Course & Description Concentration(s) Instructors Level
CIS 110 Composition and Communication I

Composition and Communication I is the introductory course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. Students will develop interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and information literacy skills by exploring what it means to be engaged, twenty-first century citizens. Students will practice com posing, critiquing, and revising ideas based on personal experience, observation, and fieldwork in the community, culminating in several discrete projects using oral, written, and visual modalities.

Alison Buckley, Allyson DeVito, Amy Gaffney, Annie Beck, Carolyn Bowman, Charlene Lin, Chas Hartman, Chelsea Wilde, Conrad Davies, Jennifer Clay, Jennifer Kidwell, Jeremy Hickman, Jessalyn Vallade, Joanne Cattafesta, Joe Martin, Lisa O'Connor, Matthew Noe, Nicolas Tatum, Rachel Winter, Raj Gaur, Robert Rice, Steve Meadows, Tabitha Dial, Tamika Tompoulidis, Teresa McGinley, Terrell Frey, Thomas Sabetta, Timothy Bill, Troy Cooper, Venicia McGhie, William Cooper, Zachary Lewis Undergraduate
CIS 111 Composition and Communication II

Composition and Communication II is the advanced course in a two-course sequence designed to engage students in composing and communicating ideas using speech, writing, and visuals. In this course, students will work in small groups to explore issues of public concern using rhetorical analysis, engage in deliberation, compose conscientious and well-developed arguments, and propose viable solutions to different audiences. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in spoken, written, and visual forms; and work effectively in teams through sustained interrogation of an issue. A significant component of the class will involve learning to use visual and digital resources both to enhance written and oral presentations and to communicate with public audiences. Prereq: CIS 110.

Ana De La Serna, Kate Sweeney, Stephanie Winkler, Stephen Haggerty, Troy Cooper, William Cooper Undergraduate
CIS 112 Accelerated Composition and Communication II

Composition and Communication 112 is an accelerated version of the standard two-semester composition and communication sequence. It focuses on integrated oral, written, and visual communication skill development and emphasizes critical inquiry and research. Students will sharpen their ability to conduct research; compose and communicate in written, oral, and visual modalities; and use interpersonal skills to work effectively in groups (dyads and small groups). In order to achieve these goals, students will explore issues of public concern in a profession that aligns with their career goals using exploratory, informative, and persuasive communication skills as both consumers and producers of information. Course members will develop complex arguments based on significant primary and secondary research, ultimately aimed at proposing a solution to their chosen issue. To do this, they will conduct individual, partner, and team-based work and produce a series of communication products that combine modalities (face to-face, written, oral, visual, digital) in different ways. A significant component of the class will consist of learning to use visual and digital resources, first to enhance written and oral presentations and later to communicate mass mediated messages to various public audiences.

Allyson DeVito, Annie Beck, Carla Bevins, Jessalyn Vallade, Joe Martin, Kari Benguria, Sarah Kercsmar, Stephen Haggerty Undergraduate
CIS 184 Communicating Arguments

Theories; strategies; techniques for researching, analyzing, constructing, and presenting oral arguments for and against selected contemporary topics and issues. Emphasis on in-class presentations. Prereq: Instructor approval required to enroll.

Undergraduate
CIS 191 Special Topics in Instructional Communication

Study of a specialized topic in instructional communication. May be repeated to a maximum of nine credits under different subtitles. Lecture. Prerequisites will be set by the instructor.

Undergraduate
CIS 284 Intercollegiate Debating

Preparation for and participation in intercollegiate debating. May be repeated to a maximum of four credits. Prereq: Instructor approval required to enroll

Jeffrey T Huber, Timothy Bill Undergraduate
CIS 300 Strategic Business and Professional Communication

This communication intensive course prepares students for their careers by developing effective communication skills (integrated written, oral, and visual) applied specifically to today’s technology-driven and global business environment. The course will focus on developing strong communication skills in interpersonal settings, on small group teams, and when delivering public presentations. Students will prepare cover letters, resumes, websites, and portfolios; develop effective interviewing skills in face-to-face and online environments; communicate effectively based on audience analysis in face-to-face and online settings; deliver effective formal public business presentations (informative and persuasive) based on audience analysis and using a variety of presentational aids that enhance the message; and learn to manage data, graphics, and a positive online presence (e.g., websites, blogs, social media outlets, email messages,and webinars). Prereq: Upper division status in accounting, analytics, economics, finance, management, marketing, or permission from instructor.

Carla Bevins, Chelsea Wilde, Nicole Staricek, Patric Spence, Robert Craig Vaughn Undergraduate
CIS 391 Special Topics in Instructional Communication

Intensive study of a specialized topic in instructional communication. May be repeated to a maximum of 9 credits under different subtitles.Lecture.

