Jihye
Kim
jihye.kim@uky.edu
859-257-8224
McVey 215
Bio: 

Jihye Kim is an assistant professor in the Department of Integrated Strategic Communication. Kim received her Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 2015. Her research interests include advertising and public relations strategies, digital communication, cause-related marketing, and health communication. Her research has been published in Journal of Interactive Advertising, Management Decision, Journal of Marketing Communications, Journal of Promotion Management, and International Journal of Business and Management, among others. Kim was the recipient of the American Academy of Advertising Doctoral Dissertation Award, the UF Graduate School Doctoral Dissertation Award, and best paper awards at the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication and International Journal of Advertising. She has taught digital strategies, research methods, international advertising, media planning, and health communication campaign.

Jennifer
Scarduzio
jennifer.scarduzio@uky.edu
859-257-2954
240 Blazer Dining
Bio: 

Jennifer Scarduzio (Ph.D., Arizona State University) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research examines the intersections of organizational, health, and interpersonal communication. She focuses on experiences of violence, identity, and wellness. Currently, she is working on multiple projects related to intimate partner violence (IPV), including: 1) perceptions of male and female perpetrators, 2) services offered for male and female perpetrators, 3) health concerns of IPV survivors, and 4) survivors' experiences navigating through the criminal justice system. Additionally, she studies the perpetration of employee sexual harassment across multiple settings, such as on social networking sites. She has published in journals and books such as Communication Monographs, Management Communication Quarterly, Health Communication, Violence Against Women, the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, and the Handbook of Health Communication, among others.

Matt
Savage
matthewsavage@uky.edu
859-257-7801
246 Grehan Building
Bio: 

Matthew W. Savage (Ph.D., 2012, Arizona State University) is an assistant professor of health communication in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky who is passionate about teaching and research. His research interests focus on the intersection of health, interpersonal, and mass communication. Dr. Savage’s scholarship is conducted within the context of creating and supporting health communication campaigns aimed to deter negative and risky behaviors among adolescents and young adults. To that end, Dr. Savage’s research is centered on team science and community approaches, relying on strong partnerships with educational institutions, government organizations, and non-profits. Currently, he is working on various projects that address adolescent bullying/cyberbullying, oral health promotion, and reciprocal violence. His research has been translated to clinical practice via funding mechanisms supported by the Appalachian Regional Commission and internal grants at the college and university level. When it comes to teaching, Matthew enjoys integrating new technology into his courses and using discussion-based formats as a catalyst for cognitive and affective learning. His teaching philosophy focuses on participatory engagement, the importance of establishing the relevance of course material to real-world experiences, and challenging students to exceed their expectations. He is recognized with prestigious university teaching awards at the University of Kentucky, the University of Hawaii, and Arizona State University.

Awards
eLearning Innovation Initiative 2014-2015; Distance Learning Course Development Grant 2014-2015; College of Communication and Information Excellence in Teaching Award 2014; Summer Faculty Research Fellowship 2013

Kevin
Real
kevin.real@uky.edu
859-257-6938
235 Blazer Dining
Brandi
Frisby
brandi.frisby@uky.edu
859-257-9470
310G Lucille Little Library
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