared for successful futures.

    “Our focus at BDC is enriching students’ lives, and we use debate as the means of achieving this goal,” Bill Eddy, director of the BDC, said. “The BDC is thankful that four colleges came together as one university to give back to the community and provide a deeper learning experience for Kentucky students.”

    This spring, the BDC will continue to host its guest lecture series, featuring different topics of interest to debaters. Learn more and register for future lectures at https://bluegrassdebate.org/guest-lecture-series/.

    If you would like to learn more about the BDC and how you can get involved in its efforts to help students thrive, visit its website at https://bluegrassdebate.org/.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Haley Simpkins Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 4, 2022) — The Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate team of sophomores David Griffith and Jordan Di has received a “first-round bid” or automatic invitation to the 2022 National Debate Tournament (NDT). Only the top 16 teams in the nation, as ranked by the National Debate Committee, receive this designation.

    “Very few programs are ranked in the top 16 year in and year out,” said Director of Debate David Arnett. “Kentucky has a long tradition of success in competitive debate, and the current students and coaches are doing a great job adding to that legacy.”

    The Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate team, housed in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, will join a list of historically strong programs including debate powerhouses such as Harvard University, Dartmouth College, Northwestern University, Emory University, Wake Forest University, the University of Southern California and the University of California, Berkeley at the upcoming NDT.

    2022 marks the eighth consecutive year that UK Debate has received at least one first-round bid, following 10 years without any such bids. Griffith and Di also received a first-round bid last year in their freshman season.

    “It feels good to get our second first-round in two years,” Griffith said. “The NDT is definitely the most challenging part of any year of debate. Everyone is working their hardest now, and every team that you need to worry about will be there in full force, so the pressure is on.”

    This automatic bid comes after Griffith and Di took second place at the Georgetown University Open in January, where they competed against many of the teams they will face in the 2022 NDT.

    “I'm looking forward to having my first in-person NDT,” Griffith said. “It is something that everyone missed out on last year, so it will be exciting to be back in the competitive environment that is unique to in-person debate tournaments.”

    The 76th National Debate Tournament hosted by James Madison University will take place using a hybrid model April 1-4, 2022.

    UK Debate sophomores David Griffith (left) and Jordan Di.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Only the top 16 teams in the nation, as ranked by the National Debate Committee, receive this designation.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mariah Kendell Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (March. 3, 2021) — Among the ongoing uncertainty of the COVID-19 pandemic, seven of the international students who joined the Wildcat community in Fall 2021 did so through a special program.

    The students, from China, India, Peru, Nicaragua, Brazil and Egypt, had one thing in common — beginning their university studies from home.

    This was made possible by the Global Wildcats program, UK’s special online program designed to give international students the opportunity to begin their studies despite travel restrictions.

    “When the world changed in Spring 2020, we realized that it was going to be hard for some students to get to the U.S.,” said Karen Slaymaker, the assistant director for international student and scholar services. In response, she and Sue Roberts, the associate provost for internationalization, organized the Global Wildcats program.

    “For these students, this program meant not waiting,” Slaymaker said. “They didn’t have to put their studies on hold and could enroll in courses that will count toward their degree.”

    As first-year students, Global Wildcats were enrolled in UK Core classes, the university’s required general education program. Additionally, students were placed in an A&S 100 course dedicated to the Global Wildcats program, where they connected with peer mentors and learned more about UK’s campus resources.

    One of these core courses, CIS 112, immersed students in the UK community through service-learning. International students completed their 10 hours of service virtually.

    “Some face-to-face students opted for virtual service too, so our Global Wildcat students had the same experience as some of our students in Lexington,” said Allyson DeVito, senior lecturer and CIS 112 coordinator in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Information Science.

    Among these students is Camila Urcuyo from Nicaragua. She partnered with the Carnegie Center for Literacy and Learning, where she tutored middle school students in Lexington virtually each week.

    “Shifting everything online was a real challenge,” Carol Jordan, the tutoring director of the Carnegie Center said. “We did the best we could, and I was really heartened by the great work of the tutors. We would not have a program without these volunteers.”

    Another student from Brazil worked virtually with the Smithsonian Institute to transcribe historic handwritten documents from the American Civil War.

    Since its inception in Fall 2020, the Global Wildcats program has seen a lot of success. Of the 20 students in the first cohort, 17 have now moved to Lexington for in-person instruction. With the spring semester underway, students like Urcuyo are now living their dream as Global Wildcats.

    “UK was the university I was dreaming of all my life,” Urcuyo said. “When they offered me this opportunity, I didn’t think twice.”

    Read more about the Global Wildcats Program here: https://international.uky.edu/GW.

    Camila Urcuyo is a UK Global Scholar from Nicaragua.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Steve Shaffer, Danielle Donham, Meg Mills, Lindsey Piercy, and Jenny Wells-Hosley Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 24, 2022) — Six University of Kentucky educators have been named 2022 Great Teachers by the UK Alumni Association.

    Initiated in 1961, UK’s Great Teacher Award is the longest-running UK award recognizing teaching. In order to receive the award, educators must first be nominated by a student. The UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Committee, in cooperation with the student organization Omicron Delta Kappa, then makes the final selection. Recipients receive an engraved plaque and stipend.

    UK’s 2022 Great Teachers are:  

    The winners were honored last night at the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award Recognition Dinner, and were later recognized during the Louisiana State University vs. Kentucky men’s basketball game that same evening.

    Learn more about the 2022 Great Teachers based on comments from their nominators:

    Beth Barnes

    Courtney Cavallo, an integrated strategic communication (ISC) senior, nominated Barnes for her real-world teaching style.

    “In every lecture I had with Dr. Barnes, she never put up a slideshow and simply read off the slides. Instead, her lectures were thoroughly engaging, providing real-world examples from her personal experience in the field and beyond. As a senior, leaving soon to enter the workforce, I have never felt as prepared, as Dr. Barnes exposed us to numerous resources that made us feel like true ISC professionals.”

    In addition to her vast knowledge of the ISC field, Cavallo said Barnes truly cares about her students.

    “Dr. Barnes is always available and makes that very clear to her students. I have never had another professor who cared for their students like she does. As a result, every student was comfortable in her teaching environment and more receptive to her teaching, as we felt the love and care she put into being a professor.”

    Zachary Bray

    Michaela Taylor, a UK Rosenberg Law student, nominated Bray for his ability to help students grasp difficult concepts, and for prioritizing his students’ mental health.

    “In the classroom, Professor Bray is able to take complicated and obscure concepts and apply them to real life situations that make the material easier to understand,” Taylor said. “Students feel comfortable working through hard concepts with him without feeling judged, which can be a fear for many, especially in law school. Even with a young child, in a pandemic, Bray went above and beyond to facilitate good discussion to make Zoom class seem as interactive and normal as possible.

    But beyond ensuring that students are engaged in the material, “he continuously emphasized that breaks, in law school, are important for overall mental health and made sure that we felt comfortable taking them. He is a strong supporter of the law school mental health week and has been a resource to students in regards to mental health.”

    Olivia Davis

    Adam Rogers, a graduate student in the Gatton College majoring in accounting, nominated Davis because of her encyclopedic knowledge of current events and her ability to integrate those events into class discussions.

    “For each accounting concept taught in class, Professor Davis is always able to illuminate the point with real-world applications that make the digestion of the material much more enriching,” Rogers said. “Accounting can be a tedious subject, but I’ve seen students — myself included — get excited about learning. She provides us with the ‘why’ to our questions, not just the ‘what.’”

    Additionally, Rogers said Davis’ “superpower” is always being there for her students.

    “She has reached and changed the lives of countless students by giving them excellent career advice and has demonstrated time and time again her willingness to put her students’ needs ahead of her own.”

    Jack Groppo

    Hart Zebulon, a mining engineering graduate student, nominated Groppo not only for his subject expertise, but because he is always there for his students.

    “The primary benefit of Professor Groppo’s extensive base of knowledge and experience is his ability to answer questions with an unparalleled amount of subject matter authority. For students who wish to pursue careers in the fields of beneficial reuse, recycling and sustainability, this is a tremendous asset,” Zebulon said. “Commonly, when a student needs advice related to an internship or job opportunity, or even difficulties with class, they search out an available faculty member. From personal experience, I can say, when you open the door to the mining department faculty office suite and look down the hallway, you will see a light — the light from Professor Groppo’s office. He is always there for his students.”

    Cortney Lollar

    Michaela Taylor also nominated Lollar for fostering an environment which gives students the confidence to share their thoughts.

    “Professor Lollar has gone above and beyond in creating methods of student engagement during the pandemic. I can confidently say that I would not have understood criminal law had it not been for her teaching style,” Taylor said. “Discussion in our criminal procedure class gets to the core issues of our criminal justice system, and although there are many opinions in the room, Professor Lollar makes sure to allow all voices to be heard.”

    Lollar also regularly engages with students on material outside of the curriculum, checking in on them after verdicts and sentencings of high-profile cases that hit home for many students.

    “Although the office hour was only scheduled for 15 minutes, she took the time to really listen to me on an issue completely outside of the normal student-professor relationship. After talking to classmates, I know I am just one of the many who have had experiences like this with her.”

    Beth Rous

    Christopher Joseph Hayden IV, a graduate student in educational leadership studies, said what makes Rous unique as a professor is her personal commitment to students and their success.

    “By no means will she ‘do it for you’ but she knows how to help a student gain the skills and tools they need to complete their pursuit. She never gives up on a student and will keep offering various ways to support.”

    Hayden credits Rous’ "show" rather than "tell" teaching methods for his success in learning about educational leadership.

    “I had never truly realized the idea of making students feel comfortable asking for help and providing opportunities for them to do that in a supportive and structured fashion until I experienced Dr. Rous’ approach through our program.”

    Learn more about the UK Alumni Associations Great Teacher Award here.

    The 2022 Great Teacher Award winners at the UK Alumni Association's recognition dinner Feb. 23, at Central Bank Center. From left: Cortney Lollar, Jack Groppo, Beth Barnes, Zachary Bray, Beth Rous and Olivia Davis. Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringLaw

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Summary: The winners of the UK Alumni Association Great Teacher Award share one commonality — a genuine love for their students at the University of Kentucky. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 23, 2022) — Some people spend years doing career searches and changes trying to find the perfect job for them. But for one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus, all it took for him was six years of watching sports on TV.

    Michael Eaves, a 1994 journalism graduate, has spent over 25 years reporting on the sports world. From creating short clips in the local WKYT newsroom, to anchoring for ESPN in Los Angeles and Bristol, Connecticut, his decorated career in sportscasting is ever-growing. And this month when he starts hosting ESPN’s “NBA Countdown,” Eaves will have crossed off the last and most important item of his career bucket list.

    “It takes a while to figure out exactly what you want to do,” Eaves said. “But fortunately for me, I figured it out and that was my only goal, and that’s the only thing I’ve ever done from a work standpoint. And thankfully I’ve been doing it for a while.”

    Growing up with energetic cousins and a father who loved golf and baseball, sports was a passion implanted in Eaves from a young age. He played his father’s favorite sports, plus basketball and football. While he excelled at basketball, he was naturally talented at golf. Eaves even became the first Black golfer to qualify for the Kentucky High School Athletic Association state golf tournament during his senior year, much to the pride of his father, and was inducted into his school's hall of fame.

    Like many young athletes, Eaves had the hope of one day going pro. But like so many other athletic hopefuls, it just wasn’t meant to be for him. However, he knew sports was his passion. He spent every day watching SportsCenter and various games around the nation on television from the fifth grade up to his high school graduation. When it came time for him to leave his hometown of White Plains, Kentucky, to further his education, he knew that if he wanted to be a sportscaster, journalism was his ticket.

    “I wasn’t looking at the broadcast as much as I was the athletes, but in the back of my mind, I think that seed was being planted,” Eaves said.

    While sports were always in the cards for Eaves, working in television wasn’t. In fact, going into his senior year at UK, he had no broadcast experience, except for one student radio show. That was until he was hired as an associate producer of the WKYT morning show by John Bobel, then news director for the station and husband of Associate Director of CI’s School of Journalism and Media Scoobie Ryan. Within a week, Eaves went from never having been in a television station to producing local cut-ins to air on the news.

    “When I got thrown into that environment in a TV station that very first day, that first week, that first month not knowing anything television production, I was able to pick it up really, really quickly because of some of the skills that I developed in the first three years of the journalism program just trying to learn,” Eaves said. “And that to me is the most valuable aspect of college is that it teaches you how to learn, and at Kentucky, I was taught how to learn.”

    After two semesters of learning the ropes, Eaves was hired as a full-time news producer where he was able to sprinkle UK basketball highlights into his cut-ins and learn from the sports department. He eventually got the opportunity to report sports and even anchor at the station. That was his official introduction into the sportscaster world.

    “Michael was one of those students who, after talking to him for a little bit, you knew he was going to be successful,” Bobel said. “After starting in the news department, he was recruited by the sports department at WKYT, where he was mentored by the professionals there and flourished. But he never lost sight of the fact that sports is news, and the same high standards that we employed for the newscasts also applied to sports programming. He never lost sight of that on his way to ESPN.”

    Once he clocked in six years with WKYT, Eaves went on to talk sports for different stations. He spent about three years in Memphis, Tennessee, working for WPTY before moving to Los Angeles for a 10-year stint with FOX Sports. There, he reported on every local team from the Lakers to UCLA, covering about 140-150 games a year. Once he was tired of that grind, he left for New York to anchor for Al Jazeera America for almost two years.

    At this point, ESPN wasn’t even on Eaves’ radar anymore, although it was arguably every sportscaster’s dream network. It wasn’t until his National Association of Black Journalists colleague Rob King, former editor-in-chief and current senior vice president and executive editor-at-large of ESPN, suggested he apply for ESPN that he took the leap to join the sports giant. And since then, Eaves said he couldn’t have asked for a better experience.

    In his nearly seven years since joining ESPN, Eaves has traveled the world and lived through once-in-a-lifetime experiences more than just once. He has covered Olympics, his first being in Brazil in 2016. He has covered and was part of the telecast doing live interviews for the Masters, something near and dear to his heart because of its connection to his father. He has covered Super Bowls, All-Star Games, UFC matches and everything in between that sports fans dream of attending. He has even earned six Emmy Awards, a Telly Award and the title of Best Television Anchor in Southern California by the LA Press Club in 2013.

    Eaves’ most recent Emmy, and his first since working at ESPN, was a 2020-2021 Sports Emmy Award for Outstanding Studio Show – Daily. As a token of his appreciation, he gifted CI’s School of Journalism and Media with the plaque. His hope is for the award to serve as a symbol of pride and inspiration.

    Despite all these achievements, his career bucket list still hasn’t been completed — although that’s right around the corner. Eaves’ number one career goal has been to host a national NBA studio show no matter the network. This February, that ambition will be met as he hosts ESPN’s “NBA Countdown” on Wednesday nights, and his bucket list will be complete before he turns 50 in July.

    With a successful career under his belt and years of even more achievement still ahead of him, Eaves advises aspiring sports reporters to put their noses to the grindstone. 

    “You got to put in the work as if you are a professional athlete,” Eaves said. “What you see in the game is only part of what they actually do for the week. If Steph Curry makes seven threes in a game, he probably made 700 two days before. You gotta do the work, and that’s working on your craft, developing your skills, and that’s when no one’s watching. That’s how you get better and that’s also how you separate yourself from those who want to do the same thing you do because this profession is extremely competitive. So just being able to do the job necessarily is not enough, you have to be really proficient at doing the job and efficient at doing the job as well, and that takes practice, that takes reps.”

    Photo provided by ESPN ImagesOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Michael Eaves, a 1994 journalism graduate, has spent over 25 years reporting on the sports world. From creating short clips in the local WKYT newsroom, to anchoring for ESPN in Los Angeles and Bristol, Connecticut, his decorated career in sportscasting is ever-growing. And this month when he starts hosting ESPN’s “NBA Countdown,” Eaves will have crossed off the last and most important item of his career bucket list.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 14, 2021) — The bourbon business is a Kentucky trademark, and a University of Kentucky alumni couple is beginning to make their mark on the industry.

    Tia Edwards, a 2001 integrated strategic communication graduate from the College of Communication and Information, entered the world of spirits by helping found a bourbon distilling company. In 2017, she started Fresh Bourbon with her husband, Sean Edwards, a business management graduate from the UK Gatton College of Business and Economics. Together the Kentucky natives are hoping to put a new spin on a local tradition while also reaching some historic milestones.

    “People in bourbon are big on age,” Tia Edwards said. “‘Fresh Bourbon’ is not an age statement — it is a fresh approach to an older industry.”

    The couple came up with the idea to start their company through the people they met on their travels. They were constantly told that Kentucky was known for three things: KFC, horses and bourbon. According to the Kentucky Distillers’ Association, bourbon adds $8.6 billion in economic impact annually, and 95% of the world’s bourbon is produced in Kentucky. After learning this, the couple decided to try their luck in the industry.

    What they found was that the bourbon business was tough. However, instead of leaving the industry how they found it, they took this as a challenge to change it from within. Combining her love of public relations, communications and advertising with her more than 20 years of sales experience, Tia Edwards was ready to tackle branding and marketing a new and unfamiliar product in a well-established space.

    What makes Fresh Bourbon different from its competitors is its recipe and flavor profile. While most bourbons use three-grain recipes, Fresh Bourbon uses four: corn, honey malt, malted rye and malted wheat. Although it isn’t a honey bourbon, this bourbon has a honey flavor thanks to its unique blend. It can also be enjoyed however the drinker pleases, as the Edwardses didn’t want to tell patrons how to enjoy their bourbon.

    While the couple was focused on making a good product, they unknowingly made history in the process. In February 2020, Fresh Bourbon was recognized by the Kentucky Senate as "the first Black-owned bourbon distillery in Kentucky" and that the distillery "produces bourbon with an African American Master Distiller, the first in Kentucky since slavery."

    “It’s that big of a deal to make an impact because it’s not only for us and our children but for other people that came before us that didn’t get recognition,” Tia Edwards said. “We’re benefiting from slaves that worked and never got the recognition they deserved. It is such an honor to have that recognition.”

    Like other businesses, the pandemic took a financial toll on the up-and-coming company. They had to push back their plans of breaking ground on their 34,000-square foot downtown Lexington distillery for later this year. Tia Edwards estimates it will take between 18 and 24 months to complete the build which will lead to 25 new jobs. Currently, Fresh Bourbon is being distilled at Hartfield & Co. in Bourbon County, Kentucky.

    Despite the setbacks they faced, the Edwardses had a successful pre-sale campaign that saw support from across the country. They have even had bottle signings across the Commonwealth to meet their customers. To expand on this, they’re opening a downtown tasting room in March that will give the Fresh Bourbon experience while they wait to carve out their own space in Lexington’s liquor scene.

    If you would like to learn more about Fresh Bourbon, visit www.freshbourbon.com.

    Tia and Sean Edwards Organizational Unit: Business and EconomicsCommunication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Together the Kentucky natives are hoping to put a new spin on a local tradition while also reaching some historic milestones.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Meg Mills Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 9, 2022) — To commemorate Black History Month, University of Kentucky Public Relations and Strategic Communications is highlighting alumni from the UK Alumni Association’s Pioneer Project throughout the month of February. Be sure to check UKNow each "Wildcat Wednesday" this month to learn more about a UK alum who left an important legacy at our university.

    On this “Wildcat Wednesday,” UK honors the late Angelo Henderson — the first Black journalist to win a Pulitzer for The Wall Street Journal. 

    Originally from Louisville, Henderson graduated from UK College of Communication and Information with a degree in journalism, and quickly went on to his first job working for the St. Petersburg Times in St. Petersburg, Florida. He worked as a beat reporter and a business writer. He then moved on to the Louisville Courier Journal where he continued to cover business before joining the staff of The Wall Street Journal's Detroit bureau.

    As deputy Detroit bureau chief, Henderson won the Pulitzer Prize for feature writing in 1999 for reporting on the long-lasting effects of crime after an attempted robbery at a drug store that ended in the robber's death. To this day, he remains the first and only Black journalist to win the Pulitzer for the WSJ.

    Henderson began a second career as a talk-show host for WCHB-AM, was an ordained minister, co-founder of a crime-watch group, and owner of Angelo Ink — a freelance writing, speaking and consulting business. He also served as a leader in the National Association of Black Journalists.

    In 2005, he was inducted into the UK Hall of Distinguished Alumni and later inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2016.

    After his passing in 2014, the Angelo B. Henderson Endowed Scholarship and Lecture Series Fund at UK was created by his wife, Felecia Henderson, in his honor.

    The upcoming lecture series will take place Thursday, Feb. 10, and will feature recently retired WUSA-TV anchor and author Bruce Johnson. More information about the 2022 Angelo B. Henderson Lecture series can be found here.

    To learn more about how the university is celebrating Black History Month visit http://uknow.uky.edu/campus-news/black-history-month-celebrating-those-who-paved-way.  

    Angelo HendersonOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: On this “Wildcat Wednesday,” UK honors Angelo Henderson — the first Black person to win a Pulitzer for The Wall Street Journal.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Nadia Sesay Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2022) — Award-winning anchor and author Bruce Johnson will deliver “Surviving Deep Waters” for the second Angelo B. Henderson Lecture Series from 5-6:30 p.m. EST, Thursday, Feb. 10, in the University of Kentucky Athletics Association Auditorium of the William T. Young Library.

    The College of Communication and Information Dean's Office, the CI Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee, the Association of Black Journalists Bluegrass student chapter and the School of Journalism and Media welcome Johnson to UK. Johnson, who is active in the National Association of Black Journalists and a 2020 inductee to the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame, will also provide a master class for student members of the ABJ.

    The title “Surviving Deep Waters” stems from Johnson’s childhood pastime of grabbing low-hanging tree branches that edged the Ohio River, then swinging out to drop into the water below — despite not knowing how to swim. Tenaciously Johnson paddled back to shore, unknowingly developing lessons for adulthood. From recalling his mother's experience living in an alley in Louisville to his relocating to Cincinnati to join the priesthood, Johnson will share the struggles he endured growing up in segregated Louisville, Kentucky, and the lessons and triumphs that ensued. Johnson shares other defining moments in his forthcoming memoir of the same title — to be released Feb. 22.

    “I’m not a victim of anything. Like my mother, I am a survivor of a lot of things,” Johnson says.  “Surviving Deep Waters is the book that I wish had been there for me to read when I started out as a journalist, but it should be required reading for any minority starting out in a majority work environment. My mother and great grandmother built me for this.”

    Like Johnson, Angelo B. Henderson was a Louisville native. Henderson — a 1985 University of Kentucky graduate — was a reporter for The Detroit News, The Courier-Journal and the St. Petersburg Times, and a member of the National Association of Black Journalists. As deputy Detroit bureau chief of The Wall Street Journal, Henderson won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize. In 2005, he was inducted into the University of Kentucky Alumni Hall of Fame and posthumously inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame in 2016. The Angelo B. Henderson Endowed Scholarship and Lecture Series Fund at UK was created by his wife, Felecia D. Henderson, in his honor.

    "I am very excited about the second Angelo B. Henderson Lecture Series. The series is designed to give students and faculty an opportunity to learn from veteran journalists,” said Felecia D. Henderson, widow of Angelo B. Henderson and director of cultural competency at the Maynard Institute for Journalism Education. “What an honor to have Bruce Johnson, considered a living legend in the broadcast industry, share his knowledge and experience."

    For 44 years Johnson was a news anchor with WUSA9-TV — the CBS affiliate in Washington, D.C. Upon his retirement, a mural of Johnson was painted outside of the city’s iconic Ben’s Chili Bowl restaurant, emblematic of his cultural and journalism legacy.

    Johnson is the recipient of 22 Emmy Awards. He was inducted to the Society of Professional Journalists Hall of Fame and is a member of the National Press Club and Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity. He is the recipient of multiple awards from the Board of Governors of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

    “The Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee is thrilled to help bring Kentucky native Bruce Johnson to the University of Kentucky,” said Kyra Hunting, Ph.D., and DEI Committee chair. “A distinguished journalist and author, Mr. Johnson’s accomplishments and health advocacy make him the perfect individual for the College’s Angelo Henderson Lecture Series which honors journalist Angelo B. Henderson for his accomplishments as a reporter and his community service. We hope individuals across our university community will be able to be inspired by Mr. Johnson’s visit and the impact he has made.”

    Johnson’s self-description as a “survivor” transcends to personal health. He completed the Marine Corps Marathon after surviving a massive heart attack. In 2018 he revealed on-air his diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Johnson remains a national advocate for survivors of heart attacks and cancer, using his voice and experience to pull others out of deep waters.

    Henderson — who passed away in 2014 at age 51 — was known for his community service, engaging personality and wide network of sources and ability to report about people in all walks of life. Similarly, Johnson counts his most prized awards his community service and civic awards, which number in the hundreds.

    This event is free and open to the public and will be livestreamed here. For more information and accommodation requests please contact Kyra Hunting at kyra.hunting [at] uky.edu.

    Award-winning anchor and author Bruce JohnsonOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Grace Colville Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 8, 2022) — For this “UK at the Half,” University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna Elle Smith discusses how thankful she is for her UK experience and connections that will undoubtedly help her successfully fulfill her role as Miss USA

    Before being crowned Miss USA in November, Smith was a television news reporter in Louisville. Smith contributes much of her personal and professional success to her undergraduate experience at UK.

    “I will always be proud to rep the University of Kentucky. I will be a Wildcat until the day I die,” Smith said. “The alumni group, the students I went to school with, the professors, everyone. We love our campus, and we love our community.”

    The title of Miss USA comes with many responsibilities, but there is one in particular that Smith holds close to her heart. She will spend her year of reign advocating for education about cervical cancer prevention in honor of her beloved grandmother, who passed away from cervical cancer in 2015. Smith will work with the National Cervical Cancer Coalition for programming and is seeking advice from UK Markey Cancer Center experts about how best to use her title to raise awareness.

    “UK at the Half” airs during halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast on radio and is hosted by UK Public Relations and Marketing. To hear the “UK at the Half” interview, click on the play button above. 

    Elle Smith Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: “UK at the Half” airs during halftime of each UK football and basketball game broadcast on radio and is hosted by UK Public Relations and Marketing.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 4, 2022) — When Aaron George first joined the Bluegrass Debate Coalition (BDC) in September 2021, he was feeling nervous to start something new yet excited to meet other kids. Toward the end of that debate season, he walked away with more confidence, more friends and more debate accolades than he had expected. 

    The SCAPA (School for the Creative and Performing Arts) at Bluegrass fifth grader is one of many students across the state taking advantage of a first-of-its-kind project. The BDC, overseen by the University of Kentucky's championship Intercollegiate Debate Team housed in the College of Communication and Information, launched in September 2020. The organization works with Kentucky schools to make competitive debate available to all elementary, middle and high school students. Its goal is to increase academic performance, enrich college and career opportunities and provide the intellectual and networking tools for youth to thrive as active, responsible leaders in their communities.

    For Aaron, the BDC presented a fun challenge and a way to overcome the loneliness he felt from two years of online schooling. What started out as a once-a-week after-school activity quickly became a daily passion where he spent several hours a week practicing the basics of debate with his classmates.

    These workshops and Aaron’s performing arts educational background have laid the foundation for his debate success. Although he attends SCAPA, which boasts 24 consecutive years as the Kentucky High School Speech League’s Junior State Speech Champion, SCAPA’s program is for middle school students and doesn’t focus on debate. As an elementary student interested in debate, Aaron had to find another way to compete. Joining the BDC gave him a way to use the drama skills he gained from SCAPA to perform well as a debater. Despite Aaron not being part of the school’s program, SCAPA Principal Beth Randolph has praised the excellent student he is and his success with debate, wishing him luck in his future competitions.

    Through the BDC, Aaron was able to meet kids his age who helped facilitate his growth not only as a scholar but as a person as well. His mother, Lisa George, said what once used to be a sensitivity to not accepting other people’s way of thinking has turned into carefully crafted arguments using supporting evidence. Since her son joined the BDC, she said the most important lesson he has learned has been about “being considerate, a good person and a good citizen.”

    “I have learned how to boost my confidence, how to be more helpful toward other people and how to not worry about being perfect and just try my best,” Aaron said. “I was able to build confidence among my team. Like I knew that I had a good team to back me up during debates, so what happened was that I built more friendships in the debate. They’re all teammates, friends and comrades to me. They’re all people who help me get through these debates that I do.”

    Learning how to work well with others is what led Aaron to a team-winning streak. After recruiting his childhood friend to debate as his teammate, the pair went on to win first place as a team during their first debate, the BDC’s All Hallow’s Eve. They then competed in the Wilson Wyatt Debate League and the BDC’s Fall Classic against older students where they placed second and first as a team, respectively. Most recently, Aaron debated with a different teammate to place second in the BDC New Year’s Resolution contest.

    Although Aaron has been a valuable teammate, his debate skills as an individual are also award-winning. In his debut debate, he placed sixth on the Top 10 Speaker’s list. In the Wilson Wyatt debate, he placed eighth. In the Fall Classic, he placed first among middle and high schoolers. And in the New Year’s Resolution contest, he won first place in the crossfire individual debate and first place overall best speaker.

    To date, Aaron has consistently been among the highest ranked speakers in his debates and has won every single debate he has done except one, leaving him with a 12-1 record. He has racked up impressive recognition throughout the first half of the debate season and is expected to shine even more leading up to the regional championship tournament in March.

    “Aaron is so deserving of recognition and respect,” Bill Eddy, director of the BDC, said. “He works hard, takes coaching really well and he is just a great person to have around. I am glad that debate is one of his activities to feel valued and respected and less stressed—giving him something fun to look forward to.” 

    Despite being on a winning streak, Aaron knows he still has a lot to learn. But seeing as his favorite part of the BDC is having fun with his friends and his lessons, he’s looking forward to sticking with debate for years to come.

    To learn more about the BDC, visit https://bluegrassdebate.org/.