Undergraduate
CIS 399 Consulting and Training - Multimodal Communication Consulting Center Internship

The principle purpose of this course is to provide students with an opportunity to intern in the Multimodal Communication Consulting Center (MC3). The internship will provide students with the ability to act as a peer tutor in the MC3, engage in classroom presentations, and develop out-of-class instructional workshop focused on presentational elements and multimodal communication. Prereq: CIS/WRD 110 and 111 or equivalents and by instructor approval.

Undergraduate
CIS 499 International Internship

Qualified students enter the professional sector to refine skills and knowledge. Supervised internships in an international location approved by the College allow placements in industry, government, the media, communication agencies, etc. International internship credit will only be given for sites/programs approved by Education Abroad at UK. Pass/Fail only. Prereq: Admission to upper-division in one of the undergraduate majors in the College of Communication and Information (COM, ICT, ISC, JOU or MAS), fulfillment of internship prerequisites for the specific major (for COM 399, JAT 399 or ICT 399), and approval of the College's executive director for international studies.

Undergraduate
CIS 590 Internship-Apprenticeship in Instructional Communication

This course provides students an opportunity to work one-on-one with a faculty member in the college as a teacher’s apprentice in a course in the track of their chosen major. As an apprentice, students will attend all classes of the course they are serving as an apprentice for and meet with the faculty member weekly to discuss course content and pedagogical strategies. Students will also prepare at least three lesson plans and lead the class in working through them at least three times over the course of the semester. Students will ultimately develop a reflective teaching portfolio for the course. This course is repeatable for up to 6 credits. Prereq: Upper division status in the College of Communication and Information, successful completion of the course for which a student wants to as an intern-apprentice (i.e., B or better), an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, permission from both the teacher of the course and the Director of the Division of Instructional Communication prior to registration, and completion of a Division Learning Contract.

ICT 150 Experience ICT

Through the exploration of social and technological theories related to Information Communication Technology and the evolution and current applications of ICT, students will gain a better understanding of how emerging technologies have led to the need and development of ICT as a discipline; its shared commonalities with other disciplines; its distinct characteristics; its applications in the workplace and personal contexts; and its impact and future implications on individuals, organizations, and societies.
Beginning in Spring 2016. This course satisfies a UK Core requirement for Inquiry in Social Sciences.

Undergraduate
ICT 205 Issues in Information and Communication Technology Policy

This course introduces students to the legal, political, and ethical issues confronting today’s information professionals and the subsequent impact of these issues on information and communication technology (ICT) policy and law development. The rapidly evolving ICT infrastructure and the global shift to an information society will provide the context for the course. Emphasis will be placed on: organizational policy development, information ethics, computer ethics, freedom of speech and expression online, information filtering, intellectual property, cyber law, and pertinent legal and political acts related to the present information and communication infrastructure.

Undergraduate
ICT 300 Information and Communication Technology in Society

This course studies the impacts of information and communication technology (ICT) on individuals and society.  It examines current issues related to the flow of information in society, including the impact of technology and the development of the information economy. The role of the information profession within the context of information society issues is also explored. Also UKC 380.

Undergraduate
ICT 301 Introduction to Databases

This course is intended to give students a solid background in databases, with a focus on relational database management systems. Topics include data modeling, database design theory, data definition and manipulation languages, storage and indexing techniques, query processing and optimization, and database programming interfaces.

Michael Tsikerdekis Undergraduate
ICT 302 Content Management Systems

The course focuses on the practice and theory of designing, building and maintaining content management systems.

Michael Tsikerdekis Undergraduate
ICT 303 Systems Analysis

This course examines and applies the principles of information systems analysis. It surveys project management, feasibility and analysis, systems requirement definition and resource allocation. It utilizes a structured systems development methodology that spans the entirety of the information system lifecycle, which starts with the conception of the need for a specific information system and ends with the implementation of that system. The course utilizes a case study approach in which students initiate the analysis and logical design of a limited-scope information system.
Prereq:  ICT 202. This course is the same as IS 303.

Undergraduate
ICT 307 Copyright

In the age of digital information, the technology, economics, and law of intellectual property are constantly in flux. In order to continue to effectively provide access to information, ICT professionals need to play a role in managing these changes. This introductory course examines the basic conceptual elements of copyright protection, and its adaptation and application to new media and information communication technologies.

Undergraduate
ICT 351 Technology Security

An introduction to the various technical and administrative aspects of Information Security and Assurance.  This course provides the foundation for understanding the key issues associated with protecting information assets, determining the levels of protection and response to security incidents, and designing a consistent, reasonable information security system with appropriate intrusion detection and reporting features.

Sherali Zeadally Undergraduate
ICT 390 Special Topics in ICT

Special topics in ICT. Offerings vary by semester. ICT 390 may be repeated up to 12 credit hours provided the special topics courses selected are different (check the course subtitles or contact infosci@uky.edu if you have questions).

