Kelly
McAninch
kelly.mcaninch@uky.edu
859-323-4334
277 Blazer Dining
Bio: 

Kelly McAninch (Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) is an assistant professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Communication. She teaches several interpersonal communication and close relationships courses and serves as the course director for COM 252. Her program of research seeks to illuminate how individuals manage conversations about difficult topics, particularly discussions between romantic partners about relationship issues.

Primary Communication Interest(s):

Specialty Areas:

Marko
Dragojevic
marko.dragojevic@uky.edu
859-218-3349
238 Blazer Dining
Bio: 

 

Marko Dragojevic (Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky. He studies language and interpersonal/intergroup communication. In particular, his research focuses on the communicative significance of linguistic variation – that is, differences in language use, including the use of different accents, dialects, and languages. His research tries to answer three broad questions: (1) How do we evaluate different language varieties and the speakers who use them? (2) How do those evaluations influence our own and others’ communicative behavior? (3) What are the cognitive and affective processes underlying those effects? He pursues these questions in three related lines of research: language attitudes, linguistic accommodation, and linguistic framing in persuasion. His recent publications have appeared in the Journal of Language and Social Psychology, Human Communication Research, Language in Society, and Journal of Health Communication.

Jennifer
Scarduzio
jennifer.scarduzio@uky.edu
859-257-2954
240 Blazer Dining
Bio: 

Jennifer Scarduzio (Ph.D., Arizona State University) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication. Her research examines the intersections of organizational, health, and interpersonal communication. She focuses on experiences of violence, identity, and wellness. Currently, she is working on multiple projects related to intimate partner violence (IPV), including: 1) perceptions of male and female perpetrators, 2) services offered for male and female perpetrators, 3) health concerns of IPV survivors, and 4) survivors' experiences navigating through the criminal justice system. Additionally, she studies the perpetration of employee sexual harassment across multiple settings, such as on social networking sites. She has published in journals and books such as Communication Monographs, Management Communication Quarterly, Health Communication, Violence Against Women, the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, and the Handbook of Health Communication, among others.

Matt
Savage
matthewsavage@uky.edu
859-257-7801
246 Grehan Building
Bio: 

Matthew W. Savage (Ph.D., 2012, Arizona State University) is an assistant professor of health communication in the Department of Communication at the University of Kentucky who is passionate about teaching and research. His research interests focus on the intersection of health, interpersonal, and mass communication. Dr. Savage’s scholarship is conducted within the context of creating and supporting health communication campaigns aimed to deter negative and risky behaviors among adolescents and young adults. To that end, Dr. Savage’s research is centered on team science and community approaches, relying on strong partnerships with educational institutions, government organizations, and non-profits. Currently, he is working on various projects that address adolescent bullying/cyberbullying, oral health promotion, and reciprocal violence. His research has been translated to clinical practice via funding mechanisms supported by the Appalachian Regional Commission and internal grants at the college and university level. When it comes to teaching, Matthew enjoys integrating new technology into his courses and using discussion-based formats as a catalyst for cognitive and affective learning. His teaching philosophy focuses on participatory engagement, the importance of establishing the relevance of course material to real-world experiences, and challenging students to exceed their expectations. He is recognized with prestigious university teaching awards at the University of Kentucky, the University of Hawaii, and Arizona State University.

Awards
eLearning Innovation Initiative 2014-2015; Distance Learning Course Development Grant 2014-2015; College of Communication and Information Excellence in Teaching Award 2014; Summer Faculty Research Fellowship 2013

Subscribe to RSS - Interpersonal