    Fifth grader Aaron George is one of many students across the state taking advantage of the BDC, a first-of-its-kind project. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The SCAPA at Bluegrass fifth grader is one of many students across the state taking advantage of a first-of-its-kind project.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Kate Maddox Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Feb. 4, 2022) — The 2022 Concordia Lexington Summit is looking for University of Kentucky students to volunteer to help with social media and other communications efforts at the event happening on April 7-8. The Summit will take place in-person at the Lexington Marriott City Center. There is also an online option. 

    The volunteer opportunities include:

    • 2022 Lexington Summit Report — Concordia seeks four strong writers to attend the Lexington Summit, watch mainstage sessions and write up summaries, which will be used for the official 2022 Lexington Summit Report. Candidates have the option to attend in-person or virtually. Interested students must be strong writers, be able to multitask and in possession of a laptop. A 30-minute training call will be provided ahead of time and writers will be publicly attributed in the report.  
    • Social Media — Concordia requests four volunteers to attend the Lexington Summit and create social media content for Concordia’s channels. Candidates have the option to attend in-person or virtually. Tasks would include live tweeting, creating copy and captions that summarize key messages, designing Instagram stories and scheduling. Interested students must be strong writers, be able to multitask and in possession of a laptop. A 30-minute training call will be provided ahead of time.

    If interested in either opportunity, please send an email outlining your interest and a short sample of your written work to rlockheart [at] concordia.net.

    The 2022 Lexington Summit will assemble a variety of voices across the political spectrum and across sectors to advance discourse and understanding between the different socioeconomic world present in the U.S. The Summit will create impactful partnerships that not only address drivers of division and improve economic empowerment for all, but that also address the future of technology, trade, environmental sustainability and much more. Learn more here.

    For more information about the 2022 Lexington Summit, visit https://www.concordia.net/americas/2022-lexington-summit/.

    About Concordia

    Concordia is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit, nonpartisan organization that builds meaningful partnerships for positive social impact. As equal parts convener, campaigner and idea incubator, Concordia is actively fostering cross-sector collaboration to create a more prosperous and sustainable future. Concordia was founded in 2011 by Matthew A. Swift and Nicholas M. Logothetis.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The Summit will take place April 7-8.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HealthCareBy Mallory Olson and Grace Colville Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 31, 2022) – When University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alum Elle Smith was crowned Miss USA in November, her life changed in an instant.

    With her name catapulted into the national spotlight, Smith quickly learned the power of the Miss USA title and platform, and the importance of capitalizing on every open door.

    Upon preparing to compete for Miss Kentucky USA, Elle’s coach encouraged her to think about a platform, especially if she had an interest that she was passionate about. She ultimately chose cervical cancer awareness, in honor of her late grandmother, who passed away from the disease in 2015.

    “My grandmother was my favorite person in the whole entire world,” Smith said. “She passed away in 2015 from cervical cancer. Before her diagnosis, I had never heard of cervical cancer. I decided that if I was going to be Miss Kentucky USA, I wanted to use that stage to advocate for education and awareness surrounding this disease.”

    Smith will work with the National Cervical Cancer Coalition to educate women about cervical cancer prevention and treatment and to empower women to seek preventative care.  

    As Smith prepares for the year of advocacy ahead, she spoke with experts from the UK Markey Cancer Center in a Behind the Blue podcast about the importance of education and awareness surrounding cervical cancer, including preventative screenings and immunization.

    Rachel Ware Miller, M.D., UK Markey Cancer Center gynecologic oncologist, sees many cases of cervical cancer, both early and advanced.

    “I see too many cases of cervical cancer,” Miller said. “This is one of those cancers that we can do something about. It is preventable in most cases, and even if we don’t prevent it, we have the capacity to pick it up early with pap smear screening. Cervical cancer is highly curable when you find it early, which drives home the need for awareness regarding the HPV vaccine and regular pap smear screening."

    Pamela Hull, Ph.D., associate director of Population Science and Community Impact in the UK Markey Cancer Center and an associate professor of Behavioral Science in the UK College of Medicine, stresses the importance of vaccination and the work she is doing to help physicians across the commonwealth better educate patients about the HPV vaccine.

    “Any power we have to protect our kids, we need to use it,” Hull said. “We need to stress better communication, from the doctors to the nurses giving the vaccine to the front desk staff, coordinating whose job it is to give the patient more information so that kids don’t get missed when they’re at the doctor. Kids and their families need to know that there is more than one dose of the HPV vaccine, and they will need to follow up for a second appointment.”

    It is estimated that more than 14,000 women in the United States suffer from cervical cancer each year. Kentucky has a higher cervical cancer burden than most states, with an incidence rate of 9.6 cases per 100,000 women.

    All women, especially those over the age of 30, are at risk for cervical cancer; however, the disease is highly preventable with screening tests and vaccines that are widely available and effective. 

    Possible indicators of cervical cancer include abnormal vaginal discharge, odor or irregular bleeding, such as spotting between menstrual cycles or after vaginal intercourse. Any bleeding after menopause should be evaluated. If cervical cancer is identified early, it is very treatable with a high chance of survival. Advanced cervical cancer is more difficult to manage, and the treatment options have significant impacts on quality of life.

    In general, women should begin having conversations with their primary care providers at age 21 about the best time to start screening. Pelvic exams are a critical part of optimizing women’s health. Routine pelvic exams are recommended once women become sexually active to identify possible signs of vulvar problems, ovarian cysts, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), uterine fibroids or early-stage cancer. 

    Most obstetricians and gynecologists recommend screening begin at age 21, with a pap test every three years. A pap smear is only one component of the pelvic exam, and the interval for each may be different. After the age of 30, co-testing for HPV infection can be utilized to extend the screening interval to every five years.

    HPV infection is the most important risk factor for cervical cancer. There are more than 100 different types of HPV, but 14 high-risk strains cause the majority of cervical cancers in the United States. Other risk factors that increase the risk for cervical cancer include:

    • High number of pregnancy deliveries.
    • Using oral contraceptives.
    • Cigarette smoking.
    • Sexually transmitted infections, such as chlamydia, HIV and herpes simplex virus.
    • Sexually active at age 15 or younger.
    • Not using condoms.
    • Obesity.
    • Poor nutrition.
    • Immunosuppression.

    HPV vaccination has the greatest potential to eliminate cervical cancer risk, and several countries around the world are on track to eliminate cervical cancer from their populations in the next decade. Kentucky has gradually improved its HPV vaccination rate, with now just over half (56%) of eligible girls and boys ages 13-17 vaccinated, but has not yet reached the national goal of 80%.

    Routine vaccination is recommended for both girls and boys at ages 11-12 years, with a two-dose series given 6 to 12 months apart if started before age 15 (or a three-dose series if started at older ages). Vaccination is most effective if completed before the age of 26, but it can be given up to age 45 with shared clinical decision-making.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationMedicinePublic HealthUK HealthCareMarkey Cancer Center

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Mallory Olson
    mallory.olson [at] uky.edu
    "> mallory.olson [at] uky.edu
    859-257-1076 Summary: As UK College of Communication and Information alum Elle Smith prepares for a year of advocacy ahead as Miss USA, she spoke with experts from the UK Markey Cancer Center about the importance of education and awareness surrounding cervical cancer, including preventative screenings and immunization.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section FeatureMedia Embed: <iframe title="Embed Player" src="//play.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/21925457/height/128/theme/modern/size/standard/thumbnail/yes/custom-color/0033a0/time-start/00:00:00/playlist-height/200/direction/backward" height="128" width="100%" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="" webkitallowfullscreen="true" mozallowfullscreen="true" oallowfullscreen="true" msallowfullscreen="true" style="border: none;"></iframe>
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Morgan Burleigh Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 31, 2022) As of Jan. 12, 91% of University of Kentucky faculty, staff and students are vaccinated for COVID-19. While this number is outstanding, the Omicron variant represents a new challenge because of its transmissibility. Even though for those who are vaccinated – and, in particular, boosted – it is less likely to cause severe illness or hospitalization.

    It’s important that we remain vigilant as a community and do everything possible to remain safe and well.

    If you are fully vaccinated, here are a few extra steps to ensure your safety this winter.

    1. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the continuation of mask-wearing in all indoor spaces or areas of high transmission. The university has provided two KN95 masks for each student coming to main campus for added protection against the Omicron variant. For more information about masking, click here.
    2. If you are feeling unwell or experiencing COVID-19 symptoms, get tested. Testing is the best way to know if you are currently infected with the virus. Students can receive a free COVID-19 test at any on-campus location.
    3. Remain six feet away from those who do not live in your home, specifically if you are at a high risk for getting sick. Those infected with COVID-19 who do not experience symptoms can still spread the virus.
    4. A great way to ensure your safety is by receiving your flu shot. The university is offering free flu shots at various on-campus locations. If you have already received your flu shot elsewhere, you can self-report.
    5. Wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Germs spread by touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. A great way to pass the 20 seconds is by singing the UK Fight Song!
    6. If you are not already vaccinated, get vaccinated. The vaccine is a strong defense against serious illness and hospitalization. The university is also distributing booster shots to students and faculty and is offering an incentive program with the chance to win scholarships. Get boosted!
    UK College of Pharmacy's Brooke Hudspeth shows how to wear and care for your KN95 masks. Mark Cornelison | UK PhotoOrganizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLawMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Hilary Brown
    hilary.brown [at] uky.edu
    "> hilary.brown [at] uky.edu
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 28, 2022) — The UK Intercollegiate Public Forum (PF) Debate Team, housed in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, officially wrapped up the fall semester of competition.

    Led by public forum debate coach, Katie Humphries, the newly established program has witnessed exceptional growth. With only one interested student at the start of the Fall 2021 semester the team is now eight competitors strong.

    “Helping to build a new program has been one of the highlights of my journey here at UK,” said Humphries. “These students come from incredibly diverse backgrounds — ranging from business to politics to neuroscience. It is rewarding to lead a program that has a spot for anyone.”

    The public forum debate program continues to grow, as students from across the country commit to attending UK with hopes to compete in PF debate. The team recently welcomed its newest member, an incoming freshman from Minnesota.

    Throughout the fall semester, students competed at several competitions. Three UK PF teams attended the Collegiate Public Forum November Invitational. The largest CPFL event to date, UK students debated the topic, “Resolved: When in conflict, the United States' obligation to protect public health outweighs the preservation of individual freedom.”

    “This semester challenged a belief that I had wholeheartedly agreed with when I learned about the negative impacts on certain people — debate makes you recognize the nuances of situations,” said sophomore debater Eriel Burns. “All in all, the fall semester has been extremely encouraging and rewarding as I was awarded top Novice speaker in our last tournament in my first-ever debate tournament!”

    Two PF teams from UK placed in the finals. Burns and freshmen Bryson Henson placed second in the Novice Division, with Burns receiving the Top Speaker Award. Freshman Cole Flaherty and sophomore Caroline Koontz placed second in the Open Division. Kentucky students competed against and triumphed over, an elite field that included teams from Vanderbilt University, the University of Southern California, the University of Texas and more.

    The team now readies for their next competition, the virtual Collegiate Public Forum Spring Opener held in early February.

    Follow UK’s Intercollegiate Debate Team’s journey by visiting their website at https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    UK Public Forum Debate Team members (left to right): Cole Flaherty, Bryson Henson, Eriel Burns, Katie Humphries (PF Debate Coach), Caleb Waters, Caroline Koontz.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The UK Intercollegiate Public Forum Debate Team, housed in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, officially wrapped up the fall semester of competition.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Haley Simpkins Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 25, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, started off the spring 2022 semester with some big wins, in what David Arnett, the director of debate at UK, said was “its most successful result of the season.”

    The team competed at the Georgetown University Open on Jan. 3 through Jan.6. The competition included 18 universities from across the country competing over the four-day event. Sophomores David Griffith and Jordan Di took second place. Griffith and Di finished the preliminary rounds as the second overall seed with a 5-1 record. The duo defeated teams from the University of Pennsylvania, Wake Forest University, University of Southern California, Michigan State University and University of Michigan on their journey to victory. In the elimination rounds, the sophomores defeated the University of Minnesota and Dartmouth College before falling to Northwestern University in the final round.

    “Reaching the final round of one of the most prestigious tournaments in the country was a tremendous way to start the second semester,” Arnett said. “I couldn’t be prouder of how the team and coaches came together. We are all excited about what comes next and looking forward to the challenge of the postseason.”

    The team's next competition is the virtual University of Texas Austin Open during the first weekend in February. Once that competition is over, the team will turn its attention to the postseason.

    For more information about UK Debate, visit https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    The UK Debate Team at the Georgetown tournament. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary:  The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, started off the spring 2022 semester with some big wins, in what David Arnett, the director of debate at UK, said was “its most successful result of the season.”
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Jan. 14, 2022) — After successfully building one of the best hunter and angler focused social apps on the market, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus is looking to also help build up his community.

    Brad Luttrell, a 2009 journalism graduate, is the co-founder and CEO of GoWild, a free social media community helping outdoor enthusiasts improve their skills, discover gear and earn rewards. Founded in 2016, the forum-based app connects community members to locals who are interested in the same topics instead of requiring members to build their own following. 

    What sets GoWild apart from its competitors is its focus on gear. There are 500,000 pieces of gear users can tag in their content to show what they’re using and about 30,000 pieces of gear users can purchase directly from GoWild, which includes about 40 brands. The app also rewards users with points that unlock different prizes as they buy products and make posts. Prizes include GoWild swag, coupons, gift cards and a free fishing trip with the company founders, which has yet to be won. Luttrell views the investment as earning his customers’ business and investing back into them.

    “Building a tech company in Kentucky, I have been told, is like growing a pineapple in the Midwest,” Luttrell said. “And the Midwest is not a conducive growing environment for pineapples, which is something we hope to change.”

    The idea for starting a tech company came after Luttrell returned to his childhood, southeastern Kentucky roots of hunting and fishing after a hiatus to come to UK. He had spent his college years squarely devoted to writing, editing and shooting photos for the Kentucky Kernel, putting in upward of 90 hours a week managing a staff of 40 for the student newspaper. After earning his degree, he worked for a couple of years as a freelance photographer, an advertising copywriter and a creative director. When he met his goal of becoming a creative director before turning 30, he made a new goal.

    As he tried to think of a company to start that would fast-track his career while also trying to improve at whitetail deer hunting, he found that there wasn’t a good online space for veteran hunters and rookies alike to connect, swap advice and share hunting experiences. And after facing “hunter harassment” for sharing his past game on other social media sites, he set his sights on creating a space for the outdoorsy community.

    “The fact that you might be afraid to share something that you care so much about is crazy to me,” Luttrell said. “I just had this simultaneous realization that there should be a niche platform where you can quickly meet other people and dialogue with them around the thing you love.”

    Combining his diverse skill set with his talent for storytelling, Luttrell built a company — with no prior startup experience — from the ground up with three other founders. For the first two years, the founders met in their basements and living rooms on holidays, early mornings and late nights, using all their free time to set the foundation for the company. In 2017, they started fundraising. By the next year, Luttrell was able to go full time with GoWild, and he credits his time with CI for developing the tools he needs for success.

    “My ability to storytell that I learned from the Kernel and the University of Kentucky is the single most important skill set I’ve ever learned,” Luttrell said. “When I made the jump into being an entrepreneur, the best thing to do to raise money is to be honest, tell an authentic story and get people to believe in you.”

    The app has been gaining a lot of traction in the past year. Last January, GearJunkie, a trusted business in the outdoor industry, named GoWild the Best Hunting Social Media App of the Year. Luttrell said the title was exciting as he felt the outdoor media had snubbed his business for a while. In April, GoWild was also featured on Fox News Media’s homepage, and in December, Louisville Business First named GoWild as one of the Startups to Watch in 2022.

    Luttrell’s startup success with GoWild led to him being named to Louisville Business First’s Forty Under 40 Class of 2021. Not only was the honor important to him because it recognized his team’s hard work over the years, but he felt it also legitimized the often-questioned hunting industry among a diverse class of companies including distilleries and health care.

    Moving forward, Luttrell hopes to scale GoWild into a profitable business that lasts and can stand its own against other social media apps. He wants the app to continue to be a safe, fun and useful space for everyone passionate about wildlife conservation. His goals also include helping other founders, especially those in the South and Midwest, to reach the level of success he’s managed to achieve so far with GoWild.

    “We are making such an impact,” Luttrell said. “Yes, it’s smaller scale right now, but I don’t want that to stop. I think if we end tomorrow, there’s a black hole on the internet that doesn’t exist in the way that we do. It’s such an important community to so many people. I just want to be able to feed them the entertainment and education that they found in our platform and continue to keep it alive.”

    Brad LuttrellOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Brad Luttrell, a 2009 journalism graduate, is the co-founder and CEO of GoWild, a free social media community helping outdoor enthusiasts improve their skills, discover gear and earn rewards. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Jan. 12, 2022) — There is a long tradition of journalists turned creative writers, and one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is continuing down the same path with great success.

    Joy Priest, a 2012 journalism graduate, had dreamed of being an author since she was a girl. In 2019, she accomplished that dream by publishing “Horsepower,” her first collection of poems. But she hasn’t stopped there in her pursuit to cement her spot in Kentucky’s literary legacy.

    “There is an incredible literary history in Kentucky,” Priest said. “As much as people talk about basketball and horse racing and bourbon, there should be talk about literary writers in Kentucky because that’s how big of a legacy there is.”

    Among her numerous awards and fellowships, Priest is the recipient of the 2021 National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, the 2020-25 Inprint MD Anderson Foundation Fellowship, the 2019 Donald Hall Prize for Poetry, the 2018 Gregory Pardlo Scholar at The Robert Frost Place, the 2016 College Writers’ Award for the Zora Neale Hurston/Richard Wright Foundation and the 2015 Emerging Artist Award from the Kentucky Arts Council.

    Although she has found her place in the poetic world, Priest did not originally plan on being a professional poet nor did she know that was even a viable career. As a girl, she was a sporty, “undercover nerd” who tried to imitate the fiction and nonfiction books she read. Her earliest memory of writing was when her first-grade teacher assigned her to write a short story, presumably because she had already been distracted by writing in class. Even so, Priest can’t recall how she got into poetry as she doesn’t remember reading it much.

    When Priest came to UK on a full academic scholarship, her affinity for writing did not immediately translate to a literary major. She went through agricultural biotechnology, pre-med, human nutrition and being vice president of Minorities in Agriculture, Natural Resources and Related Sciences (MANRRS), housed in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, before settling with journalism.

    Through journalism, not only did Priest’s expectations for others’ writing grow due to her own training but she also joined two organizations that introduced her to her poetry mentors. As president of the National Association of Black Journalists, one of her advisors was Frank X Walker, Kentucky’s 2013-15 poet laureate. And as the Kentucky Kernel’s features editor, she met Nikky Finney and covered her win for the 2011 National Book Award. After Walker read Priest’s creative writing, he suggested she take workshops. She then spent her senior year at UK being formally trained in the literary craft and introduced to regional literature, even joining the esteemed Affrilachian Poets.

    “Joy was already a good writer when she found her way into my classroom,” Walker said. “Her fearlessness on the page raised the bar for her peers. Some of the work in her new collection was born in that class. There was a reason my writing collective invited her to join the Affrilachian Poets. I’m happy the rest of the world is discovering her too.”

    After UK, Priest continued her education by following Finney to the University of South Carolina. She received her Master of Fine Arts in creative writing and certificate in women and gender studies while also continuing her focus on Black narratives and underrepresented youth. Having been a Black, underrepresented youth herself, Priest’s work takes inspiration from her own journey of using art and education to work her way out of working-class Louisville.

    “Thus far my training has been very Black, very Black fem, very Black woman,” Priest said. “I think the nature of my academic trajectory has just been shaped that way. There’s a degree of intentionality behind it because that’s what I’m interested in. I gravitated to those subjects and those teachers and those classes because through them I learned to articulate my specific subject position in the world. That’s where my academic expertise comes from thus far.”

    At the conclusion of her MFA, Priest’s life experience as a writer culminated into “Horsepower,” what she calls a “quintessential first book but a nontraditional bildungsroman, coming of age, story.” The poetry collection is a cinematic escape narrative that follows a Black, southern working-class girl as she grows up vigilant in a white supremacist household where she’s being kept from her Black father. Though Priest was working against those things in her own life at the time of writing her poems, her book is not autobiographical. Moving forward, she plans on using more mature craft and creatively imaginative approaches that won’t be easily confused with her own life story.

    Though Priest’s writing has won her national recognition, praise from her community has been most important to her. From acknowledgment by Great Friendship Baptist Church in West Louisville to receiving a book blurb from Pulitzer-winning Black poet Gregory Pardlo, Priest places these accomplishments above any other revered awards she has earned.

    “I care a lot about acknowledgment from my community, that I’m doing a good job on behalf of Black folks, to be quite honest,” Priest said. “It’s those experiences that you feel like you matter as a writer to a community and you’re not just like a diversity photo-op. Those things matter to me. Kentucky matters to me. Being acknowledged in Kentucky, which honestly has been a bit of a struggle. It’s really cliché by now but you know, ‘Started from the bottom, now we here,’ like that community acknowledgment, it means something.”

    Priest is currently pursuing her Ph.D. in literature and creative writing from the University of Houston and is expected to graduate in 2025. She has an untitled, forthcoming second book scheduled for publication in 2023.

    If you would like to read Priest’s work, visit www.joypriest.com/

    Joy Priest, a 2012 journalism graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Joy Priest, a 2012 journalism graduate, had dreamed of being an author since she was a girl. In 2019, she accomplished that dream by publishing “Horsepower,” her first collection of poems. But she hasn’t stopped there in her pursuit to cement her spot in Kentucky’s literary legacy.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Meg Mills Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 23, 2021) — The Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues (IRJCI), housed in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, in partnership with the Kentucky Press Association (KPA), have received a “Healthy Together Through Vaccinations” grant from the Kentucky Association of Health Plans (KAHP) to increase vaccine acceptance in the state.

    The institute and KPA are one of 27 winners awarded by KAHP, the trade association representing all carriers offering health coverage in Kentucky. The initiative aims to increase COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and access by empowering organizations across Kentucky with grants of up to $25,000 to pursue efforts toward improving vaccination rates through outreach, communication, education, training, transportation and/or support.

    “For many months now, we have been partnering with various groups across the Commonwealth and have had a lot of success in our vaccination efforts,” said Tom Stephens, executive director of KAHP. “We applied some of what we learned in that programming to launch a broader grant initiative that we think is quite impactful because we are really leveraging local organizations who know their communities best. It’s great to see so many different populations served. We certainly aren’t letting up because vaccines are the best defense against hospitalization and death.”

    According to Al Cross, IRJCI director, the grant will help facilitate getting special sections in Kentucky newspapers to educate readers on the importance of immunizations in general, focusing on counties with low COVID-19 vaccination rates.

    “Community newspapers continue to reach a large percentage of Kentucky households, and national surveys show such papers enjoy a high level of trust among their readers,” Cross said.

    UK Cooperative Extension Service is also supporting and partnering with IRJCI and KPA on the project. Natalie Jones, a UK extension specialist, has produced a story about vaccination that the team will offer to newspapers as the lead article for their special sections. Additional material will come from the institute’s Kentucky Health News and the community newspapers’ own reporting and photography.

    Read more about the KAHP community grant program and other recipients here.

    About Kentucky Association of Health Plans

    Kentucky Association of Health Plans is the trade organization representing the Kentucky health insurance community. KAHP is a leader on issues that strengthen the accessibility, value and quality of health care in the Commonwealth. Members include Aetna, Anthem, CareSource, Humana, Passport Health Plan by Molina Healthcare, UnitedHealth Group and WellCare.

    For more information visit: www.kahp.org or follow @kyhealthplans on Twitter.

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentCommunication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues, housed in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, in partnership with the Kentucky Press Association, have received a “Healthy Together Through Vaccinations” grant from the Kentucky Association of Health Plans to increase vaccine acceptance in the state.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Meg Mills Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 23, 2021)  One University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna’s book is heading to the big screen. 

    Dana Canedy’s New York Times best-selling memoir “A Journal for Jordan,” has been adapted into a feature film. Canedy is a graduate of the UK School of Journalism and Media.

    Directed by Denzel Washington and starring Michael B. Jordan, “A Journal for Jordan” focuses on Canedy’s real-life story with her war-hero partner, 1st Sgt. Charles Monroe King (played by Michael B. Jordan), and the journal of love and advice he left for their infant son before being killed in combat in Iraq. 

    Before being slated for a feature film, "A Journal for Jordan" was published in 10 countries and eight languages. 

    “It is truly a blessing to be able to use my platform to tell not only the story of my solider, but the story of military sacrifice,” Canedy said. “A solider never serves alone, their family is always serving with them.”

    Canedy had a huge part in bringing her book to life.

    “Not only am I a producer on the movie, but I worked very closely with our amazing director, Denzel Washington. He had me involved in every step, from script development to casting,” Canedy said. “I also spent a lot of time with the actors, showing them Charles' dog tags and purple heart, to help them understand the story was about real people, not just characters in a script.”

    Canedy says the film focuses on the idea of resilience after tragedy, but still has some humor in it. The film was privately screened to Canedy and her son Jordan before anyone else saw it.

    “The film is so beautiful and very accurate. Because we got to know the actors and directors so well, they are like family now and it made it very personal,” Canedy said. ”I am so grateful for the way the film is being received and all of the support I have gotten. I hope families see it over Christmas and can resonate with the story.”

    “A Journal for Jordan” is exclusively in theaters this Christmas. For more information about the film, or to purchase tickets, click here.

    About Canedy

    Raised in Radcliff, Kentucky, Canedy graduated from UK with a bachelor’s degree in journalism in 1988. She was named a Distinguished Alumna in the School of Journalism and Media in 2017, and was inducted into the UK Alumni Association's Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2020.

    “I’m so grateful to have attended UK,” Canedy said. “It provided me with the foundation I would need to succeed and I know I would not have gotten this far in my career without the instruction of my wonderful professors. I truly felt prepared to face the world when I left UK.”

    Following her time at UK, Canedy worked at the Palm Beach Post in Florida reporting on law enforcement and crime, The Cleveland Plain covering law enforcement, suburban government and local business, and then as an editor directing metropolitan coverage before leaving in 1996 to work for The New York Times.

    During her 20 years at the nation’s top newspaper, Canedy worked as a business reporter and three more as the Florida bureau chief, overseeing all news coverage from the state, including the 2001 election. She also was the lead writer and editor on The Times series, “How Race is Lived in America,” which won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. The series looked at race relations in this country.

    In 2020, Canedy was named the first African American woman senior vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster, one of the largest publishing houses in the world. Before her position at Simon & Schuster, she was named the administrator of the Pulitzer Prizes, working alongside the Pulitzer Prize board to select juries and prize deliberations and arranging the meetings that will select the yearly winners.

    Based on the best-selling memoir, "A Journal for Jordan" tells UK alumna Dana Canedy's true story of love beyond words. Dana CanedyOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Dana Canedy’s New York Times best-selling memoir, “A Journal for Jordan,” has been adapted into a feature film, directed by Denzel Washington and starring Michael B. Jordan. A 1988 journalism graduate of UK, Canedy says UK provided the foundation she needed to succeed in her career as a journalist and author.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Mariah Kendell Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 22, 2021) — Service is a large part of the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s mission, so when two members of the college learned about an opportunity to assist a statewide nonprofit organization with their community outreach and marketing needs, they brought their expertise together to make it happen.

    KY-Moms MATR (Maternal Assistance Towards Recovery) exists to help pregnant and parenting mothers struggling with substance use disorder. The organization serves the Commonwealth by connecting these women to community outreach and education opportunities, substance use disorder prevention and case management services.

    To achieve these goals, however, KY-Moms must promote themselves to potential clients and community partners. “They’re there to help the moms; but, in order to do that, they need to reach out to community organizations and doctors' offices, ask for donations for sponsorships, and design catchy promotional materials that can be shared on social media,” said Allyson DeVito, senior lecturer in the UK School of Information Science.

    This presented a challenge — the organization is staffed by case managers and prevention specialists, who do not have a background in marketing and community outreach. This led Katie Stratton, KY-Moms program administrator, to reach out to the University of Kentucky for advice. She was quickly connected to DeVito.

    Through her CIS 300: Strategic Business Communication class, DeVito had experience in maximizing the limited resources of nonprofit organizations. She has partnered with the $100 Solution Project in the past, tasking her students to build marketing strategies with just $100. Now, the challenge was hers.

    “I knew as soon as I spoke to Katie about KY-Moms that I wanted to ask our awesome CI Communications Director Catherine Hayden about getting involved because of her experience and all of the amazing projects she works on each day for our college,” DeVito said. The two spent months planning the logistics, connecting regional offices and creating an accessible presentation. The virtual workshop took place in late October and outlined skills such as website design, newsletter creation, email writing, social media marketing and networking skills.

    Hayden presented a main topic about basic design tips and breakout sessions on using free business tools for things like graphic design, social media scheduling, writing/editing and appointment scheduling. DeVito presented a breakout session on effective email and press release writing.

    Two KY-Moms MATR employees also presented best practices on other topics including making community connections and marketing strategies as well as a breakout session on media relations, based on the successful strategies of one location’s work with their local media outlets.

    As a result of the one-day seminar, KY-Moms MATR has since adapted its marketing approach, utilizing newsletters and free business tools to make flyers, business cards and social media images, Stratton said. She is hopeful that these efforts will lead to more referrals for services from community members.

    “It was a good feeling to be able to take what we normally do each day or teach in a classroom setting and say, ‘Here are some tips and things you can do that can help with your job to help Kentucky moms and their kids,’” DeVito said.

    Learn more about KY-Moms MATR at this link: https://dbhdid.ky.gov/dbh/kymomsmatr.aspx.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Service is a large part of the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s mission, so when two members of the college learned about an opportunity to assist a statewide nonprofit organization with their community outreach and marketing needs, they brought their expertise together to make it happen.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Riley Fort Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 22, 2021) — Kimberly Parker, an associate professor in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, and her ISC 497 Social Marketing class collaborated with Rae of Sunshine (KY) — a nonprofit organization dedicated to spreading positivity and eliminating the stigma of mental health — for their Fall 2021 semester project.