Undergraduate
ICT 395 Independent Study

The purpose of ICT 395, Independent Study in ICT, is to provide students the opportunity for directed study in an ICT-related subject, issue or problem of a particular interest to the student, and which is not dealt with in regular courses; or to enable the student to expand upon a topic which has been dealt with, but not to the degree which satisfies the student's interest. Independent research or reading and a substantial written report are required.

Prior approval and completed contract are required to be eligible for registration in an independent study.

Undergraduate
ICT 406 e-Commerce Regulation

Business and commercial transactions conducted via electronic means are subject to complex legislation and regulation that changes frequently. The relevant legislation and regulatory mechanisms govern commercial transactions as well as any electronic marketing, such as promotional emails or online newsletters. This course provides an overview of the regulatory framework governing e-commerce transactions, relevant standards and ethical considerations, protocols to ensure consumer protection, and emergent issues relating to compliance and enforcement.

Undergraduate
ICT 410 Privacy

As new information and communication technologies are developed, they increasingly raise concerns about the collection, use, storage, and sharing of personally identifiable information. This course provides an overview of privacy, privacy laws, privacy-related technologies, and self-regulatory efforts to mitigate potential privacy risks. The study of privacy will be approached from philosophical, historical, legal, policy, and technical perspectives.

Sherali Zeadally Undergraduate
ICT 471 Health Communication

An introduction to health communication theory, research, and practice. This course will examine the ways that health issues are shaped through interpersonal, group, organizational, cultural, political, economic, and historical communication processes. Topics may include health literacy, clinician-to-client communication, peer-to-peer communication, effective public health messages and mass media campaigns, risk, and emergency communication.

Undergraduate
ICT 539 Intro to Medical Informatics

Provides an overview of health care information systems, legal and ethical issues in health care, compliance and regulatory requirements, coding of health care data, quality management, HL7, data security, and HIPAA. Explores major applications and commercial vendors, decision support methods, evaluation of health-care information systems; and new opportunities and emerging trends.
Same as IS 539.

Undergraduate
ICT 550 Security Informatics

This course introduces students to policy concerns relating to security informatics, and highlights theoretical and practical approaches to designing secure information and communication technology (ICT) systems. It addresses key issues such as authentication, risk analysis, access control, database and network security, and information assurance.

Sherali Zeadally Undergraduate
ICT 552 Cybercrime and Digital Law Enforcement

The global reach of the Internet, the low marginal cost of online activity, and the relative anonymity of users have contributed to a wide escalation in cybercrimes. Consequently, information and communications technologies (ICT) are being increasingly employed to instigate threats to global civil society. This course provides an overview of cybercrime and the digital law enforcement practices put in place to respond to them. The course will focus on the types and extent of current cybercrimes, how the justice system responds to these crimes, the various constitutional protections afforded to computer users, the law and policies that govern cybercrime detection and prosecution, and related technologies.

Undergraduate
ICT 596 Internship in ICT

Supervised lab work in ICT with meetings for evaluation of student’s work, technique and review of issues.

Undergraduate
ICT 600 ICT in Society

This course examines a wide variety of issues that relate to the roles of information communication technologies(ICTs) in political, social, psychological, and cultural processes in community contexts, both physical and virtual. In so doing, this course reviews such topics as information communication technologies(ICTs), including social media and mobile technologies, and their relation to governments, political parties, nonprofit/voluntary organizations, social movements, news media organizations, citizen journalism, public sphere, social capital, deliberation, and political/civic/community engagement. As such, this course sheds light on the democratic functioning of the information communication technologies (ICTs) for a healthy community to operate at local, regional, national, and global levels.

Seungahn Nah Graduate
ICT 610 ICT Research Methods

Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are pervasive in our increasingly global society and, importantly, have the potential to improve lives and society. This course is designed to provide you with a sophisticated understanding of the philosophy, theory, design, and analysis of both qualitative and quantitative research in communication. During this course you will be exposed to a variety of methodological designs and statistical procedures to allow you to complete your own research projects during your time as a graduate student here at the University of Kentucky.
Using a variety of methods ranging from the foundational (e.g., interviews, surveys) to cutting edge (e.g., big data analysis, geospatial mapping) and readings from a variety of contexts (e.g., education, healthcare, risk and crisis), this course is designed to equip you with the research and methodological tools to understand how ICTs affect individuals, relationships, groups, organizations, social movements, and policies and to use these methodological tools in applied settings.

Brandi Frisby Graduate
ICT 650 Introduction to Leadership in Information Professions

The primary purpose of this course is to expose students to leadership strategies and challenges in the information professions. Primary attention is placed on: 1) the role of communication in effective leadership; 2) innovation and change in the information professions and the leadership styles available for addressing such changes; 3) ethical frameworks in communication leadership; 3) issues management and organizational planning; and 4) leadership communication strategies for managing conflict and crises. Pre-requisite: Graduate student status in the ICT, LIS, or CJT graduate programs.