    Taylora Schlossler, founder of Rae of Sunshine, created the organization to honor her only daughter Taylor Rae Nolan, a former ISC student, who lost her life to suicide in January 2019. Schlossler is committed to sharing Nolan’s story, helping others who are struggling with their mental health and increasing access to mental health resources.

    Schlossler attended Parker’s class at the beginning of the semester to discuss Rae of Sunshine’s mission and its current needs. Student groups were then tasked with creating a social marketing campaign for Rae of Sunshine that included the campaign’s purpose, primary focus, market analysis, target audience description, objectives, barriers, competitors, creative content and budget plan.

    “Having the opportunity to create an applicable and measurable campaign for a nonprofit so close to my heart was both an honor and a hands-on experience I can share with future employers,” senior ISC major Katherine Yochum said.

    Students noted that this assignment not only prepared them for future careers, but was extremely rewarding because it gave them the opportunity to start important conversations about mental health with their peers.

    “No one is alone in their mental health struggle, and I learned just how much that concept needs to be illuminated. These conversations have the power to change the trajectory of someone’s life for good,” Shelby Arnett, another ISC senior said. “I am incredibly passionate about mental health, so partnering with Rae of Sunshine for this social marketing campaign felt like a dream come true.”

    Arnett, Yochum and their classmates presented their final projects in class in front of several special guests, including Schlossler and Jennifer Greer, dean of the College of Communication and Information.

    “It was so obvious that the students worked so hard and were passionate and genuine. It wasn’t a project they completed for a grade — it meant something to every single group,” Schlossler said. “I really hope we can take these projects and turn them into a reality on UK’s campus.”

    Students worked all semester on creating the many parts of the campaign and the final presentation. Parker noted that students were passionate about Rae of Sunshine from the beginning and excited to share their final projects with Schlossler.

    “It meant so much to me to know that they worked so hard on something that would honor Taylor and that Taylora would be proud of,” said Parker. “It was exciting to watch them take their skill sets and see the potential it has to make a difference.”

    Visit www.raeofsunshineky.org/Foundation to learn more about the Rae of Sunshine Foundation.

    The ISC 497 class.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Kimberly Parker's ISC 497 Social Marketing class, collaborated with Rae of Sunshine — a nonprofit organization dedicated to spreading positivity and eliminating the stigma of mental health — for their Fall 2021 semester project.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Danielle Donham Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 17, 2021) — Today, the University of Kentucky honors its graduates at the December 2021 UK Commencement Ceremonies. All ceremonies will be livestreamed on the university's YouTube channel. Approximately 1,200 graduates will participate in the Commencement Ceremonies.

    The graduates represent 99 Kentucky counties, 40 U.S. states, and 31 countries.

    Overall, the UK Board of Trustees approved the conferral of 1,973 degrees at its meeting this week, including 1,409 undergraduate, 551 graduate and 13 professional degree candidates for December 2021. August 2021 degree recipients are also eligible to participate in the December ceremonies. More than 800 degrees were conferred for August.*

    In the interest of health and safety, masks are required for all graduates and their guests who attend. 

    The ceremony schedule is as follows:

    10 a.m. ceremony

    • College of Agriculture, Food and Environment
    • College of Education
    • College of Engineering
    • College of Fine Arts
    • College of Medicine
    • College of Pharmacy
    • College of Public Health
    • College of Social Work
    • Martin School of Public Policy and Administration
    • Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce

    3 p.m. ceremony

    • College of Arts and Sciences
    • College of Communication and Information
    • College of Design
    • College of Health Sciences
    • College of Nursing
    • Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Student Speakers

    Two student representatives have been selected by UK President Eli Capilouto to address the audiences at their respective ceremony. Given limitations on the number of people allowed on the stage, the speeches have been pre-recorded.

    • Peyton Schroeder, from Germantown Hills, Illinois, who will speak at the 10 a.m. ceremony. She is graduating with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering and a minor in mathematics and evaluation from the UK College of Engineering and the Lewis Honors College.
    • Bisimwa “Jack” Nzerhumana, originally from the Democratic Republic of Congo and now a Lexington resident, is graduating with two bachelor’s degrees in neuroscience and psychology from the UK College of Arts and Sciences and is also a Lewis Honors College member. 

    Full video of each ceremony will be available within two weeks after Commencement on the university’s YouTube channel, www.youtube.com/universityofkentucky.

    Social media users are encouraged to use the hashtag #UKgrad.

    For more information about UK Commencement, visit www.uky.edu/commencement.

    *These numbers reflect degree candidates, not individual graduates (some graduates earn more than one degree, thereby being counted as a degree candidate multiple times). Degrees will be certified by the UK registrar, ensuring individuals have satisfactorily completed all requirements. The most up-to-date information is available through UK and Institutional Research, Analytics and Decision Support.

    WATCH HERE: University of Kentucky December 2021 Commencement Ceremonies Pete Comparoni | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Danielle Donham
    danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    "> danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2660 Summary: Today, the University of Kentucky honors its graduates at the December 2021 UK Commencement Ceremonies. All ceremonies will be livestreamed on the university's YouTube channel. Approximately 1,200 graduates will participate in the Commencement Ceremonies. The graduates represent 99 Kentucky counties, 40 U.S. states and 31 countries.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Meg Mills Tuesday

    LEXINGTON Ky. (Dec. 14, 2021) — University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus Graham Shelby is an experienced multimedia storyteller, political speech writer, veteran stage performer and can now add documentary director to his repertoire. Shelby recently directed and released, “City of Ali,” a Kentucky-produced documentary that focuses on the week of Muhammad Ali's passing in 2016 and the Louisville roots of his global, historic legacy.

    In June 2016, Shelby was working with Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer and members of the mayor’s communications team as a speechwriter — producing what became essentially the first public eulogy for Muhammad Ali, a speech delivered by Fischer and broadcast worldwide the day after The Champ’s death.

    A week later, as more than 100,000 people lined the streets of Louisville to celebrate Ali’s life — with over 1 billion people worldwide tuned in to the event — the mayor decided the story of that week needed to be remembered.

    “There was a kind of coming together, it was a really rough time in the country. Along with being in the middle of a presidential election, there was a proposed Muslim ban and the global expansion of the Black Lives Matter movement. But when Ali passed there was a feeling of connection among people of all different backgrounds and it was very beautiful,” said Shelby.

    Shelby took charge of what was initially planned as a short documentary about Ali’s lifelong relationship with his hometown, and he quickly learned making a documentary was a difficult process. ”City of Ali” took Shelby and his collaborators four and a half years to create, in addition to his full-time job in the mayor’s office.

    “We hope when Kentuckians watch this movie they feel a sense of pride,” he said. “This global, beloved figure is from Kentucky, and no matter where he lived or traveled, he claimed Kentucky as home.”

    “City of Ali” is an 80-minute documentary that has received coverage from The New York Times, AP, The Guardian, Ebony and others, and was featured on "The Today Show." The film currently holds an 89% rating on Rotten Tomatoes.

    “It’s cool and it’s weird to have this recognition,” Shelby said. “It becomes a nice memory, but it doesn’t change anything about you or your life. What is really touching for me is when I see people’s emotional reactions — laughter, tears, applause — as they watch the documentary, along with the feedback we’ve gotten. One teenager watched the movie and said, ‘I never understood why people called Ali 'The Greatest.' Now I do.’  That really means something.”

    “City of Ali” is available on streaming platforms including Amazon Prime, Apple TV and YouTube Movies. The film makes its debut on KET and other PBS stations around the country in January.

    To view the trailer for “City of Ali” click here.

    About Graham Shelby

    Graham Shelby is an experienced multimedia storyteller who has written for The New York Times, Reader’s Digest and Salon, among other outlets. His audio stories have appeared on NPR, "The Moth Radio Hour," Marketplace and Voice of America. A veteran stage performer, Shelby hosts "The Moth Story Slam" in Louisville, Kentucky, and performs his original multimedia one-man show “The Man on TV” in theatres, universities and other venues. Along with being a CI alumnus, Shelby is also a proud alumnus of the Kentucky Kernel, UK’s student-run newspaper.

    “City of Ali” details how the death of Muhammad Ali brought the people of his Kentucky hometown - and the world- together. of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus Graham Shelby is an experienced multimedia storyteller, political speech writer, veteran stage performer and can now add documentary director to his repertoire. Shelby recently directed and released, “City of Ali,” a Kentucky-produced documentary that focuses on the week of Muhammad Ali's passing in 2016 and the Louisville roots of his global, historic legacy.Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Catherine Hayden Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 10, 2021) — Nominations for the 2022 Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame are being accepted now until Jan. 15, 2022.

    The sole criterion for selection is that nominees should have made a significant connection to Kentucky and have been active in journalism long enough to establish that the contributions they have made to the profession are significant. Kentucky natives or journalists who were raised or educated in Kentucky but practiced journalism elsewhere are eligible for nomination and selection.

    Letters of nominations should include the nominee's Kentucky connections, current and past employment, career highlights and significant contributions to journalism and society. A list of past inductees is posted at http://ci.uky.edu/jam/hall-of-fame/inductees.

    For details and instructions on how to make a nomination, go to https://ci.uky.edu/jam/HOFNomination.

    The Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame is housed in the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information.

    Nominations for the 2022 Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame are now being accepted.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Nominations for the 2022 Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame are being accepted now until Jan. 15, 2022.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 3, 2021) — The Kentucky Derby is known for its athletic horses and unique fashion. For 2022’s Derby, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is going to be known for her paintings.

    Aimee Griffith, a 2006 integrated strategic communication graduate, was recently named the official artist of the 148th Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks to be held May 6-7, 2022. The Kentucky artist is taking the title not as a well-known, classically trained painter but as a full-time mom turned nearly full-time painter.

    Becoming a professional artist was never in Griffith’s life plan. Her career was in advertising and marketing, and she loved it. But when she quit her job and moved to Australia for her husband’s career, she found herself taking a watercolor workshop while vacationing on Hamilton Island in 2016. Combining her new knowledge on the basics of painting with the inspiration she got from the art she discovered during her travels, Griffith figured she’d try her hand at making her own paintings.

    “I feel like the biggest lesson I’ve learned is to not limit myself,” Griffith said. “We’re all capable, but it doesn’t hurt to try because if you try and it doesn’t work out, so what? Throw it away. It’s no big deal. Even if it’s not something that grows into a business, it can be very therapeutic, and it can bring joy to people that you make it for. One of the biggest things I just love is making art for other people.”

    Though others might find the unforgiving nature of watercolors intimidating, Griffith finds it magical. Watercolor is her specialty because she loves its unpredictability and transparency. She can simultaneously narrow in on the details of her paintings while also allowing the watercolors to freely flow.

    What started as a hobby to fuel her lifelong love for art turned into a side hustle when she started an Etsy shop for the people who wanted prints of her paintings. Though she wasn’t sure what she was doing when she started her business, she used what she learned in ISC in the design of her Etsy shop, website, wholesale line sheets and social media marketing. Now her art business has grown enough to establish itself and become Griffith’s job instead of just a pastime. 

    “When I left my job and became a mom full time, I was really unsure of what my purpose was going to be past being a mom,” Griffith said. “And art has been an outlet for me. I’m just glad that I’ve found something that I enjoy doing so much that is able to help support me.”

    Right when Griffith hit a low point in her new art career after taking a hiatus from painting to help her kids through virtual learning, she was surprised with a request in early 2021 to submit her art for consideration of becoming the official art for the 148th Kentucky Derby. She never imagined being selected, but she knew this was a once in a lifetime opportunity she couldn’t pass up.

    She created two 2 feet by 3 feet watercolor paintings, one for the Derby and the other for the Oaks. Her goal was to create paintings with lots of energy. The Derby painting features racehorses and their jockeys mid-run. Griffith wanted to capture the “bright spot” she felt when painting this — the feelings of hope, kids going back to school and the vaccine being released. As such, this painting is full of color, excitement and joy. For the fashion-forward Oaks painting, she wanted to create a fun atmosphere showcasing the pageantry and anticipation leading up to the race. Griffith wanted this piece to tell a story with the people and fashion it features.

    Griffith hopes the exposure from the Derby and Oaks will open more doors for her art career in the future, not just to support her but to support others as well.

    “I really want to try to find a way to use my art to help other people,” Griffith said. “I think that some things are a gift, and it’s good to give that gift to other people so that it can help others. I’m trying to figure out that for me.”

    “Official Art of the Kentucky Derby” will be featured on the 2022 Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks official racing programs and a variety of merchandise, including Derby and Oaks 148 limited edition artist-signed and numbered posters. If you like to purchase other merchandise featuring the “Official Art of the Kentucky Derby,” visit the Kentucky Derby Museum and www.kentuckyderbystore.com. If you would like to purchase Griffith’s other paintings or prints, visit www.watercolorsbyaimee.com/.

    Aimee Griffith, a 2006 ISC graduate, was recently named the official artist of the 148th Kentucky Derby and Kentucky Oaks.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The Kentucky Derby is known for its athletic horses and unique fashion. For 2022’s Derby, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is going to be known for her paintings.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar and Meg Mills Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Dec. 1, 2021) — With beauty, brains and the Big Blue Nation supporting her, a University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) alumna has traded her Miss Kentucky title for Miss USA. Elle Smith has won the 2021 Miss USA pageant. The UK graduate will now represent the United States in the Miss Universe pageant on Dec. 12, in Eilat, Israel.

    Smith, a 2020 journalism graduate, won the title of Miss Kentucky USA in May 2021. While her performance may have had some people believing she was a pageant veteran, this was her first time competing in a pageant. And the road that led her to the pageant life started at UK.

    Although Smith fell in love with UK the first time she stepped on campus, she felt like the odd one out once she started her freshman year. Not only was she unsure of what to major in, but she also seemed to be one of the few of her peers who hadn’t competed in pageants previously. But she set her mind to make a change. 

    Her interest in writing and politics led her to CI. Once she got a camera in her hands, it was only a matter of time before she fell in love with journalism. During her years in the college, she participated in the UK Student News Network, the Kentucky Kernel, WRFL and the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the latter of which she served as vice president during her senior year. It was through an NABJ conference that Smith landed her job with WHAS-TV in Louisville.

    “I felt so much support from staff, faculty, peers. And there are also so many different opportunities for journalism students,” Smith said. “I think those are what led me to get this job in Louisville right out of school.”

    WHAS-TV, an ABC-affiliated station, is a Top 50 market, so Smith came into the job a bit intimidated. As a southern Indiana multimedia journalist, she is responsible for finding, pitching, shooting and editing hard news stories every day. She has a list of about 100 contacts that she has spent extensive time building relationships with, on and off the clock. She said her job was the kind you took home and was constantly on your brain. But thanks to her first “big girl job,” she was finally able to afford competing in her first pageant. 

    In December 2020, Smith committed to competing in the May 2021 Miss Kentucky USA pageant. Leading up to the competition, she prepared diligently, meeting a pageant coach and personal trainer multiple times a week, then every day as the competition drew near. 

    When the competition finally arrived, Smith was terrified. But once she was literally pushed onto the stage, she said she relaxed and had the most fun she’s had in a while. She competed as Miss Germantown against over 40 other women from across the state. After individual interviews and preliminaries, which included swimsuit and evening gown, the competition was cut down to just 15 women who competed in swimsuit, evening gown and on-stage question.

    Luckily for Smith, her life experiences helped prepare her for the pageant. Not only were interviews part of her everyday routine at work, but she also had modeled occasionally since her senior year of high school. While she acknowledges the Miss USA organization focuses on glamour, she believes they also value well-rounded women, and Smith clearly fit the bill.

    “The moment they called my name it was shock and then relief just because there had been so much hard work to get me to that moment,” Smith said. “And I never walked in wanting to win. I wanted to do the best that I could but also know that I had put in the work to be there, put in all the work I needed to do to be on that stage, and I could say that. That’s why I would’ve been happy no matter what.”

    As Miss Kentucky USA, Smith was set to represent the state for the next year in addition to working her full-time job as a reporter. She has made appearances at ball games and other pageants across different states while also appearing on camera to cover news stories for work.

    The juggling act that her responsibilities require only intensified with the preparations Smith made for the Miss USA pageant. She spent two weeks in Tulsa competing against 50 women on a grueling 4 a.m. to midnight schedule. Ahead of that competition, Smith designed her own gown, state costume and self-branding on top of physically and mentally preparing herself. She will now give her Miss Kentucky USA title to the Kentucky runner-up and move to Los Angeles on a full salary to represent the nation for a year. 

    It’s a tall order, but Smith thinks all the effort is worth it. After all, she entered pageantry to grow as a person through all the life skills and lessons pageant life brings. 

    “There’s no balance right now just because I think you have one year to take full advantage of all the opportunities that are given to you,” Smith said. “And so I am full-fledged trying to go 24/7, which is exhausting at times, but it’ll be so worth it next year when I pass down the crown and I’m like I took advantage of every single opportunity that was given to me over the past 365 days.”

    If you would like to learn more about the Miss Kentucky USA organization, visit www.misskentuckyusa.com/kyusa. If you would like to learn more about the Miss USA organization, visit www.missusa.com.

    Elle Smith is going from Miss Kentucky to Miss USA. Photo by @felipeespinal.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: With beauty, brains and the Big Blue Nation supporting her, a University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna has traded her Miss Kentucky title for Miss USA. Elle Smith has won the 2021 Miss USA pageant. The UK graduate will now represent the United States in the Miss Universe pageant on Dec. 12, in Eilat, Israel.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Jesi Jones-Bowman Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 23, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research recently announced 18 undergraduate winners of the 57th annual Oswald Research and Creativity Awards. Chad Risko, faculty director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, and several research ambassadors were on hand to congratulate the winners and distribute the awards.

    Established in 1964 by then-UK President John Oswald, the Oswald Research and Creativity Competition encourages undergraduate research and creative activities across all fields of study.

    Categories include biological sciences, design (architecture, landscape architecture and interior design), fine arts (film, music, photography, painting and sculpture), humanities (creative and critical-research approaches), physical and engineering sciences, and social sciences. All submissions are sent anonymously to faculty reviewers in related fields and are judged based on a rubric.

    Awards in each category are: First Place: $350, Second Place: $200, and Honorable Mention, if applicable. Entries are judged on originality, clarity of expression, scholarly or artistic contribution, and the validity, scope and depth of the project or investigation. Organizers expressed special thanks to the judges for their support of undergraduate research.

    This year's Oswald student award winners are:

    Biological Sciences

    • First Place: Shelby McCubbin, Honors neuroscience senior; Mentor: Robin Cooper; Pharmacological profiling of stretch activated channels in proprioceptive neurons
    • Second Place: Maya Abul-Khoudoud, Honors biology junior; Mentor: Matthew Gentry; Establishing Personalized Diagnoses for Lafora's Disease
    • Honorable Mention: Hannah Cleary, Honors agricultural and medical biotechnology senior; Mentor: Eve Schneider; Methods of Mechanotransduction in Corpuscles of Waterfowl

    Design

    • First Place: Quincy Ipsaro, biology senior; Mentor: Carolina Segura-Bell; Unorthodox but Functional Tools used for the Ecological Design and Implementation of Pollinator Gardens 
    • Second Place: Anna Claire Littleton, landscape architecture senior; Mentor: Jayoung Koo; Echoes of the Past: Huntertown Revival of "The Bottoms"
    • Honorable Mention: Abby Phelps and Katie Davis, landscape architecture juniors; Mentor: Ned Crankshaw; Urban Oasis

    Fine Arts

    • First Place: Sydney Daniels, neuroscience and economics senior; Mentor: Luke Bradley, Timothy Moyers and Michael Baker; The Symphony of the Cell
    • Second Place; Jayda Johnson, art studio junior; Mentor: n/a; Queen Mother/ Mitochondrial Eve
    • Honorable Mention: Brittani Garland, history and digital media design senior; Mentor: n/a; Visions

    Humanities: Creative

    • First Place: Tejaswini Sudhakar, Honors psychology and gender and women’s studies senior; Mentor: Rebecca Gayle Howell; hold fire 
    • Second Place: Quinn Troia, Honors gender and women’s studies and information communication technology junior; Mentor: Tara Tuttle; A Femme-ifesto

    Humanities: Critical Research

    • First Place: Erin Inouye, English junior; Mentor: Miriam Kienle; Animating Plastics: Shinto and Environmentalism in Sayaka Ganz's Reclaimed Creations 
    • Second Place: Danica Moon, Honors political science senior; Mentor: Tara Tuttle; Gender in the Garden 

    Physical and Engineering Sciences

    • First Place: Shelby McCubbin, Honors neuroscience senior; Mentor: Robin Cooper; Pharmacological profiling of stretch activated channels in proprioceptive neurons
    • Second Place: Tony Butera, mechanical engineering junior; Mentor: Martha Grady; Correlation Between Sample Preparation and SEM Imaging

    Social Sciences

    • First Place: Sydney Daniels, neuroscience and economics senior; Mentor: n/a; Rwanda's Coffee Industry: Colonialism and the Impact of Fair Trade Coffee
    • Second Place: Colton Barton, Honors English junior; Mentor: Zada Komara; Are We Doing Enough?: A Look at Current Issues Affecting LGBTQ Students at the University of Kentucky   
    • Honorable Mention: Haley Hintz, Honors psychology and political science senior; Mentor: Jonathan Golding; Juror Perceptions of Heterosexual and Same-Sex Spousal Rape in the Courtroom
    of Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsArtHonors College

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207 Summary: The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research recently announced 18 undergraduate winners of the 57th annual Oswald Research and Creativity Awards.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 23, 2021) — One hundred years after “Black Wall Street” was burned down in the Tulsa Race Massacre, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus is trying to build a Black Wall Street that can stand the test of time online.

    In June 2020, Savon Gray, a 2018 journalism graduate, started Black Business Boxes with his best friend, Robbie Dobbs. The Louisville native had watched as the outrage over the killing of former UK student Breonna Taylor had grown into ongoing protests in his city. Gray decided to take action by addressing the underlying issues of race and economics in America. 

    Through research, Gray discovered some incredible figures on Black finances. Black Americans make up only 14% of the population yet spend around $1.2 trillion a year. Figuring that money runs the country and having worked in finance himself, Gray wanted to help give the Black community more control over their wealth.

    With the prevalence of the Black Lives Matter movement, public interest for Black-owned businesses increased. However, Gray knew how time-consuming it was to find and vet such businesses. He was also unsure of how often these business promotions led to sales for Black entrepreneurs. So, he created a solution to put Black-made products directly into people’s hands.

    “We want to be your one-stop-shop for everything Black-owned,” Gray said. “Let’s make it easy to support Black-owned businesses. You got one place where you know there’s going to be multiple different Black-owned businesses that you can support. Now we’re circulating the dollar in our community. We’re empowering Black entrepreneurs. We’re giving Black people money, period. And we’re building a Black economy, which is kind of our mission statement.”

    Through reaching out to Black-owned businesses across the country through professional events, social media and personal networking, Gray and Dobbs were able to create two services to help both Black entrepreneurs and their customers. By featuring businesses on Black Business Boxes’ online marketplace, consumers can easily find business’ websites to shop individual products. Gray and Dobbs also provide a monthly subscription box filled with various items from different businesses that follow a certain theme.

    The business partners’ first subscription box launched in July 2020, just a month after starting their company. That box featured a lavender-infused hand sanitizer to help fight off rising COVID-19 cases. Other items featured in their boxes have included specialty nut butters, sunglasses, lip scrubs, watches and more. Their current box has a self-care theme, and within the next year there are plans to have quarterly theme releases.

    Despite being a relatively young company, Black Business Boxes has caught the attention of many. It was named Minority Business of the Month by Louisville City Football Club and has been featured in the Courier-Journal, Black Enterprise, USA Today and several other news services. Gray believes his communication background and his abilities to speak and clearly convey the company’s idea have been a leading cause for their success. He also feels like the press coverage signals that they are doing something important that the world needs.

    “If Black Business Boxes can help add an hour to how long a dollar stays in our community, what does that do? What does that look like in the world?” Gray said. “That’s what drives us, and that’s the change we want to make.”

    If you would like to learn more about Black Business Boxes, visit https://blackbusinessboxes.com/

    Savon Gray, a 2018 journalism graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: One hundred years after “Black Wall Street” was burned down in the Tulsa Race Massacre, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus is trying to build a Black Wall Street that can stand the test of time online.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Harrison Stiles Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 24, 2021) — Senior integrated strategic communication students in a University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information Event Planning class are working with the Downtown Lexington Partnership (DLP) to produce this year’s annual downtown Christmas Parade. 

    The event will begin 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 4, and is gearing up to be a staple of the holiday season in Lexington. UK students and DLP are excited to bring normal parade operations back to the city after a nontraditional reversed parade last year.

    “We are incredibly excited to collaborate with these creative and hardworking students to bring Lexington a wonderful parade in 2021," said Laura Farnsworth, DLP vice president of development and events. "As a result of their efforts, we will be welcoming several new high-energy entries to the parade, as well as promotions and events in our downtown businesses that will bring new customers to their front doors.”

    Students are working in a variety of teams including participant recruitment, event promotion, merchant events and logistics. One new aspect the students are focusing on incorporating is the participation from downtown businesses to host special events before, during and after the parade. 

    Attendees can expect a busy day of activities and events along with the parade. And, the parade itself is sure to be packed full of local bands, floats and even everyone’s favorite jolly fellow at the end. Stay tuned for more details as we get closer to the parade! 

    For more information about the partnership and event, contact Harrison Stiles at 502- 287-7068 or Harrison [at] downtownlex.com, or follow DLP on social media @downtownlexpartnership.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The event will begin 11 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 4, and is gearing up to be a staple of the holiday season in Lexington.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Craig Borie Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 23, 2021) — On Nov. 6, 2021, interprofessional student teams representing 12 University of Kentucky colleges, Lincoln Memorial University and the University of Louisville, competed in the annual Global Health Case Competition, with a focus on implementing hurricane disaster preparedness strategies in a changing global climate.

    The competition was hosted on UK’s campus and held virtually by the UK International Center’s Office of Global Health Initiatives, whose mission is to promote an area for study, research and practice that places a priority on improving health and achieving equity in health for all people worldwide.

    “The teams really worked together to bring comprehensive and exciting plans together in a short period of time,” said Melody Ryan, Ph.D., assistant provost for UK’s Office of Global Health Initiatives. “I think they learned a lot about the complexities of global health problems and the benefits of working with different professions.”

    During competition week, teams of undergraduates, graduates and professional students are challenged to create strategies addressing a global health issue and present their plans to a panel of judges. The winning team will represent UK at the International Global Health Case Competition, hosted by Emory University in Atlanta in 2022.

    Global Health Case Competition Team 6 took the $1,500 prize, with a high level of interdisciplinary cohesiveness and innovative solutions. Their strategy, titled “Pilipinas Malakas,” is a creation of a cyclone disaster preparedness plan.

    “It was really helpful to have a team with completely different past experiences and specializations,” said Emma Hague, a freshman in the College of Public Health and member of Team 6. “Each of us gravitated toward a certain piece of the project which we were then able to compile into a single succinct and well-rounded solution.”

    Fellow team member Caleb Chaudry, a junior studying marketing, came away with a better understanding of how to create change.

    “It’s clear we all have a drive to make the world a better place,” Chaudry said. “I learned that in order to make a change, it’s best to start local; get the communities involved and you’ll have all the help you’ll ever need.”

    Team 6 members are:

    • Caleb Chaudry – Gatton College of Business and Economics       
    • Emma Hague – College of Public Health
    • Morgan Mahone (team captain) – College of Social Work
    • Evelyn Mickschl – College of Communication and Information
    • Tran Nguyen – College of Pharmacy, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Team 7 took second place with their strategy of, “One Community, One Country, One Climate.” Team 7 members are:

    • Noah Clements – College of Medicine
    • Anna Dong – College of Agriculture, Food and Environment
    • Sasha Sairajeev (team captain) – College of Arts and Sciences
    • Matthew Sepulveda – College of Arts and Sciences
    • Hanna Shoaf – Lincoln Memorial University

    Team 2 took third place with its presentation, “Global Stewards: Climate Impact Institute.” Team 2 members are:

    • Mary Winifred Edom – College of Arts and Sciences
    • Abby Knoy – College of Arts and Sciences
    • Ojaswi Piya – College of Nursing
    • Farhad Shahidi – Gatton College of Business and Economics

    For more information about Global Health Initiatives, contact Craig Borie, Global Health Initiative program manager, at craig.borie [at] uky.edu.

    A team of UK students created strategies addressing a global health issue and presented it to a panel of judges. This winning team will represent UK at the International Global Health Case Competition in Atlanta next year. Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Sally Woodson

    Summary: On Nov. 6, 2021, interprofessional student teams representing 12 University of Kentucky colleges, Lincoln Memorial University and the University of Louisville, competed in the annual Global Health Case Competition, with a focus on implementing hurricane disaster preparedness strategies in a changing global climate.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Kel Hahn Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 19, 2021) — On Thursday, Nov. 18, the University of Kentucky Office of Philanthropy honored seven UK employees and volunteers at the Terry B. Mobley Philanthropy Awards Ceremony. Held in the Harris Ballroom of the Gatton Student Center, the Mobley Awards reward staff members and volunteers who have made substantial, impactful contributions to the university’s philanthropic mission.

    During the ceremony, several nominators noted how each recipient persevered through extraordinary challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic. From exporting routine operations to remote worksites to advancing the university’s $2.1 billion Kentucky Can: The 21st Century Campaign in uncertain times, this year’s Mobley Award winners not only demonstrated dedication, but also achieved remarkable results for the Office of Philanthropy.

    Each recipient receives a commemorative julep cup, a stipend and recognition on the wall of award winners in the Sturgill Philanthropy Building. This year’s award winners include:

    Front Line Award: Albert Kalim, technical support specialist for the UK Alumni Association; Darlene Simpson, gift acknowledgement coordinator for the Office of Philanthropy.

    The Front Line Award is presented to a UK Philanthropy, UK Alumni Association or other support staff member to recognize outstanding performance in support of philanthropy efforts at the university.

    Rising Achievement Award: Nathan P. Darce, director of philanthropy for the College of Communication and Information; Meredith M. Weber, senior associate director for communications and membership for the UK Alumni Association, and director of communications for the Office of Philanthropy.

    The Rising Achievement Award is presented to a professional staff member who has UK Philanthropy, UK Alumni Association or college/unit philanthropy or alumni relations tenure of fewer than five years, and who demonstrates excellent work performance, significant success and potential of further outstanding achievement and impact as a philanthropy or alumni professional.

    Professional Achievement Award: Gregory W. Laur, assistant vice president for philanthropy; Mary Beth Neiser, senior director of philanthropy for the College of Pharmacy.

    The Professional Achievement Award is presented to a professional staff member who has UK Philanthropy, UK Alumni Association or college/unit philanthropy or alumni relations tenure of five or more years, and who consistently demonstrates excellent work performance and has achieved significant success and impact as a philanthropy or alumni professional.

    Philanthropy Service Award: Jennifer W. Mynear, director of Jarrett’s Joy Car and volunteer with Kentucky Children’s Hospital and DanceBlue.

    The Philanthropy Service Award is presented to a UK senior professional, administrator, faculty member or volunteer who has demonstrated extraordinary support for the philanthropy effort at the university, is a strong advocate for philanthropy and is not a full-time UK Philanthropy or UK Alumni Association professional.

    The Mobley Awards are designed to honor Terry Mobley’s distinguished advancement career. A former basketball player who played under Adolph Rupp, Mobley returned to his alma mater in 1977 and used his connections to grow the university’s fundraising from $3 million annually to about $61 million. The awards program has honored more than 70 individuals since its inception.

    (Left to right:) Mary Beth Neiser, Darlene Simpson, Albert Kalim, Meredith M. Weber, Nathan P. Darce, Jennifer W. Mynear and Gregory W. Laur.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationPharmacyKentucky Children's Hospital

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Summary: The Terry B. Mobley Philanthropy Awards honor staff members and volunteers who have made substantial, impactful contributions to the university’s philanthropic mission. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Mariah Kendell Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 19, 2021) — University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information integrated strategic communication senior Camille Wright has been selected to participate in the American Advertising Federation’s (AAF) Most Promising Multicultural Students Class of 2022 program.

    The prestigious program connects the nation's top multicultural advertising students to leading industry professionals. Selected students gain invaluable networking and professional development opportunities. 

    Since AAF’s Most Promising Multicultural Students program launched in 1997, less than a thousand students nationwide have been selected to participate. This year, Wright was one of 50 students picked from a competitive pool of thousands of applicants across the country. She is the first UK student to ever be admitted to the program. 

    “When I learned I was selected, I literally started screaming,” Wright said. In February, she will make her first-ever trip to New York City to attend the program. 

    “This program will give Camille national exposure, allowing her to connect with top recruiters, agencies and peers,” said Adriane Grumbein, an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication.

    Achievements of this caliber are not uncommon for Wright. She has been recognized in various capacities during her college career and faculty and staff regard her as an integral part of the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication and other campus organizations like Ad Club and PRSSA with which she is involved.

    "I was thrilled when I was informed an ISC student has been selected," said ISC Department Chair Chike Anyaegbunam. "But I was not surprised when I learned that the student is our promising, illustrious and versatile Camille Wright."

    Wright attributes her success to the support of faculty like Grumbein, who encouraged her to apply.

    “The whole department is always super supportive. Whenever there is an opportunity, they always send it our way because they have so much faith in us,” Wright said. “It just encourages you more to want to apply because you have faculty and staff that are rooting for you the whole time.”

    Wright will graduate from UK in May of 2022 with degrees in integrated strategic communication and digital media design.

    Learn more about AAF’s Most Promising Multicultural Students Programs at https://aaf.org/mpms/.

    Camille WrightOrganizational Unit: Communication and InformationFine ArtsArt

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information integrated strategic communication senior Camille Wright has been selected to participate in the American Advertising Federation’s Most Promising Multicultural Students Class of 2022 program.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Ryan Girves Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 22, 2021)  For University of Kentucky alumna Erin Simon, esports changed her life. 

    The billion-dollar industry has opened doors for her she didn’t know existed. Now, a multimedia personality, host, producer and consultant within esports, gaming and entertainment, Simon wants to open those same doors for others at the university through the Erin Ashley Simon Esports Internship Fund.

    “I wouldn't be where I am without UK,” said Simon, who is a 2014 graduate of the College of Communication and Information. “UK was where I really built my journalism skills and had professors and fellow students who believed in me and my future. Now that I'm a broadcaster in gaming and entertainment, as well as a co-owner of the new esports organization XSET, it's my turn to pay it forward.”

    Home to the first-of-its-kind global gaming and esports program, UK brings together academics, community, professional development, collegiate competition and multidisciplinary research around the growing global sport. Together, UK and its gaming partner, Gen.G, are creating an innovative program unlike any other in the country.

    “I wanted to start this scholarship because accessibility is not only an issue in education, but also an issue in esports and gaming,” Simon said. “I want to help create an additional route for the youth to not only gain experiences in esports and get an education but to have an amazing experience at the University of Kentucky, the same way I did when I attended.”

    The Erin Ashley Simon Esports Internship Fund will include a multi-year internship, which will offer extensive mentorship and experiential learning opportunities that engage and educate students on the many facets of the dynamic esports industry that extend far beyond the classroom. 

    Financial support will also be provided to recipients with demonstrable financial need who wish to pursue UK’s esports program. The initiative seeks to make the UK experience possible for students who may not have otherwise had the opportunity to attend. 

    Leaders at the university, like Heath Price, UK associate chief information officer, believe the internship fund will add an exciting new depth and dimension to UK’s esports program, while also helping the university to reach a broader student audience. 

    “UK wants to be a thought leader in the esports and video game community, building a foundation of technology investment that pushes the envelope in areas of social and competitive gaming and seeks to serve important community values — democratizing access to great career opportunities; respecting people on- and offline; and intentional outreach to interested parties irrespective of race, gender or identity,” Price said. 

    “Practical experiences are very important in the competitive professional landscape of today and tomorrow,” Price continued. “Opportunities like the Erin Ashley Simon Esports Internship Fund, that provide a combination of experience and mentorship, have the potential to be transformative when you consider the preparation necessary to compete for jobs and pursue careers across the rapidly evolving video game and esports industries.”

    The application for the internship fund will open in the fall of 2022. The criteria to apply is as follows:

    • Applicants must possess a minimum of a 3.00 unweighted high school grade-point average, out of a possible 4.0. 
    • Applicants must possess demonstrable financial need as evidenced in their individual financial aid record. 
    • Esports experience with gaming ties, which can include coding, broadcasting, content creation, event organization and more is preferred. 
    • Applicants are holistically considered on an individual basis. Diversity in all its forms is welcome and encouraged. 

    The landscape of esports is ever evolving, particularly collegiate esports.

    As the state’s flagship, land-grant institution, UK has a bold and vital mission — to nurture an outstanding learning community that inspires students, staff and faculty alike, preparing them for an increasingly diverse and technological world.

    Not only will this fund help to fulfill the university’s mission, but it will also break barriers for students like Simon who didn’t know a future in the esports and gaming industry was possible.

    “I look forward to the start of this scholarship and am so thankful for UK, JMI, Gen.G, XSET and other companies that are interested in working with me on this opportunity for our youth,” Simon said.

    To learn more about the esports initiative at the university, go to: www.uky.edu/esports/

    More About Erin Simon

    Erin Ashley Simon is a multimedia personality, host, producer and consultant within esports, gaming and entertainment. Her love and passion for these areas has helped to shape who she is today, pushing the culture forward, breaking barriers as a female in the industry. In doing so, Simon was the first individual female public figure to be the face of PUMA’s new esports line. Additionally, she has worked tirelessly behind the scenes in the industry to provide more opportunities for those in underserved, underrepresented and marginalized communities, working with companies like Evil Geniuses, XSET and one of the largest video game publishers, Riot Games. Simon is also co-owner of one of the fastest growing esports organizations XSET. Within her role at the organization, she is helping to shape the culture of the organization to ensure the org has content and deep-rooted connections in music, entertainment and the gaming industry. Simon has been tapped by well-known brands and organizations such as AT&T, Riot Games, Bleacher Report, TBS, EA Sports, General Motors, Google Play, Tampax, Columbia Records, PUMA, Turtle Beach, Bacardi, Crown Royal, Forbes, Gen.G, Evil Geniuses, Cloud 9, The Wall Street Journal, University of Kentucky, Bleacher Report and more. As Simon's career moves forward, she looks to continue to build the intersection between gaming and culture, paving a path forward for future generations. Learn more about Simon at erinsimon.com.

    Erin Ashley Simon is working to break barriers in the esports industry for UK students. Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Ryan Girves
    ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    "> ryan.girves [at] uky.edu
    859-323-8464 Summary: For University of Kentucky alumna Erin Simon, esports changed her life. The billion-dollar industry has opened doors for her she didn’t know existed. Now, a multimedia personality, host, producer and consultant within esports, gaming and entertainment, Simon wants to open those same doors for others at the university through the Erin Ashley Simon Esports Internship Fund.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Catherine Hayden Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 16, 2021) — The 2021 James Madison Award from the University of Kentucky is going to Bennie Ivory and Stan Macdonald, both retired from the Louisville Courier-Journal, where their work provided high-quality journalism in Kentucky for 44 years, especially in numerous efforts to protect and expand First Amendment rights, including the transparency of public agencies in the state.

    Bennie Ivory was executive editor of the Courier-Journal from 1997 until 2013, and “excelled at encouraging and supporting aggressive investigative reporting at all levels,” First Amendment lawyer Jon Fleischaker, a previous James Madison Award winner who nominated both men, who worked closely with Ivory as the newspaper’s First Amendment attorney. “That effort was done in many ways, including resisting attempts by many to impinge on First Amendment rights and to uphold the public’s right to full transparency of public agencies. Bennie was totally supportive of efforts to enforce and expand the public’s right to full transparency of public agencies. Perhaps the best example of that is that in a time of real pressure to cut expenditures, he ensured that the effort to open records relating to the many failures of the Cabinet for Health and Family Services in dealing with child abuse was pursued to an extraordinarily successful conclusion.”

    Fleischaker also cited Ivory’s decision to publish the details of a lawsuit relating to clergy sexual misconduct against the Catholic Church in Lexington when other news media would not.

    Stan Macdonald began reporting for the Courier-Journal in 1969 and was city editor and special projects editor, retiring in 2013. He served as either lead reporter or primary editor for important series on topics such as law enforcement’s inadequate and inappropriate response to domestic abuse, inappropriate use of force by Louisville police, unequal treatment for female high school athletes that violated federal law, lack of enforcement by Kentucky authorities for serious coal-mining violations and voting irregularities in Eastern Kentucky, which was runner-up for a Pulitzer Prize.

    Macdonald also helped draft “substantial amendments to the Open Records Law and Open Meetings Law, recommendations which were implemented,” wrote Fleischaker. “During this entire period there were many outstanding journalists at the Courier-Journal, some of whom have been honored with this award. None is more deserving than Stan.”

    “Bennie and Stan always evidenced a deep commitment to the public's right to know and made it a driving force of their careers,” said UK Journalism Professor Al Cross, who was the C-J’s political reporter.

    The James Madison Award is scheduled to be presented at the Scripps Howard State of the First Amendment Address, to be delivered by news-media attorneys Tom Miller and Elizabeth Woodford, beginning 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, via Zoom. Details of the event are posted at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/state-first-amendment-address.

    The James Madison Award is presented annually by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center of the School of Journalism and Media in UK’s College of Communication and Information to honor those who have made outstanding contributions to First Amendment rights. The award was created in 2006, and honors the nation’s fourth president, whose extraordinary efforts led to the ratification of the Bill of Rights. Nominees must have significant ties to Kentucky, and their efforts must have resulted in the preservation or expansion of freedom of the press and/or freedom of speech. The award recognizes a long-term commitment to these ideals.

    Bennie Ivory and Stan MacdonaldOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The 2021 James Madison Award from the University of Kentucky is going to Bennie Ivory and Stan Macdonald, both retired from the Louisville Courier-Journal, where their work provided high-quality journalism in Kentucky for 44 years, especially in numerous efforts to protect and expand First Amendment rights, including the transparency of public agencies in the state.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Amanda Nelson Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 12, 2021) — The work of University of Kentucky College of Education faculty and students will be showcased at the University Council for Educational Administration’s (UCEA) annual meeting. Taking place in Columbus, Ohio, Nov. 11-14, the event provides a platform to connect and share the latest information on preparing and serving as educational leaders.

    “Making an impact in schools and communities is at the top of our priority list. To have our college’s faculty and graduate scholars invited to share impactful work on UCEA’s national stage shows the tremendous level of accomplishments they have been making. We are continuing to find ways to be innovative and ensure our work is reaching those it impacts most,” said UK College of Education Dean Julian Vasquez Heilig. 

    Notably, two UK College of Education doctoral scholars taking part in conference sessions are part of the council’s Barbara L. Jackson Scholars Network.  Rasheed Flowers, a scholar in the Department of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation, was selected as a Jackson Scholar in 2020, and Stacey Love, a scholar in the Department of Educational Leadership Studies, was named a Jackson Scholar in 2021.  

    The theme of this year’s UCEA meeting is "Emerging Stronger: Reuniting to Advance Educational Leadership."

    Faculty and scholars accepted to take part represent the UK College of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership Studies and Department of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation. Additional details on presentation topics, including collaborators from other universities, can be found in the UCEA conference program

    Department of Educational Leadership Studies presenters include: 

    • Jeri M. Heileman, Graduate Student Ignite Session, “Towards a Strategic Onboarding Process for Online Doctoral Students”; 

    • Stuart Keogh, Ian MacPhail, Jessica Martinkosky and Jane E. Walsh, panel discussion, with Stacey Love and Dan Wolford serving as facilitators, “Practitioners, Parents, and Students: How Does This Trifecta Impact Teaching and Learning in Times of Pandemic?”; 

    • Ellie Holliday and Amanda Potterton, paper session, “Education Abroad Health and Safety Policies: Analyzing Reliance on U.S. Federal Travel Guidance”; 

    • Justin M. Bathon, Erica Friis (Fayette County Public Schools), Ellie Holliday, Dan O’Hair (UK College of Communication and Information), Mary John O’Hair, Karen Perry, Amanda U. Potterton and Lu Young, panel discussion, “Leading and Learning in Times of Crisis: Twin Pandemics, Fake News, Conspiracy Theories, and Insurrections”; 

    • Justin M. Bathon, special session, “Leadership for Deeper Learning: Lessons From 30 Innovative, Deeper Learning Schools”; 

    • John Beuhring Nash, conversation on developing the Café Series podcast; and 

    • John Beuhring Nash, paper session facilitator, “Technological Innovations in Leadership Preparation and Development.” 

    Department of Educational Policy Studies and Evaluation presenters include: 

    • Kayla M. Johnson, paper session, “Learning on the Mountain: Illuminating Educational Inequities During COVID-19 to Develop Community-Informed Policy in Peru”; 

    • Julian Vasquez Heilig, paper session facilitator, “The Challenges of Leading Complex Organizations”; 

    • Rasheed Flowers, Jackson Scholars Network session, “Pray and Play: The Impact of Fellowship of Christian Athletes Among African American Football Players"; 

    • Julian Vasquez Heilig, paper session, “Beyond Social Justice: School Finance Equity and Civil Rights”; and 

    • Julian Vasquez Heilig, networking table facilitator, “Writing for Nonacademic Audiences.” 

    Photo provided by UK College of Education.Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationEducationGraduate School

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The work of University of Kentucky College of Education faculty and students will be showcased at the University Council for Educational Administration’s annual meeting. The event provides a platform to connect and share the latest information on preparing and serving as educational leaders.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Thursday

    LEXINGTON, KY. (Nov. 11, 2021) — Combining their expertise in communications, the beauty industry, medicine and women’s health, two University of Kentucky alumnae are using their passion for helping women to change the skincare industry.

    Cecil Booth, a 1984 advertising graduate (now integrated strategic communication) from the College of Communication and Information, left behind a 20-year career in a Fortune 500 global beauty company to start her own company. In 2006, she started Beauty Booth with her sister, gynecologist Rebecca Booth, a 1981 general studies graduate from the College of Arts and Sciences. The sisters are equal co-founders and owners, but Cecil Booth serves as president and CEO, while Rebecca Booth serves as vice president and scientific officer. Together they founded the brand VENeffect.

    VENeffect is named after the Venus effect, a metaphor the Booth sisters came up with to describe women at peak hormonal vitality. The idea behind the company came after Rebecca Booth, who had 20 years of experience at her own medical practice, talked to Cecil Booth about the lack of understanding women have about their hormones and the few solutions to their hormonal challenges.

    “As a marketer working in a beauty company, I kind of had an aha moment,” Cecil Booth said. “Why don’t women know more about this so they can be strategic and plan for it, and where are the solutions that talk about the effects of hormonal change? And that’s when we decided to start the company.”

    With years of experience working for Alberto-Culver (now Unilever) in brand managing, new product development, acquisition, public relations and advertising, together with the stock options she had accumulated through her work, Cecil Booth was well-equipped to launch her business. What’s more, she felt her best work came when she was working on something she was truly interested in, which was the intersection of beauty and wellness. 

    Two years after forming Beauty Booth, the sisters launched their first product. Rebecca Booth authored a book titled “The Venus Week: Discover the Powerful Secret of Your Cycle…at Any Age” which details the intricate design of women’s unique hormonal cycle and how they can implement strategies through a diet, lifestyle and beauty program to maximize overall health and vitality throughout their lifetime as women. 

    Considering the book’s focus on hormone optimization, the sisters spent six years researching and developing skincare products that followed suit. In 2012, they launched VENeffect skincare, their first product line. What was originally four products at launch has now grown to 10. While the sisters plan to expand in other categories such as hair, body and supplements, Cecil Booth said it’s unlikely their brand will grow to hundreds of products as they simply wish to “provide focused and effective solutions” for women.

    “What makes our skincare line special is it’s the first line of skincare dedicated to optimizing skin based on hormonal variation throughout a woman’s lifetime,” Cecil Booth said. “Much of the beauty world is geared around the sun or environmental factors or genetics or just pure surface improvement. But for women, the way that hormones ebb and flow throughout the month and then decline, estrogen over time has a dramatic effect on our aesthetic. Estrogen is often misunderstood or vilified. So VENeffect is needed because women need to understand the science and understand their hormonal cycle and then they need to be given options for how they can optimize.”

    If you would like to learn more about VENeffect, visit www.veneffect.com/

    Cecil (left) and Rebecca BoothOrganizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Combining their expertise in communications, the beauty industry, medicine and women’s health, two University of Kentucky alumnae are using their passion for helping women to change the skincare industry.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 9, 2021) — With beauty, brains and the Big Blue Nation supporting her, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) alumna plans to try her luck at trading in her title as Miss Kentucky USA for Miss USA.

    Elle Smith, a 2020 journalism graduate, won the title of Miss Kentucky USA in May 2021. While her performance may have had some people believing she was a pageant veteran, this was her first time competing in a pageant. And the road that led her to the pageant life started at UK.

    Although Smith fell in love with UK the first time she stepped on campus, she felt like the odd one out once she started her freshman year. Not only was she unsure of what to major in, but she also seemed to be one of the few of her peers who hadn’t competed in pageants previously. But she set her mind to make a change. 

    Her interest in writing and politics led her to CI. Once she got a camera in her hands, it was only a matter of time before she fell in love with journalism. During her years in the college, she participated in the UK Student News Network, the Kentucky Kernel, WRFL and the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the latter of which she served as vice president during her senior year. It was through an NABJ conference that Smith landed her job with WHAS-TV in Louisville.

    “I felt so much support from staff, faculty, peers. And there are also so many different opportunities for journalism students,” Smith said. “I think those are what led me to get this job in Louisville right out of school.”

    WHAS-TV, an ABC-affiliated station, is a top 50 market, so Smith came into the job a bit intimidated. As a southern Indiana multimedia journalist, she is responsible for finding, pitching, shooting and editing hard news stories every day. She has a list of about 100 contacts that she has spent extensive time building relationships with, on and off the clock. She said her job was the kind you took home and was constantly on your brain. But thanks to her first “big girl job,” she was finally able to afford competing in her first pageant. 

    In December 2020, Smith committed to competing in the May 2021 Miss Kentucky USA pageant. Leading up to the competition, she prepared diligently, meeting a pageant coach and personal trainer multiple times a week, then every day as the competition drew near. 

    When the competition finally arrived, Smith was terrified. But once she was literally pushed onto the stage, she said she relaxed and had the most fun she’s had in a while. She competed as Miss Germantown against over 40 other women from across the state. After individual interviews and preliminaries, which included swimsuit and evening gown, the competition was cut down to just 15 women who competed in swimsuit, evening gown and on-stage question.

    Luckily for Smith, her life experiences helped prepare her for the pageant. Not only were interviews part of her everyday routine at work, but she also had modeled occasionally since her senior year of high school. While she acknowledges the Miss USA organization focuses on glamour, she believes they also value well-rounded women, and Smith clearly fit the bill.

    “The moment they called my name it was shock and then relief just because there had been so much hard work to get me to that moment,” Smith said. “And I never walked in wanting to win. I wanted to do the best that I could but also know that I had put in the work to be there, put in all the work I needed to do to be on that stage, and I could say that. That’s why I would’ve been happy no matter what.”

    As Miss Kentucky USA, Smith is representing the state for the next year in addition to working her full-time job as a reporter. She has made appearances at ball games and other pageants across different states while also appearing on camera to cover news stories for work.

    The juggling act that her responsibilities require are only intensified with the preparations Smith must make for the Miss USA pageant coming up on Nov. 26-29, 2021, in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She will spend two weeks in Tulsa competing against 50 women on a grueling 4 a.m. to midnight schedule. Ahead of that competition, Smith has to design her own gown, state costume and self-branding on top of physically and mentally preparing herself. If she wins Miss USA, she will give her Miss Kentucky USA title to the Kentucky runner-up and move to Los Angeles on a full salary to represent the nation for a year. 

    It’s a tall order, but Smith thinks all the effort is worth it. After all, she entered pageantry to grow as a person through all the life skills and lessons pageant life brings. 

    “There’s no balance right now just because I think you have one year to take full advantage of all the opportunities that are given to you,” Smith said. “And so I am full-fledged trying to go 24/7, which is exhausting at times, but it’ll be so worth it next year when I pass down the crown and I’m like I took advantage of every single opportunity that was given to me over the past 365 days.”

    If you would like to learn more about the Miss Kentucky USA organization, visit www.misskentuckyusa.com/kyusa. If you would like to learn more about the Miss USA organization, visit www.missusa.com.

    Elle Smith, a 2020 journalism graduate.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Elle Smith, a 2020 journalism graduate, won the title of Miss Kentucky USA in May 2021. While her performance may have had some people believing she was a pageant veteran, this was her first time competing in a pageant. And the road that led her to the pageant life started at UK.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Erika Engstrom Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Nov. 1, 2021) — The 2021 State of the First Amendment Address, sponsored by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center housed in the School of Journalism and Media at the University of Kentucky, will be delivered by media attorneys Tom Miller and Elizabeth Woodford, who successfully argued on behalf of the Kernel Press Inc., publisher of the student-produced Kentucky Kernel, in a yearslong open records case involving UK. In March of this year, the Kentucky Supreme Court ruled that the university acted improperly when it prevented the Kernel from obtaining records regarding its reporting of a Title IX investigation.

    Miller and Woodford, both with the Lexington firm Miller, Griffin & Marks, will discuss the case University of Kentucky v. Kernel Press, Inc., and the implications of the Kentucky Open Records Act, which stipulates "free and open examination of public records" even though such examination may cause “inconvenience or embarrassment to public officials or others." 

    The address is scheduled for 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, via Zoom..​ The event is free and open to the public. Access to the event will be available at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/state-first-amendment-address.

    Information about the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center at UK's School of Journalism and Media is available at https://ci.uky.edu/jam/scripps-howard-first-amendment-center

    Attorneys Elizabeth Woodford (left) and Tom Miller.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The 2021 State of the First Amendment Address, sponsored by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center housed in the School of Journalism and Media at the University of Kentucky, is scheduled for 5-6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, via Zoom.​
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Danielle Donham Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 29, 2021) — The 40th annual Kentucky Book Festival returns to Lexington with a mix of virtual and in-person events scheduled from Monday, Nov. 1, to Saturday, Nov. 6. This year’s celebration features 140 authors who will sign books, participate in discussions and more, culminating in a daylong celebration at Joseph-Beth Booksellers on Saturday, Nov. 6. The weekdays events are a mix of in-person and ticketed events available at http://kybookfestival.org/2021-events

    These signings, conversations, trivia, meals, presentations and activities serve to celebrate the literary heritage within the Commonwealth. The University of Kentucky is the Main Stage sponsor of the festival on Nov. 6.

    Authors and editors from the University Press of Kentucky and UK, including College of Engineering alumnus and former UK trustee James HardymonCollege of Arts and Sciences and Lewis Honors College alumna and chef Ouita Michel, and College of Arts and Sciences faculty member and Kentucky Poet Laureate Crystal Wilkinson, will participate in various events during the festival. 

    Authors: Nonfiction

    Authors: Fiction and Poetry 

    • Bernard Clay, author of “English Lit.” Clay is a graduate of the UK Creative Writing Program and a member of the Affrilachian Poets collective.
    • Bobbie Ann Mason, author of “Dear Ann: A Novel.” Mason is a graduate of the College of Arts and Sciences, former writer-in-residence at UK and winner of two Southern Book Awards.
    • Crystal Wilkinson, author of “Perfect Black.” Wilkinson is a College of Arts and Sciences faculty member and Kentucky Poet Laureate. 
    • Ed McClanahan, author of “Juanita and the Frog Prince.” McClanahan is a graduate of UK and frequently guest lectures creative writing workshops on campus.
    • Frank X Walker, author of “Black Box: Poems.” Walker is a professor and the director of the MFA program for English in the Department of English in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is also a former Poet Laureate of Kentucky and founder of the Affrilachian Poets.
    • Gurney Norman, author of “Allegiance.” Norman is a UK graduate and professor of English in the College of Arts and Sciences as well as a former Kentucky Poet Laureate. 
    • Shawn Pryor, author of “Free Throw Contest.” Pryor is a computer support specialist for the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment School of Human Environmental Sciences.
    • Silas House, author of “Clay’s Quilt.” Silas is the 2021 recipient of the Kentucky Governor’s Award for his service to the arts in his home state.

    Other events featuring UK authors include:

    A program of Kentucky Humanities, the Kentucky Book Festival is a celebration of reading, writing and publishing which takes place each November. Festival events seek to connect booklovers and authors, spark engaging conversations and empower readers by providing access to new books as well as opportunities to learn more about writing in a fun, safe environment. It’s the biggest bookish celebration in Kentucky! 

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtHonors CollegeLibrariesPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePublic HealthUniversity Press of Kentucky

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Danielle Donham
    danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    "> danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2660 Summary: The 40th annual Kentucky Book Festival returns to Lexington with a mix of virtual and in-person events scheduled from Monday, Nov. 1, to Saturday, Nov. 6. This year’s celebration features 140 authors who will sign books, participate in discussions and more, culminating in a daylong celebration at Joseph-Beth Booksellers on Nov. 6.  Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Amy Brooks Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 27, 2021) — Linda Rutherford, executive vice president of People & Communications for Southwest Airlines, will deliver the 2021 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture, titled “Taking Corporate America to Task: Activism in the Workplace,” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, in the University of Kentucky’s Gatton Student Center Worsham Cinema. This is the Bowling Lecture Series’ 22nd anniversary.

    The program, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication and the College of Communication and Information.

    Rutherford serves as chief communications officer for Dallas-based Southwest Airlines, the nation’s largest airline in terms of domestic customer boardings. In her role, she oversees communication and outreach; culture and engagement; diversity, equity and inclusion; people (human resources); and the Southwest Airlines University, which is the company’s employee development and training function. Prior to joining Southwest Airlines in 1992, she was a journalist in the Dallas area, including working for the Dallas Times Herald, and she began her career with Newsweek magazine in New York.

    A Texas Tech University alumna with a bachelor’s degree in journalism, Rutherford describes herself as having “a passion for education” and has shared her experience with today’s youth by serving as an adjunct instructor for undergraduate courses at universities throughout the country. Regarded as an expert in her field, she also authored a chapter in "Mastering Business for Strategic Communicators" (2017) and provided the foreword for "Business Acumen for Strategic Communicators" (2020).

    Rutherford is known for her participation in professional organizations and through service on advisory boards. She has dedicated her time to organizations including: The Make-A-Wish Foundation (current board member); Arthur W. Page Society (current trustee and co-chair of the member insights subcommittee); Texas Tech University President’s Search Committee (2016); Texas Tech College of Media & Communication National Advisory Board (current member); and Institute for Public Relations Board of Trustees (current trustee and immediate past chair).

    Some of her recognitions for leadership excellence and achievements in communications and civic involvement include: 2017 Citizen of the Year, Metrocrest Chamber of Commerce; 2016 Metrocrest Chamber of Commerce Business Woman of the Year; 2016 PR Week named one of 36 Women Champions of PR; 2012 inductee into the PR News Measurement Hall of Fame; 2009 inductee in to the Texas Tech College of Mass Communications Hall of Fame; and 2008 inductee into PR News’ Public Relations Hall of Fame.

    “We’re thrilled to welcome Linda Rutherford to UK,” said Chike Anyaegbunam, chair of the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication. “Her experience as a public relations instructor, her training and stint as a journalist, and her extensive industry expertise in corporate strategic communication, position her as an especially appropriate speaker for the 2021 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence program.”

    Anyaegbunam added that "both students and faculty will learn a lot from her about the practice of corporate public relations given her long list of extraordinary accomplishments in the profession.”