ICT 690 Special Topics in ICT

Special topics in ICT (graduate level). May be crosslisted with LIS 690. Pre-requisites vary upon course offered, please check syllabus for descriptions and enrollment requirements.

Seungahn Nah, Tim Sellnow Graduate
ICT 695 Independent Study in ICT

Opportunities for directed study in subjects or problems of interest to a student. Observation and research required, and a written report describing the work accomplished. Pre-requisite: Consent of instructor and approval of proposal.

Graduate
IS 201 Personal Knowledge Management

Gain knowledge about information sources, information retrieval and professional information management.  Learn how information sources are described, organized, and disseminated using metadata standards and publishing practices.  Acquire the skills to locate and retrieve qualit6y sources of information with search engines and databases.  Implement knowledge management technologies and apply an understanding of social factors in order to create efficient and usable organizational work flows. Previously "General Information Sources."

Sean Burns Undergraduate
IS 202 Technologies for Information Services

This course is designed to teach the fundamental concepts of information technology in ways relevant to professional practice in informatics and the information professions. It explores applications of computers and networks to information problems. Included are features of hardware, types of software, commercial systems and search engines.

Michael Tsikerdekis Undergraduate
IS 303 Systems Analysis

This course examines and applies the principles of information systems analysis. It surveys project management, feasibility and analysis, systems requirement definition and resource allocation. It utilizes a structured systems development methodology that spans the entirety of the information system lifecycle, which starts with the conception of the need for a specific information system and ends with the implementation of that system. The course utilizes a case study approach in which students initiate the analysis and logical design of a limited-scope information system. Prereq: IS 202. (Same as ICT 303.)

Soohyung Joo Undergraduate
IS 322 Multimedia I

Introduction to techniques of multimedia production and the basic principles of communication via multimedia. Practical, hands-on experience with various media used in computer-based multimedia including: text, still graphics, motion graphics, animation, sound, and hyperlinking. Includes stand-alone computer- and Web-based applications. Lecture, two hours; laboratory, two hours per week. Prereq: Telecom major or minor status or consent of the instructor. Same as TEL 322.

Undergraduate
IS 326 Electronic Information Resources for Health Professionals

This course is a survey of electronic information resources for health professionals, including databases and Web resources, but with afocus on MEDLINE. Discussion of relevant controlled vocabularies, their use in formulating and executing search strategies, andalternative interfaces to MEDLINE are addressed. The course also includes reference management software, an evidence based healthcare component, and discussion of systematic reviews. Prereq: STA 210 or equivalent. (Same as IS 326.)

Robert Shapiro Undergraduate
IS 327 Consumer Health Information Seeking

This course will provide students with a foundation in the history and development of consumer health information seeking in addition to practical experience in locating, evaluating, and providing health information to diverse and special populations within educational and healthcare settings. Students will gain an understanding of the lifecycle of consumer health information - from policy development, to creation, to dissemination, and use – and the role of healthcare professionals in providing that information. Current issues and trends, as well as future directions in consumer health information provision and health information seeking will be discussed. There are no pre-requisites for this course.

Jeffrey T Huber Undergraduate
IS 355 Communication and Information Systems in Organizations

An examination of the role of a variety of communication and information systems used in organizations. This includes the study of communication processes across a variety of systems, including the telephone, e-mail, voice mail, and audio- and video-conferencing. It also includes an examination of the uses for a variety of information systems and technologies, including computer networks, integrated voice response systems, computer-telephony integration, call centers, automated attendants, voice recognition, and synthesis, database management systems, and a variety of additional hardware and software tools used in business today. Prereq: Telecom major status or consent of instructor. Same as TEL 355.

Undergraduate
IS 402 Competitive Intelligence

This course examines competitive intelligence models, functions, and practices; the roles of information professionals in CI, and the management of CI. Discussion and practice topics include: intelligence ethical and legal considerations; identifying intelligence needs; intelligence project management, research methods, analysis, production, and dissemination; the uses of intelligence; intelligence sources and tools; managing the intelligence function; and the evolution of CI. Prereq: IS 303.

Barbie E. Keiser Undergraduate
IS 404 Health Informatics

Provides an overview of health care information systems, legal and ethical issues in health care, compliance and regulatory requirements, coding of health care data, quality management, HL7, data security, and HIPAA. Explores major applications and commercial vendors, decision support methods, evaluation of health-care information systems; and new opportunities and emerging trends. Prereq: IS 201, IS 202.

Undergraduate
IS/ICT 200 Information Literacy and Critical Thinking

Emphasizing critical inquiry and critical thinking, this course will explore the theories and definitions surrounding the term “information literacy.” Students will put this theory into practice by developing problem-solving skills that allow them to meet information needs throughout their lifetimes. Students will gain a better understanding of how information and knowledge function in society and will discover methods of finding, accessing, evaluating, and using different information sources in an effective and ethical manner. Counts for UK Core in Arts & Creativity. IS 200 is the same as ICT 200.

Ashley DeWitt, Curt Rees, David Nemer, Deloris Foxworth, Emily Rae Cothran, Ryan Shrauner Undergraduate
LIS 510 Children's Literature and Related Materials

This course is intended for undergraduates. Graduate students should take LIS 610. A survey of children’s literature, traditional and modern. Reading and evaluation of books with multimedia materials with emphasis on the needs and interests of children. Covers media for use by and with children from preschool through grade six.

Rebecca Nelson, Sarah Flood, Stephanie Reynolds Undergraduate
LIS 514 Literature and Related Media for Young Adults

This course is intended for undergraduates. Graduate students should take LIS 614. A study of literature and related materials for use with young people in grades 6-12. Emphasis is placed on the special characteristics and needs of young people and the evaluation of materials for this age group.

Stephanie Reynolds Undergraduate
LIS 600 Information in Society

An introduction to the nature of information (both utilitarian and aesthetic) in contemporary society, and to the role played by libraries and other information organizations in disseminating that information. Emphasis is on developing perspective. Part of Library Science Core.

Lisa O'Connor, Shannon Oltmann Graduate
LIS 601 Information Seeking

This course provides an overview of the theory and practices of human information seeking behavior, including both basic models to understand user behavior, and techniques to effectively select, locate, evaluate, and use information to meet diverse information needs and facilitate human-computer interaction. Part of Library Science Core.

Lisa O'Connor, Soohyung Joo Graduate
LIS 602 Knowledge Management

This course provides an introduction to principles and practices of information description, organization, access, and retrieval by examining the representation of information through metadata records, indexes, and abstracts, as well as the operations, standards, tools, systems of categorization, bibliographic systems and methods of organizing and retrieving information sources. Part of Library Science Core. Previously called Information Representation and Access.

Melissa Adler, Namjoo Choi Graduate
LIS 603 Management in Library and Information Science

An introduction to the basic elements of management and how these are applied to the effective administration of information systems. Focus will be placed on two major roles in a system, the person who is supervised as well as the manager or supervisor. Examination of the functions of planning, organization, staffing and controlling as well as the theories of management and the effective use of these in an information system. Part of Library Science Core.

Melissa Adler, Shannon Oltmann Graduate
LIS 604 Library and Book History

Couse not currently offered. Development of libraries and books from earliest time to the present with special reference to their relationship to contemporary social, economic, cultural and political trends. Emphasis is given to American library and book history.

Academic, Public Libraries, Generalist Graduate
LIS 608 Methods of Research in Library and Information Science

Basic tools, techniques and methods of research. Consideration is given to the role and purpose of research in library and information science and its relationship to research in other disciplines. Includes critical evaluation of current research in library and information science and the development of a research proposal. Prereq: LIS 601, LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Academic, Public Libraries, Generalist Melissa Adler Graduate
LIS 610 Library Materials and Literature for Children

A survey and historical study of library materials and literature for children up to grade 6. Students will engage in extensive reading, and in the evaluation of books and some multimedia materials. Basic programming will be explored.

Public Libraries, Generalist, School Media, Youth Services Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 611 Critical Analysis of Children's Literature

Course not currently offered. Advanced study of book evaluation, literary criticism, children’s book publishing, awards, and current trends in the field. Individual projects require extensive critical reading. Prerequisite: LIS 610 or LIS 614 or consent of instructor.

Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 612 Youth Literature for a Diverse Society

A  survey  and  historical  study  of culturally  diverse literature  for  youth  of  all  ages.  Students  will  engage  in  extensive  reading,  evaluation,  and  discussion  of  literature  and  the  issues  related  to  developing  an  understanding  of  various  cultures  and  special  populations within  the  United States. Prerequisite:  Children’s  Literature  (LIS610  or  comparable)  is  preferred. This course was previously offered as an LIS 690 Special Topics course.
 

School Media, Youth Services Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 613 Information Resources and Services for Children

A study of effective programming for children and young adults. Emphasis is placed on oral presentations. Literature-based activities and community outreach. Prerequisite: LIS 510 or consent of instructor.

Public Libraries, Generalist, School Media, Youth Services Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 614 Library Materials and Literature for Young Adults

A study of literature and related materials for use with young people in grades 7-12. Emphasis is placed on the special characteristics and needs of young adults and the evaluation of materials for this age group.

Public Libraries, Generalist, School Media, Youth Services Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 621 Information Resources and Services

This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of information services, which are defined broadly as the activities in which information professionals engage to connect people to the information they need, including information needs assessment, direct information provision, information literacy instruction, and intermediation for all stages of the information search process. Emphasis is placed on the roles played by information professionals to help diverse users define and negotiate their information needs, navigate usersystem interfaces, formulate effective search strategies for information retrieval, and evaluate and select information. Attention is also given to the skills necessary to plan for, implement, and evaluate the delivery of information services in a wide variety of organizational contexts. The ethical foundations of information services are also considered. Prereq: LIS 601. Counts as part of Library Science foundational requirement.

Information Systems, Information Organization Joe Kohlburn, Sean Burns Graduate
LIS 625 Information Literacy Instruction

This course examines the theory and practice of instruction provided in information organizations to develop clients' abilities to effectively locate, evaluate, select and use information. Attention is given to the nature of information literacy, systematic instructional design, needs assessment, methods of instruction, teaching and learning preferences, and the evaluation of learning and programs. This course is interdisciplinary and draws on theory from Library & Information Science, Instructional Communication, Education and Cognitive Psychology. We will examine and criticize various instructional methods, plan for and deliver instruction in both in-person and computer-aided venues, learn various methods for assessing teaching and learning, and discuss the managerial and political aspects of instructional delivery in various information agency contexts, with a special emphasis on those in academic settings. Prerequisite: LIS 601 or consent of instructor.

Academic, Public Libraries, Generalist, Instructional Services Lisa O'Connor Graduate
LIS 626 Electronic Information Resources in the Health Sciences

Survey of electronic information resources in the health sciences, including databases and Web sources. Discussion of relevant controlled vocabularies and their use in formulating and executing search strategies. The course also includes an evidence based health care component whereby students learn to analyze critically the biomedical literature and determine reference and research relevancy. (Same as ICT 626.)

Medical, Generalist Jeffrey T Huber Graduate
LIS 627 Consumer Health Information Resources

History and development of consumer health information resources; role of professional and governmental agencies in provision of consumer health information; policy issues related to provision of consumer health information. Consumer health professional literature, user information needs, user resources, and information services. Identification, selection, utilization, and evaluation of consumer health information for special populations within specialized educational and healthcare settings. Trends and issues in consumer health informatics.

Medical, Generalist, Information Organization Graduate
LIS 629 Introduction to Medical Informatics

This course is designed to introduce the interdisciplinary field of medical informatics to health information professionals. Medical Informatics is a developing field that essentially seeks to apply information and computing technologies to improve all aspects of healthcare, including patient care, research, and education. During the semester we will explore a number of topics central to understanding the field, including: the nature of biomedical information, the electronic medical record, the role of information and computing technologies to support clinical decision making, healthcare and informatics standards, information retrieval, system analysis and technology assessment, and essential issues of information technology in medical education and medical ethics. By the end of this Web-based course, students are expected to be able to understand broad aspects of the field and can use this as a foundation for further education, training, and work in health information professions. (Same as CJT 629. Previously offered as LIS 639/539.)

Medical, Generalist Sujin Kim Graduate
LIS 630 Information Retrieval

This course reviews important information retrieval (IR) theories and models; explores a brief history of IR research; and examines various IR applications. Students will get familiar with IR foundations such as document indexing or query expansion/optimization strategies, as well as understand overall system architectures for selected IR applications. Students will explore how to analyze and compare IR systems, how to select the best IR systems for particular tasks and how to design a prototype for an efficient IR system. Prereq or concur: LIS 636 or LIS 637 or LIS 638. Counts as part of Library Science foundational requirement.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization, Instructional Services, Youth Services Soohyung Joo Graduate
LIS 634 Information Architecture

The course introduces the concepts and practices of information architectures (IA) for a Web site within the context of the organization it serves. It aims to acquaint students with principles and process of information architecture for user-centered design of websites. It also provides students the opportunity to develop practical skills related to the design of information organization and navigation systems. The course prepares students for the companion technical course of “content management systems” where they will apply the theories and techniques studied in this course to the implementation of a fully functional website.

Information Systems, Generalist Youngseek Kim Graduate
LIS 636 Foundations of Information Technology

A study of the computing fundamentals necessary for the understanding and use of information technology. Focus is on examining computer systems in concept and practice, which is essential to information professionals. Topics include how computers represent, process, store and retrieve information; how operating systems control these processes, interpret commands, present the user interface, and run applications; how databases are designed and created; how general understanding of programming processes and productivity software skills is important in a variety of professional contexts. Productivity applications include the Office suite, Internet applications and web publishing, and database management systems.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization, Instructional Services, School Media, Youth Services Anthony Ubelhor, Soohyung Joo, Youngseek Kim Graduate
LIS 637 Information Technology

Study of computer and communication technology used in modern information storage and retrieval systems. Consideration also given to managing microcomputer services, hardware evaluation and selection, and system security. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Same as CJT 637.)

Information Systems, Generalist Graduate
LIS 638 Internet Technologies and Information Services

A course examining the structure, development and evolution of the Internet; network protocols and client/server architecture issues; Web page design, authoring, and evaluation; the use of the Internet as an information storage and retrieval system; recent advances in HTML and scripting languages; and Internet related social issues such as censorship and copyright. Prerequisite: LIS 636 or consent of instructor. (Same as CJT 638.)

Information Systems, Generalist Youngseek Kim Graduate
LIS 640 Health Information Resource Services

A survey of information agencies and health science libraries, including topics related to: the healthcare community and their information needs, information resources in the health sciences, controlled medical terminologies and classification systems, search and retrieval of information resources, issues in the management of collections and access to health libraries. (Same as CJT 640.)

Medical Robert Shapiro Graduate
LIS 641 Law Librarianship

A study of the materials of legal research and reference work. Emphasis is placed on the methods of effective research and the actual use of legal materials in the solution of practical reference problems. The selection, cataloging, classification, and storage of materials in a law collection are considered. The specialized requirements of law librarianship and law library administration are treated. Prerequisite: LIS 601 and LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Academic, Generalist Michael Whiteman Graduate
LIS 642 Oral History

This course is an introduction to oral history as a research methodology and its role in library and archives collections. It is designed for persons intending to conduct oral history interviews to expand library and archival collections. It is also for persons responsible for the archival management of oral history collections. The course examines how oral history projects are initiated, how projects are administered, how interviews are conducted, and how oral history interviews are preserved and made available to researchers. The course will also explore the use of technology in making oral histories available to researchers on the Web. Students will gain practical experience in oral history interviewing and related aspects of oral history, such as transcribing, editing, and publishing oral histories. Taught essentially same as EPE 669.

Academic, Generalist, Information Organization Doug Boyd Graduate
LIS 643 Archives and Manuscripts Management

This course is designed to cover the management, care, and servicing of manuscript and archival material. Attention will also be given to criteria for building an archival/manuscript collection in a repository and to the description and interpretation of its holdings in guides and catalogs for the use of researchers. Prerequisite: LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Academic, Generalist, Information Organization Stacie Williams Graduate
LIS 644 Administration of School Library Media Centers

Examines the philosophy behind current national and state guidelines for library media programs and addresses the roles of library media professionals in program and resource management in the K-12 school setting. Students will work on their individual exit portfolios and plan a practicum experience to meet requirements for performance-based certification by the Kentucky Department of Education. Prerequisite: May be taken concurrently with last requirements or following completion of all requirements (with the exception of LIS 676) for certification as school media librarian.

School Media Maria Cahill Graduate
LIS 645 Public Libraries

Examines historical development of the public library and its roles in society. Topics considered include the environment of public libraries; organization and management; information needs of client groups; information resources and services provided to clients; and trends developments in public libraries. Prerequisite: LIS 601 and LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Public Libraries, Youth Services Dennis Carrigan, Shannon Oltmann Graduate
LIS 646 Academic Libraries

Examines historical development of academic libraries and their roles in higher education. Topics considered include the environment of academic libraries, organization and management needs of client groups, information resources and services provided clients; and issues, trends, and developments in academic libraries. Prerequisite: LIS 601 and LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Academic Stacey Greenwell Graduate
LIS 647 Current Trends in School Media Centers

An intensive study of trends in school media centers with emphasis on research, technology, and the role of the school media specialist in the school curriculum.

School Media Maria Cahill Graduate
LIS 648 Technology in the School Media Center

Consideration of new and emerging educational technologies that could be integrated into school curriculum. Includes hands-on experiences as well as critical reading and discussion on current issues relating to educational technology and the role of the media specialist in technology integration.

School Media Heidi Neltner Graduate
LIS 655 Organization of Knowledge I

Theories and practice of bibliographic description and subject analysis. Covers the organization of both print and electronic information, including use of Anglo-American Cataloging Rules, Dewey Decimal Classification, Library of Congress Classification and Library of Congress Subject Headings. Prerequisite: LIS 602 or consent of instructor.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization, Instructional Services, School Media, Youth Services Paula Hickner Graduate
LIS 658 Knowledge Management

Organizational knowledge is a valuable strategic asset. Knowledge management refers to the systematic management of an organization’s knowledge assets so that they can be leveraged for sustainable advantage. This course examines how knowledge is created, captured, organized, diffused, and implemented in an organization. Topics covered include knowledge management processes and practices, corresponding technologies, collaboration tools, and people and cultural issues.

Generalist, Information Organization Sean Burns Graduate
LIS 659 Collection Development

Intellectual and administrative aspects of building, maintaining and evaluating library collections. Topics include: library cooperation; national standards; the writing and implementation of collection policies; strategies of selection and evaluation; contemporary publishing and the book trade.

Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Instructional Services Stephanie Reynolds Graduate
LIS 661 Introduction to Data Science

This course will provide a foundation in the area of data science based on data curation and statistical analysis. The primary goal of this course is for students to learn data analysis concepts and techniques that facilitate making decisions from a rich data set. St udents will investigate data concepts, metadata creation and interpretation, general linear method, cluster analysis, and basics of informa tion visualization. At the beginning, this course will introduce fundamentals about data and data standards and methods for organizi ng, curating, and preserving data for reuse. Then, we will focus on the inferential statistics: drawing conclusions and making decisions from  data. This course will help students understand how to use data analysis tools, and especially, provide an opportunity to utilize an open  source data analysis tool, R, for data manipulation, analysis, and visualization. Finally, in this course we will discuss diverse issues around data including technologies, behaviors, organizations, policies, and society. Previously LIS 690 course. Fulfills an IT requirement.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Generalist, Information Organization Youngseek Kim Graduate
LIS 662 - Data Analysis and Visualization

This course examines three major categories of topics in relation to data analysis and visualization. First, this course will cover the basic ways that data can be obtained from various sources, such as raw text files, web APIs, and data repositories. It will also cover the techniques of data cleaning and how to organize data for analysis. Second, the course will cover the essential techniques for analyzing quantitative data. It will teach prediction and clustering methods that are useful to solve various real data analysis tasks. In addition, students will learn major theories and recent methods in text analysis. Third, this course teaches how to create visualizations that effectively communicate the meanings behind data and information. The course will cover key practical skills in information visualization, such as plotting, mapping, and network visualization. This course will not be mathematically intensive. Instead, the course will use existing computational tools and programming libraries to solve various problems. You will use the R language and environment intensively for data analysis and visualization. Previously an LIS 690 course, not offered yet. Fulfills IT requirment.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Generalist, Information Organization Soohyung Joo Graduate
LIS 665 Introduction to Digital Libraries

This course focuses on the theoretical, technological, human factors and evaluative components of digital library (DL) research and practice. Students will read and discuss literature on DLs, review existing technologies and proof-of concepts implementation projects, and work as a group to develop a prototype but operational DL. This course is foundational for students wishing to engage seriously in the world of digital librarianship. Prereq: LIS 602, LIS 636.

Information Systems, Generalist, Information Organization Graduate
LIS 668 Database Management

This course is designed as a first database course for students without any previous experience. The general aim of the course is to understand the basic concepts, principles, and hand-on experiences on database systems. The course will evolve from understanding, visualizing, and analyzing data. Then transition to understanding relational databases by designing and building databases using Access and querying using Structured Query Language (SQL). Prerequisite: LIS 636 or consent of instructor. (Same as CJT 668.). Previously called Information Systems Design.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization Graduate
LIS 672 Practicum

Practicum in a library or other information-related organization. Student assumes entry level professional duties and responsibilities in an operational setting under the close supervision of an information professional. Requires minimum of 140 hours of experiential learning, and the completion of a multimedia presentation/portfolio under the direction of the course coordinator. Prerequisites: Completion of 18 hours of graduate work in library and information science and consent of course coordinator. Examples of capstone projects as well as the learning contract may be found here. Counts as part of Library Science foundational requirement.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization, Instructional Services, Youth Services Will Buntin Graduate
LIS 676 School Media Practicum

Supervised experience at the elementary and secondary levels in school library media centers. Required for students seeking certification as school/media librarians in Kentucky. Experience will be under the joint supervision of college faculty and cooperating media librarians. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education Program and consent of instructor.

School Media Maria Cahill Graduate
LIS 690 Special Topics in Library and Information Science

Intensive study of one aspect of library and information science under the leadership of an authority in the area. (Same as CJT 690.)

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Information Organization, Instructional Services, Youth Services Graduate
LIS 695 Independent Study in Library and Information Science

Opportunities for directed study in subjects or problems of interest to a student. Observation and research required, and a written report describing the work accomplished. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor and approval of proposal.
Students who wish to participate in an independent study must fill out and submit the Independent Study Proposal Form and return it to the Student Affairs Officer for final approval.

Information Systems, Academic, Medical, Public Libraries, Generalist, Instructional Services, Youth Services Graduate
UKC 101 Information Literacy and Critical Thinking

Emphasizing critical inquiry and critical thinking through creativity, that is using and manipulating information in nontraditional ways, this course will explore the theories and definitions surrounding the term “information literacy.” Students will put this theory into practice by developing problem-solving skills that allow them to meet information needs throughout their lifetimes. Students will gain a better understanding of how information and knowledge function in society and will discover methods of finding, accessing, evaluating, and using different information sources in an effective and ethical manner throughout the semester by engaging in assignments that transform the information learned from the texts into knowledge situated in multiple contexts including text and visual.

Jasmine McNealy Undergraduate