    In addition to honoring the Bowling Lecturer-in-Residence, the series names an annual awardee for Excellence in Public Relations. The 2021 winner is Susan Straub, longtime communications director for the Lexington Mayor’s Office.

    Straub is serving her fourth Lexington mayor as communications director, a job which she began in 1992 during the administration of Mayor Pam Miller. To date, she has served as communications director for Jim Newberry, Jim Gray and, currently, Mayor Linda Gorton. She is a College of Communication and Information journalism graduate; in 2018 UK named Straub a distinguished alumna of the School of Journalism and Media.

    The Bowling Executive-in-Residence Program began in 2000 and brings to UK nationally known public relations practitioners to not only deliver an address, but also meet with students interested in public relations careers. The program includes the Executive-in-Residence visit, the Excellence in PR Award and a scholarship for a senior integrated strategic communication major with an emphasis in public relations. The 2021 scholarship recipient will be announced at the lecture.

    The series honors James C. Bowling, the late retired assistant chairman of Philip Morris Companies Inc. He attended UK and later served the university as a member of the UK Development Council. In addition to serving on several national boards, Bowling also worked with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment, the UK Gatton College of Business and Economics and the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging.

    Linda RutherfordOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Linda Rutherford, executive vice president of People & Communications for Southwest Airlines, will deliver the 2021 James C. Bowling Executive-in-Residence lecture, titled “Taking Corporate America to Task: Activism in the Workplace,” at 6 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 4, in the University of Kentucky’s Gatton Student Center Worsham Cinema.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 21, 2021) — When her sons were being bullied in school by other kids, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna was devastated and aggravated. After exhausting the proper channels for action, she decided to turn the tables on the bullies through education.

    Jeanne Marie Tidwell, a 1983 communication graduate, took the writing confidence she had gained at UK to create a cross-media series aimed at teaching children from kindergarten to third grade the importance of the Golden Rule, kindness, manners and empathy. Soon, she will be adding an online game to her repertoire that already includes an interactive mobile app, full-length musical album and Ph.D. created school curriculum.

    The “Sir Dapp!” series follows a rapping, dancing Schnauzer, named Sir Dapp, and his family and friends as they navigate social situations — teaching by example the right and wrong ways to do things not only for themselves but others.

    While the fictional world Tidwell created is quite literally all fun and games, her family acknowledges the inspiration behind it was much darker. Tidwell’s adult sons, Steven and Kyle, have vivid memories of their ordeals in school and understand there wasn’t much their mother could do at the time to stop it.

    “Through the experiences that I was having, I know my mom was there in every step of the way when there was an issue where we had to talk to a teacher, talk to another parent,” Steven said. “She was always there to kind of be the advocate.”

    Tidwell’s sons were told by teachers to “stop tattling” while the administration told their mother that there was nothing they could do. The bullying eventually got so bad for Kyle that switching schools was the only solution.

    “Being bullied is never easy, especially as a kid, and you’re growing up in an environment that doesn’t make you feel very good,” Kyle said. “My mom went through it with us. So, it’s just as difficult for the parent as it is for the child.”

    As difficult as it was for Tidwell and her family, she used the experience as creative fuel. Before Kyle, the younger of the two siblings, had graduated high school, the idea for “Sir Dapp!” was born. 

    “I channeled what I was feeling about my children being bullied and the frustration I had in trying to think of ways that I could help maybe other kids relate to each other better and understand that no one wants to be talked down to, no one wants to be harassed,” Tidwell said. “And I was able to use my communication and writing skills and formulate the basis for what became the ‘Sir Dapp! Game Show’ app that we launched in 2018.”

    The app showcases social emotional type categories that direct children to complete reason-based rhymes and solve whodunit mysteries, creating a fun platform for children to absorb lessons in consideration of others, self-care and social and environmental responsibility. While Tidwell had originally wanted to create a children’s television show, she and her sons realized that an app would be a better avenue and more effective since it is interactive and mobile. The digital product studio heading the project, Lightseed Inc., then had the app reviewed by Natascha Crandall, a Ph.D. expert in children’s growth and development, to create the curriculum for teachers. 

    Creating the “Sir Dapp!” concept and bringing it to fruition was a family affair under the organization name Crystal Tree Group. Tidwell provides the creative backbone and writing, Kyle provides the business and marketing expertise, and Steven helps with game design, public outreach and a little bit of everything else. Tidwell’s husband, Steve, joins his wife as an investor in the products.

    “It’s interesting having your family work with this product that we all believe so much in,” Kyle said. “And we all have a personal history as to why we all believe in ‘Sir Dapp!,’ in many different ways and many different perspectives. We’re all passionate about it and we believe in what we’re doing.”

    Kyle was the one who suggested creating an accompanying album for the “Sir Dapp!” crew. The cross-genre musical album, “This is Our Time,” features all of the characters who make up the fictional band, Sir Dapp & the Paw Prints, and explores similar lessons featured in the app along with messages of self-empowerment, diversity and the power of words. Despite writing moral lessons into the lyrics, Tidwell wanted the musical quality of the album to be enjoyable to everyone, not just kids. To achieve this, they worked with Miami Beach Recording Studios and music technologist Luciano “Looch” Delgado, who has worked with talents like Bonnie Pointer and Cee Lo Green. Three songs on the album have won awards from the Great American Songwriting Contest and the John Lennon Songwriting Contest.

    The family is currently working with the United Kingdom-based digital development studio Dubit on an online game version of “Sir Dapp!” to be featured on the Roblox platform that presents the brand’s values in a treasure hunt genre. The game, titled “Sir Dapp’s Mysterious Manor,” will launch Oct. 25. With Dubit’s clientele of companies like Discovery Channel and Cartoon Network, Tidwell hopes the game will bring them enough attention to attract a publisher for the handful of children’s books she has already written that expand on the world of “Sir Dapp!”

    With all these different avenues and the expansion of their reach, she wants her creations to help young kids communicate better with one another to prevent the physical and emotional turmoil her sons experienced.

    “I don’t want any kid to ever feel that way. That’s what drives me,” Tidwell said. “It’s important. Someone has to talk about it. That’s the main drive for all of us.” For more information about the “Sir Dapp! Game Show” or Sir Dapp & the Paw Prints, visit https://sirdapp.com/. If you would like more information about “The Mysterious Manor,” visit www.roblox.com/games/6336130187/The-Mysterious-Manor-PRE-ALPHA.

    of Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: When her sons were being bullied in school by other kids, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna was devastated and aggravated. After exhausting the proper channels for action, she decided to turn the tables on the bullies through education. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Erika Engstrom Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 19, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is accepting nominations for its James Madison Award, which honors a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment. The center, in the College of Communication and Information’s School of Journalism and Media, is accepting nominations to recognize those whose contributions protect or expand First Amendment freedoms.

    The nominator must submit a letter identifying the nominee, listing the nominee’s address, phone number and position, and explain why the nominee would be a worthy recipient. The letter should detail the specific efforts taken on behalf of First Amendment rights and should discuss obstacles and difficulties as well as the impact of the nominee’s efforts. 

    The James Madison Award recognizes someone who has worked in one or more of these areas: open government and open records; promotion of the watchdog role of the press; defense against government or private censorship, or robust debate in the marketplace of ideas.

    Nominees must have significant ties to Kentucky and their efforts must have resulted in the preservation or expansion of freedom of the press and/or freedom of speech. Dedication to the First Amendment principle of free expression is not accomplished in a day’s work but rather a lifetime. Thus, the award recognizes a long-term commitment to such ideals.

    Honorees do not have to be journalists. Nominees may include, for example, educators, lawyers, judges, scholars, librarians, students or ordinary citizens. The most deserving recipient will be someone who has made a significant contribution regardless of how much public attention it has received. 

    Send nomination letters via email to John Cruz, School of Journalism and Media projects manager, at john.cruz [at] uky.edu by Friday, Nov. 5.

    This year’s State of the First Amendment Address and James Madison Award will be presented at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 17, via Zoom. The featured speakers are Tom Miller and Elizabeth Woodford, the media law attorneys who successfully argued on behalf of the Kentucky Kernel in University of Kentucky vs. Kernel Press, Inc. Event details will follow.

    For more information about the James Madison Award and past winners, go to https://ci.uky.edu/jam/james-madison-award.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky Scripps Howard First Amendment Center is accepting nominations for its James Madison Award, which honors a Kentuckian who is a champion of the First Amendment.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Grace Colville Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 18, 2021) — Flu shots are now available for University of Kentucky students, faculty and staff. See below for a list of locations to receive your flu shot. UK HealthCare employees should see their department manager to receive their flu shot. If their manager has not received their flu shot toolkit, UK HealthCare employees are encouraged to get their shot at one of the retail pharmacy locations.

    Please bring your insurance card with you when you receive your flu shot.

    Gatton Student Center Blue Box Theater

    Students and employees can receive their free flu shot at the GSC Blue Box Theater. Walk-ins are welcome. You may also make an appointment here.

    • Monday-Friday: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

    University Health Service

    Students can receive free flu shots in the first-floor lobby of UHS with a valid Student ID. Walk-ins are welcome and encouraged on each of the following dates from 9 a.m.-noon and 1-6 p.m. 

    • Tuesday, Oct. 19
    • Thursday, Oct. 21
    • Tuesday, Oct. 26
    • Thursday, Oct. 28

    If you are unable to get a flu shot at UHS during one of these days, call 859-323-2778 to make an appointment.

    UK Retail Pharmacy Locations

    UK students and employees may also receive their flu shot at any UK Retail Pharmacy site listed below. Make an appointment here. Walk-ins will be accommodated when possible, but appointments are preferred. If you need assistance, please call 833-333-UKRx (8579) toll-free and speak to the location of your choice.

    • Chandler Retail Pharmacy 1000 S. Limestone First Floor, Room A.01.114 Lexington, KY 40536 Phone: 859-218-3340
    • Good Samaritan Retail Pharmacy 310 S. Limestone Room C-017 Lexington, KY 40508 Phone: 859-218-4777
    • Kentucky Clinic Pharmacy 740 S. Limestone First Floor, Room J134 Lexington, KY 40536 Phone: 859-323-5855
    • Turfland Clinic Pharmacy 2195 Harrodsburg Road Lexington, KY 40504 Phone: 859-257-5899
    • UK Bluegrass Clinic Pharmacy 3101 Beaumont Centre Circle, Room 135 Lexington, KY 40513 Phone: 859-562-0220
    • Alumni Park Plaza 2317 Alumni Park Plaza Lexington, KY 40517
      • Open Saturdays 8 a.m.-1 p.m.

    When receiving your flu shot, there are a few important things to remember. Bring your valid UK student or employee ID and your prescription insurance card (if separate from your medical insurance card).

    • Students: If you are on your family's insurance plan, you should contact your family members and ask for this information. A screenshot of the insurance card is acceptable.
    • If you don’t have insurance, you will still be able to receive a free flu shot.

    For more information on flu shots and how to get yours, visit www.uky.edu/coronavirus/do-your-part/flu-shots.

    Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDentistryDesignEducationEngineeringFine ArtsArtArts AdministrationDanceMusicTheatreGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesHonors CollegeLawLibrariesMartin School of Public Policy and AdministrationMedicineNursingPatterson School of Diplomacy and International CommercePharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkStudent and Academic LifeUK HealthCare

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Grace Colville
    grace.colville [at] uky.edu
    "> grace.colville [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2294 Summary: Flu shots are now available for all members of the UK community.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Riley Fort Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 15, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, recently competed at the virtual 2021-2022 debate season opener hosted by Northwestern University.

    Nearly 300 students from 38 schools across 20 states competed in the four-day event. The topic for the season opener was “Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase prohibitions on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector.”

    Three partnerships from UK reached the elimination rounds. Sophomores Sophia Dal Pra and Lex Barrett, senior Marcus Williams and sophomore Lauren McBlain, and sophomores David Griffith and Jordan Di, reached the Sweet Sixteen. Along the way, UK defeated several powerhouse programs, including Harvard, Emory, Wake Forest and the University of Southern California.

    After the opener, the UK Debate team continued a busy and successful start to the season by both hosting and competing at two tournaments. First, they hosted the 50th “Run for the Roses” where only the top seven teams in the nation are invited. Kentucky joined an elite field that included Harvard, Kansas, Emory, Northwestern, Michigan and the University of Southern California.

    The UK team of David Griffith and Jordan Di finished with a very strong 3-3 record.

    Next, the team hosted the JW Patterson Open where more than 100 teams from across the country competed. The UK team of Lauren McBlain and Marcus Williams reached the round of 32 before losing to the eventual tournament champion from Michigan. 

    The team now readies for their next competition, the virtual Harvard Invitational held Oct. 29-31.

    “It’s always a busy start to the season between hosting and competing, and we’ve managed to do a good job across the board,” said UK Debate Director David Arnett. “We’ve had three different partnerships in the elimination rounds of national tournaments and that shows the kind of depth we’re always striving for year in and year out.”

    Follow UK’s Intercollegiate Debate Team’s journey by visiting their website at https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    The team of Lauren McBlain and Marcus Williams prepare for the JW Patterson Open Debate Tournament held at UK.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team, housed in the College of Communication and Information, recently competed at the virtual 2021-2022 debate season opener hosted by Northwestern University where three partnerships from UK reached the elimination rounds.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Meg Mill and Steve Shaffer Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 14, 2021) — The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s David Stephenson takes a hands-on approach to his own learning, along with that of his students.

    However, the idea of “doing” is not a new concept to the assistant professor in the CI School of Journalism and Media. “When I think about how I want to teach my classes, I think about how I want to learn — personally — and how I’ve learned the best and learned the most. For me it’s always been through doing.”

    Stephenson currently teaches classes using emerging technologies for storytelling like mobile phones, drones and virtual reality.

    “It’s easy to talk about the technical stuff in filmmaking and photography, but I want to make sure to teach how to apply those techniques to make their stories better. I want the entire package for my students — that’s my goal,” Stephenson said.

    When asked if he had any advice for current UK students Stephenson said, “The best thing a student can do is ask questions. If I can share with them something they want to know, it’s very rewarding. That is where the mentorship starts to happen. Anyone that has taught probably has had a good teacher in their life that inspired them, including me, and that helped me get to where I am today. I want to do the same thing — I want to have those same relationships with my students.”

    Learn more about Stephenson and how he creates mentorship opportunities for his students inside and outside the classroom in the video above.

    Get to Know Your Professors at UK: David Stephenson David Stephenson with a student from his VR class. Mark Cornelison | UK Photo.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information’s David Stephenson takes a hands-on approach to his own learning, along with that of his students. Learn more about Stephenson and how he creates mentorship opportunities for his students inside and outside the classroom Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Arts & CultureBy Whitney Hale and Mark Mozingo Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 11, 2021) — As American society begins to question more and more how much of the Thanksgiving history they know is true, the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance presents MacArthur Fellow and Native American playwright Larissa FastHorse’s hit satirical comedy "The Thanksgiving Play." Join UK Theatre as they take on "wokeness" and display how humor can fuel change by sparking productive dialogue around race and equity. "The Thanksgiving Play" will open UK Theatre's Main Stage Season Oct. 14-17, at the Briggs Theatre, located in the Fine Arts Building. 

    "The Thanksgiving Play" introduces audiences to four “woke” white artists attempting to devise a politically correct and historically accurate play for an elementary school in honor of Native American Heritage Month. What could go wrong? You’ll laugh, you’ll learn and you’ll be thankful you saw this gem of the theatre. "The Thanksgiving Play" challenges the myths surrounding Thanksgiving, FastHorse (Sicangu Lakota Nation) says, and how celebrating the holiday can erase and flatten Indigenous experiences.

    Director Peter Allen Stone, assistant professor, thinks this is the perfect time to bring this production to the UK Theatre stage, "It is such an exciting time to return to live theatre with this ensemble of talented, hilarious and collaborative actors. Our rehearsals have been an absolute joy, and I can't think of a more important and timely piece to be performing than 'The Thanksgiving Play.'"

    The cast of UK Theatre's production of "The Thanksgiving Play" features: theatre and arts administration senior Zoe Womack, playing Logan; theatre junior Wheeler Green, playing Jaxton; junior Mason Fryman, playing Caden; and nursing junior Breanna Duvall, playing Alicia, with a chorus including theatre and psychology sophomore Brandon Bost, theatre and arts administration senior Ceana Carey, theatre and integrated strategic communication sophomore Sara Spellman and chemical engineering freshman Alessandra Lozano. Theatre and journalism senior Spencer Neichter is serving as stage manager. 

    "The Thanksgiving Play" is presented by arrangement with Concord Theatricals on behalf of Samuel French Inc.  

    "The Thanksgiving Play" takes the spotlight 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Oct. 14-16, and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 16 and 17. Tickets to "The Thanksgiving Play" are $10 for students with a university ID and $15 for the general public. To purchase tickets to UK Theatre and Dance's productions, contact the Singletary Center for the Arts ticket office at 859-257-4929, visit online at www.scfatickets.com, or visit the ticket office in person.

    UK Department of Theatre and Dance performances will be presented in compliance with the UK mask mandate

    The Department of Theatre and Dance, part of UK College of Fine Arts, is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Theatre. Students in the department get hands-on training and one-on-one mentorship from professional theatre and dance faculty and renowned guest artists in acting, directing, playwriting, theatrical design and technology, and dance. From mainstage productions to student-produced shows, students have plenty of opportunities to participate on stage or backstage. Special programs include a musical theatre certificate, education abroad, as well as a thriving dance program that emphasizes technique, composition, performance and production.

    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEngineeringFine ArtsArts AdministrationDanceTheatreNursing

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    "> whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: As American society begins to question more and more how much of the Thanksgiving history they know is true, the University of Kentucky Department of Theatre and Dance presents MacArthur Fellow and Native American playwright Larissa FastHorse’s hit satirical comedy "The Thanksgiving Play." Join UK Theatre as they take on "wokeness" and display how humor can fuel change by sparking productive dialogue around race and equity. Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Mariah Kendell Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 11, 2021) — The University of Kentucky’s independent student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, has been selected as a Pacemaker finalist in the prestigious Associated Collegiate Press Competition.

    Often referred to as “the Pulitzer Prize of student journalism,” the National Pacemaker Award is the highest honor in collegiate journalism. Each year, the Associate Collegiate Press recognizes the finest broadcast, magazine, online, newspaper and yearbook publications.

    “The students from the Kernel and KRNL have made a very fine showing with this many national finalists,” Kentucky Kernel Advisor Ryan Craig said. “The UK community should be proud of all of the students who work hard in what I feel are two of the best collegiate publications in the nation. I wish them all the best in the upcoming national Pacemaker competition.”

    Additionally, 12 Kentucky Kernel and KRNL staffers have been announced as finalists for individual awards.

    Kendall Boron

    • Magazine Page/Spread finalist, “Back to Their Roots” and “Rewind To Nostalgia”

    Michael Clubb

    • Sports Game/Action Photo finalist, “NC State Bowl Game vs. Kentucky”
    • Sports Feature Photo finalist, “NCAA Volleyball National Championship”

    Sydney Hill

    • Multimedia Sports Story finalist, “Homefield

    Isaac Janseen

    • Environmental Portrait finalist, “Skater Park”

    Martha McHaney

    • News/Breaking News Photo finalist, “Honoring those lost to COVID-19”

    Kennedy Miller

    Natalie Parks

    Natalie Parks, Sarah Michels, Gillian Stawiszynski

    Akhira Umar

    Jack Weaver

    • News/Breaking News Photo finalist, “Vaccine Clinic”
    • Sports Game/Action Photo finalist, “Volleyball vs. Ole Miss”

    Justin Williams

    The winners will be announced at 6.p.m EDT Thursday, Oct. 14, during Associate Collegiate Press’ virtual Fall National College Media Convention.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky’s independent student newspaper, the Kentucky Kernel, has been selected as a Pacemaker finalist in the prestigious Associated Collegiate Press Competition.
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Elizabeth Chapin Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 6, 2021) — Recent studies by the University of Kentucky's HEALing Communities Study (Helping to End Addiction Long-term) researchers show a notable rise in opioid overdose death rates among non-Hispanic Black individuals.

    Opioid overdose death rates increased by 40% among non-Hispanic Black individuals between 2018 and 2019, despite having leveled off overall, according to study results published in the American Journal of Public Health this September.

    The death rate trends were determined using data from 67 communities disproportionately affected by opioid overdose, which represent 8.3 million individuals in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York and Ohio.

    Another UK study published in JAMA this July found that the increase in opioid overdose death rates among Black individuals continued over the next year, rising 57% in Kentucky from 2019-2020.

    Historically, opioid overdose death rates have been disproportionately higher among white individuals. The new shifting demographics are shaping the way UK’s HEALing Communities Study (HCS) research team is helping to address the opioid epidemic in Kentucky, says Sharon Walsh, Ph.D., the principal investigator for UK's HCS and director of UK’s Center on Drug and Alcohol Research.

    “The data are being used to help inform communities about evidence-based practices proven to reduce opioid overdose,” said Walsh. “The HCS team is developing and implementing more culturally tailored interventions to reach communities of color in Kentucky, which face additional barriers to accessing treatment.”

    This includes outreach events in Black communities, which include overdose education and distribution of naloxone — a life-saving, highly effective medication that rapidly reverses an opioid overdose.

    The JAMA study also reports a significant increase in drug overdose mortality across all demographic groups in Kentucky in 2020 when the COVID-19 pandemic began. The UK study was released before the CDC released their provisional 2020 estimates.

    “Kentucky has one of the most timely drug overdose surveillance data collection and reporting in the U.S. and the UK research team has been on the front line, informing other practitioners and researchers about changing trends in non-fatal and fatal drug overdoses,” said study co-author Svetla Slavova, Ph.D., associate professor in the UK College of Public Health’s Department of Biostatistics and faculty member in the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center

    Funded by the National Institutes for Health (NIH) and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), the HCS aims to significantly reduce opioid overdose deaths by helping communities implement evidence-based practices to treat opioid use disorder and reduce harms from opioid use. Learn more at www.uky.edu/healingstudy/.

    Research reported in this publication was supported by funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention under Award Number 6 NU17CE924971-02-01, by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration under Award Number HHSF223201810183C under Broad Agency Announcement Number 17-00123, and by the National Institutes of Health through the Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative under Award Numbers UM1DA049406, UM1DA049412, UM1DA049415, UM1DA049417 and UM1DA049394. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Food and Drug Administration or the National Institutes of Health. 

    BackyardProduction, iStock/Getty Images Plus. Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationMedicineNursingPharmacyPublic HealthSocial WorkUK HealthCare

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207 Summary: The death rate trends were determined using data from 67 communities disproportionately affected by opioid overdose, which represent 8.3 million individuals in Kentucky, Massachusetts, New York and Ohio.
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Jenny Wells-Hosley Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2021) — This weekend, the University of Kentucky inducted 27 new members into its esteemed Hall of Distinguished Alumni. The 2020 class of inductees returned to their alma mater on Friday to be honored for their meaningful contributions to the Commonwealth, nation and the world. 

    The prestigious event, held every five years, was postponed last year due to pandemic restrictions. 

    “The 2020 class is diverse in its range of accolades and achievements, but they each share a common characteristic: they make us proud to call them UK alumni,” said UK President Eli Capilouto.

    The inductees included:

    • Henry B. “Bub” Asman Jr. B.A. ’71 — Telecommunications, College of Communication and Information
    • Steven L. Beshear B.A. ’66 — History, College of Arts and Sciences; J.D. ’68 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law
    • Dana R. Canedy B.A. ’88 — Journalism, College of Communication and Information
    • Jon C. Carloftis B.A.’86 — Communication, College of Communication and Information
    • Joe Cross Creason* B.A. ’40 — Journalism, College of Arts and Sciences
    • James C. Duff B.A. ’75 — Philosophy, Political Science, History, College of Arts and Sciences
    • O. Gene Gabbard B.S. ’61 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering
    • F. Joseph Halcomb III B.S. ’74 — Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering; M.D. ’78 — Medicine, College of Medicine
    • John G. Heyburn II* J.D. ’76 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law
    • Ashley T. Judd B.A. ’07 — French, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Elmer T. Lee* B.S. ’49 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering
    • Alan C. Lowe B.A. ’86 — History, College of Arts and Sciences; M.A. ’89 — History, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Davis Marksbury B.S. ’80 — Civil Engineering, College of Engineering
    • Sally K. Mason B.A. ’72 — Zoology, College of Arts and Sciences
    • Martha M. McCarthy B.A. ‘66 — Elementary Education, College of Education; M.A. ‘69 — Elementary Education, College of Education
    • L. Stanley Pigman B.S. ’81 — Mining Engineering, College of Engineering
    • Eugene Poole Jr. A.S. ’80 — Hopkinsville CC; B.A. ’85 — Architecture, College of Design
    • Tommy L. Preston B.A. ’56 — Journalism, College of Communication and Information
    • Laura M. Schwab J.D. ’98 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law
    • William E. Seale B.A. ’63 — Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences; M.S. ’69 — Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; Ph.D. ’75 — Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment
    • Charles L. Shearer B.S. ’64 — Accounting, Gatton College of Business and Economics; M.A. ’67 — Economics and International Diplomacy, Gatton College of Business and Economics
    • Valerie Still B.S. ’00 — Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment
    • Gregory L. Summe B.S. ’78 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering
    • Paul C. Varga B.B.A. ’85 — Finance, Gatton College of Business and Economics
    • Paul R. Wagner B.A. ’70 — English, College of Arts and Sciences; M.A. ’72 — Communication, College of Communication and Information
    • John A. Williams B.S. ’62 — Accounting, Gatton College of Business and Economics
    • Terry Woodward B.S. ’63 — Commerce, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    *Joe Creason passed away in 1974 at the age of 56. John Heyburn passed away in 2015 at the age of 66. Elmer Lee passed away in 2013 at the age of 93.

    To read full bios of the inductees, visit www.ukalumni.net/s/hall-of-distinguished-alumni.

    With the addition of the 2020 honorees, the total number of alumni honored to date is 333, since the hall was created in 1965.

    To learn more about the Hall of Distinguished Alumni and previous inductees, visit www.ukalumni.net/s/hall-of-distinguished-alumni.

    The University of Kentucky's 2020 Hall of Distinguished Alumni inductees on campus Friday, Oct. 1, 2021. Photo by Tim Webb.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringGraduate SchoolLawMedicine

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The 27 inductees were recognized on Friday for their meaningful contributions to the Commonwealth, nation and the world. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Nadia Sesay Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 4, 2021) ­— The University of Kentucky's College of Communication and Information's (CI) Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Committee and American Sign Language & Deaf Culture Club (ASLDCC) will welcome certified sign language interpreter Virginia Moore — Kentucky's Communicator of the Year for 2021 — on Tuesday, Oct 5.

    The event, “Virginia Moore: Communicating For All Kentuckians,” will begin at 5 p.m. in the UK Athletics Auditorium at the William T. Young Library. Moore will speak about accessibility and inclusivity during a global pandemic. An American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter will be provided.

    Moore is the current executive director of the Kentucky Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (KCDHH). For many Kentuckians she became a familiar name, and sight, as she appeared on screen interpreting Gov. Andy Beshear’s daily COVID-19 briefings. Moore advocated for the nearly 700,000 Kentuckians who are deaf and hard of hearing and requested the governor utilize an interpreter at his briefings, marking the first time that any Kentucky governor had done so.

    The governor’s briefings were a steadfast component of Kentucky’s fight against coronavirus and Moore’s presence was an unmissable addition to the effort. The Kentucky District of the National Speech and Debate Association recognized Moore as Communicator of the Year for her commitment to ensuring deaf and hard of hearing Kentuckians had equal access to coronavirus updates at a most critical time for the state.

    Born into a family with deaf parents and siblings, Moore learned ASL as her first language. She graduated from Indiana State University and holds the highest level of interpreter certification from the National Association of the Deaf as well as the Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf National Interpreter Certification. Moore joined KCDHH as the executive director’s interpreter and has worked with the agency for 25 years. In that time she has witnessed the enhancement of resources and implementation of new technologies for deaf and hard of hearing Kentuckians, including captioning services for all state agencies.

    Moore continues to be involved with DeaFestival - Kentucky, a biennial event and cultural program that celebrates the diversity, art and language of the deaf and hard of hearing community. She has also provided interpreting services for the USA Deaf Sports Federation, the United States Deaflympic Committee and the Kellogg Foundation.

    “Not only did Ms. Moore help bridge the gap in accessibility, she was an advocate and a voice for others. She brought forth much awareness to interpreting services; with many individuals desiring to learn ASL, pursue careers as interpreters, be advocates for the deaf community, among so many others,” said Courtney Martin, president, ASLDCC. “We cannot thank her enough for not only what she has done during COVID-19 but what she continues to do each and every day. She is and will continue to be an inspiration to us, and so many others.”

    The event honoring Moore is a capstone of CI DEI’s programming to highlight deaf awareness in line with Deaf Awareness Month, which is celebrated annually in September, and is a collaboration between CI DEI and ASLDCC that highlights UK’s ongoing commitment to diversity, inclusion and accessibility.

    This event is free and open to the public. A Zoom link will be provided here.

    For more information and accommodation requests please contact Kyra Hunting at kyra.hunting [at] uky.edu.

    The CI DEI Committee also thanks UK College of Education’s Kentucky Deaf/Blind Project.

    About American Sign Language & Deaf Culture Club (ASLDCC)

    ASLDCC is an organization on campus focused on promoting ASL proficiency while also educating members about deaf culture and raising awareness about issues facing the deaf community. ASLDCC partners with organizations on campus and in the Lexington community to share their mission and help others expand their knowledge of both ASL and deaf culture.

    Virginia MooreOrganizational Unit: Communication and InformationEducation

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky's College of Communication and Information's Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Committee and American Sign Language & Deaf Culture Club will welcome certified sign language interpreter Virginia Moore — Kentucky's Communicator of the Year for 2021 — on Tuesday, Oct 5.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy UK PRSC staff Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 30, 2021) — Today is International Podcast Day. Not surprisingly as the popularity of the podcast format has exploded in recent years, University of Kentucky students, faculty and staff have launched a variety of podcasts to share their own expertise, ideas and stories. With a wide range of topics covered, it is likely the podcast lover in your family can find a UK podcast to meet their needs. 

    A resource for "all things UK," the "Behind the Blue" weekly podcast covers the university's latest medical breakthroughs, research, artists and writers, along with the most important news impacting the institution. "Behind the Blue" is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher and Spotify and transcripts for all episodes of "Behind the Blue" can be downloaded from the show’s blog page. You can also find the newest edition of "Behind the Blue" each Monday on UKNow.

    The UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment (CAFE) maintains a selection of podcasts for listeners interested in topics ranging from food sciences and gardening to agriculture, forestry and sustainability. UK CAFE's podcasts are as follows: 

    Visit www.ca.uky.edu/podcasts to access all these individual podcasts from one place. 

    For those wanting to focus on other issues related to sustainability, UK's Student Sustainability Council presents "Sustainability: Green Talks" highlighting the people and programs working on campus environmental and sustainability initiatives. You can hear "Green Talks" on WRFL.

    The Patterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce revived its podcast series, “Patterson Perspectives,” last year to speak with alumni responding to the COVID-19 pandemic in their professional roles. More recently, the school has expanded its reach discussing a wide range of global issues. 

    Those interested in the Appalachian region should tune into "Holler Back!" from Appalachian studies students in the UK College of Arts and Sciences. The podcast is one of the most active from the college.

    UK College of Education's podcast, "The Learning Project," has returned after a short hiatus for those interested in hearing about topics related to the field of education. 

    With the "Champions of Active Women" podcast, the UK Active Women’s Health Initiative (AWHI) shares stories of active female role models and individuals who support the active pursuits of women to encourage and inspire girls and women to be active for a lifetime, to reach their goals, and to break new barriers in sport and life. This podcast is brought to you by AWHI, part of the Sports Medicine Research Institute at UK's College of Health Sciences.

    The UK Libraries Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History has a treasure trove of audio and video recordings as part of its collection of more than 14,000 interviews. Through its "Wisdom Project Podcast," the center features stories from a collection that has focused on 20th century Kentucky history; Appalachia; agriculture; African American history; the history of education, politics and public policy; the arts; Kentucky writers; gender; diversity; the Civil Rights Movement; veterans; the University of Kentucky; health care; and industries such as the coal, equine and bourbon industries.

    In addition to the "Wisdom Project Podcast," the Nunn Center provides even shorter interview clips for a radio news format via its "Saving Stories" series with WUKY. 

    UK Human Resources produces the "Becoming Wildly Resilient" podcast, a series that explores a variety of well-being topics to help you thrive at work, home and beyond.

    The UK Staff Senate Employee Engagement Committee launched a podcast last year titled “The Kentucky WildCast: Making the Impossible Possible.” This podcast highlights the people at UK, conversations are not limited to work at the university but transcend into life stories, lessons learned, inspirations and personal accomplishments. 

    For research, scholarship and creative activity topics that lend themselves to a conversation format or extra content that doesn't fit into a short video, UK Research Communications produces podcasts, including “Research Made Possible.” See these and more at www.research.uky.edu/news-archive?news-type=5.

    Interested in happenings in the field of information technology? UK Information Technology Services produces "ITS Spotlight" to keep listeners in the know. 

    “From the Blue” is an interview-style podcast created by the UK Alumni Association to keep you connected with Kentucky alumni around the world through stories, interviews and discussions. No matter where you are, the “From the Blue” podcast will bring back a sense of nostalgia from your time on campus while keeping you informed with news and features about UK and your fellow Wildcat alumni.

    And in the wild, and wide, world of sports, Big Blue fans can go behind the scenes of their favorite Wildcat teams, get valuable insights and updates around each university athletic program, and hear original UK-related sports stories from UK Athletics. Tune into UK Sports Network on your favorite podcast provider to hear "UK Sports Network Radio," "Behind Kentucky Football" and "Behind Kentucky Basketball."

    The Kentucky Kernel also has a sports podcast for True Blue fans. Check out "Between the Blue and White Lines" for their coverage of the Wildcats.

    For those more interested in college lifestyle and fashion, the KRNL magazine has you covered through the podcast "KRNL Talks."

    UK also saw the launch of two other podcasts in recent months hosted by students. "Bowman’s Friends" was created to connect and inform students of issues, important deadlines and ways to get involved on campus. With a goal of amplifying student voices, the podcast includes conversations with people across the university relevant to current campus culture from the student’s perspective​.

    And, last spring “Breaking the Boundary,” a podcast produced by media arts and studies students in UK College of Communication and Information’s studio, made its debut. The podcast discusses the action needed to correct crises like the opioid epidemic, climate change and financial literacy.

    Bet_Noire from iStock / Getty Images Plus.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationHealth SciencesLibrariesPatterson School of Diplomacy and International Commerce

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Whitney Hale
    whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    "> whitney.hale [at] uky.edu
    859-257-8716 Summary: Not surprisingly as the popularity of the podcast format has exploded in recent years, University of Kentucky students, faculty and staff have launched a variety of podcasts to share their own expertise, ideas and stories.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Mariah Kendell Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 29, 2021) — How do Hollywood clichés perpetuate the status quo? Erika Engstrom, media content expert and director of the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, explores this question in her new book “Gramsci and Media Literacy: Critically Thinking about TV and the Movies.”

    In this compelling analysis, Engstrom and co-author Ralph Beliveau, of the University of Oklahoma, compare case studies of movies and television shows that actively challenge societal stereotypes — or in Engstrom’s words, media that is “counter-hegemonic.”

    “Hegemony” is the dominant world view of most participants in society. This theory, first employed by Italian philosopher Antonio Gramsci in his critiques of capitalism, suggests that most of what we see is created by people in power with self-serving interests. To keep said power, hegemonic actors reinforce the status quo and suppress resistive voices.

    In entertainment media, hegemony is personified as overused character tropes: the damsel in distress, the wise old man, the girl next door, the stoic muscleman and more.

    “That’s why people get marginalized,” Engstrom said. “The people who make the movies and TV want you to keep watching. If there is something that seems a little unusual or out of the ordinary, you won’t want to watch.”

    However, Engstrom and movie critics alike sense a subtle shift in the industry. Thanks to streaming services, resistive stories have slowly gained popularity, influencing even big-box films like “Avengers: Endgame” — a case study in this book.

    Unlike other films in the Marvel cinematic universe, Engstrom thought “Endgame” was a terrific movie. Characters like Tony Stark, who were previously portrayed as hyper-masculinized and one-dimensional are now seen crying, going to support groups and contributing to their households.

    “They’re showing real men being people; it’s counter-hegemonic masculinity,” Engstrom said. "Resistive media does more than diversify stories on the big screen, it contributes to the evolution of our culture. Normalizing human emotions can change society and our relationships with others in our everyday life."

    "If we have more people able to show their emotions, we wouldn't have war; we wouldn't have violence against women."

    Although “Avengers: Endgame” does challenge society’s traditional view of masculinity, it is still hegemonic in some ways, especially in its portrayal of women. Therefore, Engstrom argues, all consumers of media must watch with a critical eye and question the media they love. To watch critically, Engstrom says, is to understand that you have a choice to do whatever it is you want to do.

    “That is what this book is about — let’s question what we know so that we can resist the hegemony,” Engstrom said. “That’s kind of my purpose on this earth, to make (people) understand that this is for the good of everybody.”

    For more information on “Gramsci and Media Literacy: Critically Thinking about TV and the Movies,” visit Rowman & Littlefield. The book is also available for purchase on Amazon and Barnes & Noble.

    Erika Engstrom is a nationally known gender and media scholar, with specialties in studying the portrayal of gender, religion and weddings in mass media. Before joining UK in 2020, Engstrom served as a professor of communication studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, as well as the acting general manager of the campus radio station KUNV-FM.

    Engstrom holds a bachelor’s degree in radio-television and a master’s degree in communication from the University of Central Florida. Her doctorate, from the University of Florida, is in mass communication.

    The University of Kentucky School of Journalism and Media was founded in 1914. As one of only 114 fully accredited journalism schools in the world, UK JAM leads the way in training students for success in any media field, with emphasis on hands-on application.

    Erika Engstrom. Photo by Michael Clubb.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Erika Engstrom, media content expert and director of the School of Journalism and Media in the University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information, explores the Marvel Universe in her new book “Gramsci and Media Literacy: Critically Thinking about TV and the Movies.”Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Professional NewsBy Akhira Umar Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 28, 2021) — With singers for parents, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is taking the family talents to country music’s most famous stage.

    Singer/songwriter Hannah Ellis, a 2012 integrated strategic communication (ISC) graduate, is making her debut tonight at the Grand Ole Opry. After turning her hobby into her career, this performance will mark a milestone for the rising star. 

    “I’d been wanting to play the Opry for a really long time, since I was a really young kid,” Ellis said. “To be able to stand up there where all of my heroes stood is going to be a really special moment.”

    Singing has been on Ellis’ radar nearly her whole life. Her parents were wedding singers who encouraged her and her siblings to sing in church and contests. However, it wasn’t until attending high school and committing to attend UK that Ellis decided singing was going to be her calling.

    She came to UK and joined CI. There she became an ISC major, learning all the tricks and trades of public relations and marketing the most important brand of her profession — herself.

    “You are the brand. You are the business. So being able to learn how to market myself and my music was exceptionally helpful when it came to my music career,” Ellis said. “I feel like I use tools that I learned in that major all the time in my music career.”

    Not only did her CI classes help prepare her for a life of singing, but her CI professors and administrators were instrumental in the infancy of her music career. Her professors helped push her in the direction of her dreams by accommodating her assignment submission times and absences when music conflicted. Beth Barnes, then the director of the School of Journalism and Media, helped Ellis get an internship that allowed her to work out of Nashville while still being applicable for her degree. 

    After graduating, Ellis moved to Nashville, the country music capital of the world. She worked her way through the music scene, songwriting with the local community and even competing on season eight of “The Voice.”

    Music became Ellis’ full-time job after she got a publishing deal in 2015. For the next two years, she focused on songwriting, performing shows and putting out her first, self-titled, self-financed EP (extended play).

    Her efforts were rewarded in 2018 when she was named one of Rolling Stone’s “Artists to Watch” and CMT’s “Next Women of Country.” The year after, she performed along the east coast on the CMT Next Women of Country Tour with Cassadee Pope and Claire Dunn.

    In March 2020, Ellis signed her record deal with Curb Records. With lots of new music coming out this fall, Ellis and her team knew this was the perfect time to perform at the Opry. This appearance will be particularly significant because it will also be a first for her dad, whom she called about the Opry news as soon as she got word.

    “He said to me one of the sweetest things. He said, ‘Can you imagine being a country music fan for 55 years and the first time you get to go to the Opry, your daughter’s playing?’” Ellis said. “It was a pretty special moment to get to call him and tell him something that we had dreamed about was coming true.”

    For her performance tonight at the Grand Ole Opry, Ellis is hoping to enjoy the moment she has worked so hard for and play for the fans who have helped her get this far. If you would like to watch or listen to Ellis’ Grand Ole Opry performance, Opry shows are available on Circle, the TV network that broadcasts the Opry, or stream the performances through the Circle website and the official Grand Ole Opry YouTube and Facebook pages. Opry broadcasts are also available live on Nashville's WSM-AM radio, as well as the station's website and mobile app.

    If you would like to listen to Ellis’ release of “Home and a Hometown,” it is available on all music streaming services. Her new song “Us” will be available anywhere you listen to music on Oct. 1.

    Watch the official video for "Home and a Hometown" by Hannah Ellis. Hannah Ellis. Photo by: BothurVisuals.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: With singers for parents, one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumna is taking the family talents to country music’s most famous stage. Singer/songwriter Hannah Ellis, a 2012 integrated strategic communication graduate, is making her debut tonight at the Grand Ole Opry. Homepage Feature: Primary feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jenny Wells-Hosley and Meredith Weber Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 28, 2021) — This Friday, the University of Kentucky will induct 27 former students into the 2020 Hall of Distinguished Alumni. The alumni will be honored for their meaningful contributions to the Commonwealth, nation and the world. 

    The prestigious event, held every five years, was postponed last year due to pandemic restrictions. 

    “This is a great group that we’re putting forward,” said Taunya Phillips, 2019-20 UK Alumni Association national president who served on the selection committee for the 2020 inductees. “The university has a wealth of people we could nominate for this honor, and some of the people who are going to be recognized this year I think really stand out. They have done great things in the world of arts, acting, education, engineering and all sorts of different areas. UK produces great people, and (the Hall of Distinguished Alumni) allows us to recruit students, faculty and staff from everywhere — they want to come here and be a part of the University of Kentucky. It also encourages our current students and others to look at these people and aspire to their achievements.”

    The 2020 inductees include:

    Henry B. “Bub” Asman Jr. B.A. ’71 — Telecommunications, College of Communication and Information

    Henry B. “Bub” Asman Jr. of Union, Kentucky, is a two-time Academy Award-winning sound editor. He spent 38 years editing the sound for more than 30 films for filmmaker Clint Eastwood and about 40 more films for various other directors in Hollywood. He and his co-editor Alan Murray received six Academy Award nominations for sound editing, winning Oscars in the category of Best Achievement in Sound Editing for the films “Letters from Iwo Jima” and “American Sniper,” both directed by Eastwood. The other nominations were for “Eraser,” “Space Cowboys,” “Flags of our Fathers” and “Sully.”

    Steven L. Beshear B.A. ’66 — History, College of Arts and SciencesJ.D. ’68 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law

    Steven L. Beshear of Lexington, Kentucky, served as the 61st governor of Kentucky from 2007 to 2015. He also served as attorney general from 1979 to 1983, lieutenant governor from 1983 to 1987 and was a member of the Kentucky House of Representatives from 1974 to 1979. While at UK, he was the student body president, a member of Phi Beta Kappa and served as an editor for the Kentucky Law Journal. Additionally, he served as a visiting scholar at the University of Kentucky College of Public Health in 2018.

    Dana R. Canedy B.A. ’88 — Journalism, College of Communication and Information

    Dana R. Canedy of New York City is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and the senior vice president and publisher of Simon & Schuster. She previously ran the Pulitzer Prizes, serving as a board member, selecting prize jurors, and announcing the winners. She was recently named one of Fortune Magazine’s Most Powerful Women. Canedy was a lead writer and editor on The New York Times series, “How Race is Lived in America,” which won the 2001 Pulitzer Prize for national reporting. She is the author of “A Journal for Jordan” which has been made into a movie to be released by Sony in theaters this Christmas, directed by Denzel Washington and starring Michael B. Jordan. The book tells the story of her fiance, 1st Sgt. Charles Monroe King, and the 200-page journal he left for their son, Jordan, written before being killed in Iraq.

    Jon C. Carloftis B.A.’86 — Communication, College of Communication and Information

    Jon C. Carloftis of Lexington, Kentucky, is an award-winning rooftop gardener and garden designer. After moving to New York City in 1988, he became one of America’s pioneers in rooftop/small space gardening as he designed and installed rooftop gardens all over Manhattan for such celebrities as Julianne Moore, Edward Norton and Mike Myers.

    Carloftis was a contributing editor of Garden Design magazine and his gardens have been featured in more than 250 national magazines. He restored the Kentucky Governor’s Mansion Formal Gardens and the historic garden at the president’s home at the University of the Cumberlands. He is the author of “Beautiful Gardens of Kentucky in 2010” and has been named the Salonniere Top 100 Best Party Hosts in America for three years in a row.

    Joe Cross Creason* B.A. ’40 — Journalism, College of Arts and Sciences

    Joe Cross Creason of Louisville, Kentucky, was a journalist for The Courier-Journal. During his time at UK, Creason served as sports editor for both the Kentucky Kernel and The Kentuckian and was president of his fraternity, Alpha Tau Omega. After graduation, the Benton, Kentucky, native worked at several newspapers in Western Kentucky before accepting a writing position at The Courier-Journal in 1941. Except for a two-year period from 1944-1946 when he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy in the Pacific theater, he would work at The Courier-Journal for the next 34 years developing relationships with citizens from across the Commonwealth of Kentucky. In 1975, the University of Kentucky and the Bingham Enterprises Foundation created the annual Joe Creason Lecture Series bringing prominent journalists to Lexington to speak and meet with students and the public. Creason passed away in 1974 at the age of 56.

    James C. Duff B.A. ’75 — Philosophy, Political Science, History, College of Arts and Sciences

    James C. Duff of Bethesda, Maryland, is executive director of the Supreme Court Historical Society. He was director of the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts from 2006 to 2011 and again from 2015 to 2021 where he also served as secretary of the Judicial Conference of the United States. From 1996 to 2000, Duff served as counselor to Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist and was his liaison with Congress, the executive branch, and various state and federal organizations involved in the administration of justice. Duff is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, a graduate of the UK Honors Program, and was a walk-on on the UK basketball team in 1971-1972.

    O. Gene Gabbard B.S. ’61 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering

    O. Gene Gabbard of Cary, North Carolina, and Naples, Florida, has worked as a private investor and entrepreneur since 1993. He’s worked on more than 25 startups, invested in more than 40 start-up companies on a personal basis and served on more than 20 boards. He is a venture partner in Ballast Point Ventures, venture capital funds, based in Tampa, Florida. During his career, he served as executive vice president and chief financial officer (1990-1993) of MCI Communications Corp. (now Verizon Business); was on the board of directors (2005-2014) of COLT Telecom Group SA, Luxembourg, a provider of telecommunications and data center services to businesses throughout Europe; and became a member of the board (2010) of NetCracker Technology Corp., Waltham, Massachusetts, a leading provider of management and support systems and services to telecommunication carriers throughout the world.

    F. Joseph Halcomb III B.S. ’74 — Mechanical Engineering, College of EngineeringM.D. ’78 — Medicine, College of Medicine

    F. Joseph Halcomb III of Camarillo, California, is a physician, engineer and private equity investor with a distinguished career as an executive in the medical device and biotechnology industries. He is founder and CEO of Phoenix Initiãre and a partner at Telegraph Hill Partners. Both firms are dedicated to helping life science, medical device and health care companies achieve their growth objectives. In 2010, Halcomb established the Halcomb Endowed Fellowship in Medicine and Engineering at UK. After a larger commitment to the endowment in 2016, the Department of Biomedical Engineering became the first named department at the university. He also holds a M.S. degree in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received the degree of Honorary Doctor of Engineering from UK in May 2021.

    John G. Heyburn II* J.D. ’76 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law

    John G. Heyburn II was nominated to the United States District Court as a United States District Judge for the Western District of Kentucky by President George H. W. Bush in 1992. His opinions were known for his indefatigable sense of fairness, respect for litigants and commitment to clear, logical and thoughtful rulings. His passions for the rule of law fueled his rise to leadership in the Federal Judiciary. He sought “to ever improve the legal system considered the envy of the world.” Heyburn presided over 7,645 cases in his 23 years on the bench. He served as the Chief Judge of the Court between 2001 and 2008. He passed away in 2015 at the age of 66.

    Ashley T. Judd B.A. ’07 — French, College of Arts and Sciences

    Ashley T. Judd of Franklin, Tennessee, and Cambridge, Massachusetts, is an award-winning actor, writer, humanitarian and activist. Her work as both an artist and advocate began right here on the UK campus. Her film and stage career has spanned 30 years and includes indie gems like “Ruby in Paradise” which won the Sundance Film Festival, and box office smashes such as “Double Jeopardy.” Since 2004, Judd has traveled to 22 countries in her capacity as a global ambassador for nongovernmental organizations such as Population Services International and UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund. In 2020, Judd was recognized by the United Nations as Global Advocate of the Year. She was the first actor to go on the record about Harvey Weinstein`s serial predation and is a leader of the #MeToo movement and co-founder of Time's Up. Her book “All That Is Bitter & Sweet” was a New York Times best seller and in 2010, Judd earned an M.P.A. from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

    Elmer T. Lee* B.S. ’49 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering

    Elmer T. Lee of Frankfort, Kentucky, joined the Air Force in 1942 where he flew on missions as a radar bombardier on a B-29 Superfortress. In 1946, he was honorably discharged and returned home to study electrical engineering at UK. He graduated with honors in 1949 and proceeded to take a position with George T. Stagg Distillery in Frankfort (renamed Buffalo Trace in 1999). Initially a maintenance engineer, Lee was promoted to plant superintendent in 1966. In 1969, he held the dual titles of plant manager and master distiller, becoming the distillery’s first master distiller. He would continue to hold both titles until his retirement in 1985. In 1984, Lee created Blanton’s Single-Barrel Bourbon which became the first single-barrel bourbon to be sold commercially. Lee passed away in 2013 at the age of 93.

    Alan C. Lowe B.A. ’86 — History, College of Arts and Sciences; M.A. ’89 — History, College of Arts and Sciences

    Alan C. Lowe of Knoxville, Tennessee, is director of the American Museum of Science and Energy and the K-25 History Center, both located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Previously, he held positions at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in California and the Office of Presidential Libraries at the National Archives in Washington. He served as director of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library in New York and the Howard H. Baker, Jr. Center at the University of Tennessee. From 2009 to 2016, Lowe was the founding director of the George W. Bush Presidential Library in Dallas, Texas, and from 2016 to 2019 was executive director of the Abraham Lincoln Presidential Library in Springfield, Illinois. Currently Lowe serves on the board of Childhelp Tennessee and on the advisory board for the UK Department of History. He co-hosts "American POTUS," a popular podcast about the presidency, and hosts "AMSEcast," a podcast dedicated to science, engineering, and technology.

    Davis Marksbury B.S. ’80 — Civil Engineering, College of Engineering

    Davis Marksbury of Lexington, Kentucky, co-founded Exstream Software in 1998 providing customer relationship document software solutions to enterprises around the world. Marksbury served as CEO of Exstream until it was acquired by Hewlett Packard in 2008. Marksbury is a pioneer in the document software industry, with Exstream being the third company he successfully launched to address complex technology challenges in the industry. He currently serves as chairman of the Marksbury Family Office and Family Foundation. Generosity from his family foundation to the UK College of Engineering helped construct the Davis Marksbury Building and donations to UK Athletics has provided funding for facilities.

    Sally K. Mason B.A. ’72 — Zoology, College of Arts and Sciences

    Sally K. Mason of Hilton Head, South Carolina, is senior fellow and executive search consultant for the Association of Governing Boards. She is president emerita at the University of Iowa, having served as the 20th university president (2007-2015). Trained as a cell/developmental biologist, she also retired as professor emerita from the UI Department of Biology. Mason served two consecutive terms as a presidential appointee to the National Medal of Science Committee, including a term as chair. Initially appointed to this committee in 2006 by President George W. Bush, she was reappointed by President Barack Obama in 2008. Mason is currently a trustee for two private universities, Des Moines University and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. She received an honorary degree from UK in 2012.

    Martha M. McCarthy B.A. ‘66 — Elementary Education, College of Education; M.A. ‘69 — Elementary Education, College of Education

    Martha M. McCarthy of Marina Del Rey, California, is a presidential professor in the School of Education at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles. She is also a chancellor’s professor emeritus at Indiana University (IU), where she served as associate dean of the faculties and was founding director of the Indiana Education Policy Center and the High School Survey of Student Engagement. Her research focuses primarily on education law and policy, and the evolution and reform of leadership preparation programs. McCarthy has written or co-authored more than a dozen books and more than 350 articles or chapters. Among other recognitions, she was named the first female Living Legend by the International Council of Professors of Educational Leadership.

    L. Stanley Pigman B.S. ’81 — Mining Engineering, College of Engineering

    L. Stanley Pigman of Wilmington, North Carolina, is an entrepreneur who began his early professional career after college as a project engineer with a new mining company, Sierra Coal, a subsidiary of General Electric. Later in 1992, he joined two colleagues to form Sugar Camp Coal. Eventually, Pigman formed his own company, Pigman Coal Sales, providing sales services to an independently owned start-up company for a new mining project in Western Kentucky. Pigman routinely initiates and financially supports programs that connect high school youth with engineering and technology. A longtime advocate for Project Lead the Way in Eastern Kentucky schools, Pigman and his wife, Karen, recently committed to funding 16 new high school chapters of the Kentucky Technology Student Association. He and his family also provide scholarships for 70 UK engineering students each year. Their scholarship has benefited more than 200 Pigman Scholars thus far, including 20 first-year students this fall. UK awarded him an Honorary Degree of Humane Letters in 2017.

    Eugene Poole Jr. A.S. ’80 — Hopkinsville CC; B.A. ’85 — Architecture, College of Design

    Eugene Poole Jr. of District Heights, Maryland, is the jurisdiction executive and the senior project executive of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. The Hopkinsville, Kentucky, native is an architect and certified project construction manager with over 30 years of professional design/construction management executive-level experience. His work includes Air Force defense initiatives and Joint Air Force/Navy, and Air Force/Army Mil-Con construction projects overseas and within the United States. Poole is a decorated former United States Air Force officer who was honorably discharged after serving three tours of duty. His private industry architectural work includes hotel resorts, high schools, colleges, high-end mixed-use and retail buildings, casino and gaming resorts, private residences, urban planning, civic and religious facilities, health care facilities, airfield runway restoration repair and pilot training support facilities. His more recent government projects include the globally iconic U.S. Capitol Dome Restoration project, U.S. Supreme Court, Library of Congress, Senate and House Office Buildings, design/construction for three U.S. Presidential Inaugural ceremonies, the ongoing design/management of the new U.S. Capitol Visitor Center Exhibition Hall Museum, and he currently serves on numerous professional industry boards.

    Tommy L. Preston B.A. ’56 — Journalism, College of Communication and Information

    Tommy L. Preston of Nashville, Tennessee, founded The Preston Group in 1968, a consulting services firm that expanded into 42 states and D.C., leading to many national recognitions. Preston began his career as the youngest Kentucky newspaper editor in 1956 at the Carrollton News-Democrat, where he was born, and used unusual strategies and tactics to impact results for clients representing corporations, institutions and themselves as circumstances dictated. Later, his training in the U.S. Army proved beneficial for subsequent counterterrorism efforts, and he founded Preston Global, a companion firm, for strategies and training to attenuate violence at schools and other venues. He was senior advisor to Gov. and U.S. Sen. Wendell Ford and appointed executive director of the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security by Gov. Steve Beshear. He became the first such director to complete the U.S. Army War College National Security Program.

    Laura M. Schwab J.D. ’98 — Law, J. David Rosenberg College of Law

    Laura M. Schwab of San Clemente, California, is the global sales and marketing officer of Rivian, the electric car company launching several new vehicles this year and electrifying Amazon’s worldwide delivery fleet. From 2015 to 2020, she was president of Aston Martin the Americas, the first female to serve in the role in the company’s history and one of only two women to ever hold this title in the automotive industry. She was responsible for overseeing sales, service, marketing and communications to dealers and customers across two continents. Throughout her career, Schwab has championed the empowerment of women in the workplace and has spent her time helping to advance the careers of others along the way.

    William E. Seale B.A. ’63 — Chemistry, College of Arts and Sciences; M.S. ’69 — Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment; Ph.D. ’75 — Agricultural Economics, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    William E. Seale of Annapolis, Maryland, and Key Largo, Florida, is a partner in the ProFunds Group. As chief investment officer, he developed the financial models and investment techniques that direct the investments of the over 200 ProShares and ProFunds. Seale is a professor emeritus of finance at George Washington University, where he had been chairman of the Department of Finance and senior associate dean of the business school. He also was engaged in a consulting and expert witness practice through his firm, Financial Markets Group Inc. Seale was a commissioner on the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, worked as government relations vice president for a New York futures exchange and was a senior legislative assistant to U.S. Sen. Walter D. Huddleston.

    Charles L. Shearer B.S. ’64 — Accounting, Gatton College of Business and Economics; M.A. ’67 — Economics and International Diplomacy, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Charles L. Shearer of Louisville, Kentucky, is the former president of Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky. He served as Transylvania’s 24th president and is the longest-serving president in the university’s history after 27 years in office. Shearer helped grow the institution’s student enrollment by more than 75%, with corresponding growth in the number of faculty members and majors offered. Shearer was named vice president for finance at Transylvania University in 1979 before becoming president in 1983. Shearer also holds a master’s degree and Ph.D. in economics from Michigan State University. He was awarded an honorary Doctor of Letters degree from UK in 2012 for his lifetime service to higher education.

    Valerie Still B.S. ’00 — Animal Sciences, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    Valerie Still of Palmyra, New Jersey, is a former professional basketball player and coach, author and musician. She also earned a master’s degree in African and African American studies and is finishing her Ph.D. in sports humanities at The Ohio State University, where she was a graduate research and teaching associate. She was a member of the UK women’s basketball team (1979-1983) and holds UK career records (men and women) in scoring (2,763) and rebounding (1,525). Still played professional basketball in Italy, hosted her own television show and was a TV commentator for men’s basketball. Later in the USA, she played in the American Basketball League, winning two world championships with the Columbus Quest and earning MVP for both championship series. She then joined the Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) and became a WNBA assistant coach with the Mystics and Orlando Miracle. She founded the Valerie Still Foundation, a nonprofit organization that assists youth in their development, and launched STILL Java, a socially-conscious gourmet coffee company to assist charities and women and children in underdeveloped countries.

    Gregory L. Summe B.S. ’78 — Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering

    Gregory L. Summe of Naples, Florida, is the co-founder and co-chairman of NextGen Acquisition Corp. II, a special purpose acquisition company, which has announced a pending merger with Virgin Orbit. He was also the co-founder of NextGen Acquisition Corp I, which has merged with Xos Inc., a leading manufacturer of electric commercial vehicles. Summe is also the founder and managing partner of Glen Capital Partners LLC, a value-oriented hedge fund. He was managing director and vice chairman of Global Buyout at the Carlyle Group (2009-2014) and responsible for the buyout funds in financial services, infrastructure, Japan, the Middle East and Africa. He was also the chairman, CEO and president of PerkinElmer Inc. (1998-2009) and a senior advisor to Goldman Sachs Capital Partners (2008-2009).

    Paul C. Varga B.B.A. ’85 — Finance, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Paul C. Varga of Louisville, Kentucky, was elected president and chief executive officer of Brown-Forman Corporation in 2005 and became chairman of the company in 2007 before retiring in 2018. He has been a member of the company’s board of directors since 2003. Prior to becoming CEO, he served as president and CEO of the company’s Brown-Forman Beverages subsidiary and served as senior vice president and chief marketing officer for Brown-Forman Beverages. During Varga’s tenure at Brown-Forman, he partnered with UK’s Alcohol and Health Education Office to support alcohol awareness and education programs on campus. Varga is a charter member of the UK Tennis Hall of Fame and a Kentucky Tennis Hall of Fame inductee. He was a two-time All-SEC performer (both athletically and academically), became UK’s second player to ever qualify for NCAA singles competition and is the second winningest player in the school’s history.

    Paul R. Wagner B.A. ’70 — English, College of Arts and Sciences; M.A. ’72 — Communication, College of Communication and Information

    Paul R. Wagner of Charlottesville, Virginia, is an Academy Award and Emmy Award-winning independent filmmaker, who has received multiple grants of support from the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Wagner’s documentaries and dramatic features have premiered at the Sundance, Toronto, Telluride and Rotterdam film festivals. His films include “Miles of Smiles, Years of Struggle,” about the first African American labor union; “Signature: George C. Wolfe,” a portrait of the New York theatrical writer and director; “Thoroughbred,” an inside look at the world of big-time horse racing produced for Kentucky Educational Television; and “Out of Ireland,” a history of Irish emigration to America featuring Liam Neeson and Gabriel Byrne. In 2018, “Black in Blue” told a story of triumph and tragedy about UK football players Nate Northington, Greg Page, Houston Hogg and Wilbur Hackett, the men who broke the color line in the SEC. His current film project is a feature documentary about the artist Georgia O’Keeffe.

    John A. Williams B.S. ’62 — Accounting, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    John A. Williams of Paducah, Kentucky, is the founding executive of Computer Services Inc., headquartered in Paducah and is now chairman emeritus. His career also includes accounting and management consulting with Arthur Andersen & Co. in St. Louis; and serving in the U.S. Army Signal Corps (1963-1965) directing development of experimental data processing systems at the 7th Army Headquarters in Germany. He has been active in many organizations, such as the Association of Financial Technology (president), Boy Scouts Kentucky/Tennessee (president), Kentucky Chamber of Commerce (vice president), Federal Reserve — Louisville (chairman), among others. Williams also lectured on banking technology at UK, Louisiana State University, University of Nebraska and University of Georgia, and he was a faculty member at Paducah Community College.

    Terry Woodward B.S. ’63 — Commerce, Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Terry Woodward of Owensboro, Kentucky, is the owner and CEO of Wax Works Inc., one of the nation’s leading authorized wholesale home entertainment distributors. Located in Owensboro, Wax Works is one of the largest video distributors in America, servicing online and retail accounts nationwide. Woodward has long been of service to the business community. He was chairman of the International Bluegrass Music Association (IBMA) during the first three years of its existence; a board member of the Country Music Association; a board member and chairman of the National Association of Recording Merchandisers; and a trustee and chairman of the International Bluegrass Music Museum (renamed the Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame & Museum in 2018). Inc. magazine named him Entrepreneur of the Year in 1990, he was awarded the IBMA Distinguished Achievement Award in 2005 and was inducted into the IBMA Bluegrass Hall of Fame in 2018.

    To read full bios of this year’s inductees, visit www.ukalumni.net/s/hall-of-distinguished-alumni.

    With the addition of the 2020 honorees, the total number of alumni honored to date is 333, since the hall was created in 1965. To learn more about the Hall of Distinguished Alumni and previous inductees, visit www.ukalumni.net/s/hall-of-distinguished-alumni.

    This Friday, the University of Kentucky Alumni Association will honor 27 former students for their meaningful contributions to the Commonwealth, nation and the world. The Hall of Distinguished Alumni induction ceremony is held every five years.Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationDesignEducationEngineeringGraduate SchoolHonors CollegeLaw

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: The recogntion ceremony will take place this Friday, Oct. 1, at the Gatton Student Center.
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  • Body: Campus NewsBy Riley Fort Tuesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 21, 2021) — The Allegro Dance Project, a Lexington-based dance company, gives children with special needs the opportunity to dance through its Inclusive Outreach Program and adaptive classes. With the help of University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information students, the Allegro Dance Project had a very successful summer show.

    Jeana Klevene, the founder and director of the Allegro Dance Project, created the company after several interactions with children who did not have opportunities to dance in a traditional setting or with traditional instruction.

    “I noticed that any time we did any kind of community outreach, children with specific needs were encouraged to not participate,” Klevene said.

    Inspired to foster a more inclusive and accessible environment, Klevene created the Allegro Dance Project. Now entering its eighth season, the Allegro Dance Project has paved a path for all children to feel safe in the dancing community.

    In July, the Allegro Dance Project hosted its summer show, called “Renaissance,” which centered on parallels between the Renaissance period and the 21st century. The last piece of the show, a fan favorite, allowed participants from the Inclusive Outreach Program and adaptive classes to join the company on stage.

    “Renaissance” reached the highest attendance numbers for a show in the Allegro Dance Project’s history. Klevene gave partial credit to UK students for this success.

    “We were able to work with a group of students who, through The $100 Solution, helped us work on and strategize our marketing and advertising for the show,” Klevene said. “That was so much fun, not only for us, but for the students to get to make decisions that impact the organization.”

    These students — members of Allyson DeVito’s CIS 300 class — partnered with The $100 Solution to solve local organizations’ problems. DeVito tasked one of her groups with promoting the Allegro Dance Project's summer show.

    Additionally, UK students contributed to the show’s success as interns, musicians and company dancers. The interns — who are majoring in integrated strategic communication, political science and digital media and design — helped "Renaissance" by designing T-shirts, helping with outreach efforts and volunteering backstage.

    Two musicians, DeBraun Thomas and Keenan Ray, are also UK graduates, and company dancers Kate Cox and Marian Bokyo are in their second year of medical school and first year of physical therapy school at UK, respectively.

    “It’s a great experience for UK students to get to work with nonprofits,” Klevene said. “We are so grateful for all the ways we get to interact and engage with UK.”

    If you are interested in getting involved with the Allegro Dance Project, there are several opportunities for you to help create a safe space for self-expression.

    “In providing either live music for our outreach or composing and performing in a show, I think we have a lot of different opportunities for volunteering, interning and paid work,” Klevene said. “We would love to continue to develop a relationship with UK.”

    If you are interested in getting involved with the Allegro Dance Project, you can email info [at] allegrodanceproject.org or visit their website at www.allegrodanceproject.org/.

    Follow along on the Allegro Dance Project’s journey on Instagram (@allegrodanceproject).

    Photo credit to Ryan Peters Photographic.Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationFine ArtsArtDanceHealth SciencesMedicine

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The Allegro Dance Project, a Lexington-based dance company, gives children with special needs the opportunity to dance through its Inclusive Outreach Program and adaptive classes. With the help of University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information students, the Allegro Dance Project had a very successful summer show.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 17, 2021) — Students who dream of making their mark in the entertainment industry used to think they’d need to head to Hollywood, New York or Atlanta. But 10 University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information (CI) students and alumni added their names this summer to the credits of a new, nationally televised reality show without ever leaving Lexington.

    “Relative Justice,” which premiered earlier this week on Monday, Sept. 13, is the first nationally syndicated television show taped in Kentucky, and thanks to strong ties between the college and Lexington-based Wrigley Media Group (WMG), students and alumni were an integral part of the production crew.

    “Working on a nationally syndicated show was amazing in and of itself, but to be able to be a part of something like that right here in Kentucky was even better,” said CI alumna Katie Sam Smith. “I’m so glad that I was able to be involved in something that not only kickstarted my career but also benefited my home state by providing employment opportunities and supporting local business.”

    “Relative Justice” (check your local listings) is a family-based unscripted court show that “moves the drama from the family room to the courtroom.” With 150 episodes of more than 200 cases, viewers can expect a wide range of conflicts and emotions, all from real people with authentic disputes, presided over by Judge Rhonda Wills, a Houston attorney.

    WMG is a full-service content creation company founded by Misdee Wrigley that works on everything from short-form web series to long-form network programming. The company recently converted the former Cinemark Woodhill Movies 10 into a full media production facility, and the “Relative Justice” taping took place there from May to August.

    “The industry is changing to where you can make quality TV and films really anywhere in the world that you can then provide to the networks,” said Ross Babbit, chief content officer of WMG and executive producer of “Relative Justice.” “Misdee Wrigley decided to invest in this community because she believes, and I believe, we all believe, that Lexington is the next hot spot for television and film production.”

    Producing the first season of “Relative Justice” saw a staff of half court show veterans and half Lexington locals. Along with other UK alumni, CI alumni and current students, many from the Media Arts and Studies (MAS) degree program, comprised a healthy portion of the Lexington crew:

    • Ross Allen (communication, 2019) is a full-time WMG production specialist and was key grip. He ensured all the set equipment was working properly and ready to shoot. Not only did that include fixing technical failures but also perfectly tailoring lighting to each plaintiff, defendant and their props.
    • Brianna Bellomo (MAS, 2021) was a stage production assistant. Her everyday responsibility was to get the set ready. This included prepping every plaintiff on the show and cuing them at the beginning of each case.
    • Sydney Carroll (MAS senior) was a production office assistant/runner. She worked with the executive in charge of production, kept records of who won their cases, made sure guests were paid and documented spending on shoot days. In post-production, she helped arrange air dates for the show and watched early cuts, ahead of broadcast.
    • Will Casada (MAS, 2021) was a production office assistant and worked in craft services. He was in charge of all food handling, from serving breakfast to going on grocery runs to planning catered lunches.
    • Jack Dillender (MAS senior) was a control room production assistant. His main responsibility was communicating with the remote producers and showrunner. He also got remote witnesses TV-ready via Zoom.
    • Maurice Fleming (MAS, 2020) was a stage production assistant. He helped maintain the set, escorted the audience members on and off stage, cued the litigants, helped the prop master and ensured everyone on set was following the director’s orders.
    • Austin Iannone (MAS, 2021) was an audience coordinator. He recruited audience members, welcomed and instructed the audience members about their appearance and ensured each day of filming saw a full gallery of engaged audience members.
    • Simon Relford (MAS, 2020) and Tatum Tucker (MAS, 2021) were creative production assistants. They each worked in a group of three with a producer and associate producer to find interesting cases for the show. This required online and in-person coaxing of a diverse group of people, from Lexington to Cuba. Once chosen, the guests were booked, their stories were pitched and their legal work was finalized before they could appear on the show.
    • Katie Sam Smith (MAS, 2021) was a COVID-19 compliance officer. She was tasked with keeping production up and running during a pandemic. This included enforcing social distancing and mask-wearing protocols, keeping up with employee and visitor vaccination cards and overseeing COVID-19 testing for the crew, talent, litigants and the audience. 

    Although the CI alumni and students had no previous experience working on a courtroom show, their diligence and eagerness to learn impressed Lou Dennig, another executive producer of “Relative Justice.” 

    “UK students stack up against the ‘Emerson Mafia’ and Syracuse University people in Los Angeles 100%,” Dennig said, referring to his experience guest lecturing at the communication powerhouse universities. “I didn’t realize that UK had such a deep program also. And clearly, the training that students get at UK is world-class because the people came in, they stepped up and they did a great job.”

    For many of the CI alumni and current students on the “Relative Justice” crew, the relevant training they received at UK came from Kyra Hunting, assistant professor in the School of Journalism and Media. Hunting had the opportunity to watch her students in action as an audience member. Denning took advantage of a break in taping to lead the entire crew in a round of applause for Hunting’s positive impact on the future of media.

    “It was incredibly gratifying to be able to watch our talented and dedicated students in their element on set,” Hunting said. “The students who worked on this program were among our very best — creative, enthusiastic and professional — and it was so special to be able to see all the potential I observed in the classroom at work as they helped make a TV series that will be seen nationwide. Our students are as prepared and talented as students from anywhere in the country, and it was wonderful to see them having theki opportunity to prove that and start on their journeys in the industry.”

    Real-world career track experiences are an integral part of CI, and WMG has been a strong partner in helping train students as interns for several years. CI and WMG are working to build on their relationship to include even more opportunities like “Relative Justice.” The hope is that the best and brightest media students-turned-professionals can have a storied “Hollywood” career right here in their home state.

    In the Lexington area, “Relative Justice,” airs on the CW Network Mondays through Fridays at 9 a.m. EDT. For more information, please go to www.relativejustice.tv.

    CI students and alumni work with other UK alumni at Wrigley Media Group to produce “Relative Justice,” the first nationally syndicated television show taped in Kentucky.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Students who dream of making their mark in the entertainment industry used to think they’d need to head to Hollywood, New York or Atlanta. But 10 College of Communication and Information students and alumni added their names this summer to the credits of a new, nationally televised reality show without ever leaving Lexington.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Shawntaye Hopkins and Danielle Donham Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 16, 2021) — The University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law and College of Communication and Information is recognizing Constitution Day on Friday, Sept. 17, with a series of events and activities throughout the week.

    On Wednesday, Sept. 15, law students put their constitutional knowledge to the test with Constitutional Bingo from noon-1 p.m. in the G. Chad Perry III Grand Courtroom. Participants received a pocket copy of the U.S. Constitution. Prize packages were awarded at the conclusion of each of the five rounds of play.

    In addition, the law school will host a public reading of the entirety of the Constitution beginning noon Friday, Sept. 17, in the Stites & Harbison PLLC Commons located on the second floor near Common Grounds @ Law café. UK Rosenberg Law faculty and staff will take turns reading.

    Finally, the law library has a special book display in recognition of Constitution Day.

    The UK College of Communication and Information will host “Remembering David Hawpe: A Symposium at the University of Kentucky” Friday, Sept. 17. The symposium, sponsored by the School of Journalism and Media, is scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. at Worsham Cinema in the Bill Gatton Student Center. The symposium will be livestreamed and can be viewed at this link

    The event honors journalist, UK alumnus and former UK Board of Trustees member Hawpe, known for his passionate defense of the First Amendment. The event is free and open to the public.

    More information about the event can be found here.

    Photo credit: alancrosthwaite, iStock / Getty Images Plus. Organizational Unit: Communication and InformationLaw

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Danielle Donham
    danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    "> danielle.donham [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2660 Summary: The University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law and College of Communication and Information will recognize Constitution Day on Friday, Sept. 17, with a series of events and activities throughout the week.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Jenny Wells-Hosley Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 10. 2021) — Tomorrow, the nation will commemorate the 20th anniversary of 9/11 — a day that lives in infamy after nearly 3,000 people lost their lives in what was the deadliest terrorist attack in human history.

    Like most places, Sept. 11, 2001 at the University of Kentucky started out as an ordinary, late summer day. But as the events of that tragic morning unfolded, the university community, like everyone, was never quite the same.

    After the series of attacks occurred, classes were canceled for the rest of the day. According to the Kentucky Kernel, students quickly mobilized to donate blood and relief funds. Later that evening, a candlelight vigil took place outside of the William T. Young Library.

    In the following weeks, tribute walls with messages of hope and unity flooded campus, and gatherings that celebrated diversity and inclusion of students from all nationalities were organized in the wake of discrimination and hates crimes following the attacks.

    The people of UK lifted each other up during those dark days that followed, and just like the nation, they came together in a spirit of resilience and unity.

    While many of today’s UK students were likely too young to remember the events of 9/11 (or not yet born), many UK faculty and staff still vividly recall where they were that morning and how that day impacted their lives.

    Ahead of the 20th anniversary, UKNow invited those with personal stories or connections to the 9/11 victims and their families to share their stories.

    Content warning: Some of the stories below include recounts of the 9/11 violence and resulting deaths of family members and friends. Reader discretion is advised.

     

    Carl Nathe, public address announcer for UK Football and now-retired employee of UK Public Relations and Strategic Communications, shares his story on the loss of his childhood friend in the World Trade Center attacks.

    Rick Hall, and his younger brother Doug, moved in as my nextdoor neighbors in Pleasantville, New York, shortly before we both started kindergarten. Their father was a former minor league baseball player and taught the game to us — Mr. Hall took us to a baseball field anytime we wanted to learn how to hit, field, throw, run the bases, etc. Rick and I, along with Doug, became youth baseball players and added in basketball and football along the way. We all loved to listen to sports on the radio, watch games on TV or attend in-person whenever possible.

    Rick remained a close friend all the way through high school and beyond. We each went to different colleges, yet still saw each other during summers. We each moved to different places in the country to begin our full-time working careers after graduation, but still kept in touch. As we began to have families of our own and lived farther apart, we were not able to see each other very much. Still, each of us remained the other’s oldest friend. 

    The last time we got to see each other in person was in 1998 in New York City. My entire family went to visit Rick at his office on the 104th floor of one of the twin towers of the World Trade Center. It was a wonderful 45 minutes or so, sharing stories and catching up on our respective lives. We still emailed each other after that, and had hopes to reconnect again down the road.

    On Sept. 11, 2001, I was out on UK's campus working on a project when someone told me there had been a “horrible accident” and that a plane had struck one of the towers. Immediately hustling back to my office, I prayed that somehow everyone in the World Trade Center and in the plane would be OK. I turned on one of the office TVs to see what was happening and then just a couple of minutes later, a second plane crashed into the other tower. Now it was readily apparent: this was not an “accident.”

    Like all of us experienced that day, there was a gnawing, sick feeling inside of me. I later learned that Rick’s building was the second one hit and that he was presumed dead, together with nearly 3,000 others. His body was not recovered from the wreckage until several weeks later.

    In November, back in our hometown of Pleasantville, we held a memorial service to honor Rick and remember him. He was just 49 years old.

    I have visited his gravesite on several occasions and his name is inscribed in the World Trade Center Memorial. We all miss him dearly, yet life must go on.

     

    Janie Heath, dean of the UK College of Nursing, shares her story on living in Washington, D.C., in 2001. Her husband worked at the Pentagon, and she recalls the agonizing wait to learn if he was safe.

    At exactly 8:46 a.m. my life as well as millions of others changed forever. It truly was the longest day of my life. I still vividly remember teaching Acute Care NP students at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., when word got to us that something so tragic and unimaginable was happening in our country.  

    We started hearing that a plane hit the World Trade Center and then we started seeing the smoke from the Pentagon and knew we were under attack.

    The town was literally shut down — no communication coming in or out and traffic was at a standstill. Students started running for their lives on campus and nursing students started running to the hospital to assist in any way possible for incoming victims — except no one came.  

    It was so surreal and hard to comprehend the full impact of what was going on — another plane had hit the second tower of the World Trade Center and a plane had crashed into a corn field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania, (and then) smoke filled the sky in Washington, D.C.

    All I could think about was my husband — a U.S. Army colonel assigned to the Pentagon. I couldn’t remember if we exchanged our usual goodbyes and I love you — all phones were dead and I knew our kids were worried sick about us.

    Employees started walking home while I stayed paralyzed watching the news and waiting for a call that never came, until 12 hours later when I finally made it home and heard his exhausted voice:

    “I’m okay — I walked out of the Pentagon 20 minutes before the attack.”

    It would be another 24 hours before I saw my husband, as “duty calls” and “the soldier” gets to work with managing the devastation of so many civilian and military lives lost that day.  

    To this day whenever I hear a low-flying, loud plane, I cannot help to worry is it happening again, and no matter wherever I am and I see our beautiful American flag I am so proud of what it stands for and all those that serve to protect our freedom and safety that day and every day — firefighters, police, military, emergency personnel and more. 

     

    Beth Barnes, professor and director of undergraduate studies in the UK Department of Integrated Strategic Communication, was assistant dean for professional master’s programs at Syracuse University in 2001. She remembers many students who lost family members in the attacks, and recounts coming together with a large group of students, domestic and international, in the wake of prejudice and hate crimes against those of certain nationalities.

    My morning on Sept. 11, 2001 began with the fall kick-off event for the Syracuse (NY) Ad Club. I was president that year, and one of the city’s advertising agencies was hosting a fall TV preview, where we were seeing clips from the pilot episodes for the fall’s new TV series and hearing about each network’s primetime program lineup.

    As has often been reported, it truly was a beautiful day. In Syracuse, a little over four hours’ drive from midtown Manhattan, there was a nip of fall in the air and the sky was cloudless and bright blue. Syracuse University had started its fall semester a few weeks earlier, so we were into the swing of classes.

    The first sign that something was going on was when the mobile phones of the various station ad reps in our preview event began ringing. A call would come in, the rep would step out to answer it and then they didn’t come back. After that happened several times, the video clip we were watching was stopped and one of the agency tech people came out of the control room to tell us that a plane had hit one of the World Trade Center towers. At that point, the assumption was that it was a small private plane. We ended the meeting and everyone headed to their jobs.

    I was still in my car driving to campus when the announcement came over the radio of the second plane hitting. As soon as I parked, I ran into our building, where I knew there would be TVs going. Sure enough, the building lobby was full of students, faculty and staff, all watching the news coverage. I hadn’t been inside long when the first tower fell. I particularly remember my dean, a native New Yorker, sitting in stunned silence.

    As the morning continued to unfold, my next, very vivid memory, is of trying to track down my brother. He was working in Boston at the time, and flying to the West Coast fairly often. (The two planes that hit the towers were both Boston departures heading for Los Angeles.) The person who first answered the phone when I called my brother’s company just wouldn’t tell me anything, which felt like a punch to the gut. But when I called back, the person I got the second time was able to reassure me that they had seen my brother that morning and he was there and in a meeting.

    By early afternoon, there was already tremendous speculation about who was behind the attacks, and already some reports of backlash against people from other countries happening. We decided to call a meeting of our master’s students; we had 200 or so across the school’s various programs, and about a third of them were international students from a range of countries. We wanted to give all of our students the chance to come together and talk, and to encourage everyone to look out for one another. I also remember being very aware that for some of our international students, terroristic violence on their own soil was something they were very used to. So, it was also a chance for them to share their experience of living with that with our domestic students.

    Over the next days as more details came out and as victims were identified, I learned that the older brother of one of my students had died at the World Trade Center. He didn’t work there, but he’d been at a breakfast meeting at Windows on the World, the restaurant on the top of the North Tower. Another of our students lost her father in the attack on the Pentagon. 

    Syracuse University lost 30 of its graduates in the 9/11 attacks. Many Syracuse students lost family members that day; the university draws a large portion of its students from the New York metropolitan area. And, tragically, SU was no stranger to terrorism; 35 of the people killed in the Pan Am bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland in 1988 were current SU students on the way back from a semester-long study abroad program in London.

    One other 9/11-related memory that has stayed with me over the years was formed more than a month after the attacks. I traveled from Syracuse to Anchorage, Alaska to lead an accreditation team at University of Alaska. All of Central New York and, I’m sure, much of the East Coast was still draped in American flags and bunting. But I wasn’t expecting to see the same thing over 4,000 miles away as I walked around Anchorage. That really brought home to me the extent of the national grief.

    To this day, if I’m teaching on 9/11 at the time the first plane hit, I stop my class and ask my students to join me in a moment of silence. I’ve yet to be able to get through making that request without starting to cry.

     

    Peter Berres, now-retired assistant dean of student affairs in the College of Health Sciences, shares his story of losing his nephew in the World Trade Center attack.

    Like many Americans, my first memory of Tuesday, Sept. 11, is of the wondrously beautiful day it began as. And the unprecedented, horrific day it became.

    At home (as I prepared to drive to Bowling Green for a UK meeting) and watching the incomprehensible story unfold, aware of the first plane and hoping — though I found it impossible to believe — that a small plane had accidently hit the first World Trade Center Tower, I held to that belief even as I entertained other explanations, including purposefully violent attack scenarios.

    I knew that my sister’s son, Paul Kenneth Sloan, age 26, had recently moved from San Francisco to NYC with a financial-investment job. Unaware that he worked at the World Trade Center, I worried about him working close to the towers and that some of the secondary effects might threaten his safety.

    Around lunch time, I phoned my sister living in California, beginning the conversation by asking “how far is Paul from the towers?” The answer came in her tone, before her words registered with me: “he works in the south tower, I just talked to him, he is okay and now leaving the building.”

    Paul began descending the staircase from the 87th floor. Somewhere down, the public announcements insisted that it was more dangerous outside the building and to stay inside on your work floor. He returned to the 87th floor and called his dad, who was in a meeting in Houston, where they were watching the news accounts of the first plane. (While) telling his dad he had attempted to leave, but was persuaded back to his company’s offices, the second plane hit his building — with his dad watching — and the phone went dead.

    Unable to get a plane out, my brother-in-law drove his rental car straight to San Francisco, collected his two other sons and my sister, and then drove — nonstop —  from SF to NYC to meet with their daughter who lived north of city.

    Days of searching hospitals, days of hope fading …. Days of collecting his personal belongings and talking to the everyday people in his life — grocers, laundry-cleaners, parking attendants, door men, neighbors — all of whom spoke of his unique kindness and gentle and genuinely engaging personality.

    Crushed, they returned to California to await confirmation, wait for his body, and for a funeral and a spot to lay him to rest and a place to visit. The knock, finally, came early one morning, weeks later. Confirmation was made from a piece of thumbnail.

    Plans for a funeral were abandoned, instead a memorial was held. My sister asked me to eulogize Paul, which has remained the saddest, most difficult of 10 eulogies I’ve delivered. But his was the easiest, having such incredible material from his short life: his character grounded in values and ethical standards which represent the best of us; a work ethic which drove him to do the best in everything he attempted, often building on rather ordinary qualities which he willed into excellence. And, above all, evident from the earliest times of his young life, the kindest and sweetest personality, the kind we seldom see so clearly, so early.

    With all eulogies, my hope is that those qualities we admire in others will find their way into our own hearts. In the last 20 years, my thoughts return to Paul regularly as I recognize my many faults and flaws and look to Paul to remind me what a gracious, meaningful life looks like. The youngest of those I have eulogized (parents, two brothers, war buddies who ended their own lives) Paul’s short life has taught me more about being a human being than anyone. He has made me — and his friends and family — all better persons by his well-lived example than any other influence I am aware of. To that extent, Paul lives in so many people and continues to guide us and inspire us to the decent humans we are capable of being.

    My heart remains heavy for my sister and her family, a burden I wish I could carry for them all. 

    At this 20-year anniversary, I am both proud and humbled by my sister and brother-in-law’s courage and resiliency in carrying their burden and the grace and dignity with which they have managed themselves for the betterment and comfort of their children, grandchildren, extended family and friends. Life goes on, indeed, but Paul lives on in so many of us.

     

    Amanda Nelson, director of media and strategic relations in the UK College of Education, was a senior at UK in 2001. She shares a story of how a group of volunteers from her hometown of Lawrenceburg, Kentucky, traveled to New York City to assist with recovery efforts after 9/11.

    My father was the local newspaper publisher, so we drove from Lawrenceburg to New York to report on their work. It was surreal to be in the city with people I had known my whole life as they wore Red Cross vests and prepared meals.

    We were invited to go with them to the World Trade Center site to deliver packages of clean socks and freshly cut fruit to the rescue and recovery workers. I had watched 9/11 play out on campus televisions at UK, trying to process with my friends what was happening. I was nervous about how it would feel to see it in person. I recall the exhaustion on workers’ faces, being surprised by the vastness of the destruction and the smell of burning plastic. It was haunting to see the debris and dust in unusual places, like covering tombstones at St. Paul’s Chapel, and in a nearby jewelry store’s window display, frozen in time. It deepened my sense of reverence for what people experienced, and the memories of how that felt continue to be a profound part of my life.

    Looking back 20 years later, I realize what a pivotal time that was globally, and also in my own life. I was on the cusp of finishing school and entering adulthood and it was the first time I saw that level of tangible fear and grief. But it showed me that, no matter how devastated they are, people keep putting one foot in front of the other to get through, and that gave me hope.

                                                                                                                                                                     ***

    To read more personal accounts, UK Libraries’ Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History houses a collection of interviews and personal stories of Kentuckians surrounding their connections to Sept. 11, 2001.

    • “Bourbon in Kentucky: Women in Bourbon Oral History Project” featuring Jessica Pendergrass
    • “From Combat to Kentucky Oral History Project” featuring Tyler Gayheart and Ian Abney
    • “Peace Corps: Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (Kentucky) Oral History Project” featuring Tara L. Lloyd
    • “Quilt Alliance’s Quilter’s S.O.S. Oral History Project: American Quilt Study Group” featuring Mary Perini
    • “The John G. Heyburn II Initiative for Excellence in the Federal Judiciary Oral History Project” featuring Judge Joseph H. McKinley, Jr.
    • “Walter D. Huddleston Oral History Project” featuring U.S. Sen. and former Senate Select Committee on Intelligence member Walter D. Huddleston

    The University of Kentucky will commemorate the 20th anniversary of 9/11 in multiple ways tomorrow:

    • UK Army and Air Force ROTC will honor the victims of 9/11 by placing small flags in memory of each of the nearly 3,000 victims of 9/11 on the front lawn of UK's Main Building. From a podium, cadets will also read the name of each victim throughout the day. They will begin reading the names at 8:46 a.m., when the first attack occurred. Learn more here.  
    • UK Opera Theatre Director Everett McCorvey, along with three vocal students and alumni from the UK School of Music, will join the National Chorale, the U.S. Army Field Band and the Soldiers' Chorus at the Empty Sky Memorial Remembrance Ceremony, beginning 2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 11, in Liberty State Park, located in Jersey City, New Jersey. Learn more here.  
    • This Saturday's UK vs. Missouri football game will also serve as the UK Heroes Day Football game. The game starts at 7:30 p.m. and a special ceremony will recognize all active, reserve and veteran members of the U.S. armed forces along with police, firefighters and other first responders.
    of Organizational Unit: Arts and SciencesCommunication and InformationEducationFine ArtsMusicGraduate SchoolHealth SciencesLibrariesNursing

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Jenny Wells-Hosley
    jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    "> jenny.wells [at] uky.edu
    859-257-5343 Summary: Tomorrow, the university will commemorate the 20th anniversary of 9/11. UKNow invited those with personal stories or connections related to the attacks to share their memories.Homepage Feature: Primary featureSection Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: ResearchBy Jesi Jones-Bowman Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 9, 2021) The University of Kentucky Office of Undergraduate Research (OUR) has selected 23 outstanding undergraduates for the 2021-2022 Undergraduate Research Ambassador program.

    The newly redesigned ambassador program’s mission is to increase awareness and create opportunities for students to actively engage in research and creative scholarship. Ambassadors must demonstrate academic excellence, leadership and be involved in mentored research or creative work. This year's ambassadors represent six colleges, 15 disciplines and 19 research areas.

    “Mentored research and creative work provide distinct opportunities for UK undergraduates to put to practice knowledge from the classroom and develop new skills,” says Chad Risko, director of the UK Office of Undergraduate Research. “This year’s class of ambassadors, who have each showcased success in their research and creative efforts, represent a broad spectrum of disciplines across the university. Such extensive representation is important as OUR seeks to make more visible the contributions of our fantastic undergraduate scholars and create opportunities for anyone that would like to pursue mentored research and scholarship.”    

    The student leaders’ goal is to make undergraduate research more accessible. Ambassadors will promote undergraduate research involvement and opportunities through student outreach and program events, such as tabling, information sessions, student workshops, speaking engagements, class and student organization presentations, and OUR sponsored events including the 5-Minute Fast Track Competition and Showcase of Undergraduate Scholars.

    The 2021-2022 Undergraduate Research Ambassadors include:

    ●     Sophia Abraham, College of Communication and Information

    ●     Maya Abul-Khoudoud, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Humza Anwar, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Bridget Bolt, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    ●     Kayli Bolton, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Shelby Brantley, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Trey Coburn, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Ethan Cofer, College of Design

    ●     Riley Droppleman, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Isabella Erickson, College of Nursing

    ●     Sarah Fields, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    ●     Claire-Marie Hall, College of Nursing

    ●     Wilson Harris, College of Engineering

    ●     Emily Keaton, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Caleb Kennedy, College of Engineering

    ●     Courtney Martin, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Shelby McCubbin, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Nadja Nelson, College of Nursing

    ●     Reagan Parker, College of Arts and Sciences

    ●     Avery Patrick, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    ●     Gretchen Ruschman, College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    ●     Haley Shaver, College of Engineering and College of Fine Arts

    ●     Gabija Ziemyte, College of Arts and Sciences

    The Research Ambassadors are available by request for class and organization presentations, college and university research events, and campus outreach efforts. Requests must be submitted two to three weeks in advance and approved by OUR staff. If you would like to request a Research Ambassador presentation, please submit a request form.

    To learn more about the Office of Undergraduate Research, please visit https://our.uky.edu.

    of Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesCommunication and InformationDesignEngineeringFine ArtsNursing

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Elizabeth Chapin
    Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    "> Elizabeth.chapin [at] uky.edu
    859-562-2207 Summary: The student leaders’ goal is to make undergraduate research more accessible. Ambassadors will promote undergraduate research involvement and opportunities through student outreach and program events.Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Mariah Kendell Wednesday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 8, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team is gearing up for their 2021-22 season.

    The policy team, led by coaches Casey Harrigan and Lincoln Garrett, returned to campus recently for their annual pre-season work retreat. Students researched and discussed the upcoming topic of the season — Resolved: The United States Federal Government should substantially increase prohibitions on anticompetitive business practices by the private sector by at least expanding the scope of its core antitrust laws.

    In policy debate, teams of two spend months researching both sides of the given topic. Before the competition, opposing teams are assigned as the “affirmative” (in favor of the resolution) or the “negative” (opposed to the resolution). The team with the most impactful argument wins the round.

    “This is an exciting time for the program with so many new initiatives. We’ve really embraced the value of promoting debate on and beyond our campus and hope to see a big impact over the coming season,” Debate Director Dave Arnett said.

    The policy team will open their season virtually on Sept. 18, just a month before the debut of UK Debate’s newly established public forum team on Oct. 9.

    Public forum is similar to policy debate, but it is more accessible and beginner-friendly with shorter rounds. UK is leading the way in the expansion of public forum debate as a founding member of the new Collegiate Public Forum League.

    This year’s public forum team, under the leadership of Katie Humphries, is preparing for the upcoming topic of the season — Resolved: When in conflict, the United States' obligation to protect public health outweighs the preservation of individual freedom.

    In addition to preparation for tournaments, UK Debate will continue to oversee the Bluegrass Debate Coalition. Director Bill Eddy and current UK debate students are sharing their resources with Kentucky middle and high students through after school classes, tournament opportunities and summer programs. Visit the BDC website at https://bluegrassdebate.org/.

    The UK Debate Team is the 2019 National Debate Tournament champion and is housed in the College of Communication and Information at the University of Kentucky. Follow the team at https://ci.uky.edu/UKDebate/.

    The policy team at their recent pre-season work retreat.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The University of Kentucky Intercollegiate Debate Team is gearing up for their 2021-22 season.
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Bill Eddy Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 3, 2021) — The Bluegrass Debate Coalition (BDC) is again offering no-cost, online public speaking and debate courses for the children of University of Kentucky’s faculty and staff. The after school debate program is part of a greater outreach from the UK College of Communication and Information aimed at enriching the lives of children across Kentucky. The initiative is helping students develop essential life skills now to substantially improve their self-confidence and their thinking/speaking abilities.

    This high-quality debate education experience is designed to be fun, educational and produces valuable life skills that last well beyond their school years. The BDC offers beginner, intermediate and advanced classes featuring a short lesson, group discussion and fun activities to generate new skills. These courses are provided in a virtual environment for safety and convenience.

    • Elementary courses are geared at students in grades four through six. The lessons are activities-based leading to lots of doing and time passes smoothly — and enjoyably. These classes meet once per week for 60 minutes over a period of six weeks. The BDC will also create a fun speaking event for them and give them medals like in the Olympics.
    • Middle school courses are geared at students in grades six through eight. No matter their experience in speech and debate, there is a course that will fit. Middle-school classes meet once per week for 90 minutes over a period of six weeks. At the completion of the course an event will be created for them and the BDC will give positive encouragement for the students to join a team and attend tournaments (if they are interested).
    • High school courses are geared at students in grades nine through 12. These classes will not occupy too much of a student’s time as the BDC strives to create a healthy balance to challenge students, but not overwhelm them. These classes meet once per week for 90 minutes over a period of six weeks. Students are encouraged to start a team, and go to speech and debate tournaments, which can be a lot of fun for them. Three experience levels are available: beginner, intermediate and advanced.

    Customized scheduling is also available. Students who have missed the deadline can be waitlisted so that additional classes can be created later in the month or possibly the following month. This creates a space for people to request classes that better align with their busy schedules.

    The courses are currently offered at no cost. The BDC initiative greatly appreciates donations, which help the program to offer even more classes and special events throughout the year.

    For questions or to enroll, please visit bluegrassdebate.org or call 859-218-8888.

    Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The Bluegrass Debate Coalition is again offering no-cost, online public speaking and debate courses for the children of University of Kentucky’s faculty and staff.
    Category:
  • Body: UK HappeningsBy Catherine Hayden Thursday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Sept. 2, 2021) — David V. Hawpe, whose journalism career had major impacts on Kentucky and its largest university, will be remembered by those who worked with him at “Remembering David Hawpe: A Symposium at the University of Kentucky” on Friday, Sept. 17.

    Hawpe, who died July 18, was a reporter and editor at the Louisville Courier Journal for almost 40 years. On his watch, the newspaper won four Pulitzer Prizes and was a strong voice for education reform and regulation of the coal industry. After his retirement in 2009, he was a UK trustee for six years.

    “We hope this event will pay proper tribute to one of Kentucky’s greatest journalists, and help the university community and the people of Kentucky realize more deeply the essential role that journalism must play in protecting and advancing the public interest, with news coverage that makes a difference in people’s lives,” said Al Cross, director of UK’s Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues. Cross is a faculty member of the School of Journalism and Media, which is sponsoring the event scheduled from 1 to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 17, at Worsham Cinema in the Bill Gatton Student Center.

    UK President Eli Capilouto will join 11 other speakers who worked with Hawpe to help students, faculty and the public appreciate his impact on the state and the university.

    “David Hawpe devoted his life to Kentucky,” Capilouto said. “That commitment was particularly evident in his belief that Kentucky needed a strong system of higher education — and a nationally regarded flagship institution — to help our Commonwealth reach its potential. As a trustee at two institutions, Morehead State and UK, and as a passionate advocate for higher-education reform, he was unquestionably one of the strongest and most eloquent advocates for how an affordable, accessible system, with outstanding faculty, could transform the state. His role as a trustee was, in an important sense, an extension of his work as a journalist, someone who saw his role as a protector of the state but also someone who pushed it to be even better.”

    The other speakers will be:

    • Stephen J. Ford, who followed Hawpe in The Courier-Journal’s Eastern Kentucky Bureau and was a ranking editor under him for most of their careers at the newspaper. He will give an overview of Hawpe’s career and what it was like to work with him.
    • Richard Wilson, retired C-J reporter and former interim director of the journalism school, will recall Hawpe as the student reporter and editorialist who revealed player discontent on the football team.
    • Mimi Pickering, Appalshop filmmaker and board president of the Appalachian Citizens Law Center, and Steve Cawood, Pineville lawyer who first met Hawpe at the 1970 Hyden mine disaster that killed 38 miners, will discuss Hawpe and the coal industry.
    • Franklin Circuit Judge Phillip Shepherd and state Sen. Morgan McGarvey of Louisville, for whom the retired editor was a volunteer aide, will discuss the politics of David Hawpe, who loved politics about as much as anything.
    • Jon Fleischaker and Kim Greene of Louisville, leading First Amendment lawyers in Kentucky, will discuss what it was like to be Hawpe’s attorney, and some of the battles they won for open government.
    • Betty Winston Baye, former C-J reporter and editor and member of the National Association of Black Journalists Hall of Fame, will discuss Hawpe’s leadership in the advancement of diversity in journalism.
    • David Thompson, executive director of the Kentucky Press Association and Hawpe’s friend of 55 years, will discuss his leadership in the industry as president of KPA and Associated Press Managing Editors.

    All speakers will be part of a concluding roundtable about the current state of journalism, where it may be going and how Hawpe’s career might inform that. Cross, who was C-J political writer under Hawpe, will moderate.

    The event is free and open to the public. Parking will be available in the Gatton Student Center lot, next to the center on Avenue of Champions.

    Following the symposium, UK College of Communication and Information Dean Jennifer Greer will host a reception in the student center.

    All officially recommended public health prevention measures will be observed.

    David HawpeOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: David V. Hawpe, whose journalism career had major impacts on Kentucky and its largest university, will be the focus of "Remembering David Hawpe: A Symposium at the University of Kentucky” on Friday, Sept. 17.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 27, 2021) — The COVID-19 pandemic saw professional journalists worldwide working tirelessly to disseminate timely, consequential information to the public. This responsibility was just as weighty for student journalists. But despite the mounting pressure, University of Kentucky's Kentucky Kernel Media reigned triumphant over a trying year, raking in several state and national awards. Overall, the media organization and its staff won nearly 100 awards during the 2020-2021 school year.

    For the Kentucky Kernel and KRNL Lifestyle + Fashion, the tone for this past school year was set on March 6, 2020. That day, Natalie Parks was selected as the editor-in-chief for the Kernel while Rachael Courtney was selected for KRNL. But it was also the day that the coronavirus hit Kentucky.

    “The board of directors was selecting the new editor and the first COVID-19 case in Kentucky was announced while we were in the middle of selecting,” Student Media Advisor Ryan Craig said. “Basically, it was hanging over us like a cloud from the beginning of this current group, especially for Natalie and Rachael.”

    Rick Childress, 2019-2020 Kernel editor-in-chief, had rushed out of that selection meeting to cover the press conference announcing the case. He said the moment was “earth shattering” and the following months “absurd.”

    Parks said she felt distinctly that “everything from here on out would be different.” And her prediction would come to pass.

    Within a couple weeks, Childress’ former staff-filled newsroom would be empty, and he would have to virtually pass on his editorial responsibilities and knowledge to Parks. The weekly newspaper would also have its last print edition of the semester before going virtual as everything and everyone soon went on lockdown. 

    Luckily for KRNL, the staff had sent their Spring 2020 magazine to print before the lockdown started. Courtney was also fortunate to have been managing editor for Allie King, her predecessor. King said that made Courtney well-prepared for her new role, though that did not make her job any easier.

    The summer before the Fall 2020 semester was full of uncertainties for Parks and Courtney, filled with questions of how to operate their staffs virtually and if, when and how the university would resume in-person operations. And come the fall semester with CDC-compliant restrictions, Kentucky Kernel Media would face COVID-19 scares, absent staffers and the universally felt frustrations associated with adapting to online life. And challenges often faced by college media students, like limited media access and resources, were only worsened by the pandemic.

    Both Parks and Courtney agree that one of the hardest parts of their tenure was forming and keeping a sense of camaraderie among the staff. Kentucky Kernel Media is known among its alumni to host several social functions during the year, whether that be a summer staff retreat, semester tabling event or holiday office party. But while Courtney thought her KRNL staff were able to bond well via Zoom, Parks said that she and her Kernel staff missed out on “many of the things that make college journalism worth it.”

    However, these challenges did not come without reward. Beginning in October 2020 and continuing into July 2021, Kentucky Kernel Media’s multitude of state, national and international awards started rolling in. Though most of these awards were earned during Childress and King’s tenures, they provided a much-needed morale boost and motivator for Parks and Courtney’s staffs.

    For the 2019-2020 College Media Association Pinnacle Awards:

    • The Kernel won five awards.
    • KRNL won three awards.
    • Kentucky Kernel Year in Photos, the University of Kentucky’s unofficial yearbook, won two awards and one honorable mention. 

    For the 2019-2020 Associated Collegiate Press Pacemaker Awards, commonly referred to as the “Pulitzer Prize” of college journalism:

    • The Kernel won six Pacemakers, five honorable mentions, was a Newspaper Pacemaker finalist and won a first-place special award for COVID-19 coverage.
    • KRNL won one Pacemaker, one honorable mention, was a Magazine Pacemaker winner and placed second for the Best of Show Awards.
    • Year in Photos won one Pacemaker, one honorable mention and placed sixth for the Best of Show Awards.
    • Kentucky Kernel Inside UK, Kernel Media’s freshmen move-in magazine, placed second for the Best of Show Awards.

    For the 2019-2020 College Photographer of the Year Awards held in November, three Kernel staffers each won an Award of Excellence for the respective categories of sports portfolio, sports action and sports feature.

    Also in November, the Kentucky Kernel received the James Madison Award, awarded by the Scripps Howard First Amendment Center in the School of Journalism and Media at the UK College of Communication and Information in recognition of the organization’s outstanding contribution to the First Amendment.

    For the 2020-2021 Hearst Foundation’s Journalism Awards Program, which ran from December 2020 to July 2021:

    • Kernel staffers had four individual Top 20 finishes, two photojournalism and two writing, with two of them being Top 10.
    • KRNL staffers had two individual Top 20 finishes, one being Top 10, and one group Top 20 finish.
    • UK placed fifth in photojournalism, its highest ranking to date.
    • UK also placed 10th in overall finish, also its highest ranking to date.

    For the 2019-2020 Kentucky Press Association Awards held in February 2021, the Kernel won two Certificates of Merit and 45 awards, sweeping seven categories and taking home 18 first place finishes. Parks was also named Student Journalist of the Year in addition to receiving the Jon Fleischaker Freedom of Information award, the latter of which was also awarded to Craig.

    Also held in February was the 2021 Kentucky News Photographer Association Conference. Three Kernel photographers won 11 awards. Michael Clubb, Parks’ managing editor, won Sports Photographer of the Year, competing with professional photojournalists for the first time, and Runner-up Student Photographer of the Year.

    At the 2021 American Advertising Awards held in March, KRNL’s Kendall Boron won a Golden Addy for her work with the organization.

    Finally, in July 2021, the Associated Collegiate Press named the Kentucky Kernel a Top 100 Pacemaker Winner and aims to honor the organization during the ACP centennial celebration planned for October 2021 in New Orleans.

    “Awards are far from everything, but they’re certainly nice confidence boosters,” Childress said. “They’re a tried and true stamp that you’re doing a good job and I couldn’t help but feel extremely proud watching our reporters, photographers and designers reel in award after award. It was one thing for me to tell someone they did a good job, but when someone got national or state recognition, then they really knew it and so did everyone else.”

    Besides awards, the 2020-2021 class of Kernelites proved in other ways that they could uphold the tradition of strong journalism despite the pandemic. Though the Kernel staff never met in person and only allowed one staffer at a time in the newsroom, they continued their pre-pandemic weekly printed papers, even increasing the number of pages in some editions, while bolstering their electronic newsletter. The KRNL staff also expanded its multimedia coverage to include regular podcasts and video content while producing two magazines that Craig said were the best in the country college-wise.

    “I’ve talked to many advisors across the country, and we all agree that the adaptations students had to make to ensure each publication, whether a campus newspaper or special publication, came out on time and successfully was outstanding,” Assistant Student Media Advisor May May Barton said. “Kernel/KRNL students were focused, determined and dedicated to putting out the best product for the campus and the community.”

    Although the year was what Parks called “the opposite of the ideal college journalism experience,” she also thought the Kernel surviving through the year was the “height of success.” She and Courtney both hope for their successors, Rayleigh Deaton for the Kernel and Allie Diggs for KRNL, to be able to get back in the office, make lasting memories and create the top-tier content they know Kentucky Kernel Media is capable of.

    “The Kentucky Kernel and KRNL have a mission, and that mission is to cover the campus of the University of Kentucky fairly, equitably and, without a doubt, to tell the stories that aren’t being told,” Craig said. “This is a laboratory, we are learning, we are trying to uplift these students and make them realize their potential as journalists. And even if they don’t work in journalism, if they do something else, if they major in something else, their time working for the Kernel or KRNL will make their lives better and also make them see the world differently, and I think that’s where we can really excel.”

    The Kentucky Kernel staff celebrate winning the KPA General Excellence Award for Large Collegiate Papers in January 2020, the last time they were able to celebrate awards together before the pandemic began.Organizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: The COVID-19 pandemic saw professional journalists worldwide trying to disseminate timely, consequential information to the public. This responsibility was just as weighty for student journalists. But despite the mounting pressure, Kentucky Kernel Media reigned triumphant over a trying year, raking in several state and national awards. Overall, the media organization and its staff won nearly 100 awards during the 2020-2021 school year. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 20, 2021) — Children are usually told to “shoot for the moon” when planning their future careers. For one University of Kentucky College of Communication and Information alumnus, he’s taking that advice literally — except he’s shooting for the moon AND Mars.

    John Ramsey, a 1995 telecommunications graduate (now media arts and studies), has turned his childhood love of flying and human spaceflight into a profession supporting NASA. Since 2017, he has served as the senior project manager and integrated product team leader for the Spaceport Command and Control System at Kennedy Space Center. 

    But it wasn’t a straight road from Space Camp to the Spaceport. Though Ramsey had attended the U.S. Space and Rocket Center summer camp multiple times as a child, he started his career with the military. 

    Having earned his pilot’s license at 17, Ramsey had envisioned himself as an Air Force fighter pilot. But these plans soon changed when he discovered he had worsening eyesight. Instead, he joined UK’s Army ROTC and, subsequently, the School of Journalism and Media, known then as the School of Journalism and Telecommunications.

    As a telecommunications major, Ramsey aimed to learn the parameters of the communication industry, such as the technical side of systems, while also dabbling in the array of classes offered at UK. He said his degree afforded elective flexibility that allowed him to expand his horizons.

    “I got this kind of rich mixture of different domains and different subject matter that was really interesting, and I didn’t realize at the time how well it would equip me for life later on,” Ramsey said. “The ability to explore my interests and to feed parts of my brain that I hadn’t or wouldn’t have otherwise tapped into gave me that Swiss Army knife set of capabilities to go out in the world and do some pretty diverse things.”

    After graduating, Ramsey went on to serve as an infantry officer before putting in 15 years in the telecommunications industry. He worked his way up from frontline management to the executive director and global practice lead for Solutions Architecture at Verizon.

    These years of career expertise made Ramsey a “valuable resource” for John Clark, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Media. Clark said Ramsey was an “engaging” and “diligent student” in his telecommunications network management class, and he would later return to the same class as a “guest expert speaker,” much to Clark’s appreciation.

    While reaching a top position at a Fortune 50 company is the pinnacle for some people’s careers, this was the moment Ramsey bowed out for a coincidental opening of his dream job.

    He had returned to Space Camp as a volunteer instead of a camper. While helping out the organization, he was appointed to the foundation board and helped to start the camp’s alumni association. This led to regular interaction with NASA and the contractor community. Through these connections, Ramsey learned that Jacobs, the prime contractor for ground systems supporting the human exploration program at Kennedy Space Center, was looking for a professional with his credentials.

    Now he’s responsible for a team of over 200 software engineers and developers, system engineers, hardware engineers and more. As the senior project manager and integrated product team leader, Ramsey oversees the design, development, test and sustainment of the primary command and control system for processing and launch of the vehicles in NASA’s Artemis program. The program aims to take the first woman and next man to the moon and, eventually, Mars.

    A previous coworker of Ramsey’s, Sandra Newfang, former senior manager for software delivery on the Test and Operations Support Contract at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, said, “John's leadership was so critical to the success of Launch Control Systems at Kennedy Space Center, and I especially admired both how thoroughly he understood such a complicated system, and his sheer talent for strategy.”

    Considering all the “cool things” Ramsey does in his role and the reality of living his childhood dream, there is one fact about his niche career that continues to amaze him even after four years on the job.

    “I’m constantly standing in those rooms where people have worked so hard to allow people to leave Earth,” Ramsey said. “That’s what we say about Kennedy Space Center — it is the place where you come to watch people leave Earth.”

    John RamseyOrganizational Unit: Communication and Information

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: John Ramsey, a 1995 telecommunications graduate, has turned his childhood love of flying and human spaceflight into a profession supporting NASA. Since 2017, he has served as the senior project manager and integrated product team leader for the Spaceport Command and Control System at Kennedy Space Center. Section Feature: Section Feature
    Category:
  • Body: Campus NewsBy Akhira Umar Friday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 13, 2021) — A little girl from Kentucky who went to the local library housed in a jail cell has now become a section head at the Library of Congress (LC), turning her getaway into a realized dream job.

    Jasmyne Lewis-Combs, who earned her master’s degree in library science in 2014 from the School of Information Science (SIS) in the University of Kentucky’s College of Communication and Information, took her love of local libraries and transformed it into a career in the United States’ national library, one of the largest libraries in the world.

    “It took me a long time to get here, but it’s a good place to be now. You don’t leave LC,” Lewis-Combs said. “My dream job wanted me. I didn’t just want them. Some days I still can’t believe it.”

    Lewis-Combs’ library career started at the end of a nearly decade-long career teaching special education. Due to Great Recession budget cuts, she was let go from her school district. This left her scrambling for months trying to find a job, none of which stuck, until one opened up the door to further her education. 

    As a Kentucky girl, Lewis-Combs had always wanted to attend UK, but after getting her bachelor’s degree from Morehead State University, a master’s degree from Georgetown College and teaching certificate from West Virginia University, it was a forgotten dream. Thankfully, her short stint as a social worker finally gave her the opportunity as one of the job requirements was to apply for graduate school at UK. When she got her acceptance letter two months after quitting the job, her mother suggested she go into library science like she had dreamed of as a child.

    “As I fell out of love with teaching because of the bureaucracy involved, I fell even more in love with the library because I could teach what I wanted when I wanted to who I wanted, and it was like this perfect environment for me,” Lewis-Combs said. “I had this love of library anyway because it was always my escape. If I had something going on that I wanted to run from, well that’s where you found me. Or if I had any free time, my nose was in a book.”

    Though she had an affinity for libraries, she did not know all the work it took to be a librarian until she started her program at UK. There, she learned the philosophy, logistics and science behind libraries and how they operate. It was also at UK that she discovered her dream job through an internship program.

    The UK SIS Alternative Spring Break program offers library science students career-enhancing experience by working in the country’s leading national libraries and archives. While participating in the program, Lewis-Combs spent time interning in the LC. For the next 10 years, she gained progressive experience to work toward landing a job in the national library.

    Before she even graduated from UK, Lewis-Combs was already serving as a library director for the Rocky J. Adkins Public Library in Sandy Hook, Kentucky. Her focus there was to assist the community with what she observed as their main needs: free child care and meals during the summer. With a small budget from the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Lewis-Combs ran an eight-week science-based summer reading program from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for 50 school-aged children. She also ran a two-week senior citizen computer class, teaching the elderly how to shop online, create an email address and use Facebook.

    “Everybody thinks books when they think library, but that’s not the case anymore. It’s not the books — it’s the people. Our libraries are the center of our community. Libraries are changing. It’s no longer older ladies with buns and glasses shushing patrons while carrying stacks of books. Our libraries are living, breathing entities that are the hubs of everyday life,” Lewis-Combs said. “All of these resources are available through your library, and all of the social aspects that we need as humans to be well-rounded people are available there.”

    Throughout the years, Lewis-Combs was also a correctional librarian in the Little Sandy Correctional Complex where she ran reading programs for inmates, a supervisor in the West Virginia Library Commission Division of Special Services, where she taught others skills to teach Braille and provided public library services to the visually impaired and blind through the LC’s National Library Service and an educational technology teacher/ librarian at Kentucky Christian University.

    Nine months into the KCU job, Lewis-Combs got a call from the LC about an application she had submitted before even applying to the university. After an interview she thought she bombed, two months of waiting for a call back and a 72-page background check, she was well on her way to becoming the section head for the Science, Medicine and Agriculture Section of the LC.

    “It’s an amazing feeling to be there and to be chosen for the job that you dreamed about and sought after for almost 10 years,” Lewis-Combs said. “It’s been the road meant to be traveled. Really bad circumstances turned into something really wonderful.”

    As a section head, Lewis-Combs supervises a team of cataloguers, two librarians and three technicians, who complete the Cataloguing in Publication (CIP) records for books in pre-publication and catalogue published books sent from the United States Copyright Office. Though the job is not public-facing, Lewis-Combs said she has a large enough staff and ample program opportunities to satisfy her social needs as a librarian.

    While her library career started from a love of books, it quickly blossomed into a love of helping others. She dreams of one day heading the NLS to help solve social inequalities like she had as a librarian in West Virginia and assisting with the Alternative Spring Break program to help set career goals for other future librarians.

    “So many times, our librarians get discounted as, ‘Oh, they’re just a librarian.’ But they’re not. They’re the keys to unlocking all this knowledge,” Lewis-Combs said. “They can be the catalyst for change in our communities for the better.”

    For more information please visit: 

    Library Science Program

    LIS Alternative Spring Break Program

    Library of Congress

    Jasmyne Lewis-CombsOrganizational Unit: Communication and InformationGraduate School

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

    Contact Meg Mills
    Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    "> Margaret.Mills [at] uky.edu
    859-323-7978 Summary: Jasmyne Lewis-Combs, who earned her master’s degree in library science in 2014 from the School of Information Science in the University of Kentucky’s College of Communication and Information, took her love of local libraries and transformed it into a career in the United States’ national library, one of the largest libraries in the world.
    Category:
  • Body: Student NewsBy C. Lynn Hiler Monday

    LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 23, 2021) — The University of Kentucky Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence is honored to announce the 2021 class of Chellgren Student Fellows.

    The Chellgren Center Student Fellows Program aligns with the university’s goal of cultivating undergraduate excellence. By providing experiences that go beyond the classroom, students become prepared for the next phase of their career, whether it be graduate school, a position in their field, or a gap year dedicated to service. Created in 2005 with a gift from Paul Chellgren, a UK graduate, and his family, the Chellgren Center creates unique educational opportunities for outstanding undergraduate students and professors at the university. Chellgren’s commitment to undergraduate education at UK has impacted thousands by creating countless number of opportunities for UK students, staff and faculty.

    The last academic year was certainly like no other, but the Chellgren Center is excited to return to a more traditional experience for the 2021 cohort of Chellgren Student Fellows as we celebrate our 15th year. Plans are also underway to add new opportunities for students, which will soon be shared. Philipp Kraemer, Chellgren chair, is optimistic about the coming year. “Technology certainly enabled the university to implement a meaningful higher education experience despite the pandemic, but we all look forward to a return to an in-person learning community.”

    The 2021-2020 Fellows are:

    College of Agriculture, Food and Environment

    Chase Eastham

    Megan Johnston

    Bailey Smith

    College of Arts and Sciences

    Olivia Allran

    Madison Baker

    Meghan Brockman

    Isha Chauhan

    Ryan Crane

    Christine Haddad

    Leena Haider

    Shria Holla

    Tesslyn Hutchinson

    Katelyn Keen

    Abbey Loar

    Boston Oliver

    Emma Poole

    Nicholas Relich

    Hallie Rice

    Ross Shumard

    Lakyn Steffen

    Caroline Sumner

    Olivia Swanbeck

    Zora Woolfolk

    Gatton College of Business and Economics

    Megan Wiley

    College of Communication and Information

    Eliza Crans

    Nyah Marasigan

    College of Engineering

    Seun Adekunle

    Catherine Cornwell

    Anna Erpenbeck

    Jackson Huse

    College of Health Sciences

    Elizabeth Ruschman

    College of Public Health

    Kassidy Maust

    College of Social Work

    Kotomi Yokokura

    The Chellgren Student Fellows Program is supported by the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence within the Office of the Provost. To learn more about the Chellgren Center for Undergraduate Excellence, please visit www.uky.edu/chellgren/

    Organizational Unit: Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentArts and SciencesBusiness and EconomicsCommunication and InformationEngineeringHealth SciencesPublic HealthSocial Work

    The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